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21Carrier
04-02-2011, 13:45
Hey guys, I've got a problem. I believe I am seeing signs of overpressure from some factory new ammo I bought yesterday. I was planning to shoot, then reload it, but now I'm a little leery to even shoot the stuff. Problem is, I am COMPLETELY new to 10mm (those were my first 10s to shoot), so these things that I am interpreting as "signs of overpressure" may be totally normal and characteristic of this awesome caliber.

Just for some background on me, I have shot many guns (rifles, pistols, shotguns) in my past, but just bought my first pistol about two years ago (G21SF). I wanted to start reloading, and upon telling my awesome neighbor about my desire to roll my own, he promptly let me "borrow for an indefinite length of time" his Dillon 550B. So, I quickly jumped headfirst into reloading. I have been reloading .45ACP for about 6 months now, and have made over a thousand rounds, but I'm still somewhat of a novice.

Yesterday, I bought my first 10mm (a Glock 29, awesome gun), and bought the following ammo: Cor-Bon Pow'rball 135 gr.; Cor-Bon 180gr BCSP (this is a pretty hot load for a Cor-Bon. 1300fps and 676fpe, I wish they had more than one box), and finally, 3 boxes of American Eagle 180gr FMJ. I had planned to carry the Pow'rball, shoot the Cor-Bon 180s for fun, and shoot and reload the American Eagles.

Well, after shooting the first magazine of AE, I began picking up my brass, and noticed quite a large bulge on one side of the casings near the pressure ring. Then, looking at the primers (and comparing them to unfired primers), they seemed decidedly flattened. I will post pics.

Anyway, my question is: Are these apparent "signs" normal to the 10mm, or at least 10mm out of a Glock 29? I would not have been surprised to see such signs in a hot loading (like the C-Bs, which were similarly bulged), but I guess what threw me for a loop was the fact that these were 1030fps (rated) target ammo. I was just shocked to see the bulge. Maybe this is totally normal for even soft 10mms, but since I am really only familiar with the low pressure .45ACP, I don't know. When I fire .45s the primers look exactly like they did before they went into the gun, except now they have a strike, and there is no bulge that can be seen. The 10mm primers are quite flattened compared to the rounded edges of the new primers.

So, should I reload this brass, or is it crap? I was guessing (if there even is a problem) that it is weak brass. Recoil was not excessive, and quite a bit milder than the Cor-Bons. Anyway, you guys get the point by now, so I'll quit rambling. By the way, the gun is brand new, and totally stock. These were the first rounds through it. Below will be measurements and pics of the fired brass. Let me know what y'all think, and thanks in advance for the help!

American Eagle 180gr FMJ, MV=1030fps (rated), Federal (F C) headstamp:
Unfired dia. @ pressure ring=.420"
Fired dia. @ pressure ring=.4335"
Fired dia. @ case mouth=.426"
Fired brass thickness=.011"

Cor-Bon 180gr BCSP, MV=1300fps (rated), Remington (R-P) headstamp:
Unfired dia. @ P.R.=.420"
Fired dia. @ P.R.=.4345"
Fired dia. @ case mouth=.426"
Fired brass thickness=.0115-.012"

The first three pics should be of the American Eagles, the last three, Cor-Bon.

Keoking
04-02-2011, 13:48
I saw bulges much worse than this when I shot Double Tap through my stock G29. I put the gun up until my KKM barrel arrived, and haven't see a bulge since (even with my hot reloads).
I wouldn't shoot that brass again through a Glock barrel, but I would reload it for use in a quality aftermarket barrel.

21Carrier
04-02-2011, 13:58
I saw bulges much worse than this when I shot Double Tap through my stock G29. I put the gun up until my KKM barrel arrived, and haven't see a bulge since (even with my hot reloads).
I wouldn't shoot that brass again through a Glock barrel, but I would reload it for use in a quality aftermarket barrel.

Thanks for the advice. I will likely be ordering some barrels soon, probably a .40, and maybe a .357sig, since I am about to start reloading it for my friend's Glock 32, but I hadn't planned on an aftermarket 10mm barrel. I know the factory Glock barrels lack support compared to aftermarket ones, but it just aggravates me that I am quite possibly stuck to buying new ammo until I get an aftermarket barrel. I have some Starline brass on order. Is it going to be better than the AE brass with the stock barrel, or am I going to end up ruining it as well (with some medium powered reloads)?

_The_Shadow
04-02-2011, 14:56
21Carrier, Welcome to the forum...
Those bulges are typical of glock's loose chambered factory barrel and stock recoil spring setup. Brass swell is OK to reload but you may want to use Pass Thru sizer to recondition them. Primers look fine to me for those loads.

I use the Wolff Gun Springs non-captured recoil rod and their 21lb spring system for my Glock 29. Even with my handloads I don't get that much of a bulge from the factory barrel, as it keeps lock up for a little longer.( I think that the slide starts to recoil too soon with the factory springs. Just my observation!)

I would change recoil springs before changing barrels...that's just me! If you didn't shoot all of those rounds, get a recoil system (I am not affiliated wit Wolff Gun Springs in any way but I use and will recommend their product for this application!) and look to see if you see a difference in the amount of bulge from those same rounds. I bet you will see less bulging.
http://www.gunsprings.com/

21Carrier
04-02-2011, 16:04
Thanks, Shadow, I was thinking about that as well. It seems like it is the general consensus that all Glocks (but especially the 20 & 29) are under sprung. It definitely makes sense that premature unlocking is the main culprit. It is obvious that the bulge is too far up the case (toward the mouth) for it to have occurred while fully seated in the chamber. I would guess that, as you said, the case is being bulged down into the feed ramp as the gun recoils and the case begins coming out of the chamber. I will try the recoil spring, and will buy a Wolff, as I only hear good things about them. Also, 21lb. seems the clear favorite. I appreciate the advice.

I am glad to hear that I can reload this brass, but I will likely keep them rather mild. I was just shocked that, at least visually, the weak target loads looked as bad as the hotter Cor-Bons.

By the way, has anyone ever heard of these particular Cor-Bons? They only had one box, and it was mixed in with a bunch of boxes of some other Cor-Bon (I think some 165gr). The boxes looked all the same, but this one was a much hotter load (according to the box's specs). It was almost like this one box was accidentally put in with a case of different ammo at Cor-Bon. Also, I've never heard of a BCSP bullet. It's kind of weird. It's a hollow point that is filled up with lead. I was also surprised to see a Cor-Bon load making damn near 700ft-lbs of energy. Here's a pic.

_The_Shadow
04-02-2011, 16:27
21Carrier, I will say I purchased the recoil calibration pack which has the 19, 21 and 23 lb springs. I test various handloads and felt this was a good option for testing things. The 23 is stout and makes for tough cycling of the slide in difficult drills. Be sure to read the info that Wolff has on their site to inform yourself about the products and their use, very informative!

Bes regards!

whenmonkeysfly
04-02-2011, 17:32
Primers don't look bad to me at all and the bulges are due to the stock Glock barrel. Get you a decent aftermarket barrel with a fully supported chamber, e.g., KKM, Lone Wolf, Storm Lake, Javis. Happy Shooting and reloading!

Taterhead
04-02-2011, 17:55
That looks normal. Federal brass is not too great in my opinion. Worth it to reload moderate pressure loads. Full length resize and you should be gtg in the stock barrel. You may need a push-through die if you want to load for an after market barrel.

I recommend taking expansion ring measurements on just about everything that you shoot - since you are new to this gun and caliber. You will begin to understand what is acceptable.

I like to load Starline brass. For a quick baseline for max expansion, you might consider buying a box of Buffalo Bore ammo. They load in Starline brass as well. The expansion of BB factory loads will be toward the upper limit of expansion for Starline Brass. You'll have somewhat of an apples to apples comparison for working up your own loads. Of course different makes of brass have different expansion characteristics. Collecting data on the loads that you run through your stock barrell will give a nice set of data points. I put way more stake in what brass exspansion is telling me than I do primer condition.

_The_Shadow
04-02-2011, 18:22
Also, I've never heard of a BCSP bullet. It's kind of weird. It's a hollow point that is filled up with lead. I was also surprised to see a Cor-Bon load making damn near 700ft-lbs of energy. Here's a pic.

Bonded Core Soft Point

DWARREN123
04-02-2011, 22:03
Looks like the brass from my G20SF and I have had no problems reloading them.
Looks normal to me.
Most folks do not get as many reloads from 10mm as from other calibers, it is hard on brass in my opinion.

21Carrier
04-03-2011, 04:19
Thanks guys. It looks like the general consensus is that this is about normal for 10mm brass out of a stock barrel. I really appreciate the feedback. It was just shocking after shooting primarily .45ACP. The .45ACP brass/primers look no different before and after shooting (even with hot reloads). I just had never actually seen a case bulge or a primer begin to flatten, and when I saw my "light target" FACTORY ammo doing BOTH I kind of freaked. I almost took the ammo back to the gun shop.

Since the last time I posted, I went with a friend out to the woods (with 6 guns and over 1,000 rounds between the two of us) and had fun. I finished off the American Eagles and Cor-Bons without any problems. I have to say, I absolutely LOVE the 10mm and the Glock 29. We were right next to a railroad track, and there is a sign about 130 yards away (130 paces, and my pace is almost exactly 1 yard) measuring about 18x24 inches. I usually take a few shots at it when I go out there, but my .45ACP is about worthless at that distance. If I hold the sights right on the sign, my .45 hits the ground about 2 yards shy of the sign.

With the 10mm, I was holding the sights on the first shot right around the center of the sign (standing, no rest) just to see about where it would go, and PING!!! I hit 6 out of 20, and I'm not that great of a shot. I then went down to the sign and shot it from about 5 yards with the .45. The holes from the 10mm at 130 yards were WAY more destructive than the .45 at basically point-blank range. Simply amazing.

Since the day that I first decided to buy a Glock, and went to their website to decide which caliber to buy, I have been intrigued by the 10mm. I would have made a 10mm my first gun, but the cost of ammo is just too prohibitive without reloading. Now that I reload, it simply has no equal. It has diameter, velocity, perfect trajectory, and awesome versatility in reloading. Why there is even another handgun caliber I don't know. The ONLY downside to 10mm is the grip size of most guns in which it is chambered.

Long live the 10mm, and I will do everything I can to convert anyone I come across into a 10mm owner and shooter. I can tell you that both me and my friend were completely sold on its merits after today's shooting session. It is at once powerful, accurate, far-reaching, and fun to shoot. It simply has no equal in the realm of automatic pistol cartridges.

whenmonkeysfly
04-03-2011, 08:02
Thanks guys. It looks like the general consensus is that this is about normal for 10mm brass out of a stock barrel. I really appreciate the feedback. It was just shocking after shooting primarily .45ACP. The .45ACP brass/primers look no different before and after shooting (even with hot reloads). I just had never actually seen a case bulge or a primer begin to flatten, and when I saw my "light target" FACTORY ammo doing BOTH I kind of freaked. I almost took the ammo back to the gun shop.

Since the last time I posted, I went with a friend out to the woods (with 6 guns and over 1,000 rounds between the two of us) and had fun. I finished off the American Eagles and Cor-Bons without any problems. I have to say, I absolutely LOVE the 10mm and the Glock 29. We were right next to a railroad track, and there is a sign about 130 yards away (130 paces, and my pace is almost exactly 1 yard) measuring about 18x24 inches. I usually take a few shots at it when I go out there, but my .45ACP is about worthless at that distance. If I hold the sights right on the sign, my .45 hits the ground about 2 yards shy of the sign.

With the 10mm, I was holding the sights on the first shot right around the center of the sign (standing, no rest) just to see about where it would go, and PING!!! I hit 6 out of 20, and I'm not that great of a shot. I then went down to the sign and shot it from about 5 yards with the .45. The holes from the 10mm at 130 yards were WAY more destructive than the .45 at basically point-blank range. Simply amazing.

Since the day that I first decided to buy a Glock, and went to their website to decide which caliber to buy, I have been intrigued by the 10mm. I would have made a 10mm my first gun, but the cost of ammo is just too prohibitive without reloading. Now that I reload, it simply has no equal. It has diameter, velocity, perfect trajectory, and awesome versatility in reloading. Why there is even another handgun caliber I don't know. The ONLY downside to 10mm is the grip size of most guns in which it is chambered.

Long live the 10mm, and I will do everything I can to convert anyone I come across into a 10mm owner and shooter. I can tell you that both me and my friend were completely sold on its merits after today's shooting session. It is at once powerful, accurate, far-reaching, and fun to shoot. It simply has no equal in the realm of automatic pistol cartridges.

Great review... 10mm rules!