No love for the Colt Series 80? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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teleblaster
06-06-2011, 10:37
I would like to get a GI looking 1911. The Colt 1991 has the look, and I would really prefer blued to parkerized. I would just use it as a house gun, take it to the range to shoot, and have no aspirations (delusions) about becoming a great marksman. To me, the firing pin block to make it drop safe seems like a plus, even though I realize it makes it hard to get a great trigger job, which I don't think I need.

Plus which, Hickok45 has one! But I sense a lack of affection for them here. What is a better alternative for a blued, GI looking 1911? Learn to live with parkerized?

glock2740
06-06-2011, 10:45
I love mine. There's not much left that's Colt about it other than the slide and frame though. :cool:

http://i914.photobucket.com/albums/ac341/OU1911/DSC01824.jpg

JBnTX
06-06-2011, 10:47
The current Colt series 70 re-issue is closer to the GI 45 than the series 80 1991.
Get one of those.
http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols/ColtSeries70.aspx

Or buy the Colt 1991 and convert it to a series 70 by removing all the series 80
crap and installing a 4.00 dollar shim in place.
http://www.tjscustomgunworks.com/Photos4/1911Shim.htm

Or, buy a Springfield Armory GI 45 and have it blued.

limbkiller
06-06-2011, 12:00
I love Colts with or without the fireing pin safety. The only draw back that I see is putting those pieces back in after breaking the gun down. They can be a pain in the butt.


http://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee457/limbkiller/DSC00271.jpg

samuse
06-06-2011, 12:21
The only draw back that I see is putting those pieces back in after breaking the gun down. They can be a pain in the butt.


Tweezers help out a lot for me.

I don't have anything against a series 80 either.

Three-Five-Seven
06-06-2011, 12:23
Go to a gun store and dry fire some series 80 pistols and then dry fire one of the new series 70 guns.

If you come back here and say there is no difference in the trigger pull of the two types, I will reply by telling you my experience has been very different.

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb147/davegriffey/Left70.jpg

teleblaster
06-06-2011, 12:26
To to a gun stor and dry fire some series 80 pistols and then dry fire one of the new series 70 guns.

If you come back here and say there is no difference in the trigger pull of the two types, I will reply by telling you my experience has been very different.
I never thought they would be different; I'll see if I can do that. But is drop safe to be entirely sneezed at?

faawrenchbndr
06-06-2011, 12:31
I never thought they would be different; I'll see if I can do that. But is drop safe to be entirely sneezed at?

The drop safety is a good gimmick if you want it. It does drastically effect the trigger, vs series 70.
I feel it is an unneeded combination of parts/pieces.

The thing to remember is to NOT drop a loaded weapon!:whistling:

Three-Five-Seven
06-06-2011, 13:07
The drop safety is a good gimmick if you want it. It does drastically effect the trigger, vs series 70.
I feel it is an unneeded combination of parts/pieces.

The thing to remember is to NOT drop a loaded weapon!:whistling:

A titanium firing pin (lighter than steel) in combination with a heavy return spring are viewed as reliable means for preventing inertial discharge in dropped weapon. A drop safety without additional parts, if you will.

Bare in mind the 1911 was seventy years old before Colt's employed lawyers as gun designers.

teleblaster
06-06-2011, 13:08
The drop safety is a good gimmick if you want it. It does drastically effect the trigger, vs series 70.
I feel it is an unneeded combination of parts/pieces.

The thing to remember is to NOT drop a loaded weapon!:whistling:

Don't drop them you say? Really?

Do you have a work around on the firing pin safety on your Glocks?

Actually, I get the message. I need to fire them both at a store to really see what you guys are talking about. But there are a lot of references on the forum about how almost all modern handguns are drop safe. Products liability may drive a lot of that, but in theory it doesn't seem like a bad idea.

faawrenchbndr
06-06-2011, 13:18
No sense of humor? :dunno:

Anyrate,......"Do you have a work around on the firing pin safety on your Glocks?"

Yep,......carry a Springfield Armory EMP. I've sold off all my Glocks, not sure if I'll ever own another.

Three-Five-Seven
06-06-2011, 13:32
almost all modern handguns are drop safe.

First rule. All guns are loaded. Always.
Second rule. Don't point a gun at anything you don't want to destroy.

From a user's perspective, all guns are in condition zero. Always

No gun is ever safe to drop, throw, flip, twirl, slam, kick, lick, or treat in a casual fashion.

If you don't get the notion that a series 80 safety protects Colt's and not you, or that only you have responsibility for the safety of the firearms in your possession, then, I'm sorry to say, you're not ready to own a series anything that uses gunpowder and lead to do its work.

limbkiller
06-06-2011, 13:40
Maybe I've smashed my fingers too often in my trade. But I don't really feel any differance. But then I bass fish alot and don't use worms or jigs if I can use something else as my feel is not as acute as some.

faawrenchbndr
06-06-2011, 13:58
....If you don't get the notion that a series 80 safety protects Colt's and not you, or that only you have responsibility for the safety of the firearms in your possession, then, I'm sorry to say, you're not ready to own a series anything that uses gunpowder and lead to do its work.

Dang dude,..........wasn't that a bit harsh?! :dunno:

Mayhem like Me
06-06-2011, 14:07
Series 80 is the best and most reliable FP safety available on a 1911...
Not that it's needed , but of policy requires it , it has proven to be the best.

teleblaster
06-06-2011, 14:44
First rule. All guns are loaded. Always.
Second rule. Don't point a gun at anything you don't want to destroy.

From a user's perspective, all guns are in condition zero. Always

No gun is ever safe to drop, throw, flip, twirl, slam, kick, lick, or treat in a casual fashion.

If you don't get the notion that a series 80 safety protects Colt's and not you, or that only you have responsibility for the safety of the firearms in your possession, then, I'm sorry to say, you're not ready to own a series anything that uses gunpowder and lead to do its work.

I actually am capable of understanding those notions, and have even seen those two rules before. Where do you get the idea I am going to twirl, slam etc. a firearm? And I am sure no one on this forum has ever accidently dropped a firearm, right? And if one ever did accidently drop a handgun, in fact the safety might protect others at the range, next door, etc.; not just Colt. And they might appreciate the feature although they would not know about it if the gun did not fire.

Now, if you are just saying, with proper gun handling, the odds are vey slight that the firing pin safety would ever be necessary, so it is not worth sacrificing a good trigger pull for, you could have just said that. Why not just address the issue and save your abuse for your loved ones?

CMG
06-06-2011, 15:25
They're alright........... :cool:

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b175/pb9x19/CCE.jpg

Nickpisp
06-06-2011, 16:20
Go to a gun store and dry fire some series 80 pistols and then dry fire one of the new series 70 guns.




I just go to my safe and dry fire both types, not much difference.

GAFinch
06-06-2011, 17:31
The main downside to a series 70 trigger comes when you have other guns with firing pin safeties. If you start really appreciating a series 70 trigger, the triggers on the other guns get worse and worse.

Hokie1911
06-06-2011, 17:37
:popcorn:

H&K .45 AUTO
06-06-2011, 18:33
My Officer's ACP is a series 80 gun (I believe they all are), and it shoots great. I ran through my department's qualification course with it as my off-duty/back-up just a couple of weeks ago, and it's plenty accurate enough. I can't say enough good things about my Colt. It's accurate, concealable, 100% reliable, fires the .45 ACP cartridge, and has a pony on the slide. I have no issues with my series 80 Colt.

woodrowNC
06-06-2011, 18:36
Tweezers help out a lot for me.

I don't have anything against a series 80 either.

yup. tweezers are a must. hold the gun sideways. and op, i love colts. all of em. but the original series 70 is my favorite. colts drop safety is a hell of a lot easier, better than kimbers.

grecco
06-06-2011, 18:57
I love all colts, i have a series 80 commander,
And it has a decent trigger pull, infact its a great carry gun.
There are many 1911's ,but only one has the little horse.

woodrowNC
06-06-2011, 19:16
I love all colts, i have a series 80 commander,
And it has a decent trigger pull, infact its a great carry gun.
There are many 1911's ,but only one has the little horse.

:cheers:

Line Rider
06-06-2011, 19:32
For about the last year I've wanted a full house custom gun. After several emails and phone calls I decided that Novak Custom was the way to go. They recommended any type of Colt and esp the Series 80 as a base gun. Since it is going to be re worked it's going to have to been refinished. Novak's tech have told me that a 1991 would be a great choice for a base gun.

Jim S.
06-06-2011, 19:33
Now, if you are just saying, with proper gun handling, the odds are vey slight that the firing pin safety would ever be necessary, so it is not worth sacrificing a good trigger pull for, you could have just said that.

Let's get to the real point here...
It has been studied and done enough to come to the conclusion that dropping a 1911 from a normal height rarely has enough force to fire a round.
I believe it is like 10' before it actually happens.
If you carry it locked and cocked you would have to break the thumb safety, and get past both the initial hammer hooks and the half cock notch.
Not likely to happen.
There are plenty of good used series 70's around at ok prices, most of which were blued.
Unless you want a series 80 there is no reason to settle for one.
If you absolutley want a series 80 you can get the special parts from Cylinder and Slide to give the series 80 a pretty good feeling trigger.
When you ask for opinions on guns around here you will certainly get a variety of answers.
It is up to you to weed out the useful info and the crap. :whistling:

woodrowNC
06-06-2011, 19:43
The current Colt series 70 re-issue is closer to the GI 45 than the series 80 1991.
Get one of those.
http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols/ColtSeries70.aspx

Or buy the Colt 1991 and convert it to a series 70 by removing all the series 80
crap and installing a 4.00 dollar shim in place.
http://www.tjscustomgunworks.com/Photos4/1911Shim.htm

Or, buy a Springfield Armory GI 45 and have it blued.

option #3.

woodrowNC
06-06-2011, 19:46
I love Colts with or without the fireing pin safety. The only draw back that I see is putting those pieces back in after breaking the gun down. They can be a pain in the butt.


http://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee457/limbkiller/DSC00271.jpg

man, i love those grips.

BuckyP
06-06-2011, 20:29
Let's get to the real point here...
It has been studied and done enough to come to the conclusion that dropping a 1911 from a normal height rarely has enough force to fire a round.
I believe it is like 10' before it actually happens.
If you carry it locked and cocked you would have to break the thumb safety, and get past both the initial hammer hooks and the half cock notch.
Not likely to happen.


Wrong. It takes far less of a height to drop for a traditional 1911 to fire when dropped. The impact makes the firing pin move and strike the primer. The thumb safety, half cock notch has nothing to do with the series of events. That being said, most modern (non FPS) guns have a titanium firing pin and extra power firing pin spring to prevent this.

ETA: Drop Tests (http://www.10-8forums.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=95994&page=1)

BuckyP
06-06-2011, 20:34
My Colt 1991A1 enhanced by EGW is one of my favorite guns. You certainly can't feel the series 80 parts in my crisp 3.5 lb trigger pull. :supergrin:

bac1023
06-06-2011, 20:58
I would like to get a GI looking 1911. The Colt 1991 has the look, and I would really prefer blued to parkerized. I would just use it as a house gun, take it to the range to shoot, and have no aspirations (delusions) about becoming a great marksman. To me, the firing pin block to make it drop safe seems like a plus, even though I realize it makes it hard to get a great trigger job, which I don't think I need.

Plus which, Hickok45 has one! But I sense a lack of affection for them here. What is a better alternative for a blued, GI looking 1911? Learn to live with parkerized?

I much prefer a classic Series 70, but there's nothing wrong with the 1991.

limbkiller
06-07-2011, 04:39
man, i love those grips.

Thanks

auto45
06-07-2011, 05:44
Let's get to the real point here...
It has been studied and done enough to come to the conclusion that dropping a 1911 from a normal height rarely has enough force to fire a round.
I believe it is like 10' before it actually happens.

Actually, if you to 10-8 forum and search drop tests, you'll find they did test a 1911 dropped at different heights and surfaces.

On concrete, the "standard series 70" started firing at just 4 feet. with a 9mm, lightweight FP and new extra power FP spring, you could go 6 feet.

These are "real tests", not mathematical calculations, using just the slide or some fixture, etc.

But then, Colt "knew" this back in the 1930's when they developed a FP system and all the manufactures must "believe", to a greater or lessor extent, since all of them "modify" their 1911s to pass the California drop test of only 39".

teleblaster
06-07-2011, 06:37
Does the current Series 70 have a titanium firing pin? No mention of that in the specifications on their website.

HexHead
06-07-2011, 07:04
Does the current Series 70 have a titanium firing pin? No mention of that in the specifications on their website.

Yes, I noticed it on their website a couple of days ago.

http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols/ColtSeries70.aspx

Right there in the bullet points.

teleblaster
06-07-2011, 07:58
Yes, I noticed it on their website a couple of days ago.

http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols/ColtSeries70.aspx

Right there in the bullet points.

Duh. That is the very page I looked at; note to self: don't try to read and comprehend before 8:00 a.m.

teleblaster
06-07-2011, 08:53
And so if the Series 70 has the titanium firing pin, which I am figuring solves the potential drop fire problem, are there any disadvantages to the Series 70 firing pin, or any advantages of Series 80 over Series 70?

garander
06-07-2011, 18:05
Actually, if you to 10-8 forum and search drop tests, you'll find they did test a 1911 dropped at different heights and surfaces.

On concrete, the "standard series 70" started firing at just 4 feet. with a 9mm, lightweight FP and new extra power FP spring, you could go 6 feet.

These are "real tests", not mathematical calculations, using just the slide or some fixture, etc.

But then, Colt "knew" this back in the 1930's when they developed a FP system and all the manufactures must "believe", to a greater or lessor extent, since all of them "modify" their 1911s to pass the California drop test of only 39".

those tests are done with the pistol held in a jig so it will land exactly square on the muzzle. nearly impossible to do on your own. for the unfortunates tho, i think you would get by unscathed if it did happen.

woettinger
06-07-2011, 21:09
I love Colts with or without the fireing pin safety. The only draw back that I see is putting those pieces back in after breaking the gun down. They can be a pain in the butt.


http://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee457/limbkiller/DSC00271.jpg

Where do you get those grips?

BuckyP
06-08-2011, 05:39
Just did a full detail strip and clean of my 1991A1. Man, was it filthy!! :wow:

The series 80 stuff is not that bad, especially the slide. Much better than a Smith slide. (What was S&W thinking, you have to remove the rear sight to get to the FPS :upeyes: )

Going to have to get it refinished soon. I really like this gun in black, but the bluing come off too easy. Any suggestions?

faawrenchbndr
06-08-2011, 06:16
I'm thinking very seriously about sending the Delta to Berryhill to have it refinished with Ionbond.
Matte frame and rounds with polished slide flats.

limbkiller
06-08-2011, 08:21
Where do you get those grips?

Altamonte grips. They are not that pricey either. 45.00 plus shipping. When I saw them I just had to order them.

bac1023
06-08-2011, 10:00
I'm thinking very seriously about sending the Delta to Berryhill to have it refinished with Ionbond.
Matte frame and rounds with polished slide flats.

:thumbsup:

BuckyP
06-08-2011, 10:01
I'm thinking very seriously about sending the Delta to Berryhill to have it refinished with Ionbond.
Matte frame and rounds with polished slide flats.

Is Ionbond a molecular coating, or a baked on finish?

faawrenchbndr
06-08-2011, 10:52
Is Ionbond a molecular coating, or a baked on finish?

See below


IONBOND;
Tungsten DLC (Diamond Like Carbon), AKA Diamondblack DLC is a PVD (physical vapor deposition) coating. The parts are placed in a special chamber, the carbon is ionized and a thin film is deposited on the surface of the steel. The color is black and will show the surface finish of the steel that is coated. Polished surfaces will remain shiny and matte surfaces will continue to look matte after refinishing.