That guy [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 09:18
..we all know him, every version of him. We have all had to deal with working with him from time to time.

The "that Guy" I have in mind today is the "that guy" the coward.

The one that always tries to make sure he never arrives at a hot call until other officers have secured the scene, even if he was just a block away when the call was dispatched.

The one that is fearful of getting hurt and tried to mask his fear and incompetence behind a smokescreen of excuses for why he never does what he knows he should do. Like false claims he didn't want to violate the suspects rights so that is why he backed down and left with his tail between his legs, or fears he would be sued is why he didn't do what he was trained to do.

He knows the real cops hold him in contempt and he equally loathes them. If he stays in LE it is not out of a desire to serve the public or do his job correctly, it's because he won't give up that pay and benefits.

Now thanks to the internet, "That Guy" can have his revenge. He can now run his cowardly mouth with impunity, safe behind the screen of anonymity that the internet provides. And of course when the Real cops point out what he is, why they are just statist Jack booted thugs, like the ones he has to work with everyday, because he lacks the integrity to put his money where his mouth and his pretend principles are and just quit.

txleapd
05-28-2011, 10:11
Before we got GPS in our patrol cars, I remember catching more than one of "those guys" parked on a side street with their lights off, waiting for other units to get to a hot call first.

Don't get me started....

msu_grad_121
05-28-2011, 10:31
I had "that guy" as a supervisor at my last agency. He'd tuck tail and slink away when a fight was gearing up, or find some lame excuse not to respond to a scene when requested, but he'd be the first one to try to jam you up over "excessive force" or "civil rights violations."

The only positive for the situation was that the supervisor above him was a stand up guy, even tho he wouldn't hold that guy's feet to the fire for his antics.

"That guy" made life miserable for all of us, because we were reflections of what he knew he should have been, and it disgusted him that he was too spineless to be that. Althought I don't see him even having the sack to talk to anyone on here, let alone confront them on a serious issue, who knows? He might be one of the punks lurking here, trying to convince everyone he's the end-all, be-all of police work.

packsaddle
05-28-2011, 10:47
I am fortunate to work for a semi-rural county with two small cities (4k) in it.

we don't have any of those "that guy".

there are very few county deputies and even fewer city officers.

everyone knows who's working and where everyone is most of the time.

EVERYONE shows up for hot calls in the order of their proximity to the call, although we may wait down the street for the person who received the call to arrive first, depending on the nature of the call.

for example, last night we had a disturbance in a rural area of the county involving a handgun and everyone on duty, including all three county units, a city officer, and a state trooper showed up at about the same time.

the only one that didn't show up was the other city officer, and that was only because he was at the other end of the county from the call and would have arrived about 30 minutes too late.

it's hard to be "that guy" in our county because we are all on the same channel, there is no way to talk your way out of it, and nowhere to hide.

blueiron
05-28-2011, 10:57
In my case, it was "those guys and gals" and boy, do these people tick me off!

I called these people "sputniks". They'd orbit a scene like a satellite, usually about a mile out and follow Kepler's laws of orbital mechanics to a T. Once the first unit arrived and bought the dispo/the DR/ and the arrest[s], the sputniks would all "fall to earth" to help out with minor paperwork, make a wagon, spectate, or make an appearance for the boss.

As described, some of these people were absolute laziness personified. They spent hours and endless amounts of energy in a quest to avoid meeting the dreaded DR number. In the early days before MDCs, they'd buy radio drinks or lunch to ingratiate themselves and bribe their ways out of radio calls or they'd volunteer to take one residential burglary call and then go hide in a station. They'd then claim they had to impound massive amounts of evidence to catch a serial burglar. The advent of the MDC and digital messaging made being a slacker as easy as watching a DVD. Call up the screen, pick a simple call - read the narrative, and silently message radio to send the call. Result? No patrol time and lots of activity.

Accidents were a particular curse, because only a few people enjoyed them and enough people didn't enjoy standing outside in the Arizona summer and working. DUI accidents were the worst - the first officer bought everything and the sputniks showed up only to do a tow sheet or man the traffic signal box. After complaining long and hard by clever officers, policy was soon changed and the first officer on scene bought only the accident. It became his or her scene and he or she could assign the next units to do specific tasks - tow inventories, the DUI investigation, traffic control, etc. Then, even the lazy officers raced to get to the scene to take accidents and avoid getting the DUI portion. We even showed how productivity went up and the grumbling stopped among the working officers - the lazy whined even more.

Some were out and out cowards. They got their guaranteed government job and were determined to avoid doing anything. Scared of the dead, scared of the homeless, scared of the drunks, scared of the suspects, scared of the dark [yes, we had a female officer who got a physician to sign off that her circadian cycle was being disrupted and she was medically impacted - thus she got M-F day shift for well over a decade], scared of weapons - including their own, and scared of life in general. We had them and many of the military vets among us wanted to shoot them first in a huge shootout situation. Most went running for DARE and bad mouthed the others in an effort to get selected to hang with the 5th grade set.

The incompetent.... oh yes, the incompetent. Their watch word was liability and boy did they love that word! Never do something, it might result in liability. Never do anything, it might result in liability. Some were genuinely low in intelligence, some were lacking in common sense, and some lacked both. All lacked any decision making ability whatsoever, other than to select the default term - liability. If one was lazy and incompetent, yet had some form of animal cunning; they worked hard to get promoted. That way, they could sit inside of an office, avoid all danger, and pass judgement on those who held them in derision on the streets. Yes, we had those as well.

Guess which defective gene pool many police administrators come from?

Because of people like these, I am glad I am gone.

MeefZah
05-28-2011, 11:14
Great post / rant, blueiron!

DaBigBR
05-28-2011, 12:33
I was talking with a couple of colleagues last night and realized something of a variation of a "that guy" - the type of officer that when somebody finds out that you know them or work with them they always ask "so, what do you think of soandso?" Never giving away their own opinion and just kinda waiting to see.

DaBigBR
05-28-2011, 12:34
One of our academy instructors referred to a specific type of "that guy" as a "STAN." It stands for "****, that ain't nothin!" They're the guys that sit there impatiently listening to somebody else's war story just waiting to jump in and tell their much "better" story.

Vigilant
05-28-2011, 12:36
We have 'em inside the fence too. One in particular sticks out like a turd in a swimming pool. He has been trying his darndest to transfer a couple hours away to shack up with his latest flame. Unfortunately for him, those above us have really tightened down on personnel evaluations. He used to be able to cover for his laziness and ineptitude by geting a certain someone to give him glowing evaluations, and even arrange for others to get screwed. He even convinced a certain someone to make a phone call and get him a passing grade on the Sergeant's exam. He has not made rank though, and I doubt that he will now. Whenever the smoke clears after a fight and the rest of us are cleaning up and choking on the OC fumes, if he is seen at all, he is far out of harm's way, with his hands in his pockets. He has no problem at all with lying his way out of his many screw-ups, and letting someone else take the hit. Has a tag on the front of his car with a strong religious theme, and it's a well-known fact that he treats his elderly mother like dirt. What a guy. yes, I can truthfully say that I know that guy. Unfortunately for us, I have been told off the record that with his personnel file in the shape it's in now, he's not going anywhere.

BTW, I'm tempted to wear my jack boots to work a few days, and see how long it takes someone to complain.

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 13:04
One of the common traits of all the "That guys" is if they are ambitious they never try to move up the ladder through merit or hard work. their route is not to be better at their job but to be better at stabbing everyone else in the back.

Their ladder to the top is comprised of the bodies of everyone between them and their goal.

That is one reason why if they do achieve rank they have no problem at all in throwing someone else under the bus.

They are the ones that gripe and moan about the administration the most and if you join in with them thier next stop is the admin office to rat on you and get their daily dose of brown-nosing the bosses.

collim1
05-28-2011, 13:34
Funny, our guy kinda of redeemed himself to me last night. Had a stabbing at a night club, chased the suspect two blocks when he turned to face me with a fixed blade knife in his hand.

I made a "tactical retreat" while clearing leather and the BG dropped the knife. Here comes goober out of nowhere like a mad, screaming banshee and nails the dude as soon as the knife hit the ground.

Well see if he can keep it up.

DaBigBR
05-28-2011, 13:35
Funny, our guy kinda of redeemed himself to me last night. Had a stabbing at a night club, chased the suspect two blocks when he turned to face me with a fixed blade knife in his hand.

I made a "tactical retreat" while clearing leather and the BG dropped the knife. Here comes goober out of nowhere like a mad, screaming banshee and nails the dude as soon as the knife hit the ground.

Well see if he can keep it up.

Good. Nobody wants a "that guy."

Did the bad guy make that whoosh sound they make when all the wind gets knocked out of them?

SAR
05-28-2011, 14:42
..we all know him, every version of him. We have all had to deal with working with him from time to time.

The "that Guy" I have in mind today is the "that guy" the coward.

The one that always tries to make sure he never arrives at a hot call until other officers have secured the scene, even if he was just a block away when the call was dispatched.



We don't have a problem with "that guy." Our bigger problem is with "this guy." This guy always gets to the scene last so he doesn't have to take the paper. After a few years, this guy becomes "this supervisor guy." This supervisor guy always makes sure he is the last supervisor to arrive so he doesn't have to take charge and take the use of force report.

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 15:09
We don't have a problem with "that guy." Our bigger problem is with "this guy." This guy always gets to the scene last so he doesn't have to take the paper. After a few years, this guy becomes "this supervisor guy." This supervisor guy always makes sure he is the last supervisor to arrive so he doesn't have to take charge and take the use of force report.

Or make a decision, a trait of That/this guy who makes rank is they will desperately endeavor to NEVER make a decision. Always trying to kick it upstairs to avoid ever having to take responsibility for something.

txleapd
05-28-2011, 15:38
I was talking with a couple of colleagues last night and realized something of a variation of a "that guy" - the type of officer that when somebody finds out that you know them or work with them they always ask "so, what do you think of soandso?" Never giving away their own opinion and just kinda waiting to see.

On a related story.... I had stopped of at a local Constable's office, while at work one day, and was talking to one of their Chief Deputies. He mentioned that one of our former officers was working for them. This guy he was referring to had been high ranking at my department, and had been forced to retire before he wanted to.... I never had a high opinion of him anyway, so when this Chief Deputy mentioned his name, I immediately commented about what a POS he is.

The Chief Deputy looked like I hit him with a flashbang, and I thought my partner started having a stroke.... I looked at them innocently and said, "What? I don't work for him anymore.... I don't have to kiss his ass."

Surprisingly, I never got called to the carpet for that one. Maybe it's because the guy burned a ton of bridged to get where he was, and left without many friends. :dunno:

msu_grad_121
05-28-2011, 18:32
...their route is not to be better at their job but to be better at stabbing everyone else in the back.

Their ladder to the top is comprised of the bodies of everyone between them and their goal.

That is one reason why if they do achieve rank they have no problem at all in throwing someone else under the bus.


This one actually made me think of one of the "investigators" at my last department. He was the type that would throw anyone and everyone under the bus in order to make himself look good to the higher ups, but wasn't smart enough or charming enough to keep himself in everyone's good graces so as to get the dirt on people.

I remember several times running into him after an arrest and he'd ask me something along the lines of, "So I hear you really gave that guy a beating. Really taught him a lesson. Is that right?" I used to love just giving him a smirk and saying, "Read my report, watch the video, it's all there" and walking away.

What a bagga******.

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 18:45
This one actually made me think of one of the "investigators" at my last department. He was the type that would throw anyone and everyone under the bus in order to make himself look good to the higher ups, but wasn't smart enough or charming enough to keep himself in everyone's good graces so as to get the dirt on people.

I remember several times running into him after an arrest and he'd ask me something along the lines of, "So I hear you really gave that guy a beating. Really taught him a lesson. Is that right?" I used to love just giving him a smirk and saying, "Read my report, watch the video, it's all there" and walking away.

What a bagga******.

Next time just ask him, "Want me to demonstrate on you what I did so you will know?

old_pigpen
05-28-2011, 19:00
Back when the City PD paid less than the poverty line, "that guy" worked for them. He used to get off on harassing teenagers and enjoyed doing traffic stops on them. However, he would not even get out of his car when he did a traffic stop on an adult until backup showed up.

On open door or alarm calls that he was dispatched to, he would arrive on scene and then dispatch would lose radio contact with him. When he didn't answer repeated calls over the radio, dispatch would pull other officers off their dinner break or out of their patrol district to head to his location, thinking he was in trouble. Each time, they'd find him sitting on the hood of his car or standing by it. His excuse - his radio stopped working (mysteriously started working soon after) or once he said his battery fell out! Yes, that was back in the day when the radios had a big screw that kept the battery door locked. I heard that he did get his butt chewed for the "battery fell out" excuse.

The only reason he wasn't fired was that he would work for the low pay. As you can guess, he was promoted to sergeant.

Hack
05-28-2011, 19:22
One of the common traits of all the "That guys" is if they are ambitious they never try to move up the ladder through merit or hard work. their route is not to be better at their job but to be better at stabbing everyone else in the back.

Their ladder to the top is comprised of the bodies of everyone between them and their goal.

That is one reason why if they do achieve rank they have no problem at all in throwing someone else under the bus.

They are the ones that gripe and moan about the administration the most and if you join in with them thier next stop is the admin office to rat on you and get their daily dose of brown-nosing the bosses.

Oooh, don't get me started on that soap box. My good agency has more than its share of brown nosing; back side kissing; leg riding; sycophants, whose soul aim in life is to get up at the expense of others, and leaving the down trodden souls in their wakes while doing so. Then there is the old mess up and move up routine. AAARGH!!! :steamed:

Hack
05-28-2011, 19:25
Or make a decision, a trait of That/this guy who makes rank is they will desperately endeavor to NEVER make a decision. Always trying to kick it upstairs to avoid ever having to take responsibility for something.

Yeah, we have those too. They must be freakin' everywhere!

ateamer
05-28-2011, 19:34
Maybe our agencies should consider handling cowards the way the Army handled Private Slovik. That Guy might have a change of heart (well, if he had anything but pus and that empty feeling inside him) and quit before he gets any of the real cops hurt.

Vigilant
05-28-2011, 19:35
I can truthfully say, they have cleaned most of it up where I'm at. But we still have a couple.

Hack
05-28-2011, 19:39
Maybe our agencies should consider handling cowards the way the Army handled Private Slovik. That Guy might have a change of heart (well, if he had anything but pus and that empty feeling inside him) and quit before he gets any of the real cops hurt.

Well executions may be a bit stiff for the punishment, but ... :whistling:

ateamer
05-28-2011, 19:42
Well executions may be a bit stiff for the punishment, but ... :whistling:
Formal drumming-out then, maybe?

AZLawDawg
05-28-2011, 19:50
Or make a decision, a trait of That/this guy who makes rank is they will desperately endeavor to NEVER make a decision. Always trying to kick it upstairs to avoid ever having to take responsibility for something.

What the... I think your old supervisor transferred out here. Did this same supervisor utter the timeless classic "why do you guys need shotguns and rifles??"

wow...

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 20:00
What the... I think your old supervisor transferred out here. Did this same supervisor utter the timeless classic "why do you guys need shotguns and rifles??"

wow...

Actually one of them told the news paper in an interview that if the dept. didn't require it he wouldn't even carry a gun.

Of course this is the same **** head that when I was a new rookie sent me to a call to "stand by" while the city fire Marshal had some junk vehicles towed from a lot. He said the Fire Marshal had requested a stand by because of the guy that owned the property and the vehicles. The POS assured me that the guy was a good guy and would cause no problems.

I ended up in a knock down drag out fight with this guy. ( the Fire Marshal just stood there and watched.) a neighbor called the dept and told them to send some officers, the Dispatcher told him that we already had an officer there, He replied,"I know he is fighting a guy".

By the time backup arrived I had the guy cuffed and stuffed. torn uniform, badge ripped off along with some of my other brass. When I told the Fire Marshal how my supervisor had told me there would not be a problem he said, "What?? I told him when I asked for the stand by this guy pulled a gun on me yesterday!"

Me and the supervisor had some words.

Funny thing though, the guy I had to beat down? later he would tell people I was the best damn cop on the dept.

:rofl::rofl:

ateamer
05-28-2011, 20:05
Funny thing though, the guy I had to beat down? later he would tell people I was the best damn cop on the dept.

:rofl::rofl:
Not many of those old school crooks left. At least they knew to respect the man who kicked their ass.

collim1
05-28-2011, 20:08
Good. Nobody wants a "that guy."

Did the bad guy make that whoosh sound they make when all the wind gets knocked out of them?

It could have gone ALOT worse than it did. When chasing a felony suspect your only thought is to catch up and get him on the ground.

When he turned around with that knife in his hand I was closing fast and well inside the 21ft gap.

I didn't know it at the time, but there was two others officers who had joined in behind me closing fast. I guess he decided he didn't want to fight all three of us.

And yes, there was a nice solid thud followed by the air in his lungs busting loose:supergrin:

OldCurlyWolf
05-28-2011, 20:13
Yeah, we have those too. They must be freakin' everywhere!

They are. I have been away from LE for years and I run into all variations of "that guy" and have for years. I don't like them either.:steamed:
One good thing is that I have enough lead in my pants to do something about it quite a lot of the times I have to deal with them. They usually try to stay far away from me.:tongueout:

:rofl::rofl:

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 20:15
Not many of those old school crooks left. At least they knew to respect the man who kicked their ass.

Yep, ran into quite a few back in the old days, once you thumped their ass they would be your friend for life.

AZLawDawg
05-28-2011, 20:48
Actually one of them told the news paper in an interview that if the dept. didn't require it he wouldn't even carry a gun.

Of course this is the same **** head that when I was a new rookie sent me to a call to "stand by" while the city fire Marshal had some junk vehicles towed from a lot. He said the Fire Marshal had requested a stand by because of the guy that owned the property and the vehicles. The POS assured me that the guy was a good guy and would cause no problems.

I ended up in a knock down drag out fight with this guy. ( the Fire Marshal just stood there and watched.) a neighbor called the dept and told them to send some officers, the Dispatcher told him that we already had an officer there, He replied,"I know he is fighting a guy".

By the time backup arrived I had the guy cuffed and stuffed. torn uniform, badge ripped off along with some of my other brass. When I told the Fire Marshal how my supervisor had told me there would not be a problem he said, "What?? I told him when I asked for the stand by this guy pulled a gun on me yesterday!"

Me and the supervisor had some words.

Funny thing though, the guy I had to beat down? later he would tell people I was the best damn cop on the dept.

:rofl::rofl:

oh ****, amazing.

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 21:03
One bright spot with bad supervisors, learn from them.

They are the best source for learning how NOT to be a supervisor.

msu_grad_121
05-28-2011, 21:06
Yep, ran into quite a few back in the old days, once you thumped their ass they would be your friend for life.

See, I can't even comprehend that. Usually it's death threats and accusations of racism, brutality, etc. I've only had one person I've laid out say anything even remotely decent to me afterwards, and to that kids' credit, he took his thumpin like a man, apologized, shook my hand and said he was ready to face whatever the judge had for him. More stand up and guts in that kid's pinky finger than in any 10 of the other guys I've had to go hands on with put together.

Dragoon44
05-28-2011, 21:13
See, I can't even comprehend that. Usually it's death threats and accusations of racism, brutality, etc. I've only had one person I've laid out say anything even remotely decent to me afterwards, and to that kids' credit, he took his thumpin like a man, apologized, shook my hand and said he was ready to face whatever the judge had for him. More stand up and guts in that kid's pinky finger than in any 10 of the other guys I've had to go hands on with put together.

Imagine your chief telling you, "You have to treat people the way they will respond to, if someone is interfering and causing a problem, some you can tell them, "Sir step back and be quiet, Some you have to tell them, "Shut your damn mouth" some you got to grab them by the throat and slam their head against the wall and tell them, "I told you to shut your ******* mouth!"

:supergrin:

msu_grad_121
05-28-2011, 21:52
Imagine your chief telling you, "You have to treat people the way they will respond to, if someone is interfering and causing a problem, some you can tell them, "Sir step back and be quiet, Some you have to tell them, "Shut your damn mouth" some you got to grab them by the throat and slam their head against the wall and tell them, "I told you to shut your ******* mouth!"

:supergrin:

*Light decending from on high, choirs of angels singing, I fall to my knees*

It's so beautiful! They should've sent a poet!

:rofl:

BennerP220
05-28-2011, 22:21
One bright spot with bad supervisors, learn from them.

They are the best source for learning how NOT to be a supervisor.

This is spot on!!!

lawman800
05-28-2011, 22:55
We actually fired a guy for cowardice. It's in our policy that we do not show cowardice in the line of duty. This guy refused to get out of his car to back an officer from another agency when he witnessed a fight between the officer and multiple assailants. The other agency was ticked and it became a big bruhaha and nobody on either side backed the coward, as it should be.

We still have our share of sputniks or people who all of a sudden have a traffic stop when a hot call comes out so they don't have to go. The best is one guy who made every reason to not hop on an emergent call of a battery in progress on a bus driver who was being attacked by gang members. We just got on shift and didn't start briefing but when the call came out, we hopped to it, everyone of us, and we knew we will just do briefing later and get our stuff and whatnot. He stayed behind and made up some excuse that he was waiting for his wife to drop something off for him so he had to wait at the station for her... WTF?

9L82
05-31-2011, 19:03
One of my road sergeants came to me with a "concern" a few months ago. He, along with several other officers, became engaged in a foot pursuit/fight with several suspects. Amazingly, the sgt. never fought or chased anyone.

He said he was concerned because he watched one of our probationary officers duking it out in a creek bed with the bad guy for " about two minutes" and felt that the use of force was excessive and concerning.

My only question to him was why his pansy ass stood there for two minutes watching a fellow cop fight with someone an his only inclination was to burn his ass with me. I told him to grow a pair and stay away from my office.

Little did I know that the Chief overheard the entire discussion and disciplined the sgt. for failing to assist the probationary officer. Awesome

Dragoon44
05-31-2011, 19:48
the sgt. never fought or chased anyone.

He said he was concerned because he watched one of our probationary officers duking it out in a creek bed with the bad guy for " about two minutes" and felt that the use of force was excessive and concerning.

Geez, I'd think one of my old Sgts. had gone to work for you except his cirrhosis finally caught up with him a few years after he retired.

He was one of those never used force guys. One time when he had a "excessive force complaint filed against him with a shoplifter that resisted when he arrested them the chief laughed the complainant out of his office.

He said, "That guy use force, much less excessive force????????" then he looked at me and said, "Now if they had said it was you, I would have been worried, but never him."

:rofl::rofl:

9L82
05-31-2011, 20:28
Geez, I'd think one of my old Sgts. had gone to work for you except his cirrhosis finally caught up with him a few years after he retired.

He was one of those never used force guys. One time when he had a "excessive force complaint filed against him with a shoplifter that resisted when he arrested them the chief laughed the complainant out of his office.

He said, "That guy use force, much less excessive force????????" then he looked at me and said, "Now if they had said it was you, I would have been worried, but never him."

:rofl::rofl:

Nothing worse than a chief who really knows you...I did tell this sgt. he'd make a fine chief one day!!

msu_grad_121
05-31-2011, 20:39
Little did I know that the Chief overheard the entire discussion and disciplined the sgt. for failing to assist the probationary officer. Awesome

Score one for the CHIEF! I need a mailing address for you 2, I've got 2 bottles of Pirate Pete's Grape-Flavored Scotch for you guys! Just...don't let it touch your skin.

9L82
05-31-2011, 21:12
Score one for the CHIEF! I need a mailing address for you 2, I've got 2 bottles of Pirate Pete's Grape-Flavored Scotch for you guys! Just...don't let it touch your skin.

Big spender, that's how I ended up with my third child!!

msu_grad_121
05-31-2011, 21:49
Big spender, that's how I ended up with my third child!!

Then you know why I gotta get rid of this crap! FOC is already huntin me! :tongueout:

car541
05-31-2011, 22:19
The one I hate is the guys who asks for backup and looks genuinely scared and in over his head when you show up at the scene.


But as soon as the cuffs get double locked, he will start in with the big talk.

I hate THAT guy.

ateamer
05-31-2011, 22:39
We had one like that. One day I rolled up to cover him when he was out with a parolee who was illegally camping in a vehicle in a parking lot. Seems that earlier in the day, the guy had told the deputy that he had permission to be there, and of course he didn't. Oh, and this was not your typical tatted up, buffed out convict, but just an old worn-down junkie.

As I got out of my car, the deputy's body language changed, and I assume the tone of his voice did as well (no idea exactly how he was before cover was there, but knowing his M.O...). He started getting redassed over the parolee lying to him and told him "son, don't you ever lie to me!" (Son? Really? The parolee was a good 15 years older than the deputy.) The parolee asked him why he had to be a hardass, which really set him off. The next thing out of the deputy's mouth was "Are you backsassing me, son? 'Cause if you give me any back-sass, I'll have your ass right back on the third tier at Quentin!" It was at that point that I got back in my car and cleared. Act like that much of an Adam Henry with no call to do so and you are on your own, Sprout.

Fortunately he retired on an injury sometime after that.

Naelbis
05-31-2011, 22:50
We have one of those. Everyone finally got tired of him but the Sheriff didn't want to cut him loose so he transferred him to Civil process. He does a pretty good job with the papers, the only annoying thing is it got him a promotion and now he is 4th on our dept chain of command. We usually don't even call him when he is a supervisor on call because he always hems and haws and says "I dunno, call someone else".

lawman800
05-31-2011, 22:53
We have all those and more.

There's a guy who calls for back for juveniles and he'll be standing by the whole time and as soon as the calvary shows, he'll start MF'ing the kids and yelling at them and acting hard. But he will never do it alone. He also calls for backs for all t-stops to the poin where if we hear him run someone and the DOB is is a female born in the 1940's or 50's, we will all call out over the air if he needs a code 3 back.

The other guy will get into foot pursuits over infractions such as minors with cigarettes, no joke. He called one stop out and immediately went into foot pursuit so we rolled, not knowing what he got and we pulled up and he said he saw some kids with cigarettes and they ran. We just drove away and left him there.

Oh... The stories about "that guy" that I can tell all of y'all!

FiremanMike
05-31-2011, 23:46
I mean, it is OK to be afraid of some of these situations, the difference is the guy who responds anyways vs the guy who doesn't.

lawman800
05-31-2011, 23:50
Courage is not the lack of fear but it is being cognizant of the fear, overcoming it, and doing your job anyway.

Bruce M
06-01-2011, 05:26
I worked with a guy who saw a couple females driving away from a shooting in progress involving an officer in a service corridor; he said he didn't see them well enough to figure out who they were. In my little corner of the world, I believe that we are missing an actual peer review process, which I suspect would be much harder on some of these officers than the administrators are. Of course that might seriously reduce the political issues that helped got them to high ranks.

lawman800
06-01-2011, 09:34
Oh yeah... The female officer that drove right by a suspect we were looking for because she said he didn't match the description. Dispatch put out suspect has shaved head, white tee shirt, dark baggy pants possibly jeans. She drives right by the guy who was shaved head, wearing a light gray tee shirt and black baggy pants. He was the only guy on the street in the same DOT. (county residential area during midday)

We stop the guy a few seconds later and ask why she didn't catch him earlier and she said he doesn't fit the description. WTF?

Dragoon44
06-01-2011, 10:02
Oh yeah... The female officer that drove right by a suspect we were looking for because she said he didn't match the description. Dispatch put out suspect has shaved head, white tee shirt, dark baggy pants possibly jeans. She drives right by the guy who was shaved head, wearing a light gray tee shirt and black baggy pants. He was the only guy on the street in the same DOT. (county residential area during midday)

We stop the guy a few seconds later and ask why she didn't catch him earlier and she said he doesn't fit the description. WTF?

And she didn't want to violate his rights by detaining him!

:rofl::rofl:

DaBigBR
06-01-2011, 11:39
Well if we're telling stories...

Former coworker (now with another agency) had a penchant for being quick with the attitude and accusations and short on the critical thinking. He stopped a car one night, smelled marijuana, and immediately removed and arrested the driver for OWI. No interview. No field sobriety. Didn't even get the kid's ID. I watched this all from the passenger side fender as I went out with him basically as he made the stop. He finally gets the kid's ID and says "****, he's a juvenile."

I got back in my car and cleared.

lawman800
06-03-2011, 03:09
Stories of "that guy" are cool! Reminds us that we all have to suffer the same with fools.

So... Another tale...

I t-stop a female. Writing her a citation for not yielding to pedestrians in a crosswalk. Female trainee (2nd month on) pulls up with her TO to watch how an experienced street wise and super tactically aware senior officer (me) conduct a stop. Well, the violator's family lives down the street, sees this, and starts walking toward us. No big deal, it was the husband and 2 kids.

She tells them to stay back while I finish up. Fine. But she yells it. Okay. Then the guy takes another step forward (he was about 20 yards from me). She yells out in front of the guy's kids, "I told you to stay back, what are you, STUPID?!?!?!"

Long story short... IA follows and I had to be interviewed about her "unprofessional conduct" after the female makes a complaint.... Wasn't fun.