Why or why not? (become a cop) [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Alderak
04-05-2011, 11:42
Hi, I'm sure there is a thread like this buried somewhere, but I wasn't able to find it, and I'm sure peoples opinions change.

I'm considering going to take the physical and written tests to be eligible to become an officer where I live. I'm in my mid to late twenties, and have a bachelor's degree in biology. My wife and I don't plan on having kids, and she is employed in a career field that often demands 50-60 hours of work per week.

What would you say to someone in my shoes? What are the good parts of the job and the bad parts?

Thanks

nikerret
04-05-2011, 12:08
Why would you want to be a cop?

1713
04-05-2011, 12:15
Why would you want to be a cop?

Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

DaBigBR
04-05-2011, 12:16
Go ahead and test and see what happens. The worst they can do is offer you a job. In today's market, there are fewer jobs and more applicants, so it would behoove you to at least start a process.

In the mean time, schedule some ride alongs.

Ajon412
04-05-2011, 13:34
Hi, I'm sure there is a thread like this buried somewhere, but I wasn't able to find it, and I'm sure peoples opinions change.

I'm considering going to take the physical and written tests to be eligible to become an officer where I live. I'm in my mid to late twenties, and have a bachelor's degree in biology. My wife and I don't plan on having kids, and she is employed in a career field that often demands 50-60 hours of work per week.

What would you say to someone in my shoes? What are the good parts of the job and the bad parts?

Thanks

Are you currently employed? Would a move to LE be an up, down or lateral move??

Go ahead and test and see what happens. The worst they can do is offer you a job. In today's market, there are fewer jobs and more applicants, so it would behoove you to at least start a process.

In the mean time, schedule some ride alongs.

:agree: Test, then see where it goes....Good luck and you might want to take a look at these previous threads. They might answer some of your questions......:wavey:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1273856&highlight

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1239676&highlight

collim1
04-05-2011, 13:41
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

:rofl::rofl: Could pay twice as much and still wouldn't be fair compensation, people that dont know you hate you, and the work environment is full of butt kissing spineless micro-managers.

Ajon412
04-05-2011, 14:09
:rofl::rofl: Could pay twice as much and still wouldn't be fair compensation, people that dont know you hate you, and the work environment is full of butt kissing spineless micro-managers.

:wow:...Bro, don't hold back....Tell us how you really feel.....:rofl:

Patchman
04-05-2011, 14:58
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

:rofl:

You copied that from NASA's Astronaut recruitment brochure, didn't you?

articulate
04-05-2011, 15:30
It's a balancing act. On the one hand, you have an admirable career serving the public, helping people in need, and feeling that your life has purpose. On the other hand, you will encounter so much ignorance and bullcaca that you will often find yourself questioning the purpose of human existence.

For me, I know that I could never, ever, EVER, EEEVVVVEEEEERRRR, hold a regular 9-5 desk job. Just couldn't happen. Regardless of the pay, I just could not do it. Law enforcement is nice because it is so different. You can work different shifts, be your own boss*, set your own work pace, and be as varied in your daily activities as you choose to be.

*= This is generally true, but the degree to which you are "your own boss" will vary depending on what agency and what kind of supervisors you have. Realistically though, you do not have a boss hovering over you telling you what to do and how to do it. You've got a gun and a brain, and you're expected to know how and when to deploy them.

On the downside, the disillusionment will hit reaaaaaaaaal quick. Be prepared to deal with the downright stupidest, most ignorant, utterly incompetent moron mouthbreathers that somehow survived long enough to learn how to press telephone buttons. These "people" will then use those telephones to call you, thus getting you involved in their downright stupidest, most ignorant, utterly incompetent moron mouthbreather problems.

txleapd
04-05-2011, 15:57
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

I don't know what job you're thinking of, but it's not police work...

silverado_mick
04-05-2011, 18:19
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

Huh? How about **** pay, mandantory OT weekly, being hated by everyone, working in all weather, with ****ty equipment, and being surrounded by people who alternately want to kill you and want you to be their best friend.

To the OP: if you have to ask on the internet...you don't want to be a cop.

trdvet
04-05-2011, 18:26
Go be a Fed, perhaps Fish & Wildlife or Forest Service. I'm guessing you would like that more especially with that bio degree of yours.

rsagona1
04-05-2011, 18:54
I don't know you, so please don't take this the wrong way.

It just seems like if someone has to ask that question, or needs a good reason to become a police officer, then one could assume that that person really doesn't have much of a desire to do the job.

Flame away.

Kahr_Glockman
04-05-2011, 19:01
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

Naw this is the firefighters recruiting poster. I mean really when was the last time that the FD showed up and people said, "****, its the fire department."

trdvet
04-05-2011, 19:05
I mean really when was the last time that the FD showed up and people said, "****, its the fire department."

True, people will trip over themselves to get something to drink for the Firefighters and then curse you for not doing anything to prevent the house fire.

chschwall
04-05-2011, 19:14
I wish I was in your shoes! I have always wanted to be an officer. In fact I was on the list for the academy when I unfortunately had a motorcycle accident (without insurance). Because of the accident I dropped out of school and started looking into an alternative career to pay the bills. The wreck caused me to be off my feet for nearly two years. Fortunately I have been very successful in IT. The downside to being successful in IT means I would have to take a major hit becoming an officer, not to mention I would also have to go back to school. With a wife and a baby on the way there is no way we could afford the loss in pay. But as I said before, I have always dreamed of being an officer so I hope to enrole in my counties Reserve program shortly. I'm hoping this will allow the best of both worlds (minus the whole working for free thing).

txleapd
04-05-2011, 19:47
[thread hijack] Another example of why I hate motorcycles, and you'll never catch me on one. [/thread hijack]

Orlando Eric
04-05-2011, 20:19
Part time academy and go to the reserve unit. You can then take the life in doses which suits you and still make real money at a real job.

kgain673
04-05-2011, 20:37
Make sure your wife is on board and knows what you (and SHE) are signing up for. If she has a crazy work schedule you may not see her very much at all, can she handle it? Can you? You can get your self seriously hurt or killed, talk to her about that seriously, and let that conversation sink in for a while. Your lifestyle may change, what if you and her run into "clients" of yours while out on the town or at the store, how does she feel about that. Your wife should be the main focus of your final decision if you are given the opportunity. Family first, the best career is difficult when your home life is screwed up, and a crappy job is not that bad when you return to a stable home life at the end of the day. Good luck with the process.

actionshooter10
04-05-2011, 21:13
I don't know you, so please don't take this the wrong way.

It just seems like if someone has to ask that question, or needs a good reason to become a police officer, then one could assume that that person really doesn't have much of a desire to do the job.

Flame away.

+1

If you have to ask the question, you shouldn't be a cop.

Sam Spade
04-05-2011, 21:20
Who's got the Cooper quote from Southland?

ETA: Got it. I suspect someone from CT is on their staff...

Ofcr. John Cooper: This is a front row seat to the greatest show on earth. Can you abuse it? Yes, sir - you can, and you will; I guarantee it. Because it is relentless, and it gets to you, and it seems like it changes nothing. But a day like today, with some interesting capers, and a few good arrests? That's good. But every once in a while, you get to take a bad guy off the streets for good... and that, my friend, is God's work. So now you wanna be a ***** and quit, you quit. You're a cop because you don't know how not to be one. If you feel that way, you're a cop. If you don't, you're not - you decide.

silverado_mick
04-05-2011, 21:50
I've been saying the reason I'm a cop is because I can't imagine being anything else for a long time. Also have said it's because being a cop is the only thing I'm really good at.

Panzergrenadier1979
04-05-2011, 22:36
Hi, I'm sure there is a thread like this buried somewhere, but I wasn't able to find it, and I'm sure peoples opinions change.

I'm considering going to take the physical and written tests to be eligible to become an officer where I live. I'm in my mid to late twenties, and have a bachelor's degree in biology. My wife and I don't plan on having kids, and she is employed in a career field that often demands 50-60 hours of work per week.

What would you say to someone in my shoes? What are the good parts of the job and the bad parts?

Thanks

I was in a similar situation (late twenties, bachelor's degree) and I felt that I was wasting my time in a career that paid very well, but did not give me any sense of fulfillment.

The big problem for me was that my wife and I had 3 kids (4 kids now); it was a sacrifice to take the pay cut and the subsequent change our lifestyle BUT...... it was worth it in the end. Now, I can't imagine doing anything else with my life.

Go for it.

Sharky7
04-06-2011, 00:03
You got to really want it.....If you really have a passion for your job, you will never have to work again a day in your life.

The guys who are the most miserable in this job are the ones who never really wanted it.....they got into for decent benefits and good retirement. It's a lifestyle...it will change everything about you and your life.

Not everyone is cut out for it. I wouldn't want my kids being the police, but I can't imagine doing anything else myself.

Mr. Payne
04-06-2011, 01:09
Come to Ohio, now that collective bargaining has been outlawed pay and bennefits are going to plummet so departments will be hiring anyone with a pulse.

collim1
04-06-2011, 01:13
You got to really want it.....If you really have a passion for your job, you will never have to work again a day in your life.

The guys who are the most miserable in this job are the ones who never really wanted it.....they got into for decent benefits and good retirement. It's a lifestyle...it will change everything about you and your life.

Not everyone is cut out for it. I wouldn't want my kids being the police, but I can't imagine doing anything else myself.

I wish I could quit it to be honest.

PinkoCommie
04-06-2011, 06:16
If you are asking why, as opposed to how, this might not be the job for you.

igor
04-06-2011, 17:04
i started the job in 1971 while in grad school when i realized that a real job wasnt going to work for me. i blame that on the draft and vietnam..
but i did the job for 40 years and more good times than bad, saw some bad stuff, but had a ball. what did they say a front seat on the world. i was the highest educated soul on the dept for my whole career two masters but thats ok. had a ball
now i get a decent pension or two . go for it life is too short

mixflip
04-06-2011, 19:14
I dont get it? If I had a bachelors in biology I'd have a burning desire to make a career using that biology degree.

Its not like a psychology degree that most people get just because at the 3 year mark of college, they NEEDED to choose a degree and thats all they could come up with lol.

I'd say if you have a burning desire to get into law enforcement and you want to parlay that biology degree...apply to be a Park Ranger (enforcement division) or Fish & Game as trdvet mentioned already.:dunno:

Alderak
04-07-2011, 18:17
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

This would be the ideal reason to be a cop. I'm sure a lot of people feel this way about the profession.. there will always be people who feel the opposite.

Alderak
04-07-2011, 18:19
Go ahead and test and see what happens. The worst they can do is offer you a job. In today's market, there are fewer jobs and more applicants, so it would behoove you to at least start a process.

In the mean time, schedule some ride alongs.

Do departments take people on ride-alongs who have no police training? My degree is completely unrelated and I've never been to any police academy training. Seems like it would be a great way to meet someone and have a good talk about what the job really means in my area.

silverado_mick
04-07-2011, 18:19
I do it because they give me a race car and a gun, and the authority to use both.

Alderak
04-07-2011, 18:21
Go be a Fed, perhaps Fish & Wildlife or Forest Service. I'm guessing you would like that more especially with that bio degree of yours.

I'm not the bread-winner in my family. My wife is a chemical engineer. Jobs like that are great, but if your looking for a specific city, you might wait a long time on them.

Alderak
04-07-2011, 18:24
To the people who said "if you have to ask on the internet, you don't want the job"...


Why would I not ask for opinions from people who presumably actually do the work that I am considering doing myself? It doesn't cost me anything but a few minutes of my time.

EDIT:

Oh, and thanks to everyone who gave a reply to my thread. That is why I made it - to hear some opinions and ideas.

DaBigBR
04-07-2011, 18:27
Do departments take people on ride-alongs who have no police training? My degree is completely unrelated and I've never been to any police academy training. Seems like it would be a great way to meet someone and have a good talk about what the job really means in my area.

I would say that the vast majority of ride-alongs are people with no police training or experience. Not all departments allow civilian ride-alongs and they have varying rules for ride-alongs, but if you don't call up some of your area agencies and ask, you'll never know.

trdvet
04-08-2011, 01:37
I'm not the bread-winner in my family. My wife is a chemical engineer. Jobs like that are great, but if your looking for a specific city, you might wait a long time on them.

Ahh, so moving is out of the option.

I would talk to the line officers at the agencies in your area that are hiring. I believe that the amount of criticism given to a department is proportional to the amount of sunlight at any given time. The more daylight there is the happier the officer will be and will most likely talk up the department. The exact opposite during nights, night shift folks have strong bond and have been known to be, ahem "outspoken".

Of course this isn't scientific, just my personal observation. :supergrin:

Make sure it's something you and your family wants, it changes the way you think, live, talk and act. You WILL bring it home with you. The divorce rate is high and so is the meager family time that you will most likely get. Plan on working nights, weekends and any meaningful holiday for the next 5 years. Not saying you're not up for it but I've seen many folks get into and decide it wasn't for them, wasting all that training etc when someone who truly wanted it get denied that spot.

4949shooter
04-08-2011, 04:40
[thread hijack] Another example of why I hate motorcycles, and you'll never catch me on one. [/thread hijack]

I can't wait until deer season.

4949shooter
04-08-2011, 04:46
Seriously though....don't do it for the money. My family doesn't live poorly, but we don't go on all the vacations and buy the new cars like the other families around here do.

When I was trying to become an LEO I wanted it so bad I could taste it. It took me three years to get hired but I trained every day, took courses for it, and applied three times at my agency. Friends and family couldn't talk me out of it. As mentioned above, if you have to think about it then you don't really want it.

Just some food for thought..

LAWDOGKMS
04-08-2011, 06:44
Like Cooper's quote, I too don't know how to do anything else..

It's a combination of things for me, and as a plainclothes on the fed side, life is very good.

Here's my list of why I like being a cop(not in any particular order):


-excitement, moments of pure adrenalin (i.e. foot-chase or car-chase) they seem to happen when you least expect it and the adrenalin is intoxicating and you learn to long for it. I've actually told arrestees that ran..."thanks bro for making my day more exciting, I enjoy a good footchase once in a while"..and I meant it.

-satisfaction...(putting that child rapist, killer or thief behind bars) at least for a while

-outsmarting the fugitive who is trying to elude you and then rubbing it in their face afterwards...it is like a game of chess

-pretty steady employment on the fed side, decent raises, decent salary, (REALLY-GOOD salary for my geographic location)

-take home 4wd SUV, with all the bells and whistles, limo tint, gas and insurance paid for

-issued assault rifle with all the accessories I can fit on the picatinny

-all the free ammo I can shoot and then some

-free range access

-speaking engagements...I enjoy speaking to local college classes about our agency's mission, history etc...

-travel...some great travel assignments (not too long, just right 1-3 weeks) In the last year (San Diego, DC, NYC, NJ, Upstate NY/Canada, New Orleans, Omaha

-Wearing bluejeans, tennies and untucked shirt everyday

-not shaving or having to cut my hair if I don't want to

-coming and going as I please, not having to punch a clock at 8am...set my own hours as long as I work a yearly "average" of 8-10 hrs a day

-going to breakfast at 8am with the guys if I want (aka "breakfast briefing")

-lunch with a big team of guys after some satisfying warrant services...

-since I'm self-protection-minded anyway and have always wanted to have a gun on my person, not only being allowed to carry a gun to work, being required to carry a gun to work is priceless

-working with like minded, gun-minded, type-a personality-types that are the type of people I'd like to be around outside of work too..

-feeling like a protector of the general public and believing I made a "difference" in making the community better, because every career criminal behind bars is one-less plotting his next crime on the street

I could go on and on...and unless I'm killed or disabled, I won't do anything else...

silverado_mick
04-08-2011, 06:46
To the people who said "if you have to ask on the internet, you don't want the job"...


Why would I not ask for opinions from people who presumably actually do the work that I am considering doing myself? It doesn't cost me anything but a few minutes of my time.

EDIT:

Oh, and thanks to everyone who gave a reply to my thread. That is why I made it - to hear some opinions and ideas.

You're missing our point, brohemian rhapsody. This isn't something that any of us just up and decided one day we wanted to do. We didn't look at a list of careers at a fair during high school and pick to be policemen. The job picks you, not the other way around. That's why we are all content to ***** about low pay and ****ty conditions and continue to work through it. There is seriously nothing else that a lot of us could do.

I've been wired to do this since as long as I can remember. All we are saying is that becoming a cop shouldn't be an afterthought or a "maybe I'd like to do that someday, it looks interesting". This is an all or nothing gig. You either live and breathe it or you don't, and if you don't you run the risk of getting yourself or your partners hurt or killed. That's why a lot of us are quick to tell you that if you have to ask then you must not want it. The last thing a good beat cop needs is to be saddled with a guy who's only there to see if he likes it.

RussP
04-08-2011, 10:19
Read this today about a new generation getting into law enforcement, the S-Generation...

http://www.policeone.com/police-heroes/articles/3498283-The-S-Generation-A-new-breed-of-LEOs-enters-our-ranks/This generation has risked it all because United States of America was attacked. They courageously volunteered, and joined committing all to the fight. While many Americans wavered and vacillated at home these young warriors never did. They risked all against an enemy as dangerous as any ever faced on a battle field and they triumphed over and over again and continue to do so.

The Good News
Now these same American Heroes are trickling back to resume their lives in “the World,” and academy instructors are finding them choosing to extend this record of service by joining the ranks of law enforcement.

All of you have heard of the “Baby Boomers,” “Generation X” and “Generation Y” and the “Millenials.” Many of you have discussed the strengths and weaknesses of each. Might I offer that is a new generation emerging that could be dubbed the “S” for “Service Generation,” or even the “September 11th Generation.”My son's a deputy. The job pretty much picked him.

I've met quite a few rookies in the last 8 years. Most told me they really didn't have a choice. They had the need to be in LE. It was law enforcement, had to be.

I said most. A couple were in it for the wrong reasons, all mentioned above in other posts. They left. A couple more still don't know if it is for them. Those are the ones that when you call for backup, they are the 4th or 5th units to respond, getting there in time to put the tape up.

Alderak, what does your wife think about your getting in to law enforcement?

MarcDW
04-08-2011, 11:32
... there will always be people who feel the opposite...

Yeah, everyone in LE at least on patrol level!

Sam Spade
04-08-2011, 11:47
It's either, "I can't believe they pay me for this ****" or "they don't pay me nearly enough for this ****". Pay ain't it.

After you've been in a few homes where you stick to the floor, after you've gotten naked in the garage so you don't track filth (by which I mean f i l t h) into your home, after a few similar episodes, you realize the work conditions aren't all that.

Respect? It is to laugh. Sure, there're good people who appreciate what you do. But you're never there when people are at their best. Read this forum: the owner has to publish rules and ban people for bagging on cops. This is among the law-abiding: imagine your interactions with criminals.

Mr. OP, you need to have heard a call. The lines saying we can't do anything else aren't complete. We can do whatever we wish through education, training and ability, many have side jobs in the normal world. But in terms of temperament, makeup, answering that call...this is what we are.

Why be a cop? Because removing evil from innocence is something you'd do for free. Because you believe in something more than yourself and you're willing to back that belief with your mortal body. Because you recognize that the little victories that don't mean anything actually do.

Take that ridealong. Pay real close attention to the little voice inside. Is it saying "Yes! This is what I'm supposed to do."?

Panzergrenadier1979
04-08-2011, 11:59
I do it because they give me a race car and a gun, and the authority to use both.

This.

However, I did not include this part in the oral interviews.... :whistling:

old_pigpen
04-08-2011, 18:41
You're missing our point, brohemian rhapsody. This isn't something that any of us just up and decided one day we wanted to do. We didn't look at a list of careers at a fair during high school and pick to be policemen. The job picks you, not the other way around. That's why we are all content to ***** about low pay and ****ty conditions and continue to work through it. There is seriously nothing else that a lot of us could do.

My 25 cents (used to be 2 cents before Obama and Bernake...)

I've come to realize there are some jobs that are really callings. As silverado_mick said, you have to be wired for them. The ministry and law enforcement are good examples. I tell my wife the same thing, since she is a teacher and has a true calling to teach. She wanted to be a teacher since he was a very little girl, and made that her life goal. The pay isn't good, and she has to put up with a lot of guff and doing work at home, but I know she loves it.

If you have that calling, you'll be content no matter what happens. If you don't have that calling, you'll only make yourself and everyone around you miserable.

Regarding complaining about your job, i've never met anyone who didn't complain about their job at some time! :) Even if you like your job, you'll still complain from time to time.

Why not look into becoming a reserve deputy or reserve officer?

lawman800
04-10-2011, 04:02
I am going to go against the grain here and take issue with Cooper's quote. Sure, it makes for great dramatic speech in a television show, but it ain't real life.

The point is, and from what I see, a lot of you here echo, is that you have to be able to separate yourself from the job. This job does not define you. This job does not consume your entirety. This is something you do. This is not forever.

I love being a cop and I wouldn't want to do anything else, but if I had to give it up, my life wouldn't be over as I know it either. Cooper basically states that you are a cop because you don't know what else to do and can't think of life not being a cop. Maybe I am reading too much into it but that is not me.

I know a few guys like that though. If you took away their badge, they would sit in a corner and never come out of the house ever again because their whole existence centers around that badge. It became who they are as a person, which is really sad. Without that badge, they had no identity.

I don't ever want to become like that. While I love this job and it's what I have always wanted to do and earning that badge was as sweet as anything I can imagine, I will not let the job define me and become my identity.

I am a cop because I can't imagine doing something else if I had a choice. I am a good cop but I am also good at other things, I just choose not to do those things, to my mother's chagrin, who is still not used to the thought of her son out there in uniform.

TreverSlyFox
04-10-2011, 23:36
As a retired LEO I think one facet to being a street cop, a fireman or a paramedic is you have to be an adrenaline junkie. You have to love the adrenaline rush otherwise the stress will kill you. If you tend to fall apart during or after a heart-in-your-mouth event the job is not for you.

If your the type that said through life "Hey lets ride the Tilt-a-Whirl again." or "Heck ya I'll go Skydiving with you, what do I have to do?" Then you'll probably handle the stress pretty well.

With your degree and such I think the best advice given you so far is the Enforcement side of Forrest Ranger or Fish & Game.

RussP
04-11-2011, 06:44
Alderak, what does your wife think about your getting in to law enforcement?"TAP, TAP, TAP...Is this thing on? Can y'all hear me in the back? Is Alderak still in the house?"

lethal tupperwa
04-11-2011, 06:57
we had lots of college kids

we had a riot

the old timers were limbering up with the long sticks

the kids were looking at the helmets and riot batons --like

oh **** this real not like in school.


That moment when you think call the Cops----I am the cops

is a reality check.

There was a bunch that moved on to safe office jobs.

Vigilant
04-11-2011, 09:52
I'll go against the tide just a bit on this one. I had a small taste of LE before I got into Corrections, but not in a sworn capacity. I had a rough idea of what it's like on the street, but no real feel for the armosphere inside the fence. I left a good paying job in management out in the Midwest due to the tyrant that assumed leadership, and my lack of willingness to get with his little skinflint program. My folks were getting old, and I could see the handwriting on the wall. So I moved back down South. The only problem for me was the crappy job market in this area, and the complete lack of any big outfits in my field. So, I surfed the want ads regularly, surfed the State Government jobs list, and nothing really looked good. I finally decided to shoot an application to the Dept. of Corrections, out of boredom more than anything. I posed a similar question here as did the OP in this thread, and received some excellent advice. All I was really looking for was a paycheck and benefits, and those were most certainly not the right reasons. But after a very short time inside the fence, I knew I belonged behind bars. :supergrin:

This job is one of the best things that ever happened to me, and this forum has helped a lot. Even so, not everyone has what it takes to be a cop, or a CO. That, in my opinion, is the next question the OP should ask himself, provided he decides to pursue this.

The bottom line is, some folks who get into Law Enforcement or Corrections for the wrong reasons end up doing quite well, much to their surprise. Others who think they have heard the 'calling' fall flat on their face. The OP is asking questions instead of just jumping in head first. I say, that's a good place to start.

Full steam ahead.

dmacker
04-11-2011, 10:40
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.

How about low pay, varied shift and days off, scorn of the community unless they need you and a rotten work environment.

If you really want to be a "sheep dog" your reasoning is all wrong.

Do I really want to feel like I'm making a difference and am I willing to make the sacrifice?

That is the question you should ask yourself.

nikerret
04-11-2011, 10:45
Like Cooper's quote, I too don't know how to do anything else..

It's a combination of things for me, and as a plainclothes on the fed side, life is very good.

Here's my list of why I like being a cop(not in any particular order):


-excitement, moments of pure adrenalin (i.e. foot-chase or car-chase) they seem to happen when you least expect it and the adrenalin is intoxicating and you learn to long for it. I've actually told arrestees that ran..."thanks bro for making my day more exciting, I enjoy a good footchase once in a while"..and I meant it.

-satisfaction...(putting that child rapist, killer or thief behind bars) at least for a while

-outsmarting the fugitive who is trying to elude you and then rubbing it in their face afterwards...it is like a game of chess

-pretty steady employment on the fed side, decent raises, decent salary, (REALLY-GOOD salary for my geographic location)

-take home 4wd SUV, with all the bells and whistles, limo tint, gas and insurance paid for

-issued assault rifle with all the accessories I can fit on the picatinny

-all the free ammo I can shoot and then some

-free range access

-speaking engagements...I enjoy speaking to local college classes about our agency's mission, history etc...

-travel...some great travel assignments (not too long, just right 1-3 weeks) In the last year (San Diego, DC, NYC, NJ, Upstate NY/Canada, New Orleans, Omaha

-Wearing bluejeans, tennies and untucked shirt everyday

-not shaving or having to cut my hair if I don't want to

-coming and going as I please, not having to punch a clock at 8am...set my own hours as long as I work a yearly "average" of 8-10 hrs a day

-going to breakfast at 8am with the guys if I want (aka "breakfast briefing")

-lunch with a big team of guys after some satisfying warrant services...

-since I'm self-protection-minded anyway and have always wanted to have a gun on my person, not only being allowed to carry a gun to work, being required to carry a gun to work is priceless

-working with like minded, gun-minded, type-a personality-types that are the type of people I'd like to be around outside of work too..

-feeling like a protector of the general public and believing I made a "difference" in making the community better, because every career criminal behind bars is one-less plotting his next crime on the street

I could go on and on...and unless I'm killed or disabled, I won't do anything else...

You have an awesome job!

dmacker
04-11-2011, 11:10
It does seem pretty awesome.
As a matter of fact it almost seems too awesome even for a Federal agency.
All that and $140k a year and it sounds like a dream job.
I wander what agency he works for that lets you come and leave when you please and gives you all the toys you want to use as you please.
It sounds like it includes travel all across the country could he be a US Marshal on the fugitive task force?
He's definitely not with the big "I", ATF or DEA.

DaBigBR
04-11-2011, 13:27
It does seem pretty awesome.
As a matter of fact it almost seems too awesome even for a Federal agency.
All that and $140k a year and it sounds like a dream job.
I wander what agency he works for that lets you come and leave when you please and gives you all the toys you want to use as you please.
It sounds like it includes travel all across the country could he be a US Marshal on the fugitive task force?
He's definitely not with the big "I", ATF or DEA.

The answer to your query lies in his user name.

silverado_mick
04-11-2011, 18:19
I am going to go against the grain here and take issue with Cooper's quote. Sure, it makes for great dramatic speech in a television show, but it ain't real life.
I've never watched this show, never heard the quote, and don't know what you;re talking about, so I'll leave this one alone :cool:

The point is, and from what I see, a lot of you here echo, is that you have to be able to separate yourself from the job. This job does not define you. This job does not consume your entirety. This is something you do. This is not forever.
On this, I have to call BS man. It DOES end up defining you as a person somewhat. It has to. How on Earth would any normal non-cop deal with half the **** we see daily without becoming jaded and cynical, like most police do? I understand leaving "the job" at work and relaxing in your off time, but you can't tell me the first time you are in the supermarket and someone comes up and starts giving you a sob story about how they just need $8 to buy a can of fix a flat for their car tire that you don't go "yeah right, tell me another one" and move on. I guess my argument is there are many personality traits that good street cops have that you can't just "shut off" when you punch out.

I love being a cop and I wouldn't want to do anything else, but if I had to give it up, my life wouldn't be over as I know it either. Cooper basically states that you are a cop because you don't know what else to do and can't think of life not being a cop. Maybe I am reading too much into it but that is not me.
Yeah but you would always be a cop on certain levels too. You'd still intervene if you saw an old man getting robbed or any number of other instances. You'd still want to carry a gun and most importantly, you would still think like a cop when accomplishing tasks daily. You know what I mean, those hundred little intagible, instinctual things that make you an effective cop on the street wouldn't just go away because you woke up one morning and didn't put the blue suit on.

I know a few guys like that though. If you took away their badge, they would sit in a corner and never come out of the house ever again because their whole existence centers around that badge. It became who they are as a person, which is really sad. Without that badge, they had no identity. This really kinda irks me the way you worded this. Maybe I'm reading too much into it brodeius maximus, but being a warrior isn't about pinning on a badge. Duder it IS a way of life and you either do it or you don't. I will not apologize for adjusting my life and existing in a society of victims as a prey animal. Or you could just use Grossman's sheep/sheepdogs overused analogy. Either way it's a way of life and not a 9-5 job, or do you not carry off duty?

I don't ever want to become like that. While I love this job and it's what I have always wanted to do and earning that badge was as sweet as anything I can imagine, I will not let the job define me and become my identity.

I am a cop because I can't imagine doing something else if I had a choice. I am a good cop but I am also good at other things, I just choose not to do those things, to my mother's chagrin, who is still not used to the thought of her son out there in uniform.Being a good cop doesn't preclude you being good at other things. I'm thinking we're arguing semantics anyway, but my argument is that like it or not, you are a different person now thanks to the job. Just like anyone else you are going to filter stimuli through your experiences, and since your experiences are cop ones, you are going to come up with cop solutions and cop answers, even after you are retired and "not a cop" anymore.


Blargh

LAWDOGKMS
04-11-2011, 20:21
It does seem pretty awesome.
As a matter of fact it almost seems too awesome even for a Federal agency.
All that and $140k a year and it sounds like a dream job.
I wander what agency he works for that lets you come and leave when you please and gives you all the toys you want to use as you please.
It sounds like it includes travel all across the country could he be a US Marshal on the fugitive task force?
He's definitely not with the big "I", ATF or DEA.

I don't make 140K a year however...but that would be nice..

Vigilant
04-11-2011, 20:55
I'll go against the tide just a bit on this one. I had a small taste of LE before I got into Corrections, but not in a sworn capacity. I had a rough idea of what it's like on the street, but no real feel for the armosphere inside the fence. I left a good paying job in management out in the Midwest due to the tyrant that assumed leadership, and my lack of willingness to get with his little skinflint program. My folks were getting old, and I could see the handwriting on the wall. So I moved back down South. The only problem for me was the crappy job market in this area, and the complete lack of any big outfits in my field. So, I surfed the want ads regularly, surfed the State Government jobs list, and nothing really looked good. I finally decided to shoot an application to the Dept. of Corrections, out of boredom more than anything. I posed a similar question here as did the OP in this thread, and received some excellent advice. All I was really looking for was a paycheck and benefits, and those were most certainly not the right reasons. But after a very short time inside the fence, I knew I belonged behind bars. :supergrin:

This job is one of the best things that ever happened to me, and this forum has helped a lot. Even so, not everyone has what it takes to be a cop, or a CO. That, in my opinion, is the next question the OP should ask himself, provided he decides to pursue this.

The bottom line is, some folks who get into Law Enforcement or Corrections for the wrong reasons end up doing quite well, much to their surprise. Others who think they have heard the 'calling' fall flat on their face. The OP is asking questions instead of just jumping in head first. I say, that's a good place to start.

Full steam ahead.

In retrospect, this post was not quite accurate. It was a little over six years ago when I began the process, and I did pretty much send the application in for the heck of it. I believe it was right after they contacted me to set up an appointment for their pitiful excuse for an entrance exam when I posed the question in this forum, "Would you become a C/O?". I received a lot of good advice, especially from our friend DEATHROW, whose presence here I sorely miss. He had me pretty well cranked up when I went to work, and after a short time, I truly did fall in the groove. But originally, all I was looking for was a way to make a living. We too have those rocket scientists who just show up every day and absorb a paycheck, and I don't like it either. Even so, with respect, I think it's somewhat brash to tell the OP that if he has to ask, he's barking up the wrong tree. I believe a better response would be to give him some food for thought as to what the job is really all about, as some have done, and also to give him a rough idea of what it takes to succeed. My number one question would be, could the OP take a human life if it were justified, in the line of duty, and the only feasible option? Then, I would probably ask how he feels about fighting to various degrees of severity if the circumstances dictate, and how he feels about getting hurt, because if he does his job, that will surely happen now and then. There are many more, but that's a place to start.

To the OP: don't get discouraged. Dig a little deeper. I think you took a very good first step by asking the question. And go for those ride-alongs. :thumbsup:

dmacker
04-12-2011, 06:44
I don't make 140K a year however...but that would be nice..

I'm sorry, But I had previously read your 12-20-2010 post in which you said:

"Take it from me...a 250K house often seems difficult to afford on a $140k salary.."

I mistakenly thought you were referring to your $140k salary.

I thought that was a bit high except for management and we certainly didn't enjoy the work "freedoms" which you spoke of.

I guess you were simply speaking metaphorically.

cowboywannabe
04-12-2011, 07:08
you might think the pay is good, but friday night i took a punch in the mug that i'd prefer to have not to....yea we beat the guy down with asps, but getting slugged good is not worth the pay....mike tyson got millions to take a punch, you'll get low thousands to do the same.

LAWDOGKMS
04-12-2011, 08:34
I'm sorry, But I had previously read your 12-20-2010 post in which you said:

"Take it from me...a 250K house often seems difficult to afford on a $140k salary.."

I mistakenly thought you were referring to your $140k salary.

I thought that was a bit high except for management and we certainly didn't enjoy the work "freedoms" which you spoke of.

I guess you were simply speaking metaphorically.

Good memory...that was a combined-income...

bloodhound
04-12-2011, 15:12
To the OP: if you have to ask on the internet...you don't want to be a cop.



Thats what I was thinking...you can for sure get input on the issue...but if you need input you should be a teacher or newspaper editor...

Law Enforcement is a calling...and if you don't feel it...don't do it

CBennett
04-12-2011, 16:44
Make sure you have no illusions of what the job entails i guess is my nicest way to put it. KNOW WHAT YOUR REALLY GETTING INTO....meaning you and (if your married) your spouse or significant other. Thats the Biggest thing I see with new guys that saw all the Cop TV shows and thought that that was just like it would really be lol...And thats also why the Divorce rate is so high among LE officers. no one can really relate to them and what they do and hear and go through and the way the job treats them and their personal time isnt kind. be prepared to

Have the exact days off ans shift to work that you DONT want

work all holidays(seems cool till the wife says...cant you be home Christmas morning or cant you be home for your kids first birthday and
you know the answer was no...but you looked beyond that because the job was gonna be so COOL lol)

Get made to do mandatory OT because some of the on coming shift officers called in sick and NO they dont give a SH** if its your kids birthday..just work it and shut up!

Get the bottom of the barrel for the first 10 years in shifts and days off and vacation slots

Holidays...the way you know its a Holiday till you reach 10+ years(or more) is yes you will be WORKING it lol

EXPECT to be doing work related stuff on your own time off..this is pretty common. Unless it was court I REFUSED to do work stuff on MY time off and they hated me for it lol.

in other words just really know that what your getting into will give you no respect except among other LE officers MAYBE...will have crappy hours and days off and holidays for a long time normally... And that yes the job EXPECTS the job to be your life(they will talk all about how family is important...till you need to do something with the family and they say..no lol)...They will EXPECT that even if your on vacation in the Bahammas and they call you begging you to come in because they are short that you should hop on the first plane back to do so...but yet when you need time off they say...sorry we are short handed lol...Talk to local cops talk to MANY and be sure what your getting into...road officers and junior officers are better to talk to than supervisors...when you start getting to supervisor lever a good majority of them become "brain washed company men" that actually start seeing the sense in everything the job makes you do lol...when you get to the point your like that as a "old timer" time to retire :)

akapennypincher
04-12-2011, 17:16
IMHO there are two kinds of people who become COPS, those who want to HELP PEOPLE (Peace Officers), and those who want the Badge, Gun, and Power of a (Law Enforcement Officer). IMHO if you want to help people become a COP, as you will have the opportunity to do so daily.:yourock:

lawman800
04-12-2011, 22:31
Blargh

Damn you for replying in a quote!

What I am saying is that yes, being a cop changed me but it is not who I am. I am me, whether or not I am a cop, I am who I am. I am not defined by being a cop. I am many things and I do not like being described as a cop or introduced as a cop or being told that I look like a cop or anything like that.

I take great pride in what I do. I am glad I get paid for doing what I love and I still have that sadness at EOW sometimes as I think... Awww man... Times up already?

But with or without the badge, I am still the same person. I will be sad but life goes on. Being a cop changes you, but it cannot consume you. You cannot get so attached to it that you cannot separate yourself from the job. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

JohnnyReb
04-12-2011, 23:25
While not a cop, and just a lowly CO, there are some similarities.

There are times I really wish I could quit and do something else. It really SUCKS working weekends (I get a real Sat., Sun., weekend every 6 weeks), holidays...ect. And it really sucks rotating shifts.

If my job had a set schedule, with permanent shifts and permanent days off I'd be happy. But we don't.

I'm currently in the process for two LEO jobs, just waiting on a phone call from both. One has rotating shifts, the other has permanent shifts, but is primarily a force protection type agency, with little LE.

Guess which one I want? The permanent shift one. My personal life outside of work is more important to me then the work itself.

lethal tupperwa
04-13-2011, 05:41
just a lowly CO?

You do realize that a great many Cops are really

uncomfortable when they put the firearm in a locker

and that door closes behind them don't you?

johnd
04-13-2011, 06:46
I cant give you any reasons why to nor why not to other than I went into LE later in life after a completely different career and absolutely love LE work. This is the best thing I have ever done. The good thing is that I dont need the money so dont suffer the stresses I see other Officers undergoing...its got to be tough worrying about money, kids and housing as well as all the weirdo things in the LE business...court dates, recertifications, paperwork up the gazoo, endless going here and there, waiting and so on...but its the most exciting and worthwhile thing I have ever done. I love helping people and its still amazing to me how many helpless people there are out there amongst us. Truly amazing what sheltered lives they must lead and when something a little out of the ordinary happens to them, they fall apart.

You either like it or you wont last, I dont know of anyone who just went into it because its a job...that may be your undoing.

CBennett
04-13-2011, 06:51
just a lowly CO?

You do realize that a great many Cops are really

uncomfortable when they put the firearm in a locker

and that door closes behind them don't you?


Ive been both and am currently a CO(was a cop B4) I wish I had done it the other way around being a CO helps you IMMENSELY when becoming a Cop..I think you learn the games Inmates run on you while a CO and can put that to good use as a Cop...I see now many ways they beat me as a Cop that I just didnt know about and if id done CO first id not have got burnt quite so much..

silverado_mick
04-13-2011, 09:39
Damn you for replying in a quote!

What I am saying is that yes, being a cop changed me but it is not who I am. I am me, whether or not I am a cop, I am who I am. I am not defined by being a cop. I am many things and I do not like being described as a cop or introduced as a cop or being told that I look like a cop or anything like that.

I take great pride in what I do. I am glad I get paid for doing what I love and I still have that sadness at EOW sometimes as I think... Awww man... Times up already?

But with or without the badge, I am still the same person. I will be sad but life goes on. Being a cop changes you, but it cannot consume you. You cannot get so attached to it that you cannot separate yourself from the job. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

“Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn’t be there, eighty are are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back.” -Attributed to Heraclitus

I'm speaking more of being a warrior than of just pinning on a badge and being a police from 11-7. Take the badge away, I'm still a warrior and will behave like one. The warrior part, well you can't take that away because not only does it consume me, it's in my DNA. You either are one or you aren't, it can't be learned, taught, or explained...only honed to a fine edge.

just a lowly CO?

You do realize that a great many Cops are really

uncomfortable when they put the firearm in a locker

and that door closes behind them don't you?

Effing THIS! Not enough money in the world to be locked in with the critters for 8 hours a day. Mad respect to the CO's out there, no doubt.

JohnnyReb
04-13-2011, 10:17
just a lowly CO?

You do realize that a great many Cops are really

uncomfortable when they put the firearm in a locker

and that door closes behind them don't you?

Sure, and I can understand that. It definitely takes a special person to do this job.

lawman800
04-13-2011, 23:15
“Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn’t be there, eighty are are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back.” -Attributed to Heraclitus

I'm speaking more of being a warrior than of just pinning on a badge and being a police from 11-7. Take the badge away, I'm still a warrior and will behave like one. The warrior part, well you can't take that away because not only does it consume me, it's in my DNA. You either are one or you aren't, it can't be learned, taught, or explained...only honed to a fine edge.

Exactly. You and I are on the same page. Just from different approaches.

You are who you are, and having a badge or not does not change the fact that you have that warrior mentality and drive within you. You can be a firefighter, soldier, crossing guard, whatever, and your nature is the same.

4949shooter
04-14-2011, 14:43
True.

series1811
04-18-2011, 05:13
[QUOTE=TreverSlyFox;17195807]As a retired LEO I think one facet to being a street cop, a fireman or a paramedic is you have to be an adrenaline junkie. You have to love the adrenaline rush otherwise the stress will kill you. If you tend to fall apart during or after a heart-in-your-mouth event the job is not for you.

/QUOTE]

I agree. My adrenal gland quit working years ago. I didn't realize how out of whack my system was until I re-married and my wife was shocked at how I dead panned stories of death and destruction. I didn't even realize how burned out I was by it.

I was telling her the story of one of my friends who was killed and she said she had heard people talk about a dog dying with more emotion than I had. I realized she was right.

DaBigBR
04-18-2011, 10:28
The day that you, as a street cop, go from thinking "sweet, I get to drive fast" to "****, I've got to drive fast" is indeed a sad day.

lawman800
04-18-2011, 11:03
The day that you, as a street cop, go from thinking "sweet, I get to drive fast" to "****, I've got to drive fast" is indeed a sad day.

I'll never get to that point. But the thought of the paper afterwards is what kills me.

DaBigBR
04-18-2011, 11:55
I'll never get to that point. But the thought of the paper afterwards is what kills me.

I said the same thing...then I had a couple of close calls, and here we are.

lawman800
04-18-2011, 23:45
My close calls aren't close enough, I guess.:supergrin:

Chowser
04-19-2011, 00:26
:rofl::rofl: Could pay twice as much and still wouldn't be fair compensation, people that dont know you hate you, and the work environment is full of butt kissing spineless micro-managers.

I agree with collim1. I keep telling myself, should've taken the fire test...

:rofl:

lawman800
04-19-2011, 00:44
Me too. I could've gotten paid to work out, cook, and sleep.

nikerret
04-19-2011, 16:10
you might think the pay is good, but friday night i took a punch in the mug that i'd prefer to have not to....yea we beat the guy down with asps, but getting slugged good is not worth the pay....mike tyson got millions to take a punch, you'll get low thousands to do the same.

You get less than that when you factor in all the other things we get paid for. Using mathematics, take your hourly wage and the time it took for him to hit you and you to realize it. That's how much you got paid. However, you also got paid to whoop ass.

just a lowly CO?

You do realize that a great many Cops are really

uncomfortable when they put the firearm in a locker

and that door closes behind them don't you?

Really? I'm guessing you are referring to the city cops who have backup readily available. Most of my work is done alone or with one other guy. In the Jail, there's backup everywhere. I feel safer there than almost anywhere else.

The day that you, as a street cop, go from thinking "sweet, I get to drive fast" to "****, I've got to drive fast" is indeed a sad day.

I'll never get to that point. But the thought of the paper afterwards is what kills me.

I said the same thing...then I had a couple of close calls, and here we are.

My close calls aren't close enough, I guess.:supergrin:

I'm with lawman on this one. I would add that the ass chewings aren't enough to stop the fun, either. However, I love to drive; especially, fast. Sometimes, it's not fun when you get to where you're going, but the drive is usually fun.

CarloTwoGuns
04-22-2011, 00:20
Good pay, steady hours, admiration of the community, and a quality work environment to name a few.


Admiration of who?

lol
Say what? lol

Alderak
09-02-2011, 10:36
Wow - I haven't been in this thread in a while.. life caught up with me for a while there.

As an update, our local sheriff's department is hiring right now and I went on my first ride-along. I pretty much had to stay in the car, but I learned a lot about the work and lifestyle of a deputy.

I do think I would enjoy this work for a lot of reasons. They are accepting applications for the next 2 months and its starting to drive me crazy waiting.

What can I do to beef up my resume? Anything I can accomplish in 2 months would be great, but I hear they are hiring again in January so a slightly longer term project would be good too.

Should I start running again to lower my time in the physical test? I'm in pretty good shape anyway, but a month or two of running would still help me a lot. I suppose this is rhetorical, but some opinions on the importance/difficulty of this test would be interesting to read anyhow.

Sam Spade
09-02-2011, 11:01
Run. Enroll in a semester-long EMT course.

The economy is a bit in the terlit in case you didn't notice, and competition is going to be fierce. Anything that sets you out from others is good. Anything that shows a desire for self-improvement is good.

lawman800
09-02-2011, 11:19
Pass the test but don't kill yourself over it. Every department here uses pass/fail for the physical test. You're not going to be ranked. Neither is the written test. The only scored test and ranking comes from the oral interview which is worth 100%. You get listed in order of score from the interview.

Then the departments start the poly and backgrounds in order of ranking and move down the list til they fill all the vacancies or DQ everyone on the list.

Then again, this is socal. Your area may differ, so you might want to ask them if the scores are weighted or is it pass/fail.

Agent6-3/8
09-02-2011, 12:04
Should I start running again to lower my time in the physical test? I'm in pretty good shape anyway, but a month or two of running would still help me a lot. I suppose this is rhetorical, but some opinions on the importance/difficulty of this test would be interesting to read anyhow.

Don't PT just to pass the test. PT to be the best you can be. In reality there is far more at stake than passing the PT test and getting through the academy. When you're in a fight for your life at o'dark thirty do you want to be in "pretty good shape" or do you want to be the best you can be?

You don't have to be a muscle bound hulk, or an olympic class runner. You do need to have very good cardio, core strength and overall practical strength. Its amazing just how quickly you get gassed during a fight.

That might all sound overly dramatic and you may go your entire career and never be assaulted. But if you are you owe it to yourself and your family to be as prepared as possible.

Just some food for thought.

Sam Spade
09-02-2011, 14:51
That might all sound overly dramatic and you may go your entire career and never be assaulted.

I'm trying to picture this. I guess if your career were measured in weeks, it'd be possible. Maybe I'm wrong.

You're a cop, you're going to go down that road.

lawman800
09-02-2011, 23:10
There was an article I read recently about the reality of all out fights when tour life is on the line. Even if you are in top shape, going all out in mortal combat will wear you out in 2 minutes or thereabouts. You get to the point where your body becomes anabolic and you simply cannot keep up with the rate at which you are burning oxygen.

Then as you run empty, what do you do with the situation? Shoot the guy?

In any event, agent makes a good point. I didn't mean do the minimum to pas the pt test. I meant do what you can in the time you have because pushing yourself for that extra half second on the run ain't gonna make a different in the pt test as long as you pass. Get in the academy and give it your best. That's where scores are kept.

Agent6-3/8
09-03-2011, 20:08
There was an article I read recently about the reality of all out fights when tour life is on the line. Even if you are in top shape, going all out in mortal combat will wear you out in 2 minutes or thereabouts. You get to the point where your body becomes anabolic and you simply cannot keep up with the rate at which you are burning oxygen.

Then as you run empty, what do you do with the situation? Shoot the guy?

In any event, agent makes a good point. I didn't mean do the minimum to pas the pt test. I meant do what you can in the time you have because pushing yourself for that extra half second on the run ain't gonna make a different in the pt test as long as you pass. Get in the academy and give it your best. That's where scores are kept.

Your numbers are quit right. I went 3 minutes with two 6', 240lb guys once and when it was over it was all I could do to stand. Thankfully, this was training, but those dudes didn't pull any punches. Such an encounter in the field would almost certainly end with someone being shot. The question is who...

Sam, you're correct also. I should have clarified that I was refering to the kind of assault you don't walk away from if you lose.

lawman800
09-03-2011, 20:21
Here's the simplest way to test yourself. If you have access to a punching bag, box and fight for 2 minutes straight. Time yourself. Not the light tap tap bs. Really punch and kick full power like you are in the fight of your life. Move around. Don't cheat yourself.

I guarantee you will be tired in less than 2 minutes unless you are really in shape. I trained that way in my heyday in college when I was doing muay thai and I really wrote myself out. By the end of two minutes, I couldn't raise my leg enough to walk.