Regional cop lingo... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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SAR
05-12-2011, 22:11
Even though police officers share in the brotherhood. They don't all speak the same language. Here in Los Angeles we may use terminology that sounds strange to an officer on the East Coast and vice versa.... It used to always make me cringe when Chief Bratton used to refer to bad guys as "perps" or "perpetrators." Around here, they are all "suspects" until caught, then they are "arrestees." We call our police cars, "shops." We don't have "dispatch" or "dispatchers." We have "Communications" and the personnel who work the floor are called "RTOs," for Radio Telephone Operators.... Our handheld radios are called "ROVERs," for Remote Out of Vehicle Equipment Radio. So what you got out where you work?

Dragoon44
05-12-2011, 22:20
We used.

Suspect
arrestee
unit, patrol car or "that POS"
Dispatch
dispatcher sometimes also referred to as "That stupid *****"
Walkies or "That useless POS"

Morris
05-12-2011, 22:49
When I hear "cruisers," I think of low riders with hydraulics . . .

Dragoon44
05-12-2011, 22:52
When I hear "cruisers," I think of low riders with hydraulics . . .

I think Ship, as in Navy.

:rofl::rofl:

SAR
05-12-2011, 22:59
We used.

unit, patrol car or "that POS"


We almost always call our cars "shops." Sometimes we call them "hoopties." The only time we call them "units" are when we are on the radio and request an additional unit.

ateamer
05-12-2011, 23:03
Patrol car: Unit
Arrestee: Custody
Sergeant: S-unit
Handheld: Handheld

SAR
05-12-2011, 23:06
Arrestee: Custody


So do you ever get citizens who walk up to you and ask, "did you get the perp?" Acting like they are all cool and stuff because they can talk the talk? :rofl:

OldCurlyWolf
05-12-2011, 23:07
suspects: CTC Turds & Turdettes. For general consumption and reports suspects
Car: Unit
Portable Radio: W/T
Arrestee: Transport 1 (or 2 or whatever)

msu_grad_121
05-12-2011, 23:17
Cars: Cruisers (yeah yeah, I know) or Squads
Radios: PREPs
Perps: Suspects, subjects, jakes or hairballs
Victims: Vics or "Poor SOBs"
Sgts: Seven-Ohs
Lts: Six-Ohs
Trainers: Tac (fill-in-the-rank)

Oh and one that drives me nuts: 10-4 becomes "14"

DaBigBR
05-12-2011, 23:40
We're real original here.

The car is a patrol car, squad car, squad, or just car.

Bad guys are suspects. Arrested suspects are prisoners (that goes over real well with people who have actually been to prison and don't feel the term suits them until they are committed to a state correctional facility.

The handheld radio is a "portable."

The car computer is an MDT.

Dragoon44
05-12-2011, 23:58
The car computer is an MDT.


For us it was, "A what?"

:rofl::rofl:

SAR
05-13-2011, 00:01
For us it was, "A what?"

:rofl::rofl:

A car? It's that conveyance that was basically a chariot with a motor. Oh wait, had they invented the wheel yet when you were working?

ateamer
05-13-2011, 00:24
So do you ever get citizens who walk up to you and ask, "did you get the perp?" Acting like they are all cool and stuff because they can talk the talk? :rofl:
One guy asked if I had arrested the "perp" for "B&E", and then referred to him as a "skell". :upeyes:

CAcop
05-13-2011, 00:32
The Sgts. Explorer="The Pig"

Since we have our shifts generally broken up Sun-Wed and Wed-Sat we refer to them as "sides of the week." When shift pick rolls around we say "What side of the week are you going for." Technically they are B and A team but we refer to them as sides. Maybe because traditionally the two is divided by the public into two side of town, eastside and westside.

MAV is our name for our in car cameras. I have no idea what it stands for. At one point I cared but I stopped a long time ago.

The radios on our belt are portables.

When ever we go out on extra checks of some place or do traffic enforcement in a particular area we as Disptach to "Start me a card for traffic/extrachecks/whatever at 123 Main Street." From when dispatchers actually filled out cards for details. Then the officers had to come in and provide info on how they cleared the call.

DaBigBR
05-13-2011, 00:41
The Sgts. Explorer="The Pig"

Since we have our shifts generally broken up Sun-Wed and Wed-Sat we refer to them as "sides of the week." When shift pick rolls around we say "What side of the week are you going for." Technically they are B and A team but we refer to them as sides. Maybe because traditionally the two is divided by the public into two side of town, eastside and westside.

MAV is our name for our in car cameras. I have no idea what it stands for. At one point I cared but I stopped a long time ago.

The radios on our belt are portables.

When ever we go out on extra checks of some place or do traffic enforcement in a particular area we as Disptach to "Start me a card for traffic/extrachecks/whatever at 123 Main Street." From when dispatchers actually filled out cards for details. Then the officers had to come in and provide info on how they cleared the call.

My money says that "MAV" is "mobile audio/video."

I know a guy that works for a department that stills calls it a "card", too. Here, it's a "call" and in some parts of the state, it's a "trip."

SAR
05-13-2011, 01:06
When ever we go out on extra checks of some place or do traffic enforcement in a particular area we as Disptach to "Start me a card for traffic/extrachecks/whatever at 123 Main Street." From when dispatchers actually filled out cards for details. Then the officers had to come in and provide info on how they cleared the call.

Yeah, I remember the cards. Early in my career, we had punchcards. When you were dispatched, they would timestamp it, when you arrived, they would timestamp it. When you cleared, they would timestamp it. I almost forgot about that.

4949shooter
05-13-2011, 02:14
The term "weak" is used to describe any cop not worth his salt.

We refer to the other side of the work schedule as "the dark side." It doesn't matter what side of the schedule you are on, the other side is always the dark one.

trdvet
05-13-2011, 02:28
Shop is also used around here but I'm nowhere near CA.

MB-G26
05-13-2011, 02:55
Does Phx and surrounding still use "Buckeye Misdemeanor" ?

igor
05-13-2011, 03:21
here in the baltimore area we are the police, our cars are eith er the radio cars or just cars or pos. the portables are the portables the sgts are sarge or boss , bAD guys are just that or a--holes. if you are a good police you are the real police the lts are the LT or just their names a humbl;e is a really petty charge cant think of any more

Mayhem like Me
05-13-2011, 04:25
Bush Bond= running on foot to evade capture, usually from a car or out of the back of a house

MPH= My &ussy Hurts used to describe a coworker booking of sick

O = dead guy mouth open

Q= dead guy mouth open tongue out

GSP= gods special Police

Jamoke= perp


From Florida

Grouper trooper..Wildlife officer

42and a half....Wife or (domestic partner)

10-13
05-13-2011, 05:09
Here's some NYPD slang:

Patrol car - RMP (Radio Motor Patrol)
RMP driver - Operator
RMP front passenger - Recorder
Bad guy - Perp. Suspect is sometimes used if we don't know for certain who did the crime, but Perp is pretty much universal.
Victim - complainant or C/V.
Voluntold - ordered.
Wife - partner.
Divorce - splitting from your steady partner.
Weekends - RDO (regular day off). Can be used as verb ie "I'm going RDO tomorrow.

collim1
05-13-2011, 05:29
car=unit
Handheld=WT
arrestee=J3 (is also a verb such as I J3'd him for POP)

unit 900
05-13-2011, 07:56
To add to Igor's Maryland list, suspects in Baltimore are called 30-1 for the reporting block number on the standard offense report.

x_out86
05-13-2011, 09:26
For us:

-Suspect
-Prisoner
-Squad
-Dispatch
-Dispatcher(s)
-Portable

cowboywannabe
05-13-2011, 09:40
patrol car = cruiser

suspect = suspect

victim = vic

arrest = pinch

portable radio = MRE (mobile radio equipment).

jail = downtown

wife = half unit

kid = quarter unit

4949shooter
05-13-2011, 09:50
Patrol car - Troop car

Cop Groupie - Queen

Kiss ass - Ball Washer

Put foot in mouth - Stepped on his dick

nikerret
05-13-2011, 09:53
Fish & Game LEO: Rabbit Ranger or Duck Detective
Patrol vehicle: Car/Truck
Kansas Highway Patrol: Big Hat's or Big Hat Police
Interstate: Big Road or The I

Cav
05-13-2011, 09:56
Suspect (perp) Suspect is a Asian female.
95 (as in 10-95 arrested) The 95 will not get a phone call till he sees the Judge.
Unit (squad car) Do we have another unit in the area.
Dispatch AKA 800 (our disptchers/911 call takers/intell) 800 I need a local check.
Comm Center (the county wide dispatchers) Check with the Comm Center for any warrants on that subject.
Radio (radio). I am having radio problems, thats why I missed the 0300 radio check.
Supervisor (any Corporal or above/gold badge). Next time you have a fleet accident you let a supervisor know and do not move the unit.


We still use 10-Codes.
We do not have 'person of intrest'. Mentioned person or suspect would be used.

Napalm561
05-13-2011, 12:02
A few local terms

Jail = Bed & Breakfast
patrol car = unit
prisoner = 10-15 or customer
person we have arrested before = repeat customer
person we arrest a lot = regular customer
report of livestock out/ near roadway = cheerleader practice ( report of cheerleader practice on Hwy 66)

msu_grad_121
05-13-2011, 12:54
Oh, forgot, Michigan State Police: Blue Goose (or Geese), Ditch Dogs, Ramp Roosters, AAA with Ticket Books

DaBigBR
05-13-2011, 13:02
Our state DOT truck enforcement guys are "smurfs"...light blue car and used to wear light blue uniforms.

SAR
05-13-2011, 13:11
Oh i was gonna ask. Who uses the term, "jackpot?" i've heard a lot of East Coast guys use it. Never on the West Coast.

Mhiett
05-13-2011, 13:24
A few local terms

Jail = Bed & Breakfast
patrol car = unit
prisoner = 10-15 or customer
person we have arrested before = repeat customer
person we arrest a lot = regular customer
report of livestock out/ near roadway = cheerleader practice ( report of cheerleader practice on Hwy 66)

Lol at cheerleader practice.

SAR
05-13-2011, 13:33
Field interview cards are "shakes."

Someone about to die is "circling the drain."

Someone who died is "KMA."

APD#69
05-13-2011, 17:43
"10-8 NHI".......(No Humans Involved)

Chico Bill
05-13-2011, 19:51
zero= Dead
suspect (not perp)
future booking number = kids of suspects (I don't like this one...I'm a softy when it comes to kids)
Cars are hoops, radio cars, or just cars
CCFCCP = Coocoo for Cocoa Puffs = Crazy...sometimes also known as a "ding".
417 = gun or verb for pulling/pointing gun...ie: I 417'd the guy and he dropped the screwdriver.
Dispatch is a frequency, not a person. SCC is the personification of our radio operators. Our "dispatcher" is a "D" unit...ie: 260-David...I need a 926 (tow truck) at walk and don't walk.
brass = supervisors

Mayhem like Me
05-13-2011, 20:39
Rolling case number... Import with fart can muffler limo tint and a bunch of flat brimmed hats inside.

Dragoon44
05-13-2011, 21:09
Not to long ago I was talking to a mechanic friend of mine at his shop when a "gangsta" car rolled by. 20 year old car with the fenders cut out to accept 26 inch rims usually painted purple or lime green.

My friend asks,

"Hey when you were a cop what did you guys call cars like that?

My response was, "Probable cause".

:supergrin:

Dragoon44
05-13-2011, 21:10
I bet I know at least one cop term that is nearly universal. Becasue every dept has a few.

ROD - Retired On Duty

:rofl:

1713
05-13-2011, 22:44
"Fred" and/or "Frida"= the wastes of skin we all deal with whether victim or suspect/accused. "Fred took off into the woods after slapping around Frida for the last can of Keystone"

"Inch and a half" or "Big Clock"=overtime , time and a half



The rest...marked car, unmarked car, portable radio I wouldnt call very creative.

CAcop
05-13-2011, 23:03
State Park Ranger=Squirrel Counter

Community Service Officer=Smurf (due to light blue shirt. AKA DNA Collectors a few years back when we had a few make their rounds of the PD)

TheDog21
05-14-2011, 02:07
Oh i was gonna ask. Who uses the term, "jackpot?" i've heard a lot of East Coast guys use it. Never on the West Coast.

We use that one on our shift. If one guy's searching a car and finds dope he just pokes his head out, looks at his partner and goes "JACKPOT!".

10-13
05-14-2011, 03:57
We use that one on our shift. If one guy's searching a car and finds dope he just pokes his head out, looks at his partner and goes "JACKPOT!".

Over here it means to get into some serious trouble. Ie "Joe was gonna take a hit for s#!tcanning that GLA but it turns out that car belonged to (someone important) so now he's in a jackpot."

ateamer
05-14-2011, 11:00
Remembered a couple more:
"A" - meal (On an A - from the old 9-codes, 908A - Out of service, meal) We haven't used the 9-codes since the mid-70s, but "A" still pops up once in a while.

"C" - residence (from 908C - Out of service at residence) Almost never heard anymore. It usually was heard in the context of dispatch telling someone to "phone your C", but with cell phones, your C can call you directly.

"X" - female (En route CJ with an X-ray). No idea why someone came up with the idea to use a code word and not say "female" on the radio. Goes back several decades.

CGMK
05-14-2011, 11:09
State Park Ranger=Squirrel Counter



Park Ranger= Twig Pig

mntrpr
05-14-2011, 15:57
suspect
squad car
portable
dispatch or radio
our Dept. of Natural Resource guys/gals, carp cops, crick dicks, nature nazis, etc...

We put a "D" on then end of a ten code to note that speed is important. 10-91D is a blood run (to deliver to, or from the red cross blood bank, speed is important)
10-200 you have to use the can
10-200D, you really have to use the can

Dragoon44
05-14-2011, 16:03
suspect
squad car
portable
dispatch or radio
our Dept. of Natural Resource guys/gals, carp cops, crick dicks, nature nazis, etc...

We put a "D" on then end of a ten code to note that speed is important. 10-91D is a blood run (to deliver to, or from the red cross blood bank, speed is important)
10-200 you have to use the can
10-200D, you really have to use the can

Whats the code for I didn't make it in time so now I gotta go home and change my pants?

:supergrin:

golls17
05-14-2011, 16:23
suspect

10-200 you have to use the can
10-200D, you really have to use the can

I've heard of 10-100 and 10-200 to differentiate whether you're going #1 or #2, respectively.

SAR
05-14-2011, 19:00
Over here it means to get into some serious trouble. Ie "Joe was gonna take a hit for s#!tcanning that GLA but it turns out that car belonged to (someone important) so now he's in a jackpot."

That's the way I've heard it used in the past by East Coast cops.... it meant some "deep serious." Like when you've been filmed beating a suspect or is that perp?

SAR
05-14-2011, 19:01
Whats the code for I didn't make it in time so now I gotta go home and change my pants?

:supergrin:

That would be, "Things have gone nuclear around here...." (meaning there's some fallout) :rofl:

DaBigBR
05-14-2011, 20:48
Whats the code for I didn't make it in time so now I gotta go home and change my pants?

:supergrin:


You aren't really a cop until you've had to take belt keepers off while driving to ensure that that you make it in time.

There's a trooper that works a couple of counties over that was sent over here to cover a manpower shortage one day. He managed to shart himself, and had to drive the sixty miles home for a change of uniform. He made it almost the whole way and was dispatched to a collision in our county. He had to explain to his Sergeant why he could not respond. He took the high road and started telling the story himself.

CAcop
05-14-2011, 22:02
Remembered a couple more:
"A" - meal (On an A - from the old 9-codes, 908A - Out of service, meal) We haven't used the 9-codes since the mid-70s, but "A" still pops up once in a while.

"C" - residence (from 908C - Out of service at residence) Almost never heard anymore. It usually was heard in the context of dispatch telling someone to "phone your C", but with cell phones, your C can call you directly.

"X" - female (En route CJ with an X-ray). No idea why someone came up with the idea to use a code word and not say "female" on the radio. Goes back several decades.

Which led to an exchange between a cop and a dispatcher who did not get along well..

"Call your ex-x at your ex-c."

CAcop
05-14-2011, 22:03
Code Brown=emergency dump

ateamer
05-14-2011, 22:48
Which led to an exchange between a cop and a dispatcher who did not get along well..

"Call your ex-x at your ex-c."
:rofl::rofl:

JohnHoliday
05-15-2011, 06:04
Suspects, Arrestees, Prisoners, Bad Guys: Bandits

Pepper45
05-15-2011, 07:19
Suspect=turd
Car=car
Radio=portable
Computer=MDC
Ticket=pinch
Custody=Another rock in the box
DRT
CTD
Whiskey courage, and beer brains.

msu_grad_121
05-15-2011, 07:28
Oh yeah,
tickets = skids (can also be a verb, eg: "i skidded the crap outta that moron") or biscuits (kinda old school, but still around)
booze = loud mouth soup

sapper1911
05-15-2011, 07:46
Car = squad (unit is more for cop and squad as in “send me another unit”)
Suspect= mope, jamoke, d-bag…
Usual Suspect = Frequent Flyer
In car computer= MDT or “SCMODS” from Blues Brothers
Sgt. = Boss, Sarge, of your Dad (as in “what your dad give you for wrecking that squad?” )
Pimp = prank
Pimpy = minor, particularly a chickensht charge/ticket
Q-Tip = the act of screwing your muzzle into the mope’s ear.
Flying Squirrel = the greatest use of force tactic in the history of coppers, a sort of leaping tackle usually performed by an overweight cop who thinks he’s still an athlete.
“So I was sitting in my squad when I saw this jamoke leaving this frequent fliers’ house. I stopped him for Aggravated Mopery then the skinny little d-bag takes off on foot . Luckily, Dep. X was just around the corner and lays him out with a flying squirrel. I saw 32 in his waistband so I gave him a .45 q-tip. Anyway your dad is pissed cause Dep. X is on work comp cause he broke his wrist and I’ve had too many use of force memos, so he’s sending both of us to Verbal Judo”

Cav
05-15-2011, 18:42
Whats the code for I didn't make it in time so now I gotta go home and change my pants?

:supergrin:

For the restroom we say;

Out at ----- for Uniform Maint.

Or 10-6 for Uniform Maint.

Or 10-6 for 30 min, Uniform Change out...

bccop
05-15-2011, 21:01
Kit- I had to use this one because it come up recently... what others refer to as gear.

mutants- lower end clients.

21- plainclothes patrol car.

51- patrol sergeant

Cartoon- CAR 10 is our duty officer (citywide). If we refer to them as Cartoon it is meant in a negative way (usually as a result of a really bad decision or someone who shouldn't be a duty officer because of lots of bad decisions).

Cylons- firemen. Those slow clunky robots from Battlestar Galactica (the original series)

Seinfelding- standing around doing nothing (usually in high drug areas to deter drug transactions). Originates from the pilot done on Seinfield that was about nothing.

Gravel Road Cops- in French the RCMP are the Gendarmarie royale du Canada (GRC) so we have altered the acronym...

Town Clowns- nickname given by the RCMP to police officers that work for independent municipal police forces.

PC- Police Constable

PW- police woman. "Can I get a PW for a search?"

Triple Box- there are 3 offence boxes on our violation tickets so if someone is triple boxed usually they are a brutal driver and/or complete knob during the traffic stop.

CAcop
05-15-2011, 23:08
Taking a Lt/Promoting a Lt.=poopy in the potty

SAR
05-15-2011, 23:28
"Submarining" - used to describe what certain officers do when end of watch approaches, especially morning (night watch). They drive in circles around the station or nearby at periscope depth waiting for the end of watch, come to the station broadcast to come out over the air. The more productive officers don't submarine, they are out handling calls right up to end of watch.

Panzergrenadier1979
05-16-2011, 08:19
Suspect = Mope, Skell, Bad Guy….
Car = Car, chariot, buggy……
Any other officer = unit
To arrest = habeus grabus
Bathroom = Little office
Mental case/ EDP = 96 or 96er
Cite a motorist = to “whack”
To cite or arrest = Pinch
Over time = On the big boy/girl clock
Portable radio = Portable or that POS….
Car Radio = MRU or that POS….
PA State Police = Gray Gods
Dispatch center = County

DaBigBR
05-16-2011, 09:07
Sgt. = Boss, Sarge, of your Dad (as in “what your dad give you for wrecking that squad?” )
Pimp = prank

We use "your dad" (or brother, or sister, or whatever) to imply a relationship with somebody undesirable. Age and gender would determine which one to use, obviously.

"Hey I saw your brother licking the windows in the PD today."

We use "pimp" to describe the fine art of getting a prisoner all worked up, generally so that they can be left in the custody of another officer. Some guys choose to work hard to pimp up their prisoners, others do it without trying (or intending it).

Panzergrenadier1979
05-16-2011, 10:19
We use "pimp" to describe the fine art of getting a prisoner all worked up, generally so that they can be left in the custody of another officer. Some guys choose to work hard to pimp up their prisoners, others do it without trying (or intending it).

:rofl::rofl:

My FTO strongly warned me NOT to get a bad reputation with the COs for consistently bringing prisoners into the booking center who'd been taunted & wound up and ready to fight the next person that looks at them. :supergrin:

chance3290
05-16-2011, 10:34
I grew up in Chicago.....'take a pinch' meant getting arrested. Now I work in Georgia and people look really confused when I say that.

Vigilant
05-16-2011, 12:09
We use "pimp" to describe the fine art of getting a prisoner all worked up, generally so that they can be left in the custody of another officer. Some guys choose to work hard to pimp up their prisoners, others do it without trying (or intending it).

Let's just say, this can also be used inside the fence, to help a problem child to decide whether they want to poop, or get off the pot. Most of 'em know just how far to push it, but with a little help, they end up going that little bit of extra distance, and cross the line.