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ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 09:29
So my co-worker and I were talking about swords the other day...he was asking me what do I do when the bullets run out? I said that's a fine question...which is why I try and make sure I have atleast 1000rnds of each caliber I own...which I know is conservative by many others standards, but it's all I can do for now.

Anyways just to humor this argument, what would be considered a good battle blade? I'm inclined to say a samurai sword for obvious reasons, but was wondering if there were things out there that would be considered battle blades that were more functional than fantasy!

We talked about a post Katrina type senario, and also Book of Eli came up as well.

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 09:47
The problem isn't so much the type of blade, but rather, the durability and construction of whatever you decide upon.
I've come to like Cold Steel products, in my experience they've always been a good value for the money. I own three CS swords, and a lot of their knives, machetes, fixed and folding knives, tomahawks, etc. Very solidly made, very sharp.
The only time I've seen any of their swords damaged or broken has been on videos of morons abusing them past the point of stupidity.
If you're looking for simple/affordable, look at their katana machete, the kukri machetes (I own one for clearing brush, great tool) or the upcoming gladius machete (I have one on order).
Alot of people first go to the katana because of the media hype surrounding the sword. Don't misunderstand, I own two and was lucky enough to take a bit of kendo when I was in Korea (weird, I know, given the feelings between the two). The katana is a great sword and very capable in the right hands, but don't dismiss western blades out of hand. Contrary to what most (think) they know, the west has a long history of martial arts. Unlike the Greeks who (for many years) simply thought athletic ability was enough on its own to produce warriors, with no thought given to the study of swordsmanship, there are manuals describing training techniques and tactics. Digrassi's "True Art of Defense" 1594 and the writings of Flavius Vegetius Renatus (430-435) are two of my favorites.
The hand and a half sword and the gladius (Pompeii) are two of my favorite designs.
Take a look at them, and the authors I mentioned if you get a chance.

glock_19guy1983
04-05-2011, 09:58
So my co-worker and I were talking about swords the other day...he was asking me what do I do when the bullets run out? I said that's a fine question...which is why I try and make sure I have atleast 1000rnds of each caliber I own...which I know is conservative by many others standards, but it's all I can do for now.

Anyways just to humor this argument, what would be considered a good battle blade? I'm inclined to say a samurai sword for obvious reasons, but was wondering if there were things out there that would be considered battle blades that were more functional than fantasy!

We talked about a post Katrina type senario, and also Book of Eli came up as well.

just because you are out of ammo doesnt mean i wont shoot YOU well before you get into cutting range.:tongueout::tongueout:

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 10:00
just because you are out of ammo doesnt mean i wont shoot YOU well before you get into cutting range.:tongueout::tongueout:


haha touché

TriggerFinger
04-05-2011, 10:05
Watch the 2:00 minute mark

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/tosh-0-cold-steel-blade/17v2gdbsf

Luminary
04-05-2011, 10:13
Watch the 2:00 minute mark

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/tosh-0-cold-steel-blade/17v2gdbsf

I've heard about this but this was the first time I've seen it. What a bunch of idiots. :shocked:

OP: I would say you're better off with a big knife than a sword. A sword usually requires 2 hands to use effectively. I believe you would be better off with a machete of a big knife like the ESEE Junglas or a Fallkniven Thor (my dream knife).

engineer151515
04-05-2011, 10:23
Tagged.

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 10:31
Watch the 2:00 minute mark

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/tosh-0-cold-steel-blade/17v2gdbsf

without side tracking this thread too much...I do love tosh.0 and died laughing at this video when it first aired..

But to the point stated above..these swords do specifically say they are not rated to cut wood......I think a one handed application would be good!

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 10:31
I've heard about this but this was the first time I've seen it. What a bunch of idiots. :shocked:

OP: I would say you're better off with a big knife than a sword. A sword usually requires 2 hands to use effectively. I believe you would be better off with a machete of a big knife like the ESEE Junglas or a Fallkniven Thor (my dream knife).

While I completely agree that in a modern context a knife is far handier, more utilitarian and easier to carry, there are many examples of effective one handed swords, for example:
Hand and a half (used with one or two hands)
Rome's Gladius
Viking broadswords
rapiers
smallswords
The turkish yataghan
the wakazashi
the greek xiphos
12th century crusader swords

firemedic1343
04-05-2011, 10:34
If I was living in a Highlander movie, I'd get a Gladius.

Goodspeed(TPF)
04-05-2011, 10:42
he was asking me what do I do when the bullets run out?

Hahahhaaha. :rofl: Your friend is funny. Run out of "bullets". lol That's a knee slapper. :supergrin: Why I've got enough ammunition to last me 10 lifetimes.:wavey:
Wait.... He was serious? :shocked:

Big Bird
04-05-2011, 10:44
Sorry, but an infantry spear is a far more effective weapon that is not only easier to learn to use but also provides far more standoff than a sword. There is a reason pre-gunpowder armies equipped their infantry with a spear as a primary weapon. The sword was the last ditch fall-back plan much like a pistol is today.

A proper figthing spear is much more intuitive, requires a LOT less training and skill than a sword. Pick up one of the Cold Steel modern interpretations of the European Boar Spear, or one of the African Asagai spears and you will immediately understand how dangerous and powerful a spear is compared to a sword.

A man with a sword has little chance against a man with a proper spear!

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 10:58
Sorry, but an infantry spear is a far more effective weapon that is not only easier to learn to use but also provides far more standoff than a sword. There is a reason pre-gunpowder armies equipped their infantry with a spear as a primary weapon. The sword was the last ditch fall-back plan much like a pistol is today.

A proper figthing spear is much more intuitive, requires a LOT less training and skill than a sword. Pick up one of the Cold Steel modern interpretations of the European Boar Spear, or one of the African Asagai spears and you will immediately understand how dangerous and powerful a spear is compared to a sword.

A man with a sword has little chance against a man with a proper spear!

One of the few fights that Miyamoto Mushashi (by accounts, one of the most accomplished swordsman) lost was to a man with a staff. A spear is (IMO) easier to learn; another benefit is that it requires less metal and less skill to make than a sword. I have a poleaxe and a spear in my collection, they easily outreach a sword blade.
The advantage of the sword was as stated above, "last ditch", in close quarters. In the tight press of battle, a polearm in many cases would be too long and unwieldy. The long wooden handles could also become entrapped in a shield, or broken at the onset of an engagement.
The only thing I disagree with is your last sentence: don't disgard the hand protection and longer blade a sword can provide.
The spear is a highly effective weapon, but so is the sword.

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 11:00
I'm interested by the SOG 18in machette
http://budk.com/ProductImages/500/A17-SGM02.jpg

Luminary
04-05-2011, 11:01
While I completely agree that in a modern context a knife is far handier, more utilitarian and easier to carry, there are many examples of effective one handed swords, for example:
Hand and a half (used with one or two hands)
Rome's Gladius
Viking broadswords
rapiers
smallswords
The turkish yataghan
the wakazashi
the greek xiphos
12th century crusader swords

Agreed. I was actually debating on getting a wakazashi a while back. My dream sword is the Busse Gladius.

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 11:11
Just looked up the Busse Gladius; that is an impressive looking blade. At 600 it looks like it may be a bit of a collector piece, though.
For a gladius, I went non-traditonal and bought the CS gladius machete. At under 50, I figured it would give me a chance to see how I like the length and basic design of the type without paying much for it.
If you're looking towards the wakazashi, I suggest the CS Chisa Katana, or their warrior series.

firemedic1343
04-05-2011, 11:16
Just looked up the Busse Gladius; that is an impressive looking blade. At 600 it looks like it may be a bit of a collector piece, though.
For a gladius, I went non-traditonal and bought the CS gladius machete. At under 50, I figured it would give me a chance to see how I like the length and basic design of the type without paying much for it.
If you're looking towards the wakazashi, I suggest the CS Chisa Katana, or their warrior series.

That CS Gladius Machete is nice. I think I might order one for camping.

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 11:17
wow yeah $600+ for a sword is a lot! I think I'm going to try out a cold steel blade to begin with.

Tvov
04-05-2011, 11:23
Why the fixation on a sword? Ever thought about a baseball bat? Simple to use, can be extraordinarily dangerous, and --- "It's just a baseball bat, officer!".

Otherwise, I would lean toward a machete. You can actually use it as a tool when not fighting off hordes. Speaking of which, ever walked into a gardening shed? The walls are dripping with weapons, if you think about it!

Goodspeed(TPF)
04-05-2011, 11:24
wow yeah $600+ for a sword is a lot! I think I'm going to try out a cold steel blade to begin with.


Lets just say that $600.00 buys you 3000 rounds of .556. How long would that last someone? Realistically. In a situation where he would "need" it. And keep in mind, probably no more leisurely target practice any more as he "needs" it now. So I can have one sword, or 3000 rounds of ammo... :whistling:

JK-linux
04-05-2011, 11:30
I'd feel well equipped with a Jo staff and a nice Bowie like a Swamp Rat Mini Uncle Mojo. Swords are great, but like anything else, require training to be of much use. Were I intent on learning a sword, I'd go for a Katana or Sabre.

http://playground.sun.com/%7Evasya/SwampRat-MiniUncleMojo-002.jpg

Big Bird
04-05-2011, 11:34
One of the few fights that Miyamoto Mushashi (by accounts, one of the most accomplished swordsman) lost was to a man with a staff. A spear is (IMO) easier to learn; another benefit is that it requires less metal and less skill to make than a sword. I have a poleaxe and a spear in my collection, they easily outreach a sword blade.
The advantage of the sword was as stated above, "last ditch", in close quarters. In the tight press of battle, a polearm in many cases would be too long and unwieldy. The long wooden handles could also become entrapped in a shield, or broken at the onset of an engagement.
The only thing I disagree with is your last sentence: don't disgard the hand protection and longer blade a sword can provide.
The spear is a highly effective weapon, but so is the sword.

In the hands of a trained and skilled user a sword is a highly effective weapon! Most warrior societies that carried them spent YEARS learning how to fight with a sword! But the spear was always THE infantry weapon of choice because its a superior tool in all respects except in tight confined space. But even in a hallway--a spear is superior.

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 11:58
I'd feel well equipped with a Jo staff and a nice Bowie like a Swamp Rat Mini Uncle Mojo. Swords are great, but like anything else, require training to be of much use. Were I intent on learning a sword, I'd go for a Katana or Sabre.

http://playground.sun.com/%7Evasya/SwampRat-MiniUncleMojo-002.jpg

man that's a nice blade...but sooo expensive!

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 12:07
That CS Gladius Machete is nice. I think I might order one for camping.

Out of curiosity, and not in any way meant to be insulting, but...camping? Are you going to use it for general camp chores and the like, or was there a specific reason the gladius came to mind for that?

wow yeah $600+ for a sword is a lot! I think I'm going to try out a cold steel blade to begin with.

Which is why the $45 price tag is nice.

In the hands of a trained and skilled user a sword is a highly effective weapon! Most warrior societies that carried them spent YEARS learning how to fight with a sword! But the spear was always THE infantry weapon of choice because its a superior tool in all respects except in tight confined space. But even in a hallway--a spear is superior.

Absolutely.
I've always been interested in the halberd, the yari, and the naginata polearms. The halberd for its blend of spearpoint, axe and spike point (fluke), the yari because it is a slightly different interpretation of the spear, and the naginata because of the heat treament and sharpness of the blade.

firemedic1343
04-05-2011, 12:16
Lets just say that $600.00 buys you 3000 rounds of .556. How long would that last someone? Realistically. In a situation where he would "need" it. And keep in mind, probably no more leisurely target practice any more as he "needs" it now. So I can have one sword, or 3000 rounds of ammo... :whistling:

Silence is golden

firemedic1343
04-05-2011, 12:17
Out of curiosity, and not in any way meant to be insulting, but...camping? Are you going to use it for general camp chores and the like, or was there a specific reason the gladius came to mind for that?

My old machete got beaten up last trip and I need a new one. 2 birds 1 stone.

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 12:29
Ah, very cool. It looks like it will be a solidly built piece, the machetes I've bought from them have been very good. I think you'll enjoy it.

VinnieD
04-05-2011, 12:46
A well made Katana can be powerful in the right hands, but if you're not willing to invest the hundreds of dollars for a combat capable, hand forged katana, and the hours of martial arts training to learn how to use it, it's pretty useless to you.

The katana simply doesn't have enough weight to cleave like a heavier european sword, so all of the cutting ability is up to the wielder's skill. You can whack at someone all day with a katana and barely inflict paper cuts if you don't know how to use it. Furthermore the blade can't handle hitting hard things like wood, bone, and metal without chipping the edge, meaning you have to choose your targets carefully, and learn to maintain the edge.

Short version. Don't get a katana if you don't want to start living your life around swordsmanship. Stick with a machete, large fighting knife, or axe of some sort, or consider getting a bayonet.

I actually know how to use a katana, and I still wouldn't go for it as my backup weapon. If you must, consider Cold Steel's Katana Machette. It's inexpensive, but well built, has the distinct curve of a katana, but is built to be used, and take abuse like a machete. This should give you some of the style of a Katana with the ease of use of a machete.

AlexHassin
04-05-2011, 12:51
Don’t own any swords but my thoughts, that pertain mainly to me.
1. Inside a house I would think something like a Kurkui or a Dirk would be the best swords. Not shore if there technically swords but hey.
2. I think sabers or cutlass would also be an excellent choice. Again I would think you would want short ones to help maneuver. There is little chance a BG is going to have armor you need to smash through, so a saber stab or slash would be lethal
3. A baseball would be easier to explain legally. I am pretty shore NYPD will as less questions if a burglar has a nasty lump on his head from a base ball bat then an arm missing from a blade.
4. I imagine laws vary about sword legality. Actually I don’t know what NYC’s are but I imagine it’s a no no there scary.

kendric98
04-05-2011, 13:08
Im going with this if the ammo runs dry.

http://i613.photobucket.com/albums/tt217/kendric98/Catapult-28114.jpg

jamesbern
04-05-2011, 13:11
Forget a sword i'm using my Khukuri!

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/69ffa878.jpg

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/097dda58.jpg

Size compared to a SOG Seal Pup

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/f4133f07.jpg

ATL_GLOCK
04-05-2011, 13:15
NICE!!! What kind is that?

Luminary
04-05-2011, 13:21
Forget a sword i'm using my Khukuri!

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/69ffa878.jpg

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/097dda58.jpg

Size compared to a SOG Seal Pup

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/jamesbernatchez/Photography/f4133f07.jpg
I bought my brother and I a KABAR khukuri but I think I'm going to replace it with one similar to yours. Looks like a Himalayan Imports machete.

rhino673
04-05-2011, 13:52
Ok, if (and that's a big if!)my ammo was all gone and we are living in a "Book of Eli" type of world and I was down to a choice in sword, spear or axe. I would go with the axe. (Maybe a machete if that was a choice )

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 13:58
Actually, eastern and western swords are not too dissimilar in terms of weight. A katana typically weighs 1.5-3 or so pounds; a comparable western sword about the same, if a touch heavier.
There are many determining factor in cutting ability. I would say that edge geometry, and the presentation angle of the edge to the cutting medium are every bit as important as weight. Weight followed function in the sword, meaning that noone wants weapons any heavier than they absolutely need. Even the heaviest dopplehander swords used by the german landsknecht weighed no more than 7 pounds.
The ha (edge) is indeed (assuming a traditional forging style) harder than the mune (spine) of a katana. While edge to edge contact was not the prefered means of stopping an opponets blade, the swords were more than capable of cutting through bone, leather, light metal, etc. While damage to the edge was possible, it was the exception, not the rule. I'm sure you realize that the statement "You can whack at someone all day with a katana and barely inflict paper cuts if you don't know how to use it" is hyperbole.

Tvov
04-05-2011, 14:01
After I made my post about using a baseball bat, I realized that this is in the Cutting Edge section... which would explain the detailed discussion of blades! Pretty cool thread, by the way.

ancient_serpent
04-05-2011, 14:03
Don't feel bad about the baseball bat, after all the Taiaha was a wooden weapon crafted with a cutting edge of sorts (from the Maori).

tobias boon
04-05-2011, 14:16
I've wanted a kukri for a good while but I see them for like $50-250. and they all seem to look generally the same? I don't know of anywhere local to "feel" it before hand so not wanting to over pay or get junk they continue to escape me.

jamesbern
04-05-2011, 14:33
NICE!!! What kind is that?

Here is the one I got:

http://www.thekhukurihouse.com/catalog/product.php?id=313436fc98

Shipping put it at close to $100 shipped, but it is solid! I love the thing! It can use a good sharpening. I chose the "raw" finish because it holds its temper better than one that has been heated when polishing. The blade has some scratches and what not on it and it could be sharpened, but I haven't gotten around to doing it yet. I'm very happy with it and would buy from them again. It did take around a month to be made and shipped to me. Blade came packed in a heavy coating of oil. They were having issues with the power over in Nepal at the time.

I keep this near me when I sleep. It will ruin anyones night. Even the back edge of the blade is wide and flat. If you were to smash down on something hard like a head or skull i've no doubt one blow will ruin their day, let alone if it was the bladed portion.

gruntmedik
04-05-2011, 15:46
I believe I'd choose a Khukuri. Which one would depend on the situation at hand.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b180/gruntmedik/Gun%20porn/Khukuri013.jpg

engineer151515
04-05-2011, 15:54
Here is the one I got:

http://www.thekhukurihouse.com/catalog/product.php?id=313436fc98

Shipping put it at close to $100 shipped, but it is solid! I love the thing! It can use a good sharpening. I chose the "raw" finish because it holds its temper better than one that has been heated when polishing. The blade has some scratches and what not on it and it could be sharpened, but I haven't gotten around to doing it yet. I'm very happy with it and would buy from them again. It did take around a month to be made and shipped to me. Blade came packed in a heavy coating of oil. They were having issues with the power over in Nepal at the time.

I keep this near me when I sleep. It will ruin anyones night. Even the back edge of the blade is wide and flat. If you were to smash down on something hard like a head or skull i've no doubt one blow will ruin their day, let alone if it was the bladed portion.

Very nice website.

I might have to pony up $100 bucks for the Afghanistan model.

http://www.thekhukurihouse.com/catalog/product.php?id=323239fc4c1

Dreamaster
04-05-2011, 15:57
A well made Katana can be powerful in the right hands, but if you're not willing to invest the hundreds of dollars for a combat capable, hand forged katana, and the hours of martial arts training to learn how to use it, it's pretty useless to you.

The katana simply doesn't have enough weight to cleave like a heavier european sword, so all of the cutting ability is up to the wielder's skill. You can whack at someone all day with a katana and barely inflict paper cuts if you don't know how to use it. Furthermore the blade can't handle hitting hard things like wood, bone, and metal without chipping the edge, meaning you have to choose your targets carefully, and learn to maintain the edge.

Short version. Don't get a katana if you don't want to start living your life around swordsmanship. Stick with a machete, large fighting knife, or axe of some sort, or consider getting a bayonet.

I actually know how to use a katana, and I still wouldn't go for it as my backup weapon. If you must, consider Cold Steel's Katana Machette. It's inexpensive, but well built, has the distinct curve of a katana, but is built to be used, and take abuse like a machete. This should give you some of the style of a Katana with the ease of use of a machete.

There is lots of EPIC FAIL in this post. :cool:

I do recommend a Katana, and I highly recommend Munetoshi as a place to start for high bang for the buck.

http://www.swordnarmory.com/Munetoshi-Brand-Handmade-Japanese-Samurai-Sword-s/304.htm

daddysnapmuffins
04-05-2011, 21:05
My Gladius, oh yeah.

firemedic1343
04-05-2011, 21:08
My Gladius, oh yeah.

:drool:

ATL_GLOCK
04-06-2011, 08:03
My Gladius, oh yeah.

:wow:

SamRudolph
04-06-2011, 08:48
wow yeah $600+ for a sword is a lot! I think I'm going to try out a cold steel blade to begin with.


LOL

Do you know how much work goes into making a good one? $600 is a steal... any of the custom makers who actually put out swords as opposed to sword-like objects will quote you a minimum of $1,000 these days.

If you want a full-dress katana by the likes of Rick Barrett, expect to wait eight years and pay $15,000.

ATL_GLOCK
04-06-2011, 08:55
LOL

Do you know how much work goes into making a good one? $600 is a steal... any of the custom makers who actually put out swords as opposed to sword-like objects will quote you a minimum of $1,000 these days.

If you want a full-dress katana by the likes of Rick Barrett, expect to wait eight years and pay $15,000.

Yeah I'm not interested in a katana...it would do me more harm than good. I'm going one handed machete type style

ancient_serpent
04-06-2011, 11:52
LOL

Do you know how much work goes into making a good one? $600 is a steal... any of the custom makers who actually put out swords as opposed to sword-like objects will quote you a minimum of $1,000 these days.

If you want a full-dress katana by the likes of Rick Barrett, expect to wait eight years and pay $15,000.

I think instead of the word "good", traditional would have been more descriptive. CS, Paul Chen and a few others make very servicable swords with non-traditional blades. While many may lack the polishing and traditional steel of nihonto, they're every bit as capable at cutting. You are very right, in that higher end blades will cost alot more.

chivvalry
04-06-2011, 12:14
I think instead of the word "good", traditional would have been more descriptive. CS, Paul Chen and a few others make very servicable swords with non-traditional blades. While many may lack the polishing and traditional steel of nihonto, they're every bit as capable at cutting. You are very right, in that higher end blades will cost alot more.

I concur. With modern manufacturing techniques you can get a very good blade with excellent metal for not too much money. Traditionally crafted blades can be superior (depending on the craftsman) but are likely to be MUCH more expensive. Best cut for the buck is a high quality (design and materials) modern manufactured blade.

ancient_serpent
04-06-2011, 12:27
Well I understand why people say what they do about the traditional process, the idea being that the large amount of attention that goes into every blade makes them better.
It's my understanding, based on my research, that in a nutshell the raw materials available to the Japanese smiths was low quality, the refinements and layering was at least in part necessary to make blades that would hold up in battle. Earlier in Japanese history, their warriors would carry several blades into battle with them due to how often they would fail. These were straight blades with a single cutting edge (chokuto). Over time, they learned forging techniques from Chinese smiths and refined it into the process we know of today.
With modern steel, you're starting off with material superior to what was available in feudal Japan. Given proper heat treatment and well made furniture modern Japanese-style katana can be very fine weapons in their own right. Besides, there is, in my mind, little point in paying thosands of dollars to any swordsmith outside of Japan beause the swords are not considered true nihonto. If I'm paying 15 grand it better be for the real deal.

MinervaDoe
04-06-2011, 17:12
Sorry, but an infantry spear is a far more effective weapon that is not only easier to learn to use but also provides far more standoff than a sword. There is a reason pre-gunpowder armies equipped their infantry with a spear as a primary weapon. The sword was the last ditch fall-back plan much like a pistol is today.
The highest paid Samurai were the spearmen.
I suspect that the pay hike came in part from being in front.

That said, Japan's finest swordman, Musashi was only beaten once, by another Samurai with a jo (a 48 inch long staff).

chivvalry
04-07-2011, 06:14
Just get you a nice pitchfork from Home Depot... one of the long ones.

MinervaDoe
04-07-2011, 08:39
Just get you a nice pitchfork from Home Depot... one of the long ones.
Grandpa was a drill instructor in WWI for a bunch of sicillians. He kept a pitchfork handy for home intruders. A 93 year old man with cataracts waiting to pitch fork anyone who climbs through a window. Now there's a pretty scenario for you.

Does this theoretical sword need to be concealable?
If so, I would lean toward a gladius.
My Gladius, oh yeah.
Very nice looking. :cool: http://glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=215625&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1302059106
What brand of gladius is that?
My roman genes have always wanted one of those.

ATL_GLOCK
04-07-2011, 13:45
Grandpa was a drill instructor in WWI for a bunch of sicillians. He kept a pitchfork handy for home intruders. A 93 year old man with cataracts waiting to pitch fork anyone who climbs through a window. Now there's a pretty scenario for you.

Does this theoretical sword need to be concealable?
If so, I would lean toward a gladius.

Very nice looking. :cool: http://glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=215625&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1302059106
What brand of gladius is that?
My roman genes have always wanted one of those.


I believe it's a BUSSE gladius

MinervaDoe
04-07-2011, 16:52
I believe it's a BUSSE gladius
Wow!! it gets my vote.
http://i46.tinypic.com/24o3ke8.jpg

ancient_serpent
04-07-2011, 16:56
Just get you a nice pitchfork from Home Depot... one of the long ones.

An idea not without merit, farm tool have been a ready source of inprovised weapons for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Typically only the wealthy were able to afford swords or armor.
In ancient Greek city states, those that couldn't afford armor or weapons such as a dory or xiphos were typically employed as psiloi skirmishers. Alternately, if in a coastal city, they may have been employed as rowers.

ATL_GLOCK
04-08-2011, 09:17
alright all...it's time to make a decision

CS Magnum Kukri machete
http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/csstoreonline_2149_27784707
or SOG 18in Jungle Machete

http://budk.com/ProductImages/500/A17-SGM02.jpg

firemedic1343
04-08-2011, 09:42
CS Magnum Kukri machete or SOG 18in Jungle Machete


I think the main difference is the SOG has the saw teeth on the back, which may make it a little less effective as a hammer side. But that Kukri is not really suited to be much of a blunt instrument anyway.

I think as a machete they can both be effective, maybe a slight nod going to the Kukri if you are very proficient with both. Otherwise, I'd probably go for the Jungle Machete in the picture and buy a more traditional Kukri from HI.

engineer151515
04-08-2011, 09:47
Quite frankly, I'd probably go for the one with the thicker blade.

And I don't know which one that is.

DaveUSAF
04-08-2011, 16:20
http://www.cashanwei.com/prod_Detail.aspx?id=SH2462

http://www.cashanwei.com/prod_Detail.aspx?id=SH2432

How about one of these!

DaveUSAF

daddysnapmuffins
04-08-2011, 18:35
I believe it's a BUSSE gladius

Correct.

firemedic1343
04-08-2011, 22:58
Quite frankly, I'd probably go for the one with the thicker blade.

And I don't know which one that is.

They're both pretty much sheet metal. I'd go with the thinner one as a thin blade is better for most cutlass work.

OldScribe2009
04-08-2011, 23:06
Have any of you ever watched a documentary on how REAL samurai swords are--or were--created?

Absolutely incredible, just mind-boggling the work they put into crafting those swords.

MinervaDoe
04-09-2011, 08:32
Have any of you ever watched a documentary on how REAL samurai swords are--or were--created?

Absolutely incredible, just mind-boggling the work they put into crafting those swords.

Seriously, it's inspiring enough for me to want to start up a blacksmith shop when I retire. :supergrin: There's something about folding steal over and over that just seems very artistic to me.

http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l496/Minervadoe/IMG_0303.jpg

engineer151515
04-09-2011, 11:32
Seriously, it's inspiring enough for me to want to start up a blacksmith shop when I retire. :supergrin: There's something about folding steal over and over that just seems very artistic to me.

http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l496/Minervadoe/IMG_0303.jpg

Not a bad idea.

hmmm

Beware Owner
04-09-2011, 11:39
The best weapon to learn to use is the Bo Staff.

44terryberry
04-09-2011, 11:41
In the War between the States,swords accounted for Very few casualties.They look neat,but just not real practical in the real world

JN01
04-10-2011, 19:54
I got one of these the other day, high quality workmanship, made from 5160 steel, extremely sharp: http://traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/Itak%20Tagalog2.html



I also have this one on order, a little shorter, and should make a useful tool as well: http://traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/Barong.html

ATL_GLOCK
04-11-2011, 09:27
I got one of these the other day, high quality workmanship, made from 5160 steel, extremely sharp: http://traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/Itak%20Tagalog2.html



I also have this one on order, a little shorter, and should make a useful tool as well: http://traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/Barong.html

Very nice as well! Has a similar look and feel to the khukuri.

JN01
04-11-2011, 17:11
Very nice as well! Has a similar look and feel to the khukuri.

Balance is a little different. Point of balance is 4 1/2" forward of the cross guard. Blade thickness at the cross guard is almost 1/4", but steps down to .148" at about 7", then has a distal taper down to .134" at the end of the 19 1/2" blade. Slight flare at the last 3/4" to strengthen the tip for stabbing. The blade also has a lightening fuller for most of its length. Altogether, it isn't balanced toward the tip as much as a kukri.

BigJoe13
04-14-2011, 17:16
ATL_GLOCK,

I have a nice sized collection of Cold Steel blades and would like to share some thoughts.

The Smaller Kukri from Clod Steel is great. I have a few as yard tools and one of the longer ones. I tend to grab the shorter version every time and seldom use the Magnum model. they all throw decently if you have a good throwing board or target to practice on.

You may also want to look at the 1917 Cutlass they make. It is the longest blade one can comfortably wield indoors (about 2 feet) without lots of practice. If you want to save a few bucks Kult of Athena is a good online vendor or wait for the 4th of july sale. You could sign up for the email notification and a free catalogue on the CS website.

I picked up a CS chisa katana at the last parking lot sale, closer to the length of the wakazashi and better indoor length. The two other katanas I have are more for collection than user blades. One is a Paul Chen and the other is a antique made in the late 17th early 18th century by a not so famous smith in Japan.

If you want something you might be able to carry concealed look at the Recon Scout or Trail Master and get some serious schooling on defensive use of edged weapons whatever you decide.

I would love to have a Busse or some of the other blades mentioned, unfortunately they are out of my price range.

Here are some of mine:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16185169&postcount=310

Edwood
04-16-2011, 13:03
http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i31/jhorton3000/294547678_photobucket_11742_.jpg
This monster was made by Jeremy Horton.
WWW.HortonKnivesUSA.COM

Edwood
04-16-2011, 13:29
http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/4201/img5099s.jpg (http://img856.imageshack.us/i/img5099s.jpg/)

Winkler Combat Axe.

As for a battle blade, I would take a tomahawk over any short sword. It’s much more practical and versatile. Naval special war fear has been carrying boarding axes and hawks for modern application since the Persian Gulf War.
This is what I have been carrying down here, couldn’t ask for anything more.

firemedic1343
04-16-2011, 23:10
http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/4201/img5099s.jpg (http://img856.imageshack.us/i/img5099s.jpg/)

Winkler Combat Axe.

As for a battle blade, I would take a tomahawk over any short sword. It’s much more practical and versatile. Naval special war fear has been carrying boarding axes and hawks for modern application since the Persian Gulf War.
This is what I have been carrying down here, couldn’t ask for anything more.

I've got a hawk that I like a lot. But I can't compare it to the versatility of a nice Khukri. I have an HI CAK. Of course, I'm not using it as my daily battle blade, but it is versatile.

Mayhem like Me
04-26-2011, 20:34
Get a big Bowie style knife and learn to use it for real close work, and a spear or staff.

firemedic1343
04-26-2011, 21:52
I love Bowie's and I actually just bought a nice hawk, but I'll take my Himalayan Imports Chiruwa Ang Khola khukuri over any of the above. It is a good tool and can be used for a ton of purposes.

skippz
04-27-2011, 21:41
Two things...
FIRST: Where in the H-E-Double hockeysticks is there a Busse Gladius for 600 bones?
--AND--
SECOND: Check out this guy's gladius (and other blades).
http://gagecustomknives.com/Tactical%20swords.htm
Now I don't know about the quality of these blades, I do however see they are 5160 steel and VERY FREAKIN' expensive... I emailed him to ask about the warranty and a few other things two nights ago, have yet to hear back from him.
If anyone already has this info please pm me or reply and let me know I'm curious. Or if anyone knows where to find a Busse Gladius in the $600 range I'd like that info as well.

Morris
04-30-2011, 23:15
Yes, John's blade are not cheap. But they are built like SOBs and are very well constructed.

In fact, I am getting one of these when ready (post #92):

http://usualsuspect.net/forums/showthread.php?t=553591&page=7

I've owned a few of his things over the last couple of years. Expensive? Maybe. But I've yet to have one fail through normal and occasional extraordinary use.

Also, a + for the H.I. A.K. I own an 18inch model and would never part with it. Big, brutal, tough, effective.