Norinco 1911, sorely tempted [Archive] - Glock Talk

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adv
03-18-2011, 13:10
Don't own a 1911and hadn't really intended of getting one soon, but......... the local pawn shop has a Norinco for $399. It's a bit scratched up but seemed fairly tight and smooth.
What's the opinion?? I know the steel is as hard as a hard thing and I've seen some here say that they're a good solid pistol that can be used as the basis for a build.

jrs93accord
03-18-2011, 13:20
I am really fond of my two Norincos. I was fortunate enough to get them in really nice condition. I paid $450 each for these.

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m8/jamesrea_2006/jamesrea2010/001-8.jpg

R0CKETMAN
03-18-2011, 14:35
Up there on my list, just haven't found the right gun for the right price. That's a good deal. Of course much more north of there and RIA begins to appeal.

Jason D
03-18-2011, 17:06
Railroad rails or not, I wouldn't buy a chinese pistol.
I would however buy a gun from just about any other country.

Jim S.
03-18-2011, 18:05
I don't understand why people think it is special if it is made from hardened railroad rails.
Once you melt the steel and forge or cast it into a gun it is no longer a hardened steel rail and has to be re harded at a spec that someone chooses their guns to be hardened at.
Plain and simple.
My old Colt is special...
It was once a Chevy V-8 engine block out of a 55 Chevy. :)

bac1023
03-18-2011, 18:10
Norincos are outstanding, in my opinion.

jrs93accord
03-18-2011, 18:15
My two Norinco 1911A1s, Norinco Model 213, and my Polytech M14S are some of the best firearms I own. There are a few things the Chinese did well. Afterall, they produced a couple of the best AK-47s money can/could buy.

bac1023
03-18-2011, 18:23
I personally don't give two damns which country its from as long as its a good firearm.

There are so many things today that are built in China or have parts out of China.

JK-linux
03-18-2011, 18:27
.....

20South
03-18-2011, 21:14
Railroad rails or not, I wouldn't buy a chinese pistol.
I would however buy a gun from just about any other country.

The sale to China has already been made. This money is staying in country and at a local shop to boot :whistling:

20South
03-18-2011, 21:16
Back to the original question - if I found a nice used one, I wouldn't hesitate to buy. However, its a ways down on the list currently.

Cerebrus
03-18-2011, 21:24
I would buy it in a heartbeat!!.. unfortunately I am in the PRK...

Mr. Gekko
03-18-2011, 21:40
I have heard nothing but good things about them. If the price is right and it is good condition, get it.

cole
03-18-2011, 22:48
Don't own a 1911and hadn't really intended of getting one soon, but......... the local pawn shop has a Norinco for $399. It's a bit scratched up but seemed fairly tight and smooth.
What's the opinion?? I know the steel is as hard as a hard thing and I've seen some here say that they're a good solid pistol that can be used as the basis for a build.

Great steel. I could tell the difference. Check the lugs. Some have issues. The ones I've seen did... which is maybe whey there were for sale.

kirgi08
03-18-2011, 23:18
I own a Norinco .25/9mm,I'd love the chance ta buy a 1911.I have a systema and 2 ballisters.If I landed a Norinco 1911,it'd be my base for a build.'08.

bac1023
03-19-2011, 05:20
The sale to China has already been made. This money is staying in country and at a local shop to boot :whistling:

Yep, you aren't buying from China anymore. They haven't been imported for years.

bac1023
03-19-2011, 05:20
I would buy it in a heartbeat!!.. unfortunately I am in the PRK...

:crying:

PlasticGuy
03-19-2011, 07:43
I've owned three Norinco 1911's, and all were great shooters. $399 is a great deal for one. I'd buy it before somebody else does.

FLIPPER 348
03-19-2011, 08:12
I don't understand why people think it is special if it is made from hardened railroad rails.
:)


I don't understand why people think the 1911s are made from hardened railroad rails.

dreis454
03-19-2011, 08:33
I don't understand why people think the 1911s are made from hardened railroad rails.

Um, because they ARE!:whistling:

lawdog734
03-19-2011, 09:05
I don't understand why people think it is special if it is made from hardened railroad rails.
Once you melt the steel and forge or cast it into a gun it is no longer a hardened steel rail and has to be re harded at a spec that someone chooses their guns to be hardened at.
Plain and simple.
My old Colt is special...
It was once a Chevy V-8 engine block out of a 55 Chevy. :)

It makes your 1911 run faster, right?:rofl:

ERASER
03-19-2011, 13:07
My only 1911 is a Norinco. Fairly accurate. Goes bang. The only problem I have with it is that the case from the last round gets pulled back into the magazine lips and is wedge tightly there. The front of the case then pivots upward and gets jammed at the top of the slide/end of barrel. I replaced recoil and mag springs with Wolff springs, tried Wilson mags. Still have the problem. Gun just sits in the safe now.

Sorry....back to the topic at hand. For that price --- buy it!

1911Tuner
03-19-2011, 13:48
ERASER...That's an extractor problem. Check it for clocking. Adjusting the tension may help...may not.

faawrenchbndr
03-19-2011, 15:02
Railroad rails or not, I wouldn't buy a chinese pistol.
I would however buy a gun from just about any other country.

But you will buy all kinds of small goods from China?! :dunno:
Seems like a flawed plan to me. I bet you have 5x the cost of a Norinco 1911
tied up in your kitchen & doo-dads in your house.


The Norinco is a rock solid 1911!

faawrenchbndr
03-19-2011, 15:05
I don't understand why people think the 1911s are made from hardened railroad rails.

Um, because they ARE!:whistling:

No,........they are made from steel that USED to be railroad rails.
Big difference, once the steel gets melted in the forge, all the work hardening is lost.
Then it just become a very good grade of steel.

Baba Louie
03-19-2011, 18:14
Do it.

Norks are unique here due to the ban, but they're just a WWII reverse engineered clone, albeit a hearty clone in regard hardness of material. If you can check the lugs for rounding or peening, by all means look at them. If they're good and it locks up tight fore and aft (barrel to slide at chamber & bushing), it might be worth haggling a little and maybe buying, knowing that it is an orphan child. Should you decide to buy, say, a baseline Springfield, for a little more moola granted, you know you'll have their guarantee/warranty backing up any needs, and a Custom Shop that's pretty well thought of. Same w/ Colt, S&W, Kimber, DW, etc.

But if you do buy it, that orphan becomes yours to dress up in any way, shape or fashion you choose and your wallet allows... but it'll still be a baseline orphan on resale.

And a great shooter in between purchase and sale more than likely.

Actually, a pretty fine "Model of the 1911" to learn on and tinker with, doncha think?

While Wilson used to accept Norks as base for build ups, is that still the case today? (I wonder..)

On the other hand, if I were going to buy my first 1911 in the year 2011, I think I'd save up some more money for a Colt made this year, maybe.

Maybe not.

ERASER
03-19-2011, 19:11
ERASER...That's an extractor problem. Check it for clocking. Adjusting the tension may help...may not.

Thanks for the help!
I assume by clocking you mean that the entire extractor (or at least the end) is not perfectly vertical. I'll look at it and if it appears not to be parallel to the side of the slide, I'll try to twist it straight.

Thanks again!!!

FLIPPER 348
03-19-2011, 19:38
No,........they are made from steel that USED to be railroad rails.
B


So Norinco 1911s are only made from steel that used to be railroad rails??

1911Tuner
03-20-2011, 02:56
I assume by clocking you mean that the entire extractor (or at least the end) is not perfectly vertical.

Nope. It means that the whole extractor is rotating and dropping the case low enough to be dragged partway back into the magazine. The follower can't hit the slidestop and lock the slide...slide rides forward and tries to feed the empty case...which noses up and gets crushed between the slide and the barrel hood. Happens on the last round because there isn't a cartridge in the magazine to keep the extracting case in position.

Jim S.
03-20-2011, 07:38
So Norinco 1911s are only made from steel that used to be railroad rails??

Now, how would anyone actually know this?
I doubt the Chinese government tells what their mills use to make guns out of.
When you make steel in an electric furnace out of scrap it is a huge amount of scrap metal that is melted down and additives are put in to make a certain grade of steel.
Doesn't matter what you started with, it is more important what you end up with.
They may harden their guns to a higher spec than say Colt or anyone else.
But that is the end result, not what the steel started out as.

FLIPPER 348
03-20-2011, 08:12
Now, how would anyone actually know this?
.


my point exactly


It's just another example of internet BS that some folks suck up like candy!

Gary1911A1
03-20-2011, 08:38
Do it.

Norks are unique here due to the ban, but they're just a WWII reverse engineered clone, albeit a hearty clone in regard hardness of material. If you can check the lugs for rounding or peening, by all means look at them. If they're good and it locks up tight fore and aft (barrel to slide at chamber & bushing), it might be worth haggling a little and maybe buying, knowing that it is an orphan child. Should you decide to buy, say, a baseline Springfield, for a little more moola granted, you know you'll have their guarantee/warranty backing up any needs, and a Custom Shop that's pretty well thought of. Same w/ Colt, S&W, Kimber, DW, etc.

But if you do buy it, that orphan becomes yours to dress up in any way, shape or fashion you choose and your wallet allows... but it'll still be a baseline orphan on resale.

And a great shooter in between purchase and sale more than likely.

Actually, a pretty fine "Model of the 1911" to learn on and tinker with, doncha think?

While Wilson used to accept Norks as base for build ups, is that still the case today? (I wonder..)

On the other hand, if I were going to buy my first 1911 in the year 2011, I think I'd save up some more money for a Colt made this year, maybe.

Maybe not.

Not sure Wilson still does, but Clark Custom still list them on their site: http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/faq1911.htm#general

JK-linux
03-20-2011, 09:17
.....

1911Tuner
03-20-2011, 12:00
I remain puzzled by the line of thought that the 1911 has become something to be bought and immediately changed if it comes in base form. Thus "Customize it!" is the rallying cry.

Why not just leave it alone? If a customized 1911 platform is desired, there are literally dozens available with those features already there, and at a much lower cost than gutting it down the the bare frame and slide and starting over.

As Jim Watson noted, quite logically..."Why does it always come down to resale value?"

And as I noted..."Why is it always about 3-pound trigger pulls and intrinsic accuracy that only a small, gifted percentage of us can appreciate?"

Why not just a solid, reliable .45 autopistol that can go anywhere and do yeoman service...without having to worry over a bruise or a scratch?

Or has it become a must to have all the flash and bling and the add-on features if we're to be taken seriously down at the range on Sunday afternoons?

Odd, methinks...

Darkangel1846
03-20-2011, 13:16
The Norinco 1911 was the cheapest 1911 on the market in the early 90s. I bought one thinking that it would be a throw away car gun....Heck it shot well, never had any feeding problems, was fairly accurate. Have had it every since. I only paid $170.00 for it. Who'd a thunk it. Now I wouldn't pay $450.00 for one, I'd just buy a Glock, but back then it was a great deal.

R0CKETMAN
03-20-2011, 13:17
I passed on one today at a fun show for $430....

jrs93accord
03-20-2011, 15:33
I remain puzzled by the line of thought that the 1911 has become something to be bought and immediately changed if it comes in base form. Thus "Customize it!" is the rallying cry.

Why not just leave it alone? If a customized 1911 platform is desired, there are literally dozens available with those features already there, and at a much lower cost than gutting it down the the bare frame and slide and starting over.

As Jim Watson noted, quite logically..."Why does it always come down to resale value?"

And as I noted..."Why is it always about 3-pound trigger pulls and intrinsic accuracy that only a small, gifted percentage of us can appreciate?"

Why not just a solid, reliable .45 autopistol that can go anywhere and do yeoman service...without having to worry over a bruise or a scratch?

Or has it become a must to have all the flash and bling and the add-on features if we're to be taken seriously down at the range on Sunday afternoons?

Odd, methinks...

I know exactly what you mean. I own 67 1911s and I have not modified any of them. Three that I have were modified before I bought them. I do not worry about the resale. Several I have are collector pieces, thus will gain in value over the years. All of my 1911s were bought because I wanted them.

jrs93accord
03-20-2011, 15:33
I passed on one today at a fun show for $430....

If it was in really good condition, that is a good price these days.