Small, reflex red dot sights? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Eric2340
06-07-2011, 17:08
Looking to possibly get a small, reflex red dot "Docter" style- WHO makes the best supposedly? Is there one that will fit my Glock that I can also buy the same one to fit a long gun for CQB?

I have an EO Tech for my long guns, but I find it a bit big and clunky. Obviously it won't fit a Glock, but I am also thinking I'd like a little smaller red dot for my long guns that is not insane price wise (that small Micro Aimpoint is just too much at $600 :( ). Again, I'd also like to use the same models between one of my Glocks and a couple of my long guns (CQB distances on the long guns, not like the longer distances the EO Tech can do).

Suggestions? Experiences?

Thanks -

GRT45
06-07-2011, 18:54
Suggestions for most durable and reliable:

Trijicon RMR LED RM02 8MOA
Trijicon RMR Adjustable LED RM07 6.5MOA (new)

The RM07 Adjustable LED can operate in auto or manual brightness mode and is suitable for lighting conditions ranging from desert sun to night vision applications.

You can find the RM02 online selling for $420 and the RM07 for $470. The RM07 is my choice for a RDS suitable for a Glock pistol or CQB shotgun. Personally, I wouldn't go with a RDS reticle smaller than 6.5MOA on a pistol that is intended for personal protection.

The RMR can be mounted on a Glock using a rear sight dovetail adapter, or on a milled slide with tall suppressor sights as co-witness BUIS. See tsdcombatsystems.com (http://www.tsdcombatsystems.com) for examples of the latter.

Eric2340
06-07-2011, 19:56
Suggestions for most durable and reliable:

Trijicon RMR LED RM02 8MOA
Trijicon RMR Adjustable LED RM07 6.5MOA (new)

The RM07 Adjustable LED can operate in auto or manual brightness mode and is suitable for lighting conditions ranging from desert sun to night vision applications.

You can find the RM02 online selling for $420 and the RM07 for $470. The RM07 is my choice for a RDS suitable for a Glock pistol or CQB shotgun. Personally, I wouldn't go with a RDS reticle smaller than 6.5MOA on a pistol that is intended for personal protection.

The RMR can be mounted on a Glock using a rear sight dovetail adapter, or on a milled slide with tall suppressor sights as co-witness BUIS. See RedDotPistols.com (http://www.reddotpistols.com/) for examples of the latter.


WOW, $400 is a little more than I wanted to spend on a reflex red dot for either application. I mean don't get me wrong, I realize things cost what they do b/c you get what you pay for, but that's just a bit more than what I was looking for.

Second choice for what I am looking for in a little more affordable range?

For $400 I'd assume just keeping the $$ in the EO Tech and NOT running a smaller one on a long gun or a Glock. :(

HAMMERHEAD
06-07-2011, 21:14
If you can't swing an RMR, the Burris Fastfire gets pretty good reviews.
Other small dots include C-More STS, Leupold Deltapoint, J-Point.

I've been saving up for the battery free Trijicon dual illuminated RMR with 7 moa dot. I have the full size Trijicon Reflex sight on a .357, and it is one rugged mo' fo'.

GRT45
06-08-2011, 09:09
Second choice for what I am looking for in a little more affordable range?

Trijicon RMR RM07/RM02 and Leupold DeltaPoint 7.5MOA are in the top tier of my favorites for one RDS suitable for both pistol and CQB shotgun, with the Leupold a distant second place. Leupold is still up there in cost at a discounted $320-$360 depending on the mount.

In the next tier, Burris FastFire II is a reasonable choice at $176 from my online source. Here is a relevant thread at the Red Dot Pistols Forum at WarriorTalk.com: RMR vs. Burris? (http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?78863-RMR-vs.-Burris)

In the next tier, my choice would be the Primary Arms Micro Green Dot Reflex Sight (http://www.primaryarms.com/product.sc?productId=1005&categoryId=419) at $75. This is a 5MOA clone of the Burris FastFire and uses the same Glock mount adapter as the FastFire. You won't need to buy another mount adapter for a Burris FastFire if you try the PA reflex sight and don't like it for some reason.

GRT45
06-08-2011, 16:00
I've been saving up for the battery free Trijicon dual illuminated RMR with 7 moa dot.

Hammer, I'm curious why you would opt for the Dual-Illuminated RMR instead of the LED? I can see going with the Dual-Illum. if you operate in a remote location where battery availability is poor or nonexistent, otherwise the LED has proven to be more adaptable for unusual lighting situations. I have been steered away from the Dual-Illuminated RMR by opinions from some who have extensively used both DI and LED versions of the RMR in a variety of lighting conditions, for example, the comment quoted below from WarriorTalk.com:
Posted by Jerry Rosenberg (Red Dot Pistols Forum at WarriorTalk.com)

http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?86341-RMR-LED-vs-Dual-Illum&p=1187880#post1187880

"I can only answer from my personal experience. I have both types. The dual illuminated version works pretty good outdoors in various light conditions. In a situation where I am in a darker area, say, in the shade, and my target is in bright light. the dot seems very dim and difficult to see. Another problem occurs when the light is low, but, not low enough for the tritium to kick in. The dot doesn't seem bright enough and it gets worse if you use a flashlight to illuminate the target. In that situation I would rely on the iron sights or just the sight window. As for the led version of the RMR, I haven't yet been in a situation where the dot hasn't been practical. It's just brighter all the time, but, not so bright that it becomes overwhelming. My first one has almost one year on the original battery. I plan to change it on my birthday."
Regarding battery life, the new RM07 and RM06 Adjustable LED RMR have a manual on/off switch to conserve battery power when not in use.

HAMMERHEAD
06-08-2011, 16:22
Hammer, I'm curious why you would opt for the Dual-Illuminated RMR instead of the LED?

I'll agree that the LED version is the better tactical choice.
I'm going with the DI version because it's going on a G-30 with dual slides, one with night sights (the tactical version) and the second slide will get the RMR.
It will mainly be used for outdoor target shooting where my 50 year old eyes are starting to fail me, and it better satisfies my paranoia about TEOTWAWKI. ;)

It's also cheaper.

BL33D 4 M3
06-08-2011, 16:26
Burris Fastfire
+1

JN01
06-08-2011, 18:17
I have both RMRs and FastFires.

The RMR is MUCH tougher, but of course, much more expensive. This is mounted on my carry gun.

I have Burris FF2 for my AA conversion kit and my Ruger Mk III. They also work well. I have found that when handling the gun (racking the slide, etc) the on/off switch is very easily turned off, so if you are contemplating using it on a self defense weapon, you may consider gluing it in the on position.

GRT45
06-08-2011, 18:48
I have Burris FF2 for my AA conversion kit and my Ruger Mk III. They also work well. I have found that when handling the gun (racking the slide, etc) the on/off switch is very easily turned off, so if you are contemplating using it on a self defense weapon, you may consider gluing it in the on position.

:goodpost:

The easily tripped on/off switch is the number one flaw consistently mentioned by nearly everyone that runs the Burris FastFire II on a pistol. IMHO, if it's on a pistol intended for personal protection, the on/off switch must be glued in the ON position.

Eric2340
06-08-2011, 20:11
:goodpost:

The easily tripped on/off switch is the number one flaw consistently mentioned by nearly everyone that runs the Burris FastFire II on a pistol. IMHO, if it's on a pistol intended for personal protection, the on/off switch must be glued in the ON position.

I wonder how much of an issue it is on a carbine / assault rifle? That would be my application.


.

GRT45
06-09-2011, 07:09
I wonder how much of an issue it is on a carbine / assault rifle? That would be my application.

It won't be as much of an issue on a long gun, but it's a problem if you shoulder the weapon on a sling with the left side of the carbine against your body. You can wrap a thin strip of black electrical tape around the RDS body to cover the switch instead of gluing it. It won't look great, but if it solves the problem, no worries. Mounted on a long gun, the real concern with the FastFire will be how well it stands up to hard blows and rough treatment. If you don't drop the rifle landing on the RDS you probably will be fine. The Trijicon RMR is designed and built to withstand such repeated abuse, the FastFire not so much.

Eric2340
06-10-2011, 17:30
It won't be as much of an issue on a long gun, but it's a problem if you shoulder the weapon on a sling with the left side of the carbine against your body. You can wrap a thin strip of black electrical tape around the RDS body to cover the switch instead of gluing it. It won't look great, but if it solves the problem, no worries. Mounted on a long gun, the real concern with the FastFire will be how well it stands up to hard blows and rough treatment. If you don't drop the rifle landing on the RDS you probably will be fine. The Trijicon RMR is designed and built to withstand such repeated abuse, the FastFire not so much.

I had not planned on beating on a RDS to death, so I am not to worried about that. Plus if I had to use my long gun as a blunt weapon, replacing a $200 RDS is then the LEAST of my concerns. :)

Application would more than likely be either an AK or a Mini 14 Tactical.

M&P15T
06-11-2011, 11:11
Keep in mind that an RDS is not going to be as accurate as your 1MOA Eotech. If I wa shopping for the same thing, I'd look at the Burris FastFire, light and auto adjusting, but strictly for 50 yards and in.

HAMMERHEAD
06-11-2011, 13:07
CDNN has some great deals right now on the Docter ($239) and Trijicon red dot ($149-not the RMR)
Mounts are $19 & $29 for the Trij. red dots.
Both are better than average quality.

Eric2340
06-11-2011, 13:42
Keep in mind that an RDS is not going to be as accurate as your 1MOA Eotech. If I wa shopping for the same thing, I'd look at the Burris FastFire, light and auto adjusting, but strictly for 50 yards and in.

Yes, I had NOT planned on getting EO Tech performance from a smaller RDS, it was just to get a smaller one for actual area on the long gun (the EO is still pretty large for a CQB gun in my opinion) and obviously I was looking at close range (probably under 50 yards to be honest).

Eric2340
06-11-2011, 13:43
CDNN has some great deals right now on the Docter ($239) and Trijicon red dot ($149-not the RMR)
Mounts are $19 & $29 for the Trij. red dots.
Both are better than average quality.

Wow, wish I had the $$ now, I'd jump all over the Docter at that price, probably would grab two of them for that. I'll just have to keep an eye out for them.

Thanks -

mpow66m
06-11-2011, 14:14
Vortex SPARC.

water_daddy
07-11-2011, 08:38
Hey OP check these out:

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/0-08mw-650nm-red-reflex-laser-sight-rifle-scope-with-gun-mount-cr2032-included-21959

Bill Lumberg
07-11-2011, 11:44
I'm not saying they're military quality, but the SPARC is a great budget sight. I have one on one of my personal rifles and it's flawless. Vortex SPARC.

Gdirty5
07-12-2011, 23:27
I just got the primary arms red dot last week... I'm going to try to take it to the range sometime this week, and If i can remember, I'll try to find this thread and give you an update/review on it.. Its mounted on my ruger 22/45 with threaded barrel using a weigand tactical scope rail.

it was about 2 weeks ago, I was about to buy the burris fast fire II until i decided to stop by primaryarms's website and found out they had it back in stock!!! figured at 75 bucks before shipping, it wouldn't hurt me to buy it and try it out.... If it's crappy, I'll order the burris fast fire, and eventually will get the trijicon RMR for a 1911 of mine if i decide I like shooting with a RDS on a pistol.

John Eastwood
07-25-2011, 13:39
I have both RMRs and FastFires.

The RMR is MUCH tougher, but of course, much more expensive. This is mounted on my carry gun.

I have Burris FF2 for my AA conversion kit and my Ruger Mk III. They also work well. I have found that when handling the gun (racking the slide, etc) the on/off switch is very easily turned off, so if you are contemplating using it on a self defense weapon, you may consider gluing it in the on position.


If I read you correctly, you have the Burris FF2 mounted up to your AA kit-slide? I'm curious about this. I have the G19 AA kit and have been looking into this option. The only reason I've not pulled the trigger yet is because I was worried that the added weight would not allow the slide to cycle...how does yours work and could you possibly post some pics? Thanks. :thumbsup:

LSP972
09-21-2011, 06:32
I have a Docter on my AA G19 kit, using a dovetail mount. Function is not affected. I start off with a clean unit, shoot maybe 100 CCI Standard Velocity until it gets dirty and begins to choke, then switch to CCI Mini-Mags and am good for another 200 rounds or so before the unit needs to be cleaned. I use the SV because I have a ton of it left over from my bullseye days.

Reliability was spotty, BEFORE installing the RDS, with various el cheapo "bulk ammo". No doubt the added weight of the RDS would aggravate that. Yes, the CCI ammunition is expensive, but malfs are few and far between. Of course, some have said the CCI invalidates the entire concept of "cheap practice".

Perhaps. However, it was never about dollars for me, as I can reload 9mm for about the same cost as the "good" .22 ammo.

I use the .22 kit to work on trigger control, because it will let you know EXACTLY what you are doing wrong.

To those looking for cheap .22 practice, I say... buy a BuckMark...:whistling:

.