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shotgunred
05-05-2011, 18:42
I bought a bicycle to help get into shape. Now that the weather is getting better I can’t even look at my bicycle without my four year old wanting to go along, As you can imagine it is not much of a workout when a four year old is riding her own bike with you. My solution was to buy a bicycle trailer. I thought a bicycle trailer makes sense for hauling a kid and working out. Also it could be real handy during SHTF.

When it is empty you don’t even notice the trailer on the bike. However when you have some weight back there it is another deal entirely. With my 40 pound daughter I dropped down two gears on level ground. Coming to any grade and it just got miserable. I just went on half of my normal route and I am whipped. Anyone who plans on using a bicycle or a bicycle and trailer better get used to riding it before they need to use it for real.

Lugi
05-05-2011, 19:14
I bought a bicycle to help get into shape. Now that the weather is getting better I can’t even look at my bicycle without my four year old wanting to go along, As you can imagine it is not much of a workout when a four year old is riding her own bike with you. My solution was to buy a bicycle trailer. I thought a bicycle trailer makes sense for hauling a kid and working out. Also it could be real handy during SHTF.

When it is empty you don’t even notice the trailer on the bike. However when you have some weight back there it is another deal entirely. With my 40 pound daughter I dropped down two gears on level ground. Coming to any grade and it just got miserable. I just went on half of my normal route and I am whipped. Anyone who plans on using a bicycle or a bicycle and trailer better get used to riding it before they need to use it for real.

Not for nothing but you should cherish these days....they don't last forever, my son is 16 and my daughter more or less ran away from home. Forget it. I think you'd move fast with a pack on your back...a trailer would most def slow ya down.

RWBlue
05-05-2011, 22:23
Like everything, there are positives and negatives.

A bicycle will kill those not use to it in short order. If you add a pack it is worse than adding a trailer.

This year I have been bicycling with camera equipment. This is hard on my body, but I am getting some good shots.

Additionally the devil is in the details. What trailer?

Mr.Pliskin
05-06-2011, 07:56
They also make a bike that clamps on to the back or yours. It has only one wheel and they can still peddle, its basically a regular kids bike without the fornt wheel that clamps on to the back of yours (couldnt figure out how to describe it). I cant seem to find it on google but I know they have them at Acedemy Sports.

cowboy1964
05-06-2011, 08:09
I still want a bike that can ride on train rails. You could cover serious ground quickly with that.

mac66
05-06-2011, 09:12
I had a bike trailer when the kids were small. Even used it one time (30 years ago) to haul gear on a 200 mile ride across the state.

Adding weight is a killer but it can be done with conditioning. I bet if the OP continued to pull that trailer he would be up to riding his regular route in about a month.

Bilbo Bagins
05-06-2011, 10:07
Much better than walking. You can hike 2 miles an hour , but even weighed down with a trailer you could probably average 10mph on a bike. There are quiet a few people who bicycle across America over the summer, using a trailer and/or panniers. All you need beyond the usual BOB stuff is inner tubes, pump, a repair kit, and maybe a tarp to protect your bike from rain when you stop for camp.

rich e
05-07-2011, 16:17
I'm too out of shape to go backpacking...But my Raliegh comfort bike with front and rear rack and panniers hauled 50 lbs of camping equipment,food and water 60-70 miles a couple years ago...We spent the weekend on the PA rails to trails...Awesome time..

Rich

PBCounty
05-07-2011, 17:53
I like the bike idea....and think it could come in handy for a lot of people. With my local off road terrain though that bike is gonna need 44" mudders. I can only assume that on the road travel is going to cross the vision of many other people who may be interested in what you have in your pack / trailer.

RWBlue
05-07-2011, 18:41
I like the bike idea....and think it could come in handy for a lot of people. With my local off road terrain though that bike is gonna need 44" mudders. I can only assume that on the road travel is going to cross the vision of many other people who may be interested in what you have in your pack / trailer.

It depends on the SHTF and your location.

You could have rode across DC or out of NYC with gold bricks just after 911 and no one would have F with you.

I would not have walked around NO with a backpack, let alone a on a bicycle.

G29Reload
05-07-2011, 18:44
Only if its a Tactical Trailer, painted in Khaki or Black. Check the 5.11 catalogue. :whistling:

IndianaMatt
05-07-2011, 21:54
I've always thought the bike concept as a bugout vehicle was a great one.

Most likely, any Long Emergency scenario will presumably involve a huge fossil fuel shortage.

For those of us that need to get somewhere in that situation, a bicycle may be the perfect conveyance: easy to store long-term, anyone can become a proficient bike mechanic with minimal training, can cover great distances if you are in shape, and can load a pretty decent amount of gear.

Best of all, fossil fuel independence!

rich e
05-07-2011, 23:29
On one weekend we probably did 50-60 miles total....Thats starting Saturday around noon and heading home Sunday around 5pm.....There were a couple hills that were just too steep to peddle with my loaded down bike...(we were temp. off the trails)...I would just push my bike until I crested the hill moving at hikers pace....

Then down the other side we would be cruising 15-18 mph....On the flats I average 7-10 mph....Slight uphill 6-8 mph....I could never hump a 50lb backpack no where near that distance..

My Raliegh was $350...Front and rear heavy duty racks $60.00...Both sets of panniers $80-90....One of the best investments I've ever made...

Rich

g27_mengi
11-15-2011, 19:47
I'm an avid cyclist, and a long-distance commuter who knows how worthless our highway systems are in a 'crisis' (an inch of snow, etc.). Thinking about buying a folding bike (Dahon, etc.) and tossing it in the car.

Akita
11-19-2011, 20:05
Worst possible case, you just walk alongside the bike. Beats the crap out of carrying the gear!

bdcochran
11-19-2011, 20:49
I purchased one of the game carts that is advertised from time to time. I went to a blacksmith and had him attach a collar to the cart that could in turn be fastened to any bicycle on the vertical portion under the seat. This gives a hauling capacity of a couple of hundred pounds. I don't know how to post pictures here, but if some one wants one, just shoot me an email address.

I have seen everything probably possible as I used to eat at a lunch counter on the main north - south route along the California coast.

One guy had two carts in tandem behind his bike. He travels up and down the coast on a permanent basis. Of course some people load the bikes up up with baskets, luggage carriers with expandable straps or haul baby strollers behind.

One guy my age has been riding around on his bicycle for over 37 years collecting bottles and cans for turn in.

Dexters
11-20-2011, 07:22
I don't know how to post pictures here, but if some one wants one, just shoot me an email address.

.

You can post a link.
http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Deer-Game-Hauler-Capacity/dp/B005DS7DPO/ref=pd_sim_sbs_sg_3/184-4198217-0293859

That is a smart piece of gear even without a bike.

UneasyRider
11-20-2011, 09:26
I'm an avid cyclist, and a long-distance commuter who knows how worthless our highway systems are in a 'crisis' (an inch of snow, etc.). Thinking about buying a folding bike (Dahon, etc.) and tossing it in the car.


Excellent idea.

pugman
11-20-2011, 09:37
I like the bike idea....and think it could come in handy for a lot of people. With my local off road terrain though that bike is gonna need 44" mudders. I can only assume that on the road travel is going to cross the vision of many other people who may be interested in what you have in your pack / trailer.

I'll ask.

Do they make a 44" tire for Mountain Bikes or is that a typo?

As for a bike, for a SHTF event, couple of things to keep in mind.

Do NOT buy a top of the line bike...heck even a nice bike for that matter. If you are talking a true SHTF event remember when you are riding it at any time someone could jack you and you could be leaving that nice $1,000 ride on the side of the road. Which brings up the second point.

Compared to walking, I would think you are much more vulnerable.

Third, take a hint from NYC messengers. Don't buy some Krypton lock which can be defeated with a pen....or even a cable lock. It will be heavy, but get yourself a nice 3-4' section of heavy duty Grade 80 chain and lock you can throw over your shoulder. You know darn well there will be people just walking around with a bolt cutter looking for stuff to take.

A bike is only worth as much as the chain used to keep in place.

RWBlue
11-20-2011, 09:47
Worst possible case, you just walk alongside the bike. Beats the crap out of carrying the gear!

Assuming we are riding on a road or normal bicycle path I totally agree.

If there is a need to go off road,......

UneasyRider
11-20-2011, 10:15
I'll ask.

Do they make a 44" tire for Mountain Bikes or is that a typo?

As for a bike, for a SHTF event, couple of things to keep in mind.

Do NOT buy a top of the line bike...heck even a nice bike for that matter. If you are talking a true SHTF event remember when you are riding it at any time someone could jack you and you could be leaving that nice $1,000 ride on the side of the road. Which brings up the second point.

Compared to walking, I would think you are much more vulnerable.

Third, take a hint from NYC messengers. Don't buy some Krypton lock which can be defeated with a pen....or even a cable lock. It will be heavy, but get yourself a nice 3-4' section of heavy duty Grade 80 chain and lock you can throw over your shoulder. You know darn well there will be people just walking around with a bolt cutter looking for stuff to take.

A bike is only worth as much as the chain used to keep in place.


In the first few hours I don't think that we will see too much panic in any but the very worst scenarios so you should be 30 miles away with proper motivation. :wow:

Dexters
11-20-2011, 11:42
Compared to walking, I would think you are much more vulnerable.



Why? And, by how much?

Dexters
11-20-2011, 11:46
Assuming we are riding on a road or normal bicycle path I totally agree.

If there is a need to go off road,......

Maybe the North Vietnamese should have been told this.


They might not have used bikes to transport supplies on the Ho Chi Min trail - can you get any more off road?.

RWBlue
11-20-2011, 12:36
Maybe the North Vietnamese should have been told this.

They might not have used bikes to transport supplies on the Ho Chi Min trail - can you get any more off road?.

How much off road, off trail bike riding have you done?

Based on my experience, the bicycle with trailer sucks when you get off road and off trail in the hills.

Now, if you want to move through the woods with several hundred of your friends you can certainly alter the area to transport goods, but even then it is easier to move a bicycle vs. move AND trailer.

Dexters
11-20-2011, 13:30
How much off road, off trail bike riding have you done?

Based on my experience, the bicycle with trailer sucks when you get off road and off trail in the hills.

Now, if you want to move through the woods with several hundred of your friends you can certainly alter the area to transport goods, but even then it is easier to move a bicycle vs. move AND trailer.

I've mountain biked last week in Fla, Last June/July in Colorado and in North GA - I live close by. What about you?

They suck compared to what?

How much weight are you carrying by bike alone vs bike with trailer vs only by backpack?

pugman
11-20-2011, 13:40
Why? And, by how much?

When you are riding a bike and say someone gets something into a tire...and you take a spill...you are out of commission for several seconds to possibly even knocked out. Yes, someone intent on getting you rather than the bike has just as much opportunity if you are walking but when riding you have speed against you.

When I've watched videos of someone on a bike gets jacked...what is usually their first response? Instinctively, they try and get back on the bike and get going again. Bad move

The other thing is when you ride a bike...you don't seem as aware of your surroundings since 1) things are moving past faster 2) you are concentrating on things like riding the bike, watching for other vehicles, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I bought a bike last summer with the sole intent of using if if something happens and gas hits $8.00/gallon; I can use it to ride to the store or whatever and save money.

Given no other choice would you rather walk or ride a bicycle through the L.A riots or post New Orleans Katrina. The bike's sole asset is speed. I just think it potentially makes you a target as well.

When the OP said SHTF I'm thinking long term

Now, can I mount a weapon on the bike? Now we are talking...:supergrin:

Dexters
11-20-2011, 13:57
When you are riding a bike and say someone gets something into a tire...and you take a spill...you are out of commission for several seconds to possibly even knocked out. Yes, someone intent on getting you rather than the bike has just as much opportunity if you are walking but when riding you have speed against you.

When I've watched videos of someone on a bike gets jacked...what is usually their first response? Instinctively, they try and get back on the bike and get going again. Bad move

The other thing is when you ride a bike...you don't seem as aware of your surroundings since 1) things are moving past faster 2) you are concentrating on things like riding the bike, watching for other vehicles, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I bought a bike last summer with the sole intent of using if if something happens and gas hits $8.00/gallon; I can use it to ride to the store or whatever and save money.

Given no other choice would you rather walk or ride a bicycle through the L.A riots or post New Orleans Katrina. The bike's sole asset is speed. I just think it potentially makes you a target as well.

When the OP said SHTF I'm thinking long term

Now, can I mount a weapon on the bike? Now we are talking...:supergrin:

As with most things in life - it is about balance and trade offs.

Waking with a 40 - 50 lb backpack a person can average 2 - 2.5/mph over 10 hrs

Biking - no game carrier - on a road packing 40 - 50 lbs a person can average 5 - 8/mph over 10 hrs

The bike gives you the option of pushing it, dropping it and adding more weight than a person with just a backpack can carry.

Both are exposed to surprise attack.

As the price of gas gets higher I think you will see more people walking to shopping centers with shopping carts like the ones below. You don't see too many of them now but they were big when I was young.


http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPM2751089502P?sid=IDx20101019x00001a&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=SPM197723403

Lone Kimono
11-20-2011, 14:46
I'm an avid cyclist, and a long-distance commuter who knows how worthless our highway systems are in a 'crisis' (an inch of snow, etc.). Thinking about buying a folding bike (Dahon, etc.) and tossing it in the car.

If that is the company that makes the folding military ones I have an in for a group buy.

RWBlue
11-20-2011, 14:49
I've mountain biked last week in Fla, Last June/July in Colorado and in North GA - I live close by. What about you?

They suck compared to what?

How much weight are you carrying by bike alone vs bike with trailer vs only by backpack?

Excellent, we can have an educated discussion. I have ridden in a half dozen different states and a couple countries.

I think you will agree that on the road/paved trail where there are no obstacles the bike will get you there much faster than on foot.

When you add a trailer, you add weight even if you haven't added any more gear. The trailers effect balance also. The type of trailer makes a big different in this respect. Some trailers have issues if you go fast.

Now go to a hard packed gravel, sand, dirt trail. The bike is still faster and easier on the body to move yourself and stuff. The trailer adds more drag as its tire(s) sink into the trail. The issues mentioned above for the trailer increase as the trail gets worse.

Now change the trail to sticky mud or sand and the bicycle could be a pain. The trailer is starts to become a burden. The bicycle can not be ridden so it is being pushed. The ergonomics of pushing a bicycle are not as good as the ergonomics of hiking the trail with a backpack.

So lets go back to the to the paved or gravel path and add some limbs across the path. Small stuff you can ride over with a mountain bike. Small stuff is more difficult to ride over with a trailer. For the larger stuff, we are back to not being able to ride. We are walking the bike. The ergonomics of pushing a bicycle are not as good as the ergonomics of hiking the trail with a backpack. Anything where you have to get off the bike and lift it over the obstacle is even more of a pain. If you have to lift the bike you now have to detach the trailer and lift it separately.

Now lets go off the trail. What do we find off trail? We have more soft soil, sticky mud, unpacked sand, large rocks, sticks and branches, and we add undergrowth. It can not be ridden unless the person want to crash often. The handle bars may or may not fit between the trees. The ergonomics of pushing a bicycle are not as good as the ergonomics of hiking the trail with a backpack. The undergrowth is getting hung up in the gears, spokes.... When the trailer is added, it may mean pushing the bike a little way and then coming back for the trailer.

I don't see a one solution to travel. Keep the options open.

RWBlue
11-20-2011, 14:58
As with most things in life - it is about balance and trade offs.

Waking with a 40 - 50 lb backpack a person can average 2 - 2.5/mph over 10 hrs

Biking - no game carrier - on a road packing 40 - 50 lbs a person can average 5 - 8/mph over 10 hrs

The bike gives you the option of pushing it, dropping it and adding more weight than a person with just a backpack can carry.

Both are exposed to surprise attack.

As the price of gas gets higher I think you will see more people walking to shopping centers with shopping carts like the ones below. You don't see too many of them now but they were big when I was young.
]

I see you have been typing while I have been typing.
Yes, exactly.

RWBlue
11-20-2011, 15:17
When you are riding a bike and say someone gets something into a tire...and you take a spill...you are out of commission for several seconds to possibly even knocked out. Yes, someone intent on getting you rather than the bike has just as much opportunity if you are walking but when riding you have speed against you.

The other thing is when you ride a bike...you don't seem as aware of your surroundings since 1) things are moving past faster 2) you are concentrating on things like riding the bike, watching for other vehicles, etc.

Given no other choice would you rather walk or ride a bicycle through the L.A riots or post New Orleans Katrina. The bike's sole asset is speed. I just think it potentially makes you a target as well.


Speed works for you on the bike. You are a harder target to shoot. Your first paragraph really makes no sense.

I became one with my bike when I was riding on a regular basis. I can speed up or slow down. I could ride into a situation very slowly and ride away fast if there was an ambush. It is not as good as a car, but much better than on foot.

I would much rather ride out of LA riots or Post N.O. vs. walk.

Akita
11-20-2011, 19:48
Assuming we are riding on a road or normal bicycle path I totally agree.

If there is a need to go off road,......
Depending on how bad off road you mean, of course. If a bike and trailer can go there, its always easier to push it than carry the gear. At least at my age it is.

RWBlue
02-14-2014, 21:58
Bumping a thread out of the past.

Depending on how bad off road you mean, of course. If a bike and trailer can go there, its always easier to push it than carry the gear. At least at my age it is.

It depends.

If going across a surface which pushing is difficult, I found myself carrying my bicycle and gear. Since a bicycle is not designed to be carried, this makes life more difficult than just carrying the gear. Then you add a trailer which means you have two trips.

If going across a surface where you can not ride, but you can walk. This isn't bad for the first mile, but then you are pushing across the bike which wears you down more than if you were just pushing from behind.

Now just for fun, assume you come to a locked fence. Now you either have the strength to pick up a loaded bike and gear and lift it over OR you find yourself taking everything off and lifting it over and then putting everything back.

BTW, Just a reminder. I enjoy riding. I did the tour camping along the way. It is great and not so great. I suggest anyone who wants to tour get on the GAP or C&O and try it out. Learn what works and what doesn't.

g27_mengi
02-15-2014, 15:57
A thread worth reviving. If only to remind ourselves that non-gas alternatives are always worth owning—and mastering. I continue to encourage folks around me to get a good bike fitting, and use that bike. Enjoy it. 'Cause on the day you might need it for some... alternate situation, it will be as familiar as tying your boots.

I'm currently building a Surly ECR, a new offering from them that's built for road and offroad. Check it out at Surly's site: www.surlybikes.com

RWBlue
02-15-2014, 16:47
A thread worth reviving. If only to remind ourselves that non-gas alternatives are always worth owning—and mastering. I continue to encourage folks around me to get a good bike fitting, and use that bike. Enjoy it. 'Cause on the day you might need it for some... alternate situation, it will be as familiar as tying your boots.


Assuming I stay in my current AO, I am thinking of getting a BikeFriday to take with me all the time. It wouldn't be a full on bug out bike, but it would get me home.

Additionally, the biggest issue with public transportation is the last mile. This would take care of the last mile, even in a suit and tie.

Cullen Bohannon
02-15-2014, 17:13
Not for nothing but you should cherish these days....they don't last forever, my son is 16 and my daughter more or less ran away from home. Forget it. I think you'd move fast with a pack on your back...a trailer would most def slow ya down.

Yes. Cherish these days, and earn your fatherhood. Watching football and hugging or kissing your offspring, as he/she heads off to Scouts/sports practice/dance class is NOT raising your child. Taking active participation (preferably...Directectly...IS raising your child). Cherish it and earn it. Please - for your child's sake. :-)

Aceman
02-16-2014, 18:39
You know, I had never really considered the BOBike. That said, having been out in the wild with Deputy Dave a couple of time's, I'm a fan!!!!

I rode full pack a couple of times and while it definitely limited situational awareness somewhat, and had a different set of pain than walking associated with it, I am now convinced that it IS an excellent alternate form of transport and should be considered.

Dep Dave used a trailer. This might not be so good, depending. Weight, stability, etc...All issues to consider.

I think, for me, the basic bike is the way to go. I'll pass on the trailer. IF I went trailer, I'd go with one of those little baby buggies.

There were also a couple of crashes. Get your trailer technique down under load! And you teamster/loading skills too.

I'd love to have the bikes on the BOVehicle. 5 bikes might not be reasonable though.

g27_mengi
02-16-2014, 19:45
You know, I had never really considered the BOBike. That said, having been out in the wild with Deputy Dave a couple of time's, I'm a fan!!!!

I rode full pack a couple of times and while it definitely limited situational awareness somewhat, and had a different set of pain than walking associated with it, I am now convinced that it IS an excellent alternate form of transport and should be considered.

Dep Dave used a trailer. This might not be so good, depending. Weight, stability, etc...All issues to consider.

I think, for me, the basic bike is the way to go. I'll pass on the trailer. IF I went trailer, I'd go with one of those little baby buggies.

There were also a couple of crashes. Get your trailer technique down under load! And you teamster/loading skills too.

I'd love to have the bikes on the BOVehicle. 5 bikes might not be reasonable though.

The older I get, and the more I 'bikepack', the less I need. So I agree with your hunch about the trailer. I owned one years ago, but sold it. If I'm down to a bicycle, I want to be as nimble as possible, so frame bag systems like those offered by Porcelain Rocket and others are my choice.

Whatever that's worth.

glockout
02-16-2014, 20:23
We are bike and motorcycle riders. Mostly off road but ride on road too. About 10 years ago I used to ride over 340 miles in a day in competition.

Don't go that far anymore. I built a trailer about 10 years ago and another bigger trailer later.
Here is my big trailer.
http://veloliner.com/trailer/bigtrailerfirstrun.JPG
and a run with fire wood with my motorbike.
http://veloliner.com/trailer/woodtrlrnet.JPG

callihan_44
02-17-2014, 05:28
best way to get into shape for a bike ride with extra weight, ride the hell out of the bike...Ive done a few rails to trails trips with 30lbs of extra gear on my bike on soft gravel and I found the best way to increase endurance was just put in the miles, I tried incorporating more weight lifting with my legs and that really didn't seem to do much for riding endurance.

Deputydave
02-17-2014, 06:24
I'll second what Aceman stated. We used the bike & trailer back in December at the second SEP gathering. I made a few mistakes; first the trailer was a bit overloaded. Second, the trailer tires weren't properly inflated. And lastly, the angle in which it was attached to the bike was wrong.

All self-correcting errors as that thing shooting out my left ear was my spleen on the way out to the remote site. I unloaded some unnecessary weight, pumped up the tires and adjusted the angle. On the way back it was a LOT easier riding.

Having said all that, like Aceman, my first choice when biking would be sans trailer and just the pack on my back and whatever I fit on the rack on the back of the bike.

But yes, imo the bike (and/or trailer) is a good prep idea. It is situational. Some scenarios it could be a blessing and in some it could be a bad idea. But better to have (and be proficient with) and not need it than to need it and you're stuck with the shoe leather express.

Wet Dog
02-17-2014, 07:42
A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k542/WhitSpurzon/Bikes/009-2.jpg (http://s1115.photobucket.com/user/WhitSpurzon/media/Bikes/009-2.jpg.html)

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.

g27_mengi
02-17-2014, 07:47
A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k542/WhitSpurzon/Bikes/009-2.jpg (http://s1115.photobucket.com/user/WhitSpurzon/media/Bikes/009-2.jpg.html)

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.

Love that. Way to improvise/adapt.

RWBlue
02-17-2014, 11:27
best way to get into shape for a bike ride with extra weight, ride the hell out of the bike...Ive done a few rails to trails trips with 30lbs of extra gear on my bike on soft gravel and I found the best way to increase endurance was just put in the miles, I tried incorporating more weight lifting with my legs and that really didn't seem to do much for riding endurance.

I found weight lifting should allow me to ride in a higher gear.

But if you want to go long range, you need to ride long range.

RWBlue
02-17-2014, 11:32
A while back I found a trail-a-bike at a garage sale inexpensively and rigged it into a cargo hauler.

This is the mark 1 version;
http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k542/WhitSpurzon/Bikes/009-2.jpg (http://s1115.photobucket.com/user/WhitSpurzon/media/Bikes/009-2.jpg.html)

It works very well and is capable of hauling a lot of weight. I (over 200 pounds) have even been pulled in it. My main use for it was hauling water up to our camping spot but have since found it useful for packing tools and even game quarters.

I'm currently testing a Mark 2 version.

A bike is a valuable asset. Those that have traveled in 3rd world countries can attest to its value and usefulness to those unable to afford cars or in areas where roads are so bad cars really aren't practical.

That wood look heavy.

If I had that, and I could weld....I am thinking some aluminum tubing would be good in making a rack. I would do it so it works with standard bags AND some attachment points for non-bicycle bags.

IF you could go wide..a fold down flat to put rubber made tubs on.

g27_mengi
02-17-2014, 11:50
That wood look heavy.

If I had that, and I could weld....I am thinking some aluminum tubing would be good in making a rack. I would do it so it works with standard bags AND some attachment points for non-bicycle bags.

IF you could go wide..a fold down flat to put rubber made tubs on.


Surly Bicycles figured this all out with the Big Dummy that was launched in 2008. I built one of the first, and sold it, but now I miss that hard-working monster and want to build another.

Do a Google search for "Surly Big Dummy" and you'll see that this platform is not a fly-by-night fad. People dig the functionality, to the point where they use it to haul their kids, move furniture, etc. Add "The Goat" to that same Google search and you'll find pictures of my build.

RWBlue
02-17-2014, 12:02
Surly Bicycles figured this all out with the Big Dummy that was launched in 2008. I built one of the first, and sold it, but now I miss that hard-working monster and want to build another.

Do a Google search for "Surly Big Dummy" and you'll see that this platform is not a fly-by-night fad. People dig the functionality, to the point where they use it to haul their kids, move furniture, etc. Add "The Goat" to that same Google search and you'll find pictures of my build.

Yep, seen those.

Right now, I could do a hotel trip with just the bags on the bike OR I can take all the camping gear I need on a trailer.

I could hall wood or other stuff on the trailer, BUT...the heavier the load, the harder it is to go...

g27_mengi
02-17-2014, 12:11
Yep, seen those.

Right now, I could do a hotel trip with just the bags on the bike OR I can take all the camping gear I need on a trailer.

Ha! So true!

Hey, I didn't say it was cheap. :whistling:

Part of the reason I sold the Goat was due to it's overall bulk. Granted, it was a remarkably able bicycle, and guys have raced these, but you won't find a committed Big Dummy race scene happening. If you do, I'll argue that those cats have way too much free time.

Anyway, I came back to a normal wheelbase for it's more nimble nature, and its ability to blend in. The Big Dummy is a head snapper on the street. In a serious situation, I'd rather hide smaller chunks of critically needed things in common bags on a common bike, than parade my stuff on a odd magnet like the Dummy.

And if it's really serious, trying to move anything of perceived value—even simple, unmarked panniers—out in the open is gonna be tough.

FWIW, my latest set of bike panniers include one bag with a backpack option, in case I have to grab one bag off the bike and run.

Aceman
02-17-2014, 12:16
I used to bike tour when I was younger. I had panniers etc. to totally load my bike. For SHTF purposes though, I think a basic rack and a handlebar bag would be good.

Easy to load up that wagon with wayyyy more than you really want to haul.

RWBlue
02-17-2014, 13:09
Part of the reason I sold the Goat was due to it's overall bulk. Granted, it was a remarkably able bicycle, and guys have raced these, but you won't find a committed Big Dummy race scene happening. If you do, I'll argue that those cats have way too much free time.

Let start off with I am old and slow, but.....

For those young and in shape...I always thought a rally race style would be interesting. People pack up all their crap, have start times, have finish times, and do long distance tour racing.

For extra excitement, you can add some of us old slow people to the path and camp.

g27_mengi
02-17-2014, 13:47
Let start off with I am old and slow, but.....

For those young and in shape...I always thought a rally race style would be interesting. People pack up all their crap, have start times, have finish times, and do long distance tour racing.

For extra excitement, you can add some of us old slow people to the path and camp.

I like it. And while I may not be in the same old/slow category, I'm old enough to prefer slower company. We can enjoy the ride while the two-wheel "Death Race 2000" blazes past. Besides, too fast and we'll spill our popcorn.

Wet Dog
02-17-2014, 14:08
You are almost describing Randonneuring. It's basically touring with a time limit. There are Bicycle and Equipment requirements too.

If you manage to make it through the qualifying 'Brevets' you can enter and ride the pinnacle of the sports Brevets; Paris-Brest-Paris, 1200 kilometers in 90 hours.

Wet Dog
02-17-2014, 14:46
I did a little touring last year on a converted mountain bike. Covering 60-80 miles in a day and being fully self contained (camping) wasn't that difficult. I have a water filter but didn't need to use it. I was able to average about 12 mph in hilly terrain.

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k542/WhitSpurzon/Bikes/001_zps82485505.jpg (http://s1115.photobucket.com/user/WhitSpurzon/media/Bikes/001_zps82485505.jpg.html)

http://i1115.photobucket.com/albums/k542/WhitSpurzon/Bikes/1-001_zps41e5f280.jpg (http://s1115.photobucket.com/user/WhitSpurzon/media/Bikes/1-001_zps41e5f280.jpg.html)

Aceman
02-17-2014, 20:27
12-15 mph loaded was about right. 20-25 on a road bike clean.

But a day could easily move you ~90 miles. 30/45 before lunch, 30 after, and 10-30 before dark.

Again, lighter is better, fit is better, water is key; But that's any prepping!

Berto
02-17-2014, 21:29
Not an expert by any means so far as Bug out options, but WRT to carrying crap on a bike in a wide range of conditions, I find it easiest to carry as much on your person as possible vs using a trailer or loading the bike.
I ride a bunch, used to race XC in the 90s and have tried panniers/low riders and HB packs (heavy touring) and that's about the most I'd ever want to tote in any real riding situation, esp if mixing dirt into the picture. The more weight you can bear in a pack or mess bag, the more able to handle mixed terrain you'll be.