Concerned about discharge when holstering [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Concerned about discharge when holstering


ghh3rd
07-05-2011, 21:51
I own a Glock 27 and am very happy with it. I've been carrying it in a crossbreed IWB holster and have only one issue. I wear the holster at about 3:30 - 4:00 and can't see the gun when holstering. Every time I slide the gun in, I have a fear that something will catch the trigger and cause a discharge.

I am considering installing a NY trigger, which I think increases it to 11 lbs pull which should make me feel a little better. Although I do have range time with this gun, it's not for pleasure, solely to keep proficient for carry, so I知 not too concerned about extra pull.

I have considered a radical alternative - switching to a SA/DA gun such as a Sig, but I really want to avoid that, because it's not a Glock.

The other option I was thinking of is installing a safety - it's one more thing to remember in a stressful situation, but even some experts such as Massad Ayoob advocate having safeties, if one practices using them until it's second nature to release them.

Any thoughts about the trigger kit, or safety? One issue with the safety is that I知 left handed, and I've only seen RH Glock safeties.

Before I get flamed for being concerned, I'd like to say that I don't think that any amount of reassurance will make me feel better about holstering without being able to see that trigger slip smoothly into the holster, but I do want to keep using my Glock for carry.

Thanks,

Randy

Shasta McNasty
07-05-2011, 21:56
11lbs is and your finger off the trigger are enough assurances for most. if it still concerns you get an m&p with a thumb safety or something.

Steel Head
07-05-2011, 22:08
I take off and put on my holster with gun it it.
The only time I take out gun is for cleaning or shooting.
As far as reholstering gun while practicing I have a look twice slow and easy approach to it-there is no rush.
My m-tac is pretty good to reholster-I also set up holster so pant waist is not over the edge of the kydex on holsters like the m-tac or cross breed.

Sonnytoo
07-05-2011, 22:21
Sir, that trigger-guard is called that for a purpose. Unless you have a real crappy holster, your gun should slip in like silk.
If you carried your gun in your waistband (Indian-carry), like lots of folks have done (and do), you'd have reason to be more concerned.
S2

Folsom_Prison
07-05-2011, 22:25
I carry a G19 in a supertuck, I've never had an issue and I don't see the problem. Form fitted kydex for your weapon. Keep your finger out of the trigger guard, slide it in. Am I missing something?

barstoolguru
07-05-2011, 22:27
man are they going to flame you..... god forbid if you should mention a safety. I was just telling one of my followers on another thread how much I like the saf-t-blok for just this reason...... watch the hate come........lmfao

EBay 13.00 free shipping......good luck

TACC GLOCK
07-05-2011, 22:31
Unload the gun, check it again to make sure it is unloaded, then practice re-holstering just like you do when you practice unholstering, after about 5000 times, it become second nature.

Your safety is your trigger finger.

21Carrier
07-05-2011, 22:39
Take your holster off, give it a little squeeze (apply pressure as if it were in your waistband), and just sit there and holster/unholster the thing until you are satisfied that the trigger won't get pulled due to the holster. Really, it won't. The only two ways I can see it happening are if you accidentally had your finger on the trigger and RAMMED it down in the holster, or if your shirt got caught, and then you RAMMED it down in the holster.

Unload the gun, and try holstering it with something caught in the trigger. See for yourself how hard it is to make that trigger break accidentally. Even try holstering it with your finger on the trigger. Really, you will be amazed how hard it is to get the trigger to break. It is not as fragile and easy as you think. As long as you have a quality holster (leather or kydex), you will be fine.

If these exercises don't prove it to you and make you feel better, then just remove the holster from your belt to reholster.



EDIT:
WAIT, PLEASE READ THIS!!! Seriously, I knew I had tested how hard it was to accidentally break the trigger before, and I remembered it being VERY hard to do accidentally. Well, I just tried it again. DO IT!!! You will quit worrying!!! Put your finger on the trigger and try to force it into the holster and make the trigger break. It HURTS! And I couldn't even get the trigger to break. Then, I took a shirt, and put a piece in the trigger, and tried to holster it. I got mine all the way in, and it still wouldn't fire. It was HARD as hell to get it in there. If you have something caught, YOU WILL KNOW! Try it and you will realize that you would know you have something caught WAY before you are in danger of fully pulling the trigger. Please just try it out, you will quit worrying.

If you absolutely have to, check out the Siderlock safety, the Saf-T-Plug, or that frame-mounted one Massad Ayoob uses. They are all good options, but they sort of defeat the purpose of a Glock.

3.slow
07-05-2011, 23:02
post a pic of your holster. My holster does not have anything that could depress the trigger and it has a trigger guard. I agree, it sounds like you have a doodoo holster

mgo
07-05-2011, 23:50
Not necessary to change the trigger. Just have the proper holster. I use the Galco Triton Kydex holster. The clip allows easy on/easy off with the pistol remaining in the holster. I have used this holster in competition matches and it has always worked well; it does not come off the belt, even when drawn quickly. When reholstering after loading prior to shooting a stage, I always take my time and make sure the holster is clear of clothing before the pistol goes back in.

Of course, be sure and use a proper belt, not some cheapy "dress pants" skinny belt.

Under concealed carry conditions, reholstering should never be necessary unless you have needed the weapon. (let's hope not!)

AA#5
07-06-2011, 00:24
I have the NY trigger in 3 of my Glocks. They increase the trigger to 8 lbs. I didn't do it for safety; but because I like the consistent pull & I'm used to a DA revolver anyway. I am one of those who shoot faster & more accurately with the NY trigger.

When holstering my Glock, I'm more cautious about taking my time & making sure no thumb snaps or clothing is in the way. I only use OWB holsters with Glocks. If I wanted an IWB, I'd only use kydex.

Sippo
07-06-2011, 06:27
Any mechanical solution doesn't really substitute for proper training and due diligence. Worse case it could lead to a false sense of confidence that could actually contribute to a negligent discharge!

Check list of ideas:

1. Be sure to purchase a holster which covers the trigger guard and has a reenforced mouth which allows one-handed reholstering.
2. Wear a cover garment that is weighted and reenforced for easier clearing of the holster
3. Slooow reholstering, painfully slow with even downward pressure. Don't ram it home if resistance is encountered. I've actually seen that during IDPA competitions. I think that could override any "NY trigger" or DA/SA set up.
4. Don't muzzle yourself while reholstering so even if you have an NG it's less likely to end up inside your thigh!
5. Train reholstering beside a mirror and watch for muzzling and garment clearance. Don't muzzle your support hand BTW.

Perhaps with training you'll gain enough confidence to not sweat the NG. What do you think?

ron59
07-06-2011, 06:32
Trigger, safety, blah, blah blah.

Seems like you're making something out of nothing. Yes, IF your pants are buttoned, then it can be difficult to see the gun go into the holster. But who says you have to have your pants buttoned to insert your gun into the holster?

I also have a CrossBreed Supertuck. And I will "install" it into my pants with the gun out. I often might have my pants buttoned so they won't fall down when putting it on, because it can be a bit of a pain. BUT... once the holster is ready... unsnap your pants and hold up the right side with your left hand. No way you CAN'T then see your gun going in the holster... heck, you could have the pants halfway down your thigh if that's what it takes, or even around your ankles. Put the gun in the holster, and THEN pull your pants up and snap/button them, or tuck your shirt, whatever. Yeah, you might have to practice some, as it's easy for your pants to fall back down as you're doing that, but it's certainly doable and no impossible feat.

But hey... far be it for you to actually think about "the process" of putting your pants on, that's tough stuff, huh? :whistling::rofl::tongueout:

Sheesh.

ronin.45
07-06-2011, 06:35
Only use a safe holster. I don't think there is anything on a CBST to catch the trigger. You could always get one of those aluminum blocks that fits behind your trigger. You will need to practice popping out during the draw though.

Texcowboy
07-06-2011, 06:50
man are they going to flame you..... god forbid if you should mention a safety. I was just telling one of my followers on another thread how much I like the saf-t-blok for just this reason...... watch the hate come........lmfao

EBay 13.00 free shipping......good luck

I too use the saf-t-block in all my Glocks. An individual choice that makes me feel comfortable.

troysglock
07-06-2011, 06:53
Good holster with a steel lined mouth for leather, or a kydex holster. No gunfight was ever won by a speedy reholster. Slow down.

Squeeze
07-06-2011, 06:56
I own a Glock 27 and am very happy with it. I've been carrying it in a crossbreed IWB holster and have only one issue. I wear the holster at about 3:30 - 4:00 and can't see the gun when holstering. Every time I slide the gun in, I have a fear that something will catch the trigger and cause a discharge.

Before I get flamed for being concerned, I'd like to say that I don't think that any amount of reassurance will make me feel better about holstering without being able to see that trigger slip smoothly into the holster, but I do want to keep using my Glock for carry.

Thanks,

Randy

Randy,

I am not sure about safety options on a Glock, but as a NRA Instructor, and a Hunter's Ed Instructor, I see this concern often. As a matter of fact, when my wife went pistol shopping, for her CC pistol, this issue came up. She settled on the M&P pistol, and opted for the manual safety model for her peace of mind. Not my choice. I practice 2-3 times a week, either from a Blackhawk CQC holster, or a Comp-Tac Infidel(IWB), with Glocks and XDs. I draw into tactical scenarios, and holster after the simulated threat is down. I never worry about a ND, but my finger is out and over the trigger guard, and it protects and guides it into the holster. But this is all about your comfort, not mine.

If you can't prove to yourself that tactical pistols(without safeties), are safe, once technique is mastered, start looking for a pistol that does leave you comfortable with holstering at 4 o'clock.

FWIW, I carry my G27 at about 5'oclock, in the Infidel, and the thought of blowing a chunk out of my butt never crosses my mind. :shocked: Well may be once, but decided it wasn't all that great of a butt to be worried about.:rofl:

Squeeze(Also a Randy)

fuzzy03cls
07-06-2011, 07:16
I own a Glock 27 and am very happy with it. I've been carrying it in a crossbreed IWB holster and have only one issue. I wear the holster at about 3:30 - 4:00 and can't see the gun when holstering. Every time I slide the gun in, I have a fear that something will catch the trigger and cause a discharge.
I have this same setup & wear it the same.
I'm confused as to your fears. Do YOU really fear this or is it brought on by posts about a glock going off while re-holstering? There have been many recent posts about this & I'm thinking your basing your fear off them instead of YOUR experiences.
Only time the gun comes out of the holster is for practice or SD. In practice you are in NO HURRY to re-holster the gun. You can take your time & find the holster & place it in slowly. Or look at the holster & guide the gun in.

bandmasterjf
07-06-2011, 07:23
Unless you have a finger growing out your butt you should be ok. I don't think you should be in a hurry to holster or re holster. My guess is that if you ever have to pull the gun you'll be more concerned about how fast you can get it out, not so much about putting it back.

vafish
07-06-2011, 07:24
Under concealed carry conditions, reholstering should never be necessary unless you have needed the weapon. (let's hope not!)

Well there are about 2 million defensive gun uses ever year and only about 1,500 of them is someone actually shot.

Your chances of drawing a gun and having the thug run away are pretty good. At that point you will will want to discreetly reholster your gun.

I personally have started to draw 3 times, but never needed to fire a shot. Being able to quickly reholster before someone can call 911 about a man with a gun is important to me.

happyguy
07-06-2011, 07:27
I own a Glock 27 and am very happy with it. I've been carrying it in a crossbreed IWB holster and have only one issue. I wear the holster at about 3:30 - 4:00 and can't see the gun when holstering. Every time I slide the gun in, I have a fear that something will catch the trigger and cause a discharge.

I am considering installing a NY trigger, which I think increases it to 11 lbs pull which should make me feel a little better. Although I do have range time with this gun, it's not for pleasure, solely to keep proficient for carry, so I知 not too concerned about extra pull.

I have considered a radical alternative - switching to a SA/DA gun such as a Sig, but I really want to avoid that, because it's not a Glock.

The other option I was thinking of is installing a safety - it's one more thing to remember in a stressful situation, but even some experts such as Massad Ayoob advocate having safeties, if one practices using them until it's second nature to release them.

Any thoughts about the trigger kit, or safety? One issue with the safety is that I知 left handed, and I've only seen RH Glock safeties.

Before I get flamed for being concerned, I'd like to say that I don't think that any amount of reassurance will make me feel better about holstering without being able to see that trigger slip smoothly into the holster, but I do want to keep using my Glock for carry.

Thanks,

Randy

Try moving the holster slightly more forward.

Do you have a physical issue that prevents you from turning far enough to see the holster? I have no problem seeing my holster at 3:30.

Regards,
Happyguy :)

cfr
07-06-2011, 08:21
I would recommend that you read this thread (http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=17591691#post17591691), for all of its useful and insightful debates. :rofl:

Seriously though, what I learned from this thread is that its a personal choice, based on your circumstances. I use a thin leather holster that collapses when my G 27 is removed. My personal feeling is that thats much different than using a hard holster that doesnt collapse, and therefore requires a more careful way of reholstering a Glock. I never worried about this when carrying my Kel Tec P11.

Thats right, after that long ugly thread (and despite being told by some I shouldn't need to do it), I'll likely only put the entire rig in my pants at once, as opposed to first putting the holster on, then putting the 27 in.

Once summer is done I plan on taking more formal training. During that time I'll likely use a different holster, as I'll likely be doing a lot of taking out/ putting back in. For now I'm going to stick to my plan.

dregotglock
07-06-2011, 08:33
Any thoughts about the trigger kit, or safety? One issue with the safety is that I知 left handed, and I've only seen RH Glock safeties.

Before I get flamed for being concerned, I'd like to say that I don't think that any amount of reassurance will make me feel better about holstering without being able to see that trigger slip smoothly into the holster, but I do want to keep using my Glock for carry.

Thanks,

Randy


Randy - there is a certain level of comfort that comes with understanding the Glock internals and how they work to make your firearm safe.

1 - If you keep your finger outside of the trigger guard during drawing and holstering you will be fine.

2 - Get a holster that is made for your specific firearm

3 - Test out the proper holster with an UNLOADED BUT IN BATTERY FIREARM and draw/ reholster your firearm. Sit down, stand up, lean, bend, go thru normal and abnormal body movements. IT will not go "click" (remember not loaded).

sciolist
07-06-2011, 10:38
Not sure if this was mentioned, but another thing to be aware of is that a jacket drawstring, etc. could get into the holster while it's empty, and cause the gun to discharge at a later time, after the the gun has been reholsterd. So with your carry rigs, you should get in the habbit of sweeping between the holster and your body after reholstering.

cowboy1964
07-06-2011, 10:51
Ask yourself if you really need to ever reholster a loaded weapon while wearing the holster IWB. I only holster mine when loaded when the holster is off me and I put the whole thing on. The only time I can ever see having to reholster while loaded is after an actual shooting incident. I suppose you could practice this over and over (UNLOADED OF COURSE) and see if the trigger ever gets snagged. I'm not going to bother because I can see it being very hard on the finish due to the tight retention of the holsters I use.

OTOH, practicing drawing (UNLOADED OF COURSE) is always a good idea.

amazon
07-06-2011, 10:59
I think one thing to keep in mind is, are you ever going to reholster quickly, absent mindedly? I didn't think so, or atleast, I hope not.

Good habits go a long way. Going slow, awareness, watching what you're doing, finger along the side of the frame, etc. It all adds up to good gun safety.

Now I'm a woman, and I'm in shape - ROUND IS A SHAPE! LOL I use an mtac at 2 o'clock-ish. I think for women, 3:30 or 4 would just you know, um, print too much. Any way, I find it easier to put on the holster with the gun in the holster. But if I have to re-holster, it's just the basics. Pay attention, clothes out of the way, don't sweep myself, index finger on the side of the frame, and in it goes. At 2 o'clock I can see what's going on no problem.

I can see why folks would be attracted to an external safety, but they fail. Why? Because there's still the human factor of forgetting to click them on. I'm not for or against them. Just saying they are not a perfect answer.

Chowser
07-06-2011, 11:31
Why would you not look at your holster when you put your gun in? if the situation is not safe, then keep your gun out. holster when everything is safe and you can look. no one ever got awards for being quickest in the holster.

now at work, it's easy since my holster is hanging out on a belt and if i need to, i can take a quick glance at my holster to make sure nothing got into it and i always have someone else there keeping an eye on any threats, but if it was off-duty and with a concealment holster and after a shooting, i'm keeping my gun out until the boys in blue show up and tell me to put it on the ground, where i'll already be kneeling with the gun near the ground.

chandne
07-06-2011, 18:49
Good habits and a NY trigger will be perfect. A 11 lb trigger is not easy to AD. A 5-6 lbs is. I bet the NY trigger will make you feel much better...just make sure you can shoot it. :)

majorwoo
07-08-2011, 08:47
This is something I worry about as well. Some of us are required to disarm and leave our weapon elsewhere for a period of time throughout the day.

Classic example: Your job has a no weapons policy. You can choose to conceal and hope nothing ever causes you to be made or you can choose to leave your weapon in the car. For some people you decide to carry against company policy, that is your call. For others we decide that the hardship losing our job would put our family through outweighs the benefits of having our firearm to defend ourselves.

Anyway, I digress as this that topic bothers me a lot. I work in a lousy area :/

THE POINT IS: Daily, I find myself reholstering my loaded Glock while sitting in my car and wanting to make sure no one else walking to their car observes me. In my case I have pulled my holster (a Theis holster, very similar to your crossbreed) forward to 3:30 instead of 4/5 to allow me to be able to see it while reholstering. I like the idea of 3 oclock but I just find it uncomfortable to not be a bit behind my hip. In this position I find I can twist around enough to feel comfortable reholstering - and in all honesty I believe it's more concealable here then 4/5 o clock, if a tad less comfortable.

Reb56
07-15-2011, 10:13
I carry a G26 or a G19 in a cbst I understand what you are talking about. I don't want my shirt to get caught in the holster by mistake. I only holster my gun in the a.m. never take it till I go to bed ( hope I never have to draw it any other time). But I use caution when holstering and go slow.

barstoolguru
07-15-2011, 10:36
saf-t-blok

majorwoo
07-15-2011, 10:46
If I wanted a safety on my weapon (which I have given thought to dropping my Glock for that reason) I would get a real one. I just don't think the idea of sticking my finger in the trigger guard to dislodge something stuck against the trigger is a habit I'd like to develop.

chandne
07-15-2011, 10:49
I'm considering the Cominolli from Ten Ring...will prob just get it done by them.

Glockz0r
07-15-2011, 10:55
Maybe try out a MIC holster?