Loading bench on carpet, ain't working out! [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Loading bench on carpet, ain't working out!


atakawow
04-20-2011, 15:46
I recently migrated the entire work station into our carpeted indoor basement due to the ball freezing temperature.

My press is set up on a flimsy computer desk. The press is screwed in nice and tight, however, there's not much support from the desk legs as it is positioned on top of the carpet. Every stroke of the lever sends the entire desk trembling. Seating primers requires me to use both hands, one to work the lever, the other to hold on to the desk for leverage as it moves too much.

I've tried stacking weights on top of the desk but that didn't do jack. I suspect the main problem is due to the flimsy legs. I don't plan on moving the work station outside again, it is way too comfortable in here. What can I do to rid of this problem? A new bench? Screwed to the wall? Help me out here!

fredj338
04-20-2011, 15:50
Yeah, I don't think it's the carpet but the bench. It needs to be sturdy, a comp table isn't all that sturdy. A cheap steel bench from HD. Lowes, Sears, works much better.

44terryberry
04-20-2011, 15:52
You can get a couple angle brackets on the back to screw it to the wall, but the front might still lift up when decapping a tuff case

ZekerMan
04-20-2011, 16:00
Toss the flimsey computer desk and build a real nice heavy duty wooden loading bench made to your specs and needs.

Colorado4Wheel
04-20-2011, 16:00
My bench is over carpet. I didn't think I was going to care and it wasn't planned like that but thats what I got. I think your issue is more the flimsy table. Get a solid bench, screw to the wall and then see what you got going on.

I put some snap together foam pads under the bench so it doesn't get the carpet dirty.

IndyGunFreak
04-20-2011, 16:05
LOL.. well, I hate being late to the show, but I think you've figured out by now that its not the carpet.

GioaJack
04-20-2011, 16:07
Build a new bench in the butler's quarters, you probably didn't spend the money to carpet his floors.


Jack

Boxerglocker
04-20-2011, 16:12
The carpet will make a slight difference. Although the bench size is a major issue too. I alleviated the slight wobble issue being on the carpet with my new set-up with a single 5 inch L bracket bolted down through the top of the bench. I then had both my kids sit on top of it to add some preload to it and lagged bolted it to a stud through the wall. It's solid as a rock now.

http://glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=215747&d=1302499375

Randy from Kansas
04-20-2011, 16:19
Go out into the back yard and put up a building say a 40x80 you might have extra room now but it will fill up. Heat it, AC it and you are good to go and don't forget the cable connections for the flat screen.

Memnok
04-20-2011, 16:35
Go out into the back yard and put up a building say a 40x80 you might have extra room now but it will fill up. Heat it, AC it and you are good to go and don't forget the cable connections for the flat screen.

"No honey, that's not new, it's been there for quite some time now..." :rofl:

barstoolguru
04-20-2011, 17:47
remove the legs

labdwakin
04-20-2011, 18:04
BG is right... BOLT THAT MUTHA DOWN!!! And get a heavier bench too...

njl
04-20-2011, 19:35
The carpet will make a slight difference. Although the bench size is a major issue too. I alleviated the slight wobble issue being on the carpet with my new set-up with a single 5 inch L bracket bolted down through the top of the bench. I then had both my kids sit on top of it to add some preload to it and lagged bolted it to a stud through the wall. It's solid as a rock now.



Will bolting the back of the benchtop to the wall behind it really keep the bench stable during primer seating? I've got a nice sturdy bench, and it doesn't move at all that I've noticed during resizing, but it will move on the upstroke seating primers. I've gotten in th habit of holding the press with my left hand while seating primers. I know it's wrong...but I've gotten used to it, loading thousands of rounds this way. I'm not willing to rip up the carpet to anchor it to the floor...but I could drill into the wall (studs). Spackle and paint is much easier than repairing carpet.

Boxerglocker
04-20-2011, 20:01
Will bolting the back of the benchtop to the wall behind it really keep the bench stable during primer seating? I've got a nice sturdy bench, and it doesn't move at all that I've noticed during resizing, but it will move on the upstroke seating primers. I've gotten in th habit of holding the press with my left hand while seating primers. I know it's wrong...but I've gotten used to it, loading thousands of rounds this way. I'm not willing to rip up the carpet to anchor it to the floor...but I could drill into the wall (studs). Spackle and paint is much easier than repairing carpet.

Yes, it makes a big difference. Especially in the upstroke during seating. The corner angle and bolts cost me $8 total at home depot. Try is and you will see. Make sureyou preload it before you drive the lag bolts.

WiskyT
04-20-2011, 20:38
To anyone who has a carpet on a wooden subfloor, just drive screws through the bench legs on a 45* angle into the floor (toenailing). It will suck the bench right down compressing the carpet and padding and the bench will be rock solid.

njl
04-20-2011, 21:36
Yes, it makes a big difference. Especially in the upstroke during seating. The corner angle and bolts cost me $8 total at home depot. Try is and you will see. Make sureyou preload it before you drive the lag bolts.

Can you post an image or link to the sort of angle hardware you used?

Boxerglocker
04-20-2011, 21:53
Can you post an image or link to the sort of angle hardware you used?

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/2612dc36-04cc-4613-b767-618130ceca07_4.jpg

They look like this. Go to the Home Depot they have them in various sizes. I take that back... I used a 6 or 8 inch I belive.

Kwesi
04-21-2011, 06:48
Or you could go to a garage sale and pick up an inexpensive dresser built out of particle board. Then fill some of the drawers with something heavy. Basically that is what I've done. I bolted the 550 to the top of the dresser, it sits on carpet BUT I did not bolt it to the floor or to the studs. I put 2,000 - 3,000 rounds of factory ammo in the drawers to keep it from wobbling...works great!

Boxerglocker
04-21-2011, 08:53
Or you could go to a garage sale and pick up an inexpensive dresser built out of particle board. Then fill some of the drawers with something heavy. Basically that is what I've done. I bolted the 550 to the top of the dresser, it sits on carpet BUT I did not bolt it to the floor or to the studs. I put 2,000 - 3,000 rounds of factory ammo in the drawers to keep it from wobbling...works great!

What happens when you go through or sell you factory ammo paper weight collection? :upeyes:

Kwesi
04-21-2011, 11:37
What happens when you go through or sell you factory ammo paper weight collection? :upeyes:

Replace it with my cache of reloads :supergrin:

Bello
04-21-2011, 18:50
Damn nice bench Mitch!

njl
04-21-2011, 18:53
http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/2612dc36-04cc-4613-b767-618130ceca07_4.jpg

They look like this. Go to the Home Depot they have them in various sizes. I take that back... I used a 6 or 8 inch I belive.

6 or 8" total, or per side of the bend? I've got a variety of those in the garage...the largest are 3.5" per side (7" steel before being bent). I was just looking at how that would go, and one problem is due to the floor molding and outlets, my bench is a couple inches off the wall, so I'd only get 1 of the 2 holes from the angle iron anchored to the bottom of the bench top.

I was just fooling around with the press, and I think the reason I hold the press is because I sit in a swivel task chair while loading and I'm not a stable enough platform. Pressing up on the handle, I wasn't seeing much if any movement of the bench. I think I could probably get the bench a bit more stable by attaching some 2x6 between the wall and bench top, so the bench could sit up against "the wall". I don't think that would solve the problem that got me into holding the press on the upstroke though. I think that's going to require either a different chair or standing.

Colorado4Wheel
04-21-2011, 18:57
Get rid of the swivel chair. Standing is actually the best way to do it. At most you should lean on a chair. But you want your body to have good leverage. Sitting takes away a lot of your leverage. I learned that the hard way.

njl
04-21-2011, 19:02
But I'm getting old and lazy. I don't want to stand.

I did setup the bench and press at such a height that I'd have the option of standing...the task chair is very tall. I guess I'll give it another try. I just think it's going to make loading even more work if I've got to stand while doing it.

Three-Five-Seven
04-21-2011, 19:02
Until, and unless, that sucker is anchored to the wall, you shall not be happy.

Colorado4Wheel
04-21-2011, 19:18
But I'm getting old and lazy. I don't want to stand.

I did setup the bench and press at such a height that I'd have the option of standing...the task chair is very tall. I guess I'll give it another try. I just think it's going to make loading even more work if I've got the stand while doing it.

Swap it for a chair that doesn't swivel then and lean into the chair, feet partly on the ground.

Boxerglocker
04-21-2011, 20:41
6 or 8" total, or per side of the bend? I've got a variety of those in the garage...the largest are 3.5" per side (7" steel before being bent). I was just looking at how that would go, and one problem is due to the floor molding and outlets, my bench is a couple inches off the wall, so I'd only get 1 of the 2 holes from the angle iron anchored to the bottom of the bench top.

I was just fooling around with the press, and I think the reason I hold the press is because I sit in a swivel task chair while loading and I'm not a stable enough platform. Pressing up on the handle, I wasn't seeing much if any movement of the bench. I think I could probably get the bench a bit more stable by attaching some 2x6 between the wall and bench top, so the bench could sit up against "the wall". I don't think that would solve the problem that got me into holding the press on the upstroke though. I think that's going to require either a different chair or standing.


6 or 8 a side whatever will work, given your situation with the molding maybe even a slightly longer one. Just bolt it down.

You could also, wood screw or bolt a 2 x 6 to the bench along the back legs. Then screw a 2 x 4 across the studs on the wall at the same height so they 2 x 6 will press against it. Then run screws through the 2 x6 to the 2 x 4.

Damn nice bench Mitch!

Thanks Robbo, how's the wifey doing?

PCJim
04-21-2011, 21:34
The carpet will make a slight difference. Although the bench size is a major issue too. I alleviated the slight wobble issue being on the carpet with my new set-up with a single 5 inch L bracket bolted down through the top of the bench. I then had both my kids sit on top of it to add some preload to it and lagged bolted it to a stud through the wall. It's solid as a rock now.

http://glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=215747&d=1302499375

Nice setup (and toolhead stand! :supergrin:). :cool:

AA#5
04-21-2011, 21:42
I had the same problem - even with thin indoor-outdoor carpeting. I cut the carpet away only where the legs sit.

vtbluegrass
04-21-2011, 21:44
Bolt it down or build a heavier bench. My bench is sitting on carpet in one of the bedroom in the house and even mounted on caster wheels and its solid as a rock. I should say it weighs about 150lbs and thats without a pile of lead on the bottom shelf.

Boxerglocker
04-21-2011, 21:48
Nice setup (and toolhead stand! :supergrin:). :cool:

Yeah, stole that stand from a GT reloading forum associate. See the box at the bottom that has RT1200 on it? That lives on it these days.

SFCSMITH(RET)
04-22-2011, 06:42
I tried working with a free and actually pretty nice computer desk. Just to wiggly. I took the top off, kept it, built a new base from 2x's.. Then built a shelf system.. I could put my safe on it now. I probably should take a picture...

EDIT: excuse the junk, we are finishing the basement, so lots of stuff and dust hanging out..lol

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/Bench2.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P4220001.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P4220002.jpg

GioaJack
04-22-2011, 11:00
There really is no trick in building a sturdy, efficient loading bench. This is evidenced by the fact that if I can do it pretty much anyone can. (I say 'pretty much anyone because we have to make allowances for people like Little Stevie and Wisky.)

If you take a look at SFCSMITH'S photo above you'll notice that he has concentrated on building a strong foundation which is the key to any strong bench.

Over the decades I have built many benches in a variety of configurations, my current room has four benches that line a bedroom walls. I have found one basic design to work very, very well and provide enough stability to mount as many presses and pieces of equipment that will physically fit on top of each bench.

After determining actual size, height, width, etc. I construct the top frame. This is done by crowning 2X4's and screwing two together side-by-side, not one on top of the other. This negates any chance of flexing caused by weight or press operation. If you plan on using a press with a deeper footprint a third 2X4 is easily scabbed onto the back of the forward frame to accommodate the bolt pattern.

I then install two more secured sets of 2x4's equally spaced between the front and rear frame. Depending on width of your bench you may need only one of these braces. Either way it provides enough strength and support to the yet to be installed top that it will never flex or move no matter what loading operation you are engaged in.

For the legs I use single 2X4's at each corner and an additional 2X4 at the mid-point of the bench both on the front and rear of the bench. If your bench is more than 8 feet long or so two support legs can be used, equally spaced on the front and rear.

I normally measure approximately 12 inches up from the floor and attach a second piece of 2X4 of that length to each corner leg and each support leg. This doubles the footprint of the legs where they contact the floor and provide a six-point, (or more) base for a shelf the size of the actual bench. Although many people prefer to use lag bolts to secure the frame I'm way too lazy for that and simply use long deck screws. If I have some of those nifty little sheet metal connectors used for securing angled wood together I use them. If I don't have any I don't worry about it... doesn't really seem to make any difference.

The final step in constructing the frame is to take short pieces of 2X4's and screw in stringers from the frame to the support 2X4's running lengthwise in the middle of the frame. This simply affords extra support and eliminates any possible flex.

Now that the frame is constructed all that is left is to secure the top and the bottom shelf. I prefer to use a two part top. First I screw down a sheet of the cheapest 3/4 inch plywood that I can find. If there happens to be a house under construction in the area without any nighttime security lights the wood turns out to be very inexpensive.

I secure the top with wood screws spaced every inch or two along the entire perimeter of the frame, along the horizontal supports and along the stringers. My choice for the finished to is a 3/4 inch piece of particle board. It's easy to work with, fairly simple to drill through for mounting various pieces of equipment and the slightly rough surface helps prevent small parts from rolling around. Those of you with a more feminine side, (Wisky, Wimpy Hand, Little Stevie, Norton, etc) may prefer a more esthetically pleasing finished top. I might point out however, we're building loading benches not pianos.

The final step is installing the bottom shelf, (again, I use particle board), but any ridged material can be used. Cut it to size, slip it over the top of the 12 inch high double legs and apply two deck screws down into the top of the legs. Go watch HBO, you're done.

There is no need, or reason to screw the bench into the wall or floor... it's not going to move or go anywhere. The installation of the bottom shelf actually provides two storage areas; the floor and the twelve inches (or what ever) of height to the bottom of the shelf and then the shelf itself.

I find it easiest to screw down some power strips to the rear of the top of the benches and one on the front middle support leg of each bench but if you're as handy as PCJim I guess you could run an actual junction box to each bench. If I tried that I'd end up burning the house to the ground.

To give you an idea of what a bench constructed like this will support; one of my benches has a 1050, a Co-Ax, two Star sizers, three tumblers, a RCBS Pro Melt furnace, all of my casting moulds, a couple multi-drawer small parts containers and at least three hundred pounds of cast bullets in various plastic bins. In addition to that weight my 185 pound son-in-law stood on the bench when he installed a range hood in the ceiling over the furnace.

That's how I build 'em, been doing it the same way for decades and nothing has fallen down yet.


Jack

Psychman
04-22-2011, 11:36
This is the biggest mistake people make. Spend some time and a bit of money on a very sturdy bench, and then add your reloading equipment. There should be NO movement at all of the bench. This will make your reloading much easier.

WiskyT
04-22-2011, 15:43
There really is no trick in building a sturdy, efficient loading bench. This is evidenced by the fact that if I can do it pretty much anyone can. (I say 'pretty much anyone because we have to make allowances for people like Little Stevie and Wisky.)

If you take a look at SFCSMITH'S photo above you'll notice that he has concentrated on building a strong foundation which is the key to any strong bench.

Over the decades I have built many benches in a variety of configurations, my current room has four benches that line a bedroom walls. I have found one basic design to work very, very well and provide enough stability to mount as many presses and pieces of equipment that will physically fit on top of each bench.

After determining actual size, height, width, etc. I construct the top frame. This is done by crowning 2X4's and screwing two together side-by-side, not one on top of the other. This negates any chance of flexing caused by weight or press operation. If you plan on using a press with a deeper footprint a third 2X4 is easily scabbed onto the back of the forward frame to accommodate the bolt pattern.

I then install two more secured sets of 2x4's equally spaced between the front and rear frame. Depending on width of your bench you may need only one of these braces. Either way it provides enough strength and support to the yet to be installed top that it will never flex or move no matter what loading operation you are engaged in.

For the legs I use single 2X4's at each corner and an additional 2X4 at the mid-point of the bench both on the front and rear of the bench. If your bench is more than 8 feet long or so two support legs can be used, equally spaced on the front and rear.

I normally measure approximately 12 inches up from the floor and attach a second piece of 2X4 of that length to each corner leg and each support leg. This doubles the footprint of the legs where they contact the floor and provide a six-point, (or more) base for a shelf the size of the actual bench. Although many people prefer to use lag bolts to secure the frame I'm way too lazy for that and simply use long deck screws. If I have some of those nifty little sheet metal connectors used for securing angled wood together I use them. If I don't have any I don't worry about it... doesn't really seem to make any difference.

The final step in constructing the frame is to take short pieces of 2X4's and screw in stringers from the frame to the support 2X4's running lengthwise in the middle of the frame. This simply affords extra support and eliminates any possible flex.

Now that the frame is constructed all that is left is to secure the top and the bottom shelf. I prefer to use a two part top. First I screw down a sheet of the cheapest 3/4 inch plywood that I can find. If there happens to be a house under construction in the area without any nighttime security lights the wood turns out to be very inexpensive.

I secure the top with wood screws spaced every inch or two along the entire perimeter of the frame, along the horizontal supports and along the stringers. My choice for the finished to is a 3/4 inch piece of particle board. It's easy to work with, fairly simple to drill through for mounting various pieces of equipment and the slightly rough surface helps prevent small parts from rolling around. Those of you with a more feminine side, (Wisky, Wimpy Hand, Little Stevie, Norton, etc) may prefer a more esthetically pleasing finished top. I might point out however, we're building loading benches not pianos.

The final step is installing the bottom shelf, (again, I use particle board), but any ridged material can be used. Cut it to size, slip it over the top of the 12 inch high double legs and apply two deck screws down into the top of the legs. Go watch HBO, you're done.

There is no need, or reason to screw the bench into the wall or floor... it's not going to move or go anywhere. The installation of the bottom shelf actually provides two storage areas; the floor and the twelve inches (or what ever) of height to the bottom of the shelf and then the shelf itself.

I find it easiest to screw down some power strips to the rear of the top of the benches and one on the front middle support leg of each bench but if you're as handy as PCJim I guess you could run an actual junction box to each bench. If I tried that I'd end up burning the house to the ground.

To give you an idea of what a bench constructed like this will support; one of my benches has a 1050, a Co-Ax, two Star sizers, three tumblers, a RCBS Pro Melt furnace, all of my casting moulds, a couple multi-drawer small parts containers and at least three hundred pounds of cast bullets in various plastic bins. In addition to that weight my 185 pound son-in-law stood on the bench when he installed a range hood in the ceiling over the furnace.

That's how I build 'em, been doing it the same way for decades and nothing has fallen down yet.


Jack

Holy crap! I didn't understand most of that. "Crowning"? That's what my kids did before they came all the way out.

WiskyT
04-22-2011, 15:49
This is a bench that even a Democrat could build. It is screwed to the wal with sheetrock screws and if you look at the bottom of the leg, you can see the srewhead that goes into the floor. All joints are made with sheetrock screws and lots of Elmer's.

http://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee460/Wiskyt/Untitled.jpg

GioaJack
04-22-2011, 15:50
How the hell have you survived as long as you have? :dunno:


Jack