Storing Rice and Beans - Long Term [Archive] - Glock Talk

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UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 17:21
I put another 300 pounnds of rice and 80 pounds of beans into long term storage today. It's scary how easy it is with the right tools and good technique to zip through the process of long term storage. I had a great time of it and it feels so good to put it away. Anybody else really enjoy doing your own storage?

dogchild
05-11-2011, 17:29
I would be interested in what is required for long term , i always thought they would store without any special preparation.

HotRoderX
05-11-2011, 17:31
I would be interested in what is required for long term , i always thought they would store without any special preparation.


+1 I thought it just needed to be air tight and dry

pilsbury
05-11-2011, 17:41
We use mylar bags in plastic 5 gal buckets with Gamma lids. We pull a vacuum on it, throw in a couple of oxygen absorbers and heat seal the bag.

AlphaTea
05-11-2011, 18:25
I put another 300 pounnds of rice and 80 pounds of beans into long term storage today. It's scary how easy it is with the right tools and good technique to zip through the process of long term storage. I had a great time of it and it feels so good to put it away. Anybody else really enjoy doing your own storage?

was that 11 or 12 buckets?

TangoFoxtrot
05-11-2011, 18:25
I put another 300 pounnds of rice and 80 pounds of beans into long term storage today. It's scary how easy it is with the right tools and good technique to zip through the process of long term storage. I had a great time of it and it feels so good to put it away. Anybody else really enjoy doing your own storage?

WOW!:wow: Another 300 lbs???? How much rice you got stored?

UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 19:01
I would be interested in what is required for long term , i always thought they would store without any special preparation.

For best results I use a 5 gallon bucket with a 20 X 30 mylar bag inside it. Once it is full I use a hot jaw clamp on "hi" to seal across the top of the bag from seam to seam leaving about 8 inches open. Once I have done that to all of my bags I toss an oxygen absorber into each one then I seal the bags the rest of the way.

Having no oxygen means no bacteria or bugs can live inside the bag, the bucket keeps out any insects or rodents that could chew their way through the bag and also keeps out light which would heat up the food and decrease it's life expectancy.

UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 19:09
was that 11 or 12 buckets?

No it was 10 five gallon buckets, 8 for rice and 2 for beans. The rice was a perfect fit and I had about 4 pounds of beans left over for immediate use. I like brown rice best so I like the fact that I can store 6 bags of 50 pounds each from Sams with none left over.

I would have needed 11 to store all of the beans but I didn't want to store such a small amount of them, good guess.

phil evans
05-11-2011, 19:25
I like brown rice best so I like the fact that I can store 6 bags of 50 pounds each from Sams with none left over.

how long can you expect brown rice to last and not go rancid?

UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 19:30
WOW!:wow: Another 300 lbs???? How much rice you got stored?

Not enough! This is my second time doing 300 pounds of rice from Sams and I plan on storing a lot more. Keeping it indoors in the low 70 degrees I am confident that my rice, wheat and beans will outlive me if I don't need them. It gives me that warm fuzzy feeling just knowing that my family will eat in the event of an interuption of food distribution.

These foods provide lot's of calories for very little money, I really like having them in my inventory. :cool:

UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 19:38
how long can you expect brown rice to last and not go rancid?

I don't store brown rice for just that reason but I really like it and that is what we buy to eat day to day. White rice is ok if I can't have brown so I store it but am glad not to have any white left over so I don't have to eat it until I need it.

jdavionic
05-11-2011, 19:39
good post...tagged for info

dogchild
05-11-2011, 19:54
For best results I use a 5 gallon bucket with a 20 X 30 mylar bag inside it. Once it is full I use a hot jaw clamp on "hi" to seal across the top of the bag from seam to seam leaving about 8 inches open. Once I have done that to all of my bags I toss an oxygen absorber into each one then I seal the bags the rest of the way.

Having no oxygen means no bacteria or bugs can live inside the bag, the bucket keeps out any insects or rodents that could chew their way through the bag and also keeps out light which would heat up the food and decrease it's life expectancy.

Thank you very much for the reply.

UneasyRider
05-11-2011, 20:39
Thank you very much for the reply.

No problem. One thing that I did not mention is that the oxygen absorbers need to be used quickly and then any extra need to be stored in an enclosed container. You can use a mason jar but I use a heavy bag and an 8 inch bag clamp. I buy these in large packs because it's cheaper so saving the unused ones is important to me. They come with a pink "pill" that changes color when it has absorbed it's fill of oxygen telling you that your absorbers are bad so it's pretty hard to screw up.

M1A Shooter
05-11-2011, 21:00
ifollow the same method as uneasyrider stated. 5G buckets from the wal-mart bakery and 20x30" mylar bags with 2000cc O2 obsorbers. i store white rice, flour, split peas, great northern beans, small red beans, and macaroni this way. i store sugar in buckets as well but only seal it in mylar with no obsorbers.

im on my way to dehydrating frozen corn and peas to store this way as well. when dehydrated, should be able to get the equivilent of 75-80lbs of frozen veggies in each bucket. probably going to do some potato dices or shreds as well but we will see. still trying to perfect my dehydrating.

UneasyRider
05-12-2011, 07:09
ifollow the same method as uneasyrider stated. 5G buckets from the wal-mart bakery and 20x30" mylar bags with 2000cc O2 obsorbers. i store white rice, flour, split peas, great northern beans, small red beans, and macaroni this way. i store sugar in buckets as well but only seal it in mylar with no obsorbers.

im on my way to dehydrating frozen corn and peas to store this way as well. when dehydrated, should be able to get the equivilent of 75-80lbs of frozen veggies in each bucket. probably going to do some potato dices or shreds as well but we will see. still trying to perfect my dehydrating.

I like your post, it's a good time isn't it. I drop a dessicant in with my baking supplies, salt and sugar just in a 5 gallon bucket with no bag. Of course I labled everything with item and date stored for later. I would like to do some pasta and the potatoes, let me know how the spuds turn out please.

TangoFoxtrot
05-12-2011, 18:27
Not enough! This is my second time doing 300 pounds of rice from Sams and I plan on storing a lot more. Keeping it indoors in the low 70 degrees I am confident that my rice, wheat and beans will outlive me if I don't need them. It gives me that warm fuzzy feeling just knowing that my family will eat in the event of an interuption of food distribution.

These foods provide lot's of calories for very little money, I really like having them in my inventory. :cool:

Next month I start my storage.

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-12-2011, 19:32
Ahh yes.. the beauty of buckets and mylar..

25 buckets make their way home..

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/buckets.jpg

we are working on 175 buckets of dry storage..

we store rice, black beans, pintos, lentils, wheat(s), corn, popcorn, sugar, brown sugar and rolled oats in buckets.

UneasyRider
05-12-2011, 19:53
Next month I start my storage.

Good for you! Check this out and if you have any questions let me know, it's really easy if you know what to buy and how to use it.


I fill up the bag and then bounce it up and down several times to settle the food.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/food-storage-bag.jpg

This guy is putting his oxygen absorbers in before clamping part of the seal. I think that it is better to clamp most of each of your bags and then to insert oxygen absorbers all of your to minimize oxygen absorber exposure to the air.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/food-storage-buckets.jpg

This is how I set up the bags before I put in the oxygen absorbers, I leave a little wider opening. This way I just make a last clamp or two and am done quick.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/clamp-sealer.jpg

Then in the last photo you make the final seal. It's important to fold the bag down and get as much air out as possible.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/disaster-preparation.jpg

Once you put your O2 absorbers into each of your bags you need to seal the extras up pronto in a small jar or a heavy plastic bag like they come in. I use the hot jaw clamp on the bag and it works.

This guy could put more rice in his bucket, I would. The picture is of a hot jaw clamp, 5 gallon buckets and a 20x30 mylar bag (probably a 4.6) since it's going into a bucket and 1,500 to 2,000 oxygen absorbers.

Lot's of options and info here:
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/longtermfoodstorage.html

M1A Shooter
05-12-2011, 19:55
I like your post, it's a good time isn't it. I drop a dessicant in with my baking supplies, salt and sugar just in a 5 gallon bucket with no bag. Of course I labled everything with item and date stored for later. I would like to do some pasta and the potatoes, let me know how the spuds turn out please.

so far ive done a 2lb bag of frozen dices on my dehydrator and then vacuum sealed it. it shrank down to about 2 cups or there about. i ate one of them straight out of the dehydrator and it had the consistancy of a potato chip but tasted like raw potato. i placed a spoon full of them in a bowl of boiling water to sit and it popped right back up to normal potato diced consistancy. i will be doing this again probably this weekend on ascale large enough to cook hashbrowns for breakfast. will give teh final thumbs up then. ive stored quite a few lbs of instant mashed potatoes but this seems to be similar and have closer results to tasting like real potatoes. frozen veggies can be fairly cheap as well if you shop around.

UneasyRider
05-12-2011, 19:58
Ahh yes.. the beauty of buckets and mylar..

25 buckets make their way home..

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/buckets.jpg

we are working on 175 buckets of dry storage..

we store rice, black beans, pintos, lentils, wheat(s), corn, popcorn, sugar, brown sugar and rolled oats in buckets.

You are the man! That's a lot of food, "If things get bad I'm going to your house". :whistling:

FatBoy
05-12-2011, 20:48
Good for you! Check this out and if you have any questions let me know, it's really easy if you know what to buy and how to use it.


I fill up the bag and then bounce it up and down several times to settle the food.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/food-storage-bag.jpg

This guy is putting his oxygen absorbers in before clamping part of the seal. I think that it is better to clamp most of each of your bags and then to insert oxygen absorbers all of your to minimize oxygen absorber exposure to the air.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/food-storage-buckets.jpg

This is how I set up the bags before I put in the oxygen absorbers, I leave a little wider opening. This way I just make a last clamp or two and am done quick.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/clamp-sealer.jpg

Then in the last photo you make the final seal. It's important to fold the bag down and get as much air out as possible.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/images08/disaster-preparation.jpg

Once you put your O2 absorbers into each of your bags you need to seal the extras up pronto in a small jar or a heavy plastic bag like they come in. I use the hot jaw clamp on the bag and it works.

This guy could put more rice in his bucket, I would. The picture is of a hot jaw clamp, 5 gallon buckets and a 20x30 mylar bag (probably a 4.6) since it's going into a bucket and 1,500 to 2,000 oxygen absorbers.

Lot's of options and info here:
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/longtermfoodstorage.html


The jaw clamp you have...Is that the one that costs around $115?? Is it really better then just using an Iron and a 2x4?

FB

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-13-2011, 05:58
The jaw clamp you have...Is that the one that costs around $115?? Is it really better then just using an Iron and a 2x4?

FB

You weren't asking me, but I can give at least "an" answer. We use an iron, the guy actually in that pic I posted helping unload buckets uses a sealer like that in the later pics. He has never had a seal failure in the 3 years since he started, we just went through his buckets a couple weeks ago before/while moving all his buckets to a new storage area. In the years I have been buying in bulk, I also have never opened a bucket and found evidence of a failed seal. I am getting ready to consolidate my buckets into 1 basement room, and *may* check them all for giggles.

I think there is no time or effort advantage in either method, if you want to spend the money for the sealer, it doesn't hurt a thing to have it. We were actually talking the other day that when we do our bucket run this weekend we may try to video doing them both ways, and post it up on you tube.

UneasyRider
05-13-2011, 06:32
The jaw clamp you have...Is that the one that costs around $115?? Is it really better then just using an Iron and a 2x4?

FB

I paid closer to $145 for it but I have seen it for less and I think that it is the only one that I have seen. Mine has a high/low switch on it.

Yes it is better than an iron and a board because it makes a 5/16" seam that is ridged about 5 times and it is very quick and easy to use. I watched all of the youtubes including the iron and the board before deciding what I felt was best and I am sure that they both seal well but the hot jaw clamp is faster and easier. That means that you will enjoy your work and your o2 absorbers will be sealed in much quicker meaning that they will work better. 6 bags of rice takes one person an hour start to finish with the clamp, you will like it.

Like SFC Smith said above they will both work. I think that the clamp is a bit better and easy to use.

Lowdown3
05-13-2011, 07:39
www.bucketpacking.com

is the original video we did 5 or so years ago showing how to pack buckets.

http://www.survivalandpreparednessforum.com/showthread.php?1149-DIY-food-storage-basics-ask-questions-get-answers-etc.

Common questions answered.

Good luck!

Lowdown3

kirgi08
05-13-2011, 08:24
WOW!:wow: Another 300 lbs???? How much rice you got stored?

He's got a lot of catching up ta do.'08. :whistling:

UneasyRider
05-13-2011, 10:01
He's got a lot of catching up ta do.'08. :whistling:

Me too. I have a lot put back but I can't help but feel like it's not going to be enough so I keep going. My relatives are involved heavily now too, both local and in Maine and Louisiana.

I have had that "This is it" feeling for a while now so the push is on very hard in my world kirgi.

UneasyRider
05-13-2011, 10:47
www.bucketpacking.com

is the original video we did 5 or so years ago showing how to pack buckets.

http://www.survivalandpreparednessforum.com/showthread.php?1149-DIY-food-storage-basics-ask-questions-get-answers-etc.

Common questions answered.

Good luck!

Lowdown3

Is that you? I watched those a couple of times when I was trying to figure out the basic concept of what was going on and how I could do it, they helped me a lot. Thanks.

1 old 0311
05-13-2011, 13:12
WOW!:wow: Another 300 lbs???? How much rice you got stored?



Must be expecting Hong Kong for dinner.:rofl::rofl::rofl:

Lowdown3
05-13-2011, 14:41
Is that you? I watched those a couple of times when I was trying to figure out the basic concept of what was going on and how I could do it, they helped me a lot. Thanks.

Glad you found it helpful. We ran a mid size commercial cannery for two years in 98 and 99 so I have a "little" experience in packing food :whistling:

quake
05-13-2011, 17:36
Must be expecting Hong Kong for dinner.:rofl::rofl::rofl:

300 pounds sounds like a lot, but it goes faster than it sounds like it might, when actually using it. That's probably(?) 125-150 meals for a family of five; or 2-3 months at two meals a day..? May be off some, but probably not too far. It's a bunch, but not anywhere near lunatic-fringe-land imo. :supergrin:

Then again, everyone's definition of lunatic fringe is different & subjective. I know people that I think are "out there" prep-wise, but I also know there are people who think I'm "out there"; who's to say who's right... :dunno:

UneasyRider
05-13-2011, 19:44
300 pounds sounds like a lot, but it goes faster than it sounds like it might, when actually using it. That's probably(?) 125-150 meals for a family of five; or 2-3 months at two meals a day..? May be off some, but probably not too far. It's a bunch, but not anywhere near lunatic-fringe-land imo. :supergrin:

Then again, everyone's definition of lunatic fringe is different & subjective. I know people that I think are "out there" prep-wise, but I also know there are people who think I'm "out there"; who's to say who's right... :dunno:

I think of myself as a piker when it comes right down to it. I am going to do another 300 pounds of rice this week, plus 25 gallons of black beans. A family member bought a mill so we are going to be doing some wheat once we find a good source for it. And I still don't have a hand pump well in... so I have a long way to go and I don't know if I will have enough time to do it all.

greatwun
05-13-2011, 20:26
just a quick question, about how many pounds of rice will fill a 5 gallon buckets?

M1A Shooter
05-13-2011, 20:27
i think i got 30-35lbs in a walmart 5gallon icing bucket iirc.

greatwun
05-13-2011, 20:36
thanks, good to know

UneasyRider
05-13-2011, 20:41
just a quick question, about how many pounds of rice will fill a 5 gallon buckets?

I bought 6 fifty pound bags of white rice at Sams for $20 per bag. This all fit into 8 five gallon buckets. So that would be what, 300 divided by 8 which is about 37.5 pounds of rice.

M1A Shooter
05-13-2011, 20:49
someone mentioned food grade buckets availibl at walmart for 2 bucks and change. are these in the hardware section? looking for a more dependable way to stock more buckets. i have to basically keep hounding the bakery for their 2/day that they are supposed to recycle now.

greatwun
05-13-2011, 20:57
someone mentioned food grade buckets availibl at walmart for 2 bucks and change. are these in the hardware section? looking for a more dependable way to stock more buckets. i have to basically keep hounding the bakery for their 2/day that they are supposed to recycle now.

Ive seen these in the paint section however Im not sure if they are food grade. Even if there not I dont think it would matter much if your are using mylar bags inside the buckets.

kirgi08
05-13-2011, 21:21
Remember folks,you may havta haul them buckets.I prefer the smaller ones for heavier grains and the 5ga ones for pasta ect.'08.

:woohoo: 15k.

FatBoy
05-13-2011, 23:48
Thanks for the info on the "clamper" guys. I was looking at this one... http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HO30TE/ref=s9_simh_co_p236_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=left-2&pf_rd_r=14PJ9HNYGBVY05QX3MM3&pf_rd_t=3201&pf_rd_p=1280661782&pf_rd_i=typ01

I have some white rice stored in #10 cans from the LDS, but I really like Jasmine rice better. Do you guys know if Jasmine has the same storage time as LG white rice? If so I'll grab some bags from SAm's and put some of that away in 5gal/mylar.

FB

UneasyRider
05-14-2011, 07:19
someone mentioned food grade buckets availibl at walmart for 2 bucks and change. are these in the hardware section? looking for a more dependable way to stock more buckets. i have to basically keep hounding the bakery for their 2/day that they are supposed to recycle now.

If you don't mind spending $7 with a lid for a new one http://beprepared.com/ has a great policy of $12 maximum shipping. So if you order 30 pails and a 55 gallon water barrel your shipping is still only $12.

UneasyRider
05-14-2011, 07:23
Thanks for the info on the "clamper" guys. I was looking at this one... http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HO30TE/ref=s9_simh_co_p236_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=left-2&pf_rd_r=14PJ9HNYGBVY05QX3MM3&pf_rd_t=3201&pf_rd_p=1280661782&pf_rd_i=typ01

I have some white rice stored in #10 cans from the LDS, but I really like Jasmine rice better. Do you guys know if Jasmine has the same storage time as LG white rice? If so I'll grab some bags from SAm's and put some of that away in 5gal/mylar.

FB


Good deal, that's the same one that I bought for $145.

AlphaTea
05-14-2011, 17:14
I have used a "clamper" and it works just great, however a cheap clothes iron from Walmart and a short piece of 2X4 works just as well.

emt1581
05-14-2011, 18:53
Man I gotta get on this rice, beans, and flour storage thing...I'm seriously lacking with food. I have enough for maybe a few months but I've been working mostly on CANNED goods.

But I admire ya uneasy...600lbs.+ of rice and beans...you're good to go for a few years with that! I'll get there one day. ;)

-Emt1581

UneasyRider
05-14-2011, 21:16
Man I gotta get on this rice, beans, and flour storage thing...I'm seriously lacking with food. I have enough for maybe a few months but I've been working mostly on CANNED goods.

But I admire ya uneasy...600lbs.+ of rice and beans...you're good to go for a few years with that! I'll get there one day. ;)

-Emt1581

Watch out for flour EMT, from what I have read there is little that we can do to preserve its life. As I understand it wheat will last just about forever and you just need a small grinder/mill to make it into flour. This is one of the easiest things that you will ever do... and it's cheap too. I have more money in my good rifles than in all of this long term food supply and it will be more valuable to me the way that I see it. I hope that you give it a try.

I had plenty of canned food and no long term foods until recently when I ordered hot jaw clamp that a relative wanted to give me for my birthday then bought pails, bags etc. and started bringing home rice and beans from Sams. I spent a lot of time watching youtube videos and reading to make sure that I understood what I was doing. It's really easy but it's also good to know the theory so that you don't screw up and waste food that you are counting on too.

I am about to reach 900 pounds of rice and 280 pounds of beans. Next are wheat and oats for bread and cereal and pasta for variety. I never knew how easy this was and how inexpensive each meal will be. Each week I am going to do 10 pails until I am done.

kirgi08
05-14-2011, 21:36
Another thing folks,with the flooding down south expect rice ta take a large jump price wise.We've got over 2t of rice split between here and yonder.'08.

emt1581
05-14-2011, 21:49
Watch out for flour EMT, from what I have read there is little that we can do to preserve its life. As I understand it wheat will last just about forever and you just need a small grinder/mill to make it into flour. This is one of the easiest things that you will ever do... and it's cheap too. I have more money in my good rifles than in all of this long term food supply and it will be more valuable to me the way that I see it. I hope that you give it a try.

I had plenty of canned food and no long term foods until recently when I ordered hot jaw clamp that a relative wanted to give me for my birthday then bought pails, bags etc. and started bringing home rice and beans from Sams. I spent a lot of time watching youtube videos and reading to make sure that I understood what I was doing. It's really easy but it's also good to know the theory so that you don't screw up and waste food that you are counting on too.

I am about to reach 900 pounds of rice and 280 pounds of beans. Next are wheat and oats for bread and cereal and pasta for variety. I never knew how easy this was and how inexpensive each meal will be. Each week I am going to do 10 pails until I am done.

A grinder eh? If I can find one that doesn't need batteries or electricity and uses a crank or compression (stones/etc. to crush) I'd give it a whirl. The more options to feed us the better right? My problem is I'd be trying to make S&P Pizza by fire within the week and probably getting frustrated when it doesn't work out...

-Emt1581

kirgi08
05-14-2011, 22:37
:headscratch:

M1A Shooter
05-14-2011, 22:49
ive heard nothing but great reviews on the "country living" brand grain mill but its also fairly expensive. its a get what you pay for thing i guess.

i store flour but also use it regularly in baking. ive heard up to 2 years on all purpose flour but also was told that it doesnt really spoil, it just loses its nutritional value after its been ground. it is still edible but will just be filler. i know the nutrition is important but that doesnt mean it still cant be used to thicken soups or make gravy or bake bread. it will just be as a filler after its beyond so old.

im up to 125lbs of flour. 25lbs fit pretty well in a 5G bucket but needs to be manually compressed a bit. i buy 25lb bags at sams and dump one in each bucket.

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-15-2011, 06:06
A grinder eh? If I can find one that doesn't need batteries or electricity and uses a crank or compression (stones/etc. to crush) I'd give it a whirl.

-Emt1581
I have experience with grinding grains in about a half dozen mills. For the money, the Country Living is the best thing since sliced bread. We grind wheat, corn, rice.
The Grain Maker is also a beautiful piece of equipment, but they just had a price increase that causes me to think they cost to much now, I have a couple friends with them, both bought when they were within a couple $$ of the CLGM, both agree at today's prices they would not buy the GM over the CLGM.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P1010003.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/clearlid1.jpg

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-15-2011, 06:16
i store flour but also use it regularly in baking. ive heard up to 2 years on all purpose flour but also was told that it doesnt really spoil, it just loses its nutritional value after its been ground. it is still edible but will just be filler. i know the nutrition is important but that doesnt mean it still cant be used to thicken soups or make gravy or bake bread. it will just be as a filler after its beyond so old.



It does in fact spoil. The oils go rancid, and it will give an off taste. You are storing all purpose flour, a product from which most of the nutritional value has been removed anyways.. Once flour goes bad, it will start turning out poor loaves, and have an odd taste. Storing the whole grains is the only way to go. As long as the endosperm is not broken, the grain will last for eons. Grind as needed. We grind flour and cracked wheat every few days. Never more than we will use up in a week. For cornbread or rice flour, we grind within minutes of use. It does make a difference.

UneasyRider
05-15-2011, 07:16
I have experience with grinding grains in about a half dozen mills. For the money, the Country Living is the best thing since sliced bread. We grind wheat, corn, rice.
The Grain Maker is also a beautiful piece of equipment, but they just had a price increase that causes me to think they cost to much now, I have a couple friends with them, both bought when they were within a couple $$ of the CLGM, both agree at today's prices they would not buy the GM over the CLGM.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P1010003.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/clearlid1.jpg

Everything that I have read says this is the mill to buy. Do you like it?

Lowdown3
05-15-2011, 08:17
Storing white flour is a waste of money IME. I've thrown out 500 lbs. or more of it over the years. Finally in the mid 90's I said "this is stupid" and stopped storing it.

Whole wheat-

*Stores longer
*In general is cheaper
*Is more versatile
*Can be GROWN to produce more wheat- try putting white flour in the ground and seeing if more white flour springs up LOL
*Is better for you

Ditch the white flour and store whole wheat. Yes you'll want a grinder. The Country living is very nice. However almost right off the bat the little "key" in the wheel came out and was lost. NO PLACE locally had anything remotely resembling it. I bought 3 of the CLM "spare parts kits" because of that single point failure. In a bad situation I could have beat/jammed something in there but still....

The Back to Basics mill is a good inexpensive alternative and a good backup if nothing else. Much lighter weight also if packing up and leaving is a possibility- and it always is.

Lowdown3

emt1581
05-15-2011, 08:38
Which is the mill to get as it was described due to price...Top or bottom pic? What's the non-acronym name of it so I can find it at the country store place?

Do super wal-marts and/or normal grocery stores sell "whole wheat" or are yall buying the big canisters of whole oat meat or what?

Thanks

-Emt1581

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-15-2011, 10:16
Which is the mill to get as it was described due to price...Top or bottom pic? What's the non-acronym name of it so I can find it at the country store place?

Do super wal-marts and/or normal grocery stores sell "whole wheat" or are yall buying the big canisters of whole oat meat or what?

Thanks

-Emt1581

Those are both the same mill.. lol, Country Living Grain Mill, pictures just taken at different times. I got bored and made a couple different lids and handles and made a handle extension. I won't comment on the woodruff key "loss" issue, other than to say, we have never lost one, but if we did, lowes and home depot both carry them, as does every small engine shop. That said, the Grain Maker mill does not use them, if it might be an issue for you.

I buy my wheat from two places, We have a local farmer from whom we have bought a half ton of Hard Red Winter Wheat, organic, raised 2 miles from our house. We have bought most of our wheat though from a distributor/store (http://www.wheat-n-things.com/) in Louisville. There are many places around the country operating like this family. Check with the local "home schooled" group. You may be surprised to find the "make up" of that group..

ERP.. OK, three places, we also have around 450lbs hard red winter wheat in #10 cans from LDS.org. (I sometimes kind of lose track of what's in LTS versus pantry)

ERP again.. if you are in the midwest, many walmarts do in fact have 25pound bags of Wheat Montana wheat, both Prairie Gold and Bronze Chief on the shelf, in the baking goods section. Whenever we go out to visit her family in Kansas, we bring home a half ton or so..:supergrin: (more if not pulling the Airstream.)

jpcmt
05-15-2011, 10:35
I applaud the OP for his diligence in being prepared, doing it right by doing what you can in intervals, and sharing it (the experience, not the actual food!). Everytime I run across friends who aren't prepared it kind of bugs me because they'll be the ones knocking on the doors of the prepared when SHTF.

I've been building my food storage out over a decade or so and in the last year I got serious about the food I've been storing by testing my ability to use it (seriously, most folks who store hard wheat have no clue how bad their diarrhea will be when they start eating real whole wheat bread they make). Got my hand grinder and made some simple loaves from it several times and attempted to acclimate my body to it. Got one of these:
http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/public/0rSXgjwrAbW_ZHA-NyJUN_wZyqzwiLp_k_0suGmTlgaEvZOSamz9HN06reMhbWYswOTVE6IZwpHGu-IymKrkQE3GTUPwwLcxehT8Eu7DwB_KDAq78-K8OlVKnCN2eEYKKCupCohAA0KrdcWVZB27NzrzB10cJRO-CAgEVnx6yrew5MQERggqaYdKW1S9fQs2MmWu1A

Then I've recently picked up a good electric one (blendtec) and have been not just testing my bread making prowess but have began to only eat bread made with it at home. Nothing is cooler than the feeling of supplying your family of 6 with super healthy, very cheap bread and filling your home with that smell. The blendtec:
http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/public/R1oBWHtfsY1R4q81RGXypFYaMBX1B1vTByjD4WaVEE4-VvkIBsiZRGd3B26zD0cI8_RvLbWBkfF8XlsW6rd4D8HdJq5dHe6MGf-wZCQ_-_THuLzOfMdnm_Opj8dL5y9rxuZY8DYr101F6wAQq1p4l6VWJ5PAIiiIjt8nqUBirCe6mg

THere's lots of panic going on right now over food. I honestly doubt there is a shortage, but some psychic financial guy said this year and next would be bad for food and he's right. You can't find freeze dried food anywhere, there's wars all over, floods, destruction, other mother nature damage that has everyone freaking out. Peace of mind is knowing you'll fare well for 3 weeks, 3 months, a year, or longer...and having at least 1000 rounds of each caliber you use!

For our part, we have a good variety of long term storage that'll sit for 20-30+ years..probably a ton. Then because it's important to have a diverse food/water supply, we have lots of freeze dried, MRE, and canned goods that alone will last my family of 6 for a few months if rationed properly. And a note on preparing with kids...fill lots of #10 cans with cheerios, cheezits, goldfish, and the like because just like African starving children will starve because they don't like rice and mush, so too will our kids starve if they only eat beans, rice, elbow macaroni, and no flavor!

For many of my faith (Mormon), food storage has been happening for us since the 50's...when it was uncool! For newbies, here's a decent calculator to give you an idea of what to pack away for times of not so plenty:
http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm

emt1581
05-15-2011, 14:48
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbBHxxwwSiE

Here's a good vid on mills. She doesn't talk about SHTF's but rather power-outages. She makes a lot of sense. Cute to.

-Emt1581

Stevekozak
05-15-2011, 17:31
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbBHxxwwSiE

Here's a good vid on mills. She doesn't talk about SHTF's but rather power-outages. She makes a lot of sense. Cute to.

-Emt1581
Not that cute, but good enough video! :)

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-15-2011, 19:40
Note, none of the electric mills I have played with would make a course flour or cracked grains, for say, cracked wheat, or cream-o-wheat, or corn meal. But they all have been at least that loud.

Cream o wheat or oatmeal is daily breakfast fare here.

M1A Shooter
05-15-2011, 20:19
i know its best to store in the house where its climate controlled, but is it ok to store out in my garage where it is not climate controlled and temps will range between 0-100 degrees? i wont be storing canned foods or perishables out there but what about dried grains and dehydrated foods? anyone doing somthing along these lines?

Lowdown3
05-16-2011, 06:46
We have that BlendTec mill. The flour comes out really hot and while it doesn't bother us, some claim that the little bit of heat ruins the nutrients. How the hell the nutrients survive the baking process I'm not quite sure then.......

SFC- on the key, checked lawn mower shops, sLowes and Home Despot, bought about a dozen similar sized but not quite the same sized ones. Might just be something down this way.

The reason I mentioned it is that is was a failure point and people should be aware of that. "For want of a nail" type deal.

We also have the Lehman's "Good" mill, which looks like a lot of it is constructed from off the shelf PVC pipe parts. It wasn't bad IIRC but it's been a while since we used it.

On Delta's Youtube channel he reviews a couple mills also-

http://www.youtube.com/user/delta69alpha

Lowdown3
05-16-2011, 06:51
i know its best to store in the house where its climate controlled, but is it ok to store out in my garage where it is not climate controlled and temps will range between 0-100 degrees? i wont be storing canned foods or perishables out there but what about dried grains and dehydrated foods? anyone doing somthing along these lines?

Have for decades and you can see the real world results of it here-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=related

Not exactly what the "chart commandos" would have you believe as far as storage life, but real world experience and video proof is hard to argue with. ;)

Lowdown3

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-16-2011, 07:25
i know its best to store in the house where its climate controlled, but is it ok to store out in my garage where it is not climate controlled and temps will range between 0-100 degrees? i wont be storing canned foods or perishables out there but what about dried grains and dehydrated foods? anyone doing somthing along these lines?

L3 has it covered, his videos are very informative, watch them all if you can.

Remember storing food and grains is not some new technology. Man started storing grain eons ago. Grain from Egyptian burials has been sprouted. "Canned" goods that were over a century old and undamaged have been recovered from shipwrecks, and found to be fine/safe/edible.

The cooler/darker/dryer you keep your grains, the longer they store. But even in a shed in TX, my brother's wheat is fine, he just opened up some that they bucketed while living in California in '02. It was in a garage in Sacramento, then down to Waco TX in '05, where he stores in a shed. He still has a couple kids at home, so he goes through it a little faster than we do. But just like our parents, neither of our family's have bought much flour in a long time.

BTW, it's says you are in Clarksville.. Not far from you in Guthrie is a Amish store called Country Pantry or something like that. Years ago when we were trying to find a local grain supply, and I was still active duty, I was down that way and heard about it, but we never had a chance to check it out, my understanding is they sell wheat berries in bulk. (we did however find time to go to DGW (http://www.dixiegunworks.com/).. lol)

DoctaGlockta
05-16-2011, 07:59
Those are both the same mill.. lol, Country Living Grain Mill, pictures just taken at different times. I got bored and made a couple different lids and handles and made a handle extension. I won't comment on the woodruff key "loss" issue, other than to say, we have never lost one, but if we did, lowes and home depot both carry them, as does every small engine shop. That said, the Grain Maker mill does not use them, if it might be an issue for you.

I buy my wheat from two places, We have a local farmer from whom we have bought a half ton of Hard Red Winter Wheat, organic, raised 2 miles from our house. We have bought most of our wheat though from a distributor/store (http://www.wheat-n-things.com/) in Louisville. There are many places around the country operating like this family. Check with the local "home schooled" group. You may be surprised to find the "make up" of that group..

ERP.. OK, three places, we also have around 450lbs hard red winter wheat in #10 cans from LDS.org. (I sometimes kind of lose track of what's in LTS versus pantry)

ERP again.. if you are in the midwest, many walmarts do in fact have 25pound bags of Wheat Montana wheat, both Prairie Gold and Bronze Chief on the shelf, in the baking goods section. Whenever we go out to visit her family in Kansas, we bring home a half ton or so..:supergrin: (more if not pulling the Airstream.)

Thanks for the info on that local supplier. I have been picking up from Creation Gardens here in town but they don't have everything.

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-16-2011, 08:47
SFC- on the key, checked lawn mower shops, sLowes and Home Despot, bought about a dozen similar sized but not quite the same sized ones. Might just be something down this way.

The reason I mentioned it is that is was a failure point and people should be aware of that. "For want of a nail" type deal.



No problem at all, it isn't an issue to me, so I hadn't thought to list it up, but that's why I pointed out the GrainMaker doesn't use them after you reminded me I had read some people had a problem with them:cool:

We have only had the CLGM for a few months, but it's not our first mill. But when it first got here, I noted that it isn't exactly like the one shown on their website or in the included manual/instructions. So there have been some changes.. We have a very different flywheel attachment for one thing.

But anyways, I found it/ours to use 3/16th x 1/2 inch keys, and standard 1628zz bearings. I bought a 10 pack of keys for like $6 and a pair of bearings for $4.50 ea. or so locally. Stuck them in a bag. I may eventually order a second set of grinding plates..

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-16-2011, 09:02
Thanks for the info on that local supplier. I have been picking up from Creation Gardens here in town but they don't have everything.

I have never been to that store, next time we are up there I may try to find it. Need to make a run up to Bass Pro anyways...

M1A Shooter
05-16-2011, 19:14
Have for decades and you can see the real world results of it here-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=related

Not exactly what the "chart commandos" would have you believe as far as storage life, but real world experience and video proof is hard to argue with. ;)

Lowdown3

thanks. i was kind of thinking along those lines as grain silos usually arent climate controlled either. saves me some room in the office now. also thinking of moving up to a few steel food grade drums to keep things rodent proof.

M1A Shooter
05-16-2011, 19:16
BTW, it's says you are in Clarksville.. Not far from you in Guthrie is a Amish store called Country Pantry or something like that. Years ago when we were trying to find a local grain supply, and I was still active duty, I was down that way and heard about it, but we never had a chance to check it out, my understanding is they sell wheat berries in bulk. (we did however find time to go to DGW (http://www.dixiegunworks.com/).. lol)

i will have to look that up as well. i know there is also a LDS cannery in the nashville area as well. so far ive just been going to SAMs but need to find a bulk source for more than beans and rice :)

jpcmt
05-16-2011, 19:57
We have that BlendTec mill. The flour comes out really hot and while it doesn't bother us, some claim that the little bit of heat ruins the nutrients.

Yeah, that really ticked me off. I actually had a burned smell in a batch of flour I made after it got too hot. Was grinding hard red wheat then threw in a cup of flax seeds and that set the RPMs higher with fluctuations as it fell in the grinder. Got real hot..the bread smelled a little burned but was still excellent. Now I just grind a few cups and then let it cool, few cups more, then cool, etc. I do my barley or flax seeds separately too.

As far as nutrients being diminished from the heat, it's probably true..to a degree (yep, pun intended!)! I doubt there's much loss and I can't imagine what would be lost..but I still know it would turn out 10x more nutritious than the best store bought bread.

Freshly ground wheat, organic celtic salt, organic yeast, cane sugar (or organic honey), organic seeds (sunflower, flax) and oats, some water and some olive oil... a yeast cake, a few hours of rising, then fill your home with the best smell ever. An amazing experience. Pure Americana!

Lowdown3
05-17-2011, 06:30
Thanks for the sizes SFC. I'm gonna check more places next time I'm in the "big city." :) They do have a spare parts kit that's about $30. with everything that probably could break in it.

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-17-2011, 06:39
Thanks for the sizes SFC. I'm gonna check more places next time I'm in the "big city." :) They do have a spare parts kit that's about $30. with everything that probably could break in it.

I happened to be in H.D. yesterday, and walked over to the bolt bin area, the only 3/16ths they had in stock were 1" long. But it doesn't take a lot of skills to make that a 1/2".. lol

Buddy of mine just called, and needs to go to the 'ville, so after I get some wood up on the porch (I can't believe we are going to need a fire tonight, but it appears so) I am going to run up, and check at Lowes.

You said you found some, but they were wrong sized.. So that kind of rules out that you talked to the McJobber that doesn't have a clue what you were looking for..

UneasyRider
05-17-2011, 14:25
Last night I bought another 300 pounds of rice at Sams in 6 bags and this morning before work I had them sealed in 8 mylar bags with Oxegen absorbers tucked into 5 gallon buckets. It did not cost me much, $111 for the rice and the other stuff I had on hand from some quantity purchases with Impak and Be Prepared. The best part was that it took less than an hour including clean up with 2 people. This is so easy once you do it a couple of times...

gimmejr
05-18-2011, 20:11
I have another bucket left to fill, youve inspired to fill it with something this weekend.

UneasyRider
05-19-2011, 07:13
I have another bucket left to fill, youve inspired to fill it with something this weekend.

Well I am new to long term storage, I have been purchasing supplies and equipment for a few months but only recently started filling bags and pails. If I knew how easy it was I would have done it years ago... it's like quiting smoking, after you do it you wonder why you didn't quit years ago. Well I feel just like that. Glad you filled another pail and for anyone who is not doing it, once you start storing food long term you will love the feeling of security that it gives you. Starting a long term food supply feels like buying your first gun, you get a real feeling of security from it.

Stonewall308
01-31-2012, 20:35
Tag.

I am thinking about doing a little long term food storage. Can anyone tell me what kind of beans you store? I was looking around Costco and all they had was canned beans. I was picturing dry beans in a bag, like rice.

UneasyRider
01-31-2012, 21:17
Tag.

I am thinking about doing a little long term food storage. Can anyone tell me what kind of beans you store? I was looking around Costco and all they had was canned beans. I was picturing dry beans in a bag, like rice.

I buy my beans from Emergency Essentials http://beprepared.com

SFCSMITH(RET)
01-31-2012, 21:37
Get mine at Sam's (pintos $7) 10 lb bags, and 2 pounders at the commissary of black beans $1.50. At Sams the pintos are right next to the bagged rice...

M1A Shooter
01-31-2012, 22:39
i store a mix of beans. mostly what i eat on a somewhat regular basis. i keep great northern white beans, split green peas, small red chili beans, and some pintos. the pintos are the easiest to find in bulk but i also buy the other 3 in 1 or 2lb bags most everytime im in the grocery store. i store my stuff mostly in 1 gallon mylar bags. in my house, its just my wife and i, so a 5 gallon bucket is a little too much to be opening at once if we need some.

gimmejr
02-01-2012, 00:35
Tag.

I am thinking about doing a little long term food storage. Can anyone tell me what kind of beans you store? I was looking around Costco and all they had was canned beans. I was picturing dry beans in a bag, like rice.

Try a different Costco if you can, one in a better part of town doesnt carry large bags of beans while other Costcos do.

Batesmotel
02-01-2012, 04:17
I have a 35 gallon steel food grade drum we packed 20 years ago with white (Botan) rice. I packed it with dry ice in the bottom and left one bung open until the ice melted and displaced the oxygen then sealed the bung. We opened it last year to inspect it and it was fine. Threw in more ice and did it again.