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High Altitude
04-13-2011, 21:58
I was all set on getting a LCT but a friend keeps telling me I should get a SS (lee breech lock challenger) being a beginner and all.

Buying a progressive (besides a lee pro 1000) is out of the question for me right now.

I am going to be reloading 9mm mostly plus small quantities (not every week) of .38 special, .40, 380 acp and I would like to eventually (not any time soon) reload .223 to shoot out of my ARs. Not counting .223, I am thinking about 300-400 handgun rounds a week on average.

I currently don't shoot any low volume rifle, bolt guns etc..

I am thinking a SS is going to be way too slow and for my budget, the LCT will be the better choice.

What do you guys think? Any reason to NOT get the LCT and to start with a SS?

Boxerglocker
04-13-2011, 22:20
Friends don't let friends buy a single stage to load pistol. Go with the LCT, you can use it as a SS of you desire to start just disable the auto index, very easy.

PsychoKnight
04-13-2011, 22:35
Why is it that nobody recommends the Dillon BL550 Basic Loader? Wouldn't it be cost effective to get this with a caliber kit ($270+$45), Lee die sets($35), and Lee Pro Auto-Measure($35) )(total $385?)? He would be priming manually one at a time, but its still a progressive, and fully upgradable to 550B. Cheapest way to do rifle pistol and .223 progressively (aside from Lee, which I can't recommend). Of course, this isn't so far from a LnL AP w/ Lee dies ($435).

I think the 550 Basic is the only scalable, full-featurable (Bush-ism) skeletol progressive available. What you veterans think?

Boxerglocker
04-13-2011, 23:06
Why is it that nobody recommends the Dillon BL550 Basic Loader? Wouldn't it be cost effective to get this with a caliber kit ($270+$45), Lee die sets($35), and Lee Pro Auto-Measure($35) )(total $385?)? He would be priming manually one at a time, but its still a progressive, and fully upgradable to 550B. Cheapest way to do rifle pistol and .223 progressively (aside from Lee, which I can't recommend). Of course, this isn't so far from a LnL AP w/ Lee dies ($435).

I think the 550 Basic is the only scalable, full-featurable (Bush-ism) skeletol progressive available. What you veterans think?

At $385 for your suggested set-up with the Dillon BL550. (Plus shiping directly from Dillon and your other vendors for dies and what not)
I would think...you might as well get a real 550B for $429.95 (free shipping from BE) and put a set of Lee dies on it for $20-25 for less than $450 total.

At $220 complete for one caliber with upgrades from Kempf's the LCT is hard to beat for features at the sub $250 range.

PsychoKnight
04-14-2011, 01:12
Yeah, I guess you're right. Brian Enos sure makes things easy, at least for that price point.

LCT is the best option for low $200s, especially at Kempf's.

Its often that after stressing over the cost of the first press, newcomers will soon come to realize that their first big order of components is already nearly the cost of the press. Definitely, far less than the cost of subsequent gun purchases.

If you really enjoy shooting, and in large quantities, it makes sense to save up longer for a press that will match your joy of shooting.

I've sold or otherwise transfered about a dozen guns. I've only relinquished one press.

How about you guys?

robin303
04-14-2011, 02:02
I bought the Lee Anv Kit. Got the Dillon beam scale plus the dies 3 books and these guys here and can put out 50 an hour. I'm happy as hell with it. I reload 9mm and 40 S&W and really have no desire to go to a another.

IndyGunFreak
04-14-2011, 03:16
Friends don't let friends buy a single stage to load pistol. Go with the LCT, you can use it as a SS of you desire to start just disable the auto index, very easy.

This...

Disabling/Enabling the indexing, takes all of about 5sec (inset/remove index rod). Pistol I think would kinda suck on a single stage... As Boxer said, you can use the LCT as a single stage, then when you're comfortable with the process, put the index rod back in, and ramp up your production.

IGF

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 07:13
Sorry, your friends wrong. His statement proves he just doesn't know anything about the LCT. LCT is a SS if you want it to be.

unclebob
04-14-2011, 08:04
If you could afford it right now I would say the Dillon 550 also. But like you said your money is tight right now. So I would go like everyone else has said the Lee LCT.

XDRoX
04-14-2011, 08:22
I think most people should start on a SS also, but 400 rounds a week would get old real fast. The LCT sounds like exactly what you need.

shotgunred
04-14-2011, 08:48
If you don't want to break that $400. price price point than the Lee Classic Turret is you next best choice.
I personally do not like the LCT. but I will admit that I still have mine attached to my bench. I removed the indexing rod. I have a 9 mm and a 40 sizing die in two of the three holes and a RCBS Pocket Swager in the last one. A quick turn of the tool head and I can be doing one of three different things like I would on a single stage press.

XDRoX
04-14-2011, 09:10
If you don't want to break that $400. price price point than the Lee Classic Turret is you next best choice.
I personally do not like the LCT. but I will admit that I still have mine attached to my bench. I removed the indexing rod. I have a 9 mm and a 40 sizing die in two of the three holes and a RCBS Pocket Swager in the last one. A quick turn of the tool head and I can be doing one of three different things like I would on a single stage press.

Doesn't the LCT have 4 holes?

Boxerglocker
04-14-2011, 09:20
Doesn't the LCT have 4 holes?

Older ones have 3... now they come with 4.

IndyGunFreak
04-14-2011, 10:04
Older ones have 3... now they come with 4.

Lee still makes a 3 hole turret. Why I don't really know, but they do.

IGF

cderk
04-14-2011, 11:13
I purchased the Lee Anniversary Kit about a month ago and am really happy with it. I've loaded about 900 rounds so far. I can do about 100 an hour. For me it works well.

The kit was a bad decision. The Lee scale, while accurate, sucks *****. Its a pain to read the tenths digits on the scale.

I am only loading 9mm at this point, but have the dies for .380 as well. With the Lee presses, they have the quick-change collar on it, so its not really a big deal to switch the dies in and out.

I don't ever sit at my bench and load from start to finish.... which is why the single stage isn't a bad setup for me. When I have some time, I might go down and resize/deprime 200 cases.

Then, I use the hand primer while I'm sitting in front of the TV versus using the primer on the press.

I purchased the AutoDisk loader for the setup so when I flare my cases the powder gets dropped in. Then I'll seat about 100 rounds and then crimp.

Its therapeutic for me... :whistling:

sellersm
04-14-2011, 11:43
Hate to say it, but don't listen to your friend.

There's nothing you can't learn on a LCT that you can learn on a SS.

This myth will never die....

unclebob
04-14-2011, 12:31
Hate to say it, but don't listen to your friend.

There's nothing you can't learn on a LCT that you can learn on a SS.

This myth will never die....

Or even a progressive press, That you also can use as a single stage press. Or that you need a single stage for load development.

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 12:50
Hate to say it, but don't listen to your friend.

There's nothing you can't learn on a LCT that you can learn on a SS.

This myth will never die....

Seriously, The LCT is a Single Stage (when we talk about learning on a SS). It's amazing how hard of a concept that is for people to understand.

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 13:08
Lee still makes a 3 hole turret. Why I don't really know, but they do.

IGF

3 pulls of the handle per round vs 4 pulls of the handle per round. I think they make a conversion for the LCT into a 3 hole but I am not sure.

sellersm
04-14-2011, 13:50
Seriously, The LCT is a Single Stage (when we talk about learning on a SS). It's amazing how hard of a concept that is for people to understand.

Yes, C4W, I agree -- that's why I added the part about the myth....

Roering
04-14-2011, 13:55
I was all set on getting a LCT but a friend keeps telling me I should get a SS (lee breech lock challenger) being a beginner and all.

Buying a progressive (besides a lee pro 1000) is out of the question for me right now.

I am going to be reloading 9mm mostly plus small quantities (not every week) of .38 special, .40, 380 acp and I would like to eventually (not any time soon) reload .223 to shoot out of my ARs. Not counting .223, I am thinking about 300-400 handgun rounds a week on average.

I currently don't shoot any low volume rifle, bolt guns etc..

I am thinking a SS is going to be way too slow and for my budget, the LCT will be the better choice.

What do you guys think? Any reason to NOT get the LCT and to start with a SS?

Well, I have a SS Lee breech lock and it works great for me. Granted, I only load about 200-300 rounds a month. If I were to do it all over again I might have gone with a turret.

Although it is still technically a single stage. There's just less die changing.

unclebob
04-14-2011, 14:12
Well, I have a SS Lee breech lock and it works great for me. Granted, I only load about 200-300 rounds a month. If I were to do it all over again I might have gone with a turret.

Although it is still technically a single stage. There's just less die changing.

And taking a case in and out of the shell holder.

shotgunred
04-14-2011, 14:25
Doesn't the LCT have 4 holes?

Mine is the lee turret and not the classic. Not to mention is is probably as old as you are.:whistling: Ok not quite that old but it is old enough to go into a bar.:drink:

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 14:35
Yes, C4W, I agree -- that's why I added the part about the myth....

I was agreeing with you. Apparently we are in a minority as far as understanding how a LCT works.

rhino673
04-14-2011, 14:52
IMO, I think new reloaders should start on a SS press first , learn the basics then move to a progressive or turret style later if their 'need for speed' (lol) demands it. Even after you get a progressive you'll still find plenty of uses for the SS press.

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 14:53
IMO, I think new reloaders should start on a SS press first , learn the basics then move to a progressive or turret style later if their 'need for speed' (lol) demands it. Even after you get a progressive you'll still find plenty of uses for the SS press.

So why not start with the LCT and use it as a SS for the first year?

Thorbird
04-14-2011, 15:01
I used the Lee Turret for 2 years, and it was great. I loaded very accurate ammo with it in the single stage setup. I have since got lucky on a Dillon 550B, and of course it is great. I sold the lee to a friend who is just starting out. You can't go wrong with it. Have fun.

unclebob
04-14-2011, 15:16
IMO, I think new reloaders should start on a SS press first , learn the basics then move to a progressive or turret style later if their 'need for speed' (lol) demands it. Even after you get a progressive you'll still find plenty of uses for the SS press.

You can take just about any press and use it as a single stage press. LNL, 550, 650, LCT, RCBS. I think all of the Lee progress pressís. Beside primer pocket swaging and bullet swaging. And most people donít do either one of them. Why do you need a single stage press? Other than last week I sized some .380 on my single stage press that has not been used for about 10 years. Other than depriming primers that went in wrong. So why do you need a single stage press and donít say load development because you can do that on a progressive press easier and a whole lot faster.

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 15:21
I agree with Bob. Use the press you want, not a single stage because of some idea that it's safer. SS is far, far from safer then a LCT operating as a auto indexing turret. Same for a 650/LnL operating properly. SS you can easily create a squib double. Same can be said for the 550. But the 550 is super easy to pay attention and get in a routine. Routine is good. But the idea that a SS is safer is a myth. It's probably the least safe of all the options.

IndyGunFreak
04-14-2011, 15:22
3 pulls of the handle per round vs 4 pulls of the handle per round. I think they make a conversion for the LCT into a 3 hole but I am not sure.

LOL.. I know the difference...

I'm saying w/ the 4 hole available, I'm not sure why they still make the 3 hole. Pretty sure I've saw the converion as well.

IGF

rhino673
04-14-2011, 15:27
So why not start with the LCT and use it as a SS for the first year?

I don't care for the Lee reloading equipment that i have used. (other then their dies , which are excellent) Granted I have no experience with the LCT ( it may be great) but the other two presses I've used I wasn't impressed. One was a basic ss the other was a friends Pro 1000. The SS just seemed kinda cheap and we never could get that dang Pro 1000 to work right.

I was looking at the LCT online though and it does seem pretty nice. I'd like to get my hands on one and check it out.

unclebob
04-14-2011, 15:38
I don't care for the Lee reloading equipment that i have used. (other then their dies , which are excellent) Granted I have no experience with the LCT ( it may be great) but the other two presses I've used I wasn't impressed. One was a basic ss the other was a friends Pro 1000. The SS just seemed kinda cheap and we never could get that dang Pro 1000 to work right.

I was looking at the LCT online though and it does seem pretty nice. I'd like to get my hands on one and check it out.

Agree. Other than the LCT and SS cast press. All the other Lee ones IMHO are no better than a light boat anchor.

Colorado4Wheel
04-14-2011, 15:48
I don't care for the Lee reloading equipment that i have used. (other then their dies , which are excellent) Granted I have no experience with the LCT ( it may be great) but the other two presses I've used I wasn't impressed. One was a basic ss the other was a friends Pro 1000. The SS just seemed kinda cheap and we never could get that dang Pro 1000 to work right.

I was looking at the LCT online though and it does seem pretty nice. I'd like to get my hands on one and check it out.

I agree with your assessment of the those Lee presses. The LCT is much nicer. Take a look at LCT setup for one caliber. $200. It's way more money then the Pro 1000 and almost as much as a Load Master. But the LCT is just a simple Auto Indexing Turret. So you pay more and get fewer features. Basically, it's because it's made better then the others. I actually thought the LM felt pretty well made as well (LCT is nicer). But it does cost more as well.

sellersm
04-14-2011, 16:17
Imho, the LCT is in a league of its own -- a good league!

Compared to the other products in the Lee lineup, the LCT stands out like a clear winner, again, imho. I've got the LCT, the regular Lee turret (non-cast), the Lee SS and the Pro 1000, and none of them compare to the LCT. I've been very fortunate with the Pro1000 as it's worked quite well for my needs, but I only load .40S&W on it. I even was able to get the bullet feeder to work!!

justinsaneok
04-14-2011, 17:42
I know you said you can't afford a progressive. I still will tell you to get a RL550b from Brian Enos. I couldn't afford one either, bought one anyway and am glad I did.

StaTiK
04-14-2011, 18:02
I don't ever sit at my bench and load from start to finish.... which is why the single stage isn't a bad setup for me. When I have some time, I might go down and resize/deprime 200 cases.

Then, I use the hand primer while I'm sitting in front of the TV versus using the primer on the press.

Personally, I think this is exactly where the LCT shines. You can quit at anytime and have X completed rounds, ready for the range, rather than hundreds at varying stages of completion. If using a traditional SS, I would hate to have a family "emergency" and walk away from a loading block with 5/8ths of the cases charged with powder and the rest empty.

I'm honestly not judging. If it works for you, great. SS loading just doesn't work for my family situation.

-StaTiK-

rhino673
04-15-2011, 07:03
After reading some of the posts in this thread I watched some videos on the LCT. It looks pretty dang sweet! I may have to try one out.

shotgunred
04-15-2011, 09:50
LOL.. I know the difference...

I'm saying w/ the 4 hole available, I'm not sure why they still make the 3 hole. Pretty sure I've saw the converion as well.

IGF

I can't see why I would want to upgrade it. I don't use it to make ammo. I use it as a three station single stage press. Mostly to size lead.

High Altitude
04-15-2011, 12:20
thanks for all the input guys, it really helps.

I know you said you can't afford a progressive. I still will tell you to get a RL550b from Brian Enos. I couldn't afford one either, bought one anyway and am glad I did.

I have looked at Brian Enos's site, ran the numbers etc.......

I could probably sell some stuff and come up with the money but expensive to get setup for other calibers.

I am starting to realize that you need more than one press set up.

In my case it would be a RL 550b for 9mm and a LCT for low volume, .38, .380, 40sw.

That would be ideal.

So which do you start with???

Round up every last dime and buy the RL 550b but only be able to reload 9mm for awhile

OR

Go with the LCT, be able to reload everything and then maybe sometime in the future get a progressive press.

I know, I know, the answer is to buy both :wavey:

IndyGunFreak
04-15-2011, 12:44
I can't see why I would want to upgrade it. I don't use it to make ammo. I use it as a three station single stage press. Mostly to size lead.

If you were buying it new, and the 3 station and 4 station were similar in price, which would you get? That was my real point... Most people don't get the LCT to use long term as a single stage.

IGF

GioaJack
04-15-2011, 13:03
No, the answer is not to buy both but rather what you can comfortably afford. It makes no sense to start off your loading hobby, or any hobby for that matter with the stress of trying to scrape together funds that would normally be directed elsewhere.

Pick a press you can afford and set it up for the caliber you shoot the most... or would like to shoot the most. Learn everything you can about loading that caliber, the various bullet/powder combinations and permutations of each one.

No matter what caliber you choose there are months and months and months of learning involved before you become proficient as a hand loader as opposed to being a simple mass production line robot.

During that time of loading and learning you have, hopefully, improved your shooting skills, gained a greater understanding of what equipment you would like to move up to, if any, and have had the opportunity to put a few dollars away every week or month so that your next purchase is not made with scared money but rather an educated investment.

You'll have plenty of time in your loading career to acquire all the equipment you want but it's meaningless without first acquiring the basic knowledge, then experience and then the intangible nuances of loading.

Forget about trying to keep up with the Jones', there's always going to be a Jones with more money and less brains.

Good luck, have fun, learn the right way.


Jack

ChrisJn
04-15-2011, 13:09
No, the answer is not to buy both but rather what you can comfortably afford. It makes no sense to start off your loading hobby, or any hobby for that matter with the stress of trying to scrape together funds that would normally be directed elsewhere.

Pick a press you can afford and set it up for the caliber you shoot the most... or would like to shoot the most. Learn everything you can about loading that caliber, the various bullet/powder combinations and permutations of each one.

No matter what caliber you choose there are months and months and months of learning involved before you become proficient as a hand loader as opposed to being a simple mass production line robot.

During that time of loading and learning you have, hopefully, improved your shooting skills, gained a greater understanding of what equipment you would like to move up to, if any, and have had the opportunity to put a few dollars away every week or month so that your next purchase is not made with scared money but rather an educated investment.

You'll have plenty of time in your loading career to acquire all the equipment you want but it's meaningless without first acquiring the basic knowledge, then experience and then the intangible nuances of loading.

Forget about trying to keep up with the Jones', there's always going to be a Jones with more money and less brains.

Good luck, have fun, learn the right way.


Jack

Sanity at last. Listen to the words of a wise old man!

shotgunred
04-15-2011, 13:25
thanks for all the input guys, it really helps.



I have looked at Brian Enos's site, ran the numbers etc.......

I could probably sell some stuff and come up with the money but expensive to get setup for other calibers.

I am starting to realize that you need more than one press set up.

In my case it would be a RL 550b for 9mm and a LCT for low volume, .38, .380, 40sw.

That would be ideal.

So which do you start with???

Round up every last dime and buy the RL 550b but only be able to reload 9mm for awhile

OR

Go with the LCT, be able to reload everything and then maybe sometime in the future get a progressive press.

I know, I know, the answer is to buy both :wavey:

Just because most people have more than one press doesn't really mean you need more than one. a LCT or a 550B or even a LNL AP will work for most people. Pick the one that fits you best right now. while I am not personally a fan of Lee presses the LCT is a very affordable way to try reloading without dumping a grand into the game. Rusty who hasn't chimed in yet has used one for years and is happy with it. Heck my 20 year old lee press is still bolted to my press and doing something. Buy what ever will work for you and you can afford. 30 years from now you can be like jack and have 10 different press on your bench and god only knows how many others in storage.

High Altitude
04-15-2011, 16:11
Thank you for the advice. I am just thinking out loud, looking at possible future needs and seeing if there is anything I can do today to minimize having to buy things twice etc.....

No, the answer is not to buy both but rather what you can comfortably afford. It makes no sense to start off your loading hobby, or any hobby for that matter with the stress of trying to scrape together funds that would normally be directed elsewhere.

Pick a press you can afford and set it up for the caliber you shoot the most... or would like to shoot the most. Learn everything you can about loading that caliber, the various bullet/powder combinations and permutations of each one.

No matter what caliber you choose there are months and months and months of learning involved before you become proficient as a hand loader as opposed to being a simple mass production line robot.

During that time of loading and learning you have, hopefully, improved your shooting skills, gained a greater understanding of what equipment you would like to move up to, if any, and have had the opportunity to put a few dollars away every week or month so that your next purchase is not made with scared money but rather an educated investment.

You'll have plenty of time in your loading career to acquire all the equipment you want but it's meaningless without first acquiring the basic knowledge, then experience and then the intangible nuances of loading.

Forget about trying to keep up with the Jones', there's always going to be a Jones with more money and less brains.

Good luck, have fun, learn the right way.


Jack

unclebob
04-15-2011, 17:23
If you decide in getting a 550 why get a LCT? The conversion are $45.00. So You could get all the conversions that you listed for less than a LCT for $200.00. But only get like what Jack said.

RustyFN
04-15-2011, 18:13
thanks for all the input guys, it really helps.



I have looked at Brian Enos's site, ran the numbers etc.......

I could probably sell some stuff and come up with the money but expensive to get setup for other calibers.

I am starting to realize that you need more than one press set up.

In my case it would be a RL 550b for 9mm and a LCT for low volume, .38, .380, 40sw.

That would be ideal.

So which do you start with???

Round up every last dime and buy the RL 550b but only be able to reload 9mm for awhile

OR

Go with the LCT, be able to reload everything and then maybe sometime in the future get a progressive press.

I know, I know, the answer is to buy both :wavey:

How many rounds do you need per week? I have been loading on a classic turret press five years now. I can load around 200 rounds per hour and it meets my needs fine, even with some competition.

High Altitude
04-15-2011, 18:17
If you decide in getting a 550 why get a LCT? The conversion are $45.00. So You could get all the conversions that you listed for less than a LCT for $200.00. But only get like what Jack said.

I was just thinking that it would be nice to have the LCT for low volume loading, working up test loads with different powder loads etc... and then use the 550 for high volume only.

EDIT: The more I research and see how the 550 works, it is very versatile since it doesn't auto rotate and has the removable die holder. Very flexible loader, I can see why it is so popular given its capabilities and quality. Having a seperate press wouldn't really be needed.

High Altitude
04-15-2011, 18:18
How many rounds do you need per week? I have been loading on a classic turret press five years now. I can load around 200 rounds per hour and it meets my needs fine, even with some competition.

About 400 rounds a week plus 2 IDPA matches a month.

PCJim
04-15-2011, 21:29
EDIT: The more I research and see how the 550 works, it is very versatile since it doesn't auto rotate and has the removable die holder. Very flexible loader, I can see why it is so popular given its capabilities and quality. Having a seperate press wouldn't really be needed.

Yes, the 550 is very versatile. If you wish to take it easy as a new reloader, simply put the die for the operation you wish to accomplish in station one and remove the pin on station two. Insert case, perform operation, rotate shellplate, remove worked case and insert new case at station one. You will not do that for long, once you become accustomed to the press.

I have found myself performing specific tasks on occasion on the 550. As an example, while performing some bullet tests for the 357sig I used the 40S&W toolhead to resize and deprime the cases in station 1, pulling the rounds out at station 2. Then on to the SS press to finish the resizing with the 357 die, priming and bullet seating to determine which 9mm bullets I had on hand could be used. While these specific tasks do not come up often, the press can be adapted when it is convenient to do so.

justinsaneok
04-15-2011, 21:34
thanks for all the input guys, it really helps.


I have looked at Brian Enos's site, ran the numbers etc.......

I could probably sell some stuff and come up with the money but expensive to get setup for other calibers.

I am starting to realize that you need more than one press set up.

In my case it would be a RL 550b for 9mm and a LCT for low volume, .38, .380, 40sw.

That would be ideal.

So which do you start with???

Round up every last dime and buy the RL 550b but only be able to reload 9mm for awhile

OR

Go with the LCT, be able to reload everything and then maybe sometime in the future get a progressive press.

I know, I know, the answer is to buy both :wavey:

I jumped in and got the RL 550b Alot of the conversion stuff crosses over. If you shoot the 9mm the most buy it with the 9mm and start adding calibers when you can. There are guys on here that have a few 1050s and still use a 550 for some stuff just because it works and the conversions are cheap. I think it is a good place to start. The best thing is you shoot .40 and 9mm and they use the same shell plate so all you need to do is get dies and a powder funnel. You would need dies if you were using the LCT anyway so just get the powder funnel and dies for the Dillon and your set for two calibers. Add the other stuff later. You can buy some dies for 25 bucks and save money. It just made sense for me because I wanted to load 9mm .40 .223 .38sp .357 .308 I just add a caliber when I can and thats that. I switch 9mm and .40 by pulling two pins because the shell plate is the same and you can buy tool heads to leave your dies in set up. I love It. Thats why I said get it. I am so glad I got it. It's paying of big for me. Plus my son will be loading on this thing when I'm dead and gone because it has a lifetime no BS warranty. I did my homework saved my pennies and sold stuff that just sits there. I have no cable T.V and nothing I don't use because I wanted to load so I could afford to shoot and do what I love. If you love to shoot I'm sure you can make it happen. Just so you know I was unemployed when I started this endeavorer. If you have a job your farther along than I was when I made it happen. DO IT

XDRoX
04-15-2011, 22:17
If money's an issue then I think the LCT is a great idea. Like someone else mentioned it's kind of in a class of it's one. When more money is available, then get a Dillon. Just my opinion.

I load 9mm, 38spl, and 223 on a 550b, and use my LCT for calibers I don't load too often like 357.

High Altitude
04-16-2011, 01:55
You know what happens once you start thinking about the possibilities of getting a 550.................

You start to compare it to the LNL.....

:faint:

:rofl:

shotgunred
04-16-2011, 09:47
and end up with a 650!:cool:

Colorado4Wheel
04-17-2011, 13:13
About 400 rounds a week plus 2 IDPA matches a month.

Get a 650. If your shooting that much already you can afford it. It's a investment. Then get the LCT later for the other calibers or convert the 650.