Anyone else, just not "ate up with it"? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Agent6-3/8
05-31-2011, 10:55
The "on call" thread got me wondering prompted me to post this thread.

I love the job. While its tough, the hours long and the pay low its an awesome way to make a living if you're in it for the right reasons. With that said, I never was ate up with it, even as a boot. Perhaps its because I worked crazy and very long hours with my last department. Seems like some guys live for it and they can't wait for their next shift, work all the OT they can, wear cop stuff all the time, even off duty, etc. We all know the kind.

For whatever reason I never was like that. (and it seems a bit unusual, honestly) I love the work, but I refuse to let it consume me. I highly value my time with my family and loved ones. Family is number one with me. When it comes down to it LE is how I make my living (or at least used to and want to again) its not my life or what I live for. Thats not to say its "just a job". It is definitely a way of life and I feel a strong calling to LE, to step out and do what others can't or won't. I simply don't let it define who I am.

Anyone else feel the same way?

collim1
05-31-2011, 11:12
I am progressively less "ate up with it" each day. After 6-7 years of it I can actually see myself not working in LE anymore at some point, something I couldn't even consider when I started.

Might always be in some form of LE, but I am growing tired of patrol and am not interested in being promoted to detectives.

SpoiledBySig
05-31-2011, 11:28
At my last department, for about 20 years, I think I was swearing that I couldn't wait to get my 20 years in and then retire every day.

When I finally made it and got my 20 year pension, for almost a year of not working, I was thinking to myself, "oh God, what am I going to do now?". I probably drove my family crazy.

I got back into LE before a year of retirement went by. It's a very different type of policing but it feels I'm still somehow "connected" and I'm sworn and all.

Still, I do love doing lawn work outside and when I was retired (2004-2005) I had the best looking lawn in the neighborhood. :cool:

Those feelings that perhaps I should just retire again, come and go every week, or two. The truth is... I totally failed at retirement and I think many here will do lousy at retirement also. :faint:

You'll probably go through lulls every few years, where you feel like you don't want to do it any longer...take a long vacation when that happens, you'll come back appreciating work more.

I mean, some people can do their time, retire and they're fine. Nothing wrong with that. It's just that most of the officers that are able to go back to job- do go back to the job.

Vigilant
05-31-2011, 11:39
The "on call" thread got me wondering prompted me to post this thread.

I love the job. While its tough, the hours long and the pay low its an awesome way to make a living if you're in it for the right reasons. With that said, I never was ate up with it, even as a boot. Perhaps its because I worked crazy and very long hours with my last department. Seems like some guys live for it and they can't wait for their next shift, work all the OT they can, wear cop stuff all the time, even off duty, etc. We all know the kind.

For whatever reason I never was like that. (and it seems a bit unusual, honestly) I love the work, but I refuse to let it consume me. I highly value my time with my family and loved ones. Family is number one with me. When it comes down to it LE is how I make my living (or at least used to and want to again) its not my life or what I live for. Thats not to say its "just a job". It is definitely a way of life and I feel a strong calling to LE, to step out and do what others can't or won't. I simply don't let it define who I am.

Anyone else feel the same way?

That pretty much sums it up for me.

Snafu
05-31-2011, 11:52
I feel very similar to the original poster. Of course I only have about 2-3 years left til I will likely retire.

Somehow the last couple years of fatal crashes, homicides, suicides, infant/child deaths have grown very, very tiring to me. I sometimes wish I could "un-see" some things.

Of course, maybe I'm just getting old. :whistling:

JTipper.45
05-31-2011, 12:38
You know, what is strange is I had this converstion with a friend of mine last night. He has just become a reserve officer and I noticed that he had been coming home in uniform for the last few nights all in a row. Last night he was in uniform and pulled a no-no by trying to be the police while in his POV over a traffic offense. That's when I had to explain a few things to him. I was "ate up with it" when I was a reserve and a part timer back in the early 90s. That was because I didn't "have" to do it, it was fun and an adrenaline rush. It was also a different type of policing back then. Things were more hands on and alot less personal. If you had to "negotiate" with someone either at a bar or during an arrest it wasn't taken personal. It was common to get back to the station, uncuff your arrestee, pour both of you a cup of coffee and sit down and lick your wounds together while doing the paperwork. Nowadays you arrest someone and It is like you have wronged them for life no matter what they have done.

I realized I was "ate up with it" right after I almost wound up divorced. It took several years to get my marrige back on track and I vowed to never let that happen again. I now also try to keep some of the younger guys coming up from making the same mistake. I have seen too many of my friends divorced over the years because of the job. While I also love my job, I had to come to the realization that the job doesn't love me. If you let it , it will chew your life up and spit it back at you. This is why I came to respect all the guys in this line of work that make it to retirement. They earn it.

CAcop
05-31-2011, 13:07
It's been a long slow transition towards it being "just a job" for the last 6 years. A few things at work have made it that way. A bad chief, a few incidents that forced me to realize this was not the only job in the world for me, the city cutting pay long before the economy tanked, and the wear and tear of the tempo our workload. A big part was getting married.

I think it is important to have that transition because at some point you are going to have to give it up. That can be voluntary or involuntary. You can't be one of those guys who goes full bore for 30 years and then retires. You wife is going to divorce you within months. I have seen it happen. You can't be a stranger to your family for 20-30 years an then suddenly be home all the time. Before they had no clue what you were like, now all of a sudden they realize you annoy the crap out of them. And this is when you decide to leave, God forbid should you get hurt before you are ready to go.

Every cop needs to know when it is time to hang it up. And you have to be ready for it when the time comes.

BL33D 4 M3
05-31-2011, 13:18
Every cop needs to know when it is time to hang it up. And you have to be ready for it when the time comes.
I've known a few that have stayed too long at the dance. I find much truth and wisdom in your post. Here is the difficult part...how do you tell someone you care for that its time?

OFCJIM40
05-31-2011, 13:40
I was worried it was just me! After 13 years of this, count me in too. Society can only tear down the Police so far until it affects our morale.

DaBigBR
05-31-2011, 14:32
The last year or so has pretty much done that for me. It's incredible what effect morale has on productivity. Were I in a department where people were treated fairly and wanted to be at work every day, things would be different.

Sharky7
05-31-2011, 14:59
It's pretty natural to be consumed by it all when you first start. I actually worry a bit about the guys who are not too excited in FTO. I would rather have to be pulling someone back then pushing them forward.

It's hard not to slow down a bit after you get crapped on. Eventually you make your way through it sooner or later and realize your badge and your department aren't just one asshat or dirty boss....can't let one or two people ruin it for you.

Balance is important though. It's fun to love what you do for your profession. But...you "work to live" not "live to work." Gotta have a life to enjoy outside of LE.

I never really got to the phase of wearing 5.11 off duty or police paraphernalia crap every where I go. That was just a bit too dorky.

wprebeck
05-31-2011, 16:34
I with you - posted m sentiments in the other thread you mentioned.


Its not "just a job", but you can't let it destroy evrything else in your life. I've seen way too much of it, and even had to cuss out a good friend who seemed to be heading down that road. Used to hear about his wife, kids, him riding his Goldwing - for a few months, it got so all I heard about was work. I don't know if our conversation had anything to do with it, but shortly after, I started seeing my friend get back to normal.

We all have to find that balance, because in the end, when you retire - few will remember you, fewer still will care. That's the way of things in this work. Do the absolute best you can while you're here but not at the expense of your family and things you love.

For me, I put the wife and kids first. Sometimes, things happen, and i miss a bit of time with them. More often, I don't, as that time is rare and precious to me. My family will be here for me long after I forget the names of almostneveryone I worked with and they deserve to be put first.

I also have hobbies that don't involve anything related to work. Other than the fact that I use a gun to kill animals, hunting/fishing/trapping are my main things. There's nothing better to me than watching the sun rise in the morning on the lake or in a treestand...except maybe watching it set. Both are nice...and recharge my batteries after a weeknofndealong with scum, refuse, and trash of the homo sapiens variety.

Keep things in perspective guys, and don't get so into it you lose the things that really matter.

KiloBravo
05-31-2011, 17:08
I don't think I could have read this thread at a better time right now. I am still in the testing process for a department, but all is going well so far and my chances seem OK at making it to the academy. *knock on wood.* I need to hear what all of you veterans have to say about finding a balance between this job and home life. I can already tell you that I am super charged up about hopefully having this opportunity. I just hope that I remember to put the important things like family first and foremost. If any of you have anymore advice on the subject for somebody in my position, please feel free to share. I am all ears.

packsaddle
05-31-2011, 17:44
Lots of good stuff so far.

Thanks for sharing.

....because in the end, when you retire - few will remember you, fewer still will care.

But, those few who DO remember you are far more important than the many that won't.

The boy you saved from drowning in a swollen creek, the piggy bank you recovered from a burglary suspect and returned to the little girl, the battered woman you convinced to leave that abusive relationship, etc. etc.

Those are the things to dwell on, not the aggressive drunk you tased after the bar closed, not the whiny speeder that complained about you to the Chief or Sheriff, not the lazy officer that threw you under the bus for a promotion, etc. etc..

old_pigpen
05-31-2011, 19:16
My boss has a couple of sayings: "The job will never tell you its loves you" and "On your death bed, you will never say "I wish I could have spent more time at work."" Good advise no matter what your job is.

The full time deputy that was our reserve coordinator made sure we reserve deputies didn't spend all our time at the SO and neglect our families. He even "fired" one reserve deputy that he felt was neglecting his family!

Cochese
05-31-2011, 19:41
I am progressively less "ate up with it" each day. After 6-7 years of it I can actually see myself not working in LE anymore at some point, something I couldn't even consider when I started.

Might always be in some form of LE, but I am growing tired of patrol and am not interested in being promoted to detectives.

This.

I am burned out. I am tired of bosses. I'm tired of the ever present danger in light of my new baby. I'm tired of patrol work and dealing with drunks every night.

I can't really do anything else and make as much money though. I'm going federal. No more uniform. Better pay, no more damn vest, no more walking or driving around in a target.

I can barely make it through a shift in a patrol car without wanting to tear my uniform off.

msu_grad_121
05-31-2011, 20:51
This.

I am burned out. I am tired of bosses. I'm tired of the ever present danger in light of my new baby. I'm tired of patrol work and dealing with drunks every night.

I can't really do anything else and make as much money though. I'm going federal. No more uniform. Better pay, no more damn vest, no more walking or driving around in a target.

I can barely make it through a shift in a patrol car without wanting to tear my uniform off.

Well, FWIW, I've heard time and again that 7-10 years is burn out territory. Apparently if you can make it past that mark, you're good. I'm not saying don't do it, but it could just be that time in your career. Of course, if you need to go Fed, no one's gonna blame you.

I don't know that I've ever been fed up with the job, but at the same time I don't think I was ever consumed by it, either. I DO have a collection of PD shirts from various areas that I or my friends have visited, but I rarely if ever wear them.

I've always been pretty good at leaving work at work, and try not to tell stories when I'm out with my friends. If I do, it's usually something awesome that happened or some way that I screwed the pooch that'll make people laugh. I've had to tell guys I work with that they're not allowed to piss and moan about work while we're out drinking, but of course we always end up discussing it a little bit.

As has been previously stated, I work to live, not live to work. My days off are mine, and precious to me, too. But that's just me...

Rabbi
05-31-2011, 21:06
One of the worst things about it all, is you have to hide a lot of it.

In life, you get to be proud of what you do. If you are a rich man, you can drive a Ferrari. If you are a West Point grad, you wear the ring. If you are a Lawyer you can hang that sheepskin....

It isnt just about "look at me..." no, the difference is, when you are a part of something else, doing something "more", a step above, sure, you get bragging rights, but it doesnt matter how people feel about you. You can enjoy the admiration and feed on the envy. You get to win no matter how someone feels about you, what you do, and how you show it.

That is not true of Police work. It is one of the suckier aspects of getting behind the badge. No one is trying to kill, sue, hurt, ruin, destroy...(all with powerful ferver) Ferrari guy, Ring knocker guy, Super educated guy.... As a cop, every thing you do is wrong in someones eyes and everyone does get a say to some extent.

I love it. I really do but in general, I have to keep it to myself except with those who understand and so far the only people I have found who understand are other LEO's.

Dukeboy01
05-31-2011, 21:26
I was lucky. I got dumped on very early in my career and had any illusions that the "big blue machine" gave a rat's patoot about me personally crushed, stomped on, set afire, and run over with a bulldozer.

I still like my job and I think I do it well. But I don't love it and I have no illusions that it loves me. I find that the best way to get through the bad days is to adopt a mercenary mindset. I'm also big into the collective bargaining and union thing and get a fair amount of satisfaction sticking it back to the bosses and the city that way.

My first FTO was a real go getter. He was a former jarhead, a member of the SWAT team, a shirt- stay wearing company man through and through. You'd never catch him joining in a b*tch session or hear him speak a disparaging word against the bosses.

He got himself promoted to sergeant and went to our training section. He had been there for awhile when a new commander came in. One thing led to another and he found himself getting the shaft and drummed out of the unit.

He called me to talk about filing a grievance. He was really, really hurt by the way he was being done. I felt really sorry for him because he had done everything the department asked of him and more, only to finally run into a boss who was out to get him.

Moving out of my jurisdiction also helped my mental health. There are days when I literally feel a weight lifting as I cross the county line and flip the police radio off.

Sharky7
05-31-2011, 21:58
I'm going federal.


Good luck man. I am thinking the same thing, plan on going federal soon enough....I have it narrowed down to FBI and USSS. Unfortunately, neither are hiring now.

Sgt127
05-31-2011, 22:01
I'm in between. I have never been a cop off duty. Don't own a pair of 911's. Shorts, jeans, T-shirts. Maybe a BDU top with the sleeves torn off to conceal my gun.

The vast majority of my friends are not cops. A very eclectic mix. Radio talk show host, a professional photographer, a business owner, a master plumber etc.

But, when I am at work, I jump every good call. I love running code to majors, shooting and cuttings. I love catching bad guys.

10 years of SWAT and, I did give that up. I still liked it, but, it wasn't worth the wear and tear, being on call 24/7. Just wasn't worth it for me.

Dispatch loves me. There is no such thing as a priority call holding when I am logged on. They know they can advise me, and, I'll head that way.

I hired on 25 years ago to be a cop, and, thats what I want to do.

But, when the cop switch is off, its off completely.

RetailNinja
05-31-2011, 22:05
Despite working with/for some questionable people, I love this job. I take OT when I can, only to help buy toys now and then. When I retire, I may try teaching, but I will complete a full career in this field. Its a job that doesn't feel like work (except on the stand with a ******stain defense attorney)

Naelbis
05-31-2011, 22:18
I have 6 years in right now and I have a love/hate relationship with work. I am pretty burned out and hate going in and dealing with the BS, but I love feeling like I am making a difference. If we had a reserve unit I would quit and find a different job in a heartbeat and just do reserves. But around here if I quit I am done in LE unless I move a few hundred miles away and I can't do that because of my kids. So I keep trying to keep it together and hope it turns around even though I kinda know that nothing is gunna change.

PROSOUTH
05-31-2011, 22:30
I feel very similar to the original poster. Of course I only have about 2-3 years left til I will likely retire.

Somehow the last couple years of fatal crashes, homicides, suicides, infant/child deaths have grown very, very tiring to me. I sometimes wish I could "un-see" some things.

Of course, maybe I'm just getting old. :whistling:

I'm with ya on this one, to many ugly things have passed before my eyes in the last 27 years. The fatal OIS I thought would bother me at night has never ever bothered me, Thug Life has a cost and was by their choice.

Most of the ugly stuff I've grown cold too, it's the death of a child or the child abuse cases I've worked that gets to me.It's the kids that still get to me...:crying:

JohnnyReb
05-31-2011, 23:05
I could take it or leave it at this point. It just simply pays the bills.

MeefZah
06-01-2011, 00:02
The only things I "take home" with me anymore from work are my gun, and my survival attitude.

Well, technically I leave my gun at work, because it's a nusiance to lug it around, but I take a gun home with me.

There was a time the job was my life. I rarely took vacation, never called in sick, chose to live in the town I policed so I could be more connected to it, had complainants come to my house or call my cell phone at all hours to get my help... I was the police 24/7 and I loved it, I felt important and significant.

Then the job ****ed me up the ass with no lube, and I realized that after all the good I did there in ten years, after all the sweat and tears and energy I'd expended; no one even gave a **** about me, especially my "brother cops".

Lesson learned. Leason well ****ing learned.

So now, I hang out at my agency for eight hours a day, bull**** with the college kids, write a ticket now and again, and take my dispatched calls. I don't get too close to anyone I work with, I take sick leave as I see fit, I burn my vacation and don't save it, and I generally treat this job the way jobs have treated me in the past.

That's not to say I'm not proactive or not a professional when I'm working. I do a good, solid job, and I am still easily the most proactive officer here (which is honestly a real shame). I just have a new appreciation that I am but one cog in a machine that is spinning more or less without any assistance from me. If I keep spinning in time I'm good. If I **** up the rythym of the machine it will simply chew me up and spit me out.

Someone on here once said something along the lines of "the job will be here long after you leave" and that's exactly right. It will. No sense in investing your entire life into it.

txleapd
06-01-2011, 08:18
I love this job, and I give it 110%. But I don't let it take over my life.

The unit I'm in is very demanding. It tends to burn people out pretty quickly. The average shelf life here is less than 3 years. The work is what keeps us going. We work good cases, chase really bad guys, and put good crooks away. My family understands this. I might have to miss a mid-season baseball game, or something like that, but I'll be damned if I miss something big, like one of my kid's birthdays.

Right now it feels like the majority of the unit is approaching burn out. It's not uncommon to hit the wall for a little bit, and then to be right back your game. But it feels like the wall has been hitting us right back, non-stop. Feeling under-appreciated doesn't help. I don't care about "atta-boys", or slaps on the back, I just don't want to be treated like a rented mule.

The crappy part is that I couldn't see doing anything else. I don't know where I would be able to get the same job satisfaction. That's important to me.

CJStudent
06-01-2011, 09:44
It seems like we're all in the same boat. I used to love coming to work, and was ready to get out and get 'em. Now, over the last 4-6 months, the entire leadership of the shift has changed, and things suck, frankly. Our best supervisors have left, leaving one good one and maybe 2 decent ones (out of 10 or so). The good ones are stepped on, while the bad ones are left alone. It's crazy; within the last month, 5 people, out of a shift of 25 or so, have left already or have their notice in, myself included (going to other agencies, mostly). Most of those of us leaving are some of the hardest workers there, that actually get out and get stuff done, just to get crapped on because someone thinks they could have done it better, or they don't like us taking sick time (even with a dr's note), or just simply because they want to make a name for themselves and get promoted.

One incident sticks in my mind. I was having a conversation with a lieutenant towards the end of the shift about a month or so ago; he was trying to give me "career advice". He made the comment that he was so dedicated to the job, it had cost him two divorces. And that was what was expected of anybody who aspired to promote. I sat there slackjawed. It just blows my mind that anybody would think that was healthy at all, much less a good idea.

FiremanMike
06-01-2011, 10:08
I've been with the fire department for 13 years now, PD for 3. The biggest lesson I've learned is that this job doesn't give a **** about you, not for a second.

Take care of your mental health, take care of your family, do your job professionally and properly and go home every shift. Those medals you worked so hard to get don't mean crap to your wife and kids, they already think you're the best person in the world, and you CANT take them with you when you die.

seagravedriver
06-01-2011, 10:44
I have a lot of years with the fire dept. One day my dr. (who is involved in fire dept. emergency medicine as an advisor), looked at me and asked if I was "OK". I remember him saying that all the stuff you see is cumulative, it just does not go away. It stays. My wife is now letting me know every now and again how many years I have till I retire. Seems others noticed before I did. I feel part of the job is mentoring the young guys not to burn up and out. It is a slow grind.

SpoiledBySig
06-01-2011, 10:55
I love this job, and I give it 110%. But I don't let it take over my life.

The unit I'm in is very demanding. It tends to burn people out pretty quickly. The average shelf life here is less than 3 years.


Yeah. My last department, they limited your stint in Vice for like 3-4 years at a time. From 1986-1998 I did 3 stints (totaling almost 9 years).

My brother in law, who is cop for a Broward County Municipal police department thought that length of a stint was way too short at a time (who knows, he may have been right). Every agency gets a different Chief, who comes up with a different policy and I saw 3 Chiefs come and go during those 20 years.

Vice was fun, but it really got old fast (for me at least). I preferred the Detective Bureau and or Road Patrol. Every few years I just needed to put the Monkey suit back on and I couldn't resist all of those overtime details to increase my pension (drove my poor family crazy, what was I thinking?).

My wife would always keep telling me, "you can't replace time". It never sunk in until later and now I sort of regret trying to make more money to pump up a pension, I think I did lose a lot of family time as a result.

I had always envied those that had a rich wife and married into money, those few didn't seem to have to race and make more money during their careers...But I'm sure they had their problems too.

Funny thing is those who didn't kill themselves to pad their pensions probably ended up with the same pension amount I got.

Cochese
06-01-2011, 16:12
Well, FWIW, I've heard time and again that 7-10 years is burn out territory. Apparently if you can make it past that mark, you're good. I'm not saying don't do it, but it could just be that time in your career. Of course, if you need to go Fed, no one's gonna blame you...

Too many benefits not to. I have to get out of uniform. I feel okay when I'm not wearing it, but when I am, I am in pain. Looking forward to a polo shirt and normal pants.

Good luck man. I am thinking the same thing, plan on going federal soon enough....I have it narrowed down to FBI and USSS. Unfortunately, neither are hiring now.

USSS just closed positions a month or so ago. Sign up at usajobs.gov for their alerts. I get an e-mail everytime some new 1811 job opens. It's only a matter of time. I don't even care where I go or with what agency at this point. I just want to start my covered FLEO retirement clock and GTFO.

...The crappy part is that I couldn't see doing anything else. I don't know where I would be able to get the same job satisfaction. That's important to me.

Same problem here. That and I'm pretty alright at doing it.

CBennett
06-01-2011, 16:21
The "on call" thread got me wondering prompted me to post this thread.

I love the job. While its tough, the hours long and the pay low its an awesome way to make a living if you're in it for the right reasons. With that said, I never was ate up with it, even as a boot. Perhaps its because I worked crazy and very long hours with my last department. Seems like some guys live for it and they can't wait for their next shift, work all the OT they can, wear cop stuff all the time, even off duty, etc. We all know the kind.

For whatever reason I never was like that. (and it seems a bit unusual, honestly) I love the work, but I refuse to let it consume me. I highly value my time with my family and loved ones. Family is number one with me. When it comes down to it LE is how I make my living (or at least used to and want to again) its not my life or what I live for. Thats not to say its "just a job". It is definitely a way of life and I feel a strong calling to LE, to step out and do what others can't or won't. I simply don't let it define who I am.

Anyone else feel the same way?


To me its just a job..I am glad to have a job and try to do a good job..but its just a job. i value my time with my family and friends and hobbies FAR,FAR more than I do the job. I work about 1-2 Over Times a YEAR and normally one of those is just because I get mandated to stay lol...the other would be because the OT is "cake" OT and fell just perfect for me to want to do it(say a cake OT before going into my days off so i know I dont have to work the next day..that only happens about 1 X a year lol. but ive never let the job or felt the job was my "life". Been on the job in one form or another since 1990 till now either as a Cop or a Hack...still feel the same way now that I did when I started.

actionshooter10
06-01-2011, 21:06
I love my job but don't like my current department.

I get in trouble for being proactive and the political bs is at an all-time high.

I'm currently in the process with a different agency and CAN'T WAIT to switch. It will do wonders for my morale.

bmoore
06-01-2011, 22:24
Hope I dont get a verbal lashing for posting this in the PD section........Ive got 10 years in the fire service, last 7 as a Fireman/Paramedic with a busy agency; a lot of that time on the medic unit. My wife and I recently had a baby and I got a month off, before that I was pretty burnt. The station I was at is in meth central. Just tired of the same old calls every shift, and waking up 3 times after midnight for stupid !@#$ is annoying. Ive always had good annual evals and even better evals in the attititude section, I try not to show the irritation on scene. Truth be told this last year was the only time I was annoyed with work. Im at a slower station now on the engine the whole time for 4 months so it will be a nice break. I love my job and want it to stay that way, but we do face some challenges in our careers.

merlynusn
06-02-2011, 07:40
Yeah. And some days I want to be a hard charging go getter. But other days I just want to relax a bit and answer my calls. And with all the BS going on, the continual lack of raises, etc, it's taking its toll. I do love how the city keep bragging about how we are lowering the crime rate, yet they obviously don't care about us and don't give us a raise, but they will raise our insurance rates. Oh well. Nothing to do but either grin and bear it or move on. Problem is I'm still at the bottom of the pay scale and need the off duty and overtime to survive. I know thats my fault for not living within my means the first few years, but I've learned and am trying to get back on track.

ditchdoc24
06-02-2011, 10:51
I think I got a lot of the "infatuation" with the job out of the way when I was younger. I'm in my mid-30s now and have been in LE for 2 years now after spending 20 years in EMS/Fire. I've been a Paramedic for the past 16 years working mostly busy, inner-city areas. I've been about as far as I can go as a medic without moving up as a firefighter. I don't mind fighting fire but I enjoy being a cop and a medic much more. Anyway, as much as I enjoy being a cop, I enjoy spending time with my family more. When I come home, I take off the uniform, hang up the gunbelt, stow away my guns and that's it. I become Daddy. I still have a gun with me when I'm off duty because while I don't live in the city I work in, I live close enough that I periodically encounter "customers" when I'm out with the family. I work in a small town and while I don't write a lot of tickets, I'm really big on DUI enforcement and dope. I'm not supercop but I'll definitely fight with the best of them.