Just ordered reloading stuff (moved from Lounge) [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Just ordered reloading stuff (moved from Lounge)


deerhuntr88
07-17-2011, 18:40
Just ordered everything I need for reloading (I think) Please let me know if there's anything else I need.

- Lee Breech lock Challenger Reloading kit which includes:

*Auto Prime XR Priming Tool with a set of 11 Auto Prime Shell Holders
*Perfect Powder Measure with stand
*Safety Powder Scale, powder funnel
*case cutter with lock stud to trim cases
*an inside/outside case neck chamfer/deburring tool
*primer pocket cleaner and a tube of premium resizing lube
*one Breech Lock Quick-Change Die Bushing.

- Berry's preferred plated bullets
- CCI 500 Small Pistol Primers
- Bullseye Powder
- Lee 9mm 3 die set
- Cabela's model 400 tumbler kit
- 100 rd ammo box
- bullet puller hammer
- digital caliper from amazon
- lyman's #49 reloading manual

I think I got everything in there. How am I looking guys? Spent right at $300 maybe a little more...

Any other Newbie tips would be greatly appreciated. I'm doing as much research as I can too...

WiskyT
07-17-2011, 18:51
You done good. You have some things that you don't need for 9mm, like the case trimmer, chamfer tool, primer pocket cleaner, case lube (ASSuming you got carbide dies).

Don't load big batches. Really, I would use the start load data (lowest) in the Lyman manual and only make ten rounds. 9mm's can be a little underpowered at start data to cycle the gun. Load your ten and see how they do. If they cycle, make 100 of them and you should be good to go. You can work up higher towards the max load if you want, but I wouldn't be in a hurry to do that unless it is necessasy to go that hight to cycle the gun.


Keep it simple. Stick with one powder and one bullet until you get the hang of things. Ignore the ensuing dogpile to get you using different bullets and powders until you have loaded a thousand rounds successfully.

DoctaGlockta
07-17-2011, 18:55
\

Keep it simple. Stick with one powder and one bullet until you get the hang of things. Ignore the ensuing dogpile to get you using different bullets and powders until you have loaded a thousand rounds successfully.

Great advice.

Have fun and be safe.

deerhuntr88
07-17-2011, 19:11
Thanks guys, once I get used to reloading, I'm gonna start doing .40 and .270 as well.

Good thing about the trimmer and other stuff is that it'll come in handy when I get to doing .270 ammo.

PhantomF4E
07-17-2011, 19:31
Welcome to the club. A great and worthwhile hobby !!! Hopefully we don't become a National Treasure any time soon !!!!! But the skills are, pass it on. I am fixing to start teaching both of my sons so they at least know how.

RustyFN
07-17-2011, 19:46
Looks good. Congratulations and welcome to reloading.

IndyGunFreak
07-17-2011, 19:49
Other than the scale, I think you'll be happy w/ that... :)

Just cuz I'm impatient and lazy, I'd probably get an Auto Disk Pro, so I can expand/powder drop at the same time... :)

Best of luck!

deerhuntr88
07-17-2011, 19:54
Other than the scale, I think you'll be happy w/ that... :)

Just cuz I'm impatient and lazy, I'd probably get an Auto Disk Pro, so I can expand/powder drop at the same time... :)

Best of luck!

Yea, I'll probably end up getting a digital scale in the near future...

IndyGunFreak
07-17-2011, 19:57
Yea, I'll probably end up getting a digital scale in the near future...

If you're gonna get a cheap digital, just get a quality beam. (Notice I said quality beam, which the Lee scale is not). Dillon Eliminator will run you about $55... that's a steal for the quality of scale that it is.

Dasglockenspiel
07-17-2011, 21:12
Deerhunter88:

Congratulations on a great array of gear. And yes, it appears that you have most everything you may need.

I still use the little Lee balance Scale and find it about as accurate as the low priced digital scales. + / _ .1 gr (ish).

The Primer Pocket Tool may help if you stumble into WCC "headstamped" 9mm brass due to their crimped and thus undersized primer pockets.

Lastly, if you don't have it get a copy of ABCs of reloading it is well worth it.

Enjoy,

Dasglockenspiel

Zombie Steve
07-17-2011, 22:00
Congrats. Welcome to the funny farm.

AZson
07-17-2011, 22:14
Congrats, you might want to buy more ammo boxes, their cheap and 100 is not enough.
You also might want to buy a 9mm factory die crimper. Makes your ammo more reliable.
Unless you are planing to reload rifle rounds you wont need the case cutter or chamfer tool, 9mm case normally dont change they just crack after a few times.
Also leave the spent primers in when you tumble the brass, they will keep the matter out of the primer holes.
I reload, 9mm, 40s&w, 38spl, 45 gap, 357 sig and just starting on .223.
I'm making some of my own killer .223s with 75gr bullets.
The .45 gap is whole reason I started reloading, that and I was shooting competitively with my G35

deerhuntr88
07-18-2011, 13:33
Here's a newb question: What happens when I load my bullet, and my OAL is too long? Can I just adjust my die and push it down farther? Or would I have to pull the bullet and pretty much start again?

I ask because I know the die crimps when it seats the bullet, so I didn't know if just adjusting the die and pushing it farther would be possible or a good thing to do.

WiskyT
07-18-2011, 15:27
Here's a newb question: What happens when I load my bullet, and my OAL is too long? Can I just adjust my die and push it down farther? Or would I have to pull the bullet and pretty much start again?

I ask because I know the die crimps when it seats the bullet, so I didn't know if just adjusting the die and pushing it farther would be possible or a good thing to do.

With a jakceted bullet, you can seat them further. With a cast bullet, it might bugger up the part of the bullet where it meets the case, but they should still shoot fine. With a plated bullet, the plating will very likely tear and that would likely give you crappy groups.

How long are we talking about here? See if the drop in and out of your barrel easily. If they do, and they fit in your magazine, they aren't too long.

Colorado4Wheel
07-18-2011, 15:31
Anyone going to state the obvious.

We already have a Deerhunter. He's not around much but having two is going to get confusing. I know we couldn't handle two Gios or two Wiskys.

WiskyT
07-18-2011, 15:34
Anyone going to state the obvious.



I'll state it, we have one too many Steves:whistling:

Colorado4Wheel
07-18-2011, 15:41
Zombie is annoying but he is a good guy.

sig357fan
07-18-2011, 17:08
Here's a newb question: What happens when I load my bullet, and my OAL is too long? Can I just adjust my die and push it down farther? Or would I have to pull the bullet and pretty much start again?

I ask because I know the die crimps when it seats the bullet, so I didn't know if just adjusting the die and pushing it farther would be possible or a good thing to do.

set your OAL first, with out a crimp, then back off the seating stem and set your crimp, then with the round raised into the die with the crimp set, adjust the seating stem until it contacts the bullet, you should be go to go.

you can then make small adjustments to dial it in to your liking.

be sure to do as Wisky T suggested and use your barrel as a "go-no go" gauge.

sig357fan

deerhuntr88
07-19-2011, 00:45
set your OAL first, with out a crimp, then back off the seating stem and set your crimp, then with the round raised into the die with the crimp set, adjust the seating stem until it contacts the bullet, you should be go to go.

you can then make small adjustments to dial it in to your liking.

be sure to do as Wisky T suggested and use your barrel as a "go-no go" gauge.

sig357fan

Thanks, I'll keep this in mind. I can't wait till it all comes in!

AZson
07-19-2011, 16:26
Here's a newb question: What happens when I load my bullet, and my OAL is too long? Can I just adjust my die and push it down farther? Or would I have to pull the bullet and pretty much start again?

I ask because I know the die crimps when it seats the bullet, so I didn't know if just adjusting the die and pushing it farther would be possible or a good thing to do.

I've seated my bullet a little deeper a few times after I had crimped them, I have not seen any problems with it, but if you are concerned with it, then again I would suggest the LEE FDC, because the crimp will not be applied until the fourth stage which that is where the FCD would be.
The LFDC crimps and sizes the whole round down to factory specs.

Zombie Steve
07-19-2011, 17:40
Anyone going to state the obvious.

We already have a Deerhunter. He's not around much but having two is going to get confusing. I know we couldn't handle two Gios or two Wiskys.

Let's call this guy Sparky.

Cobra64
07-20-2011, 00:05
Yea, I'll probably end up getting a digital scale in the near future...

Naaa... just another wire to deal with. Balance beam scales always work and require no warm up either. :cool:


http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Gun%20Room/RELOADING/P1050001.jpg

deerhuntr88
07-20-2011, 06:32
Let's call this guy Sparky.


I'm ok with sparky. lol

deerhuntr88
07-20-2011, 06:35
Naaa... just another wire to deal with. Balance beam scales always work and require no warm up either. :cool:




I'm liking the reloading room you got there man. I looked at the other thread of people's rooms and it just makes me jealous. lol right now I'll be in the unfinished basement on a work table for about a year until we can move. (we got a first time home buyer credit which gave us a good chunk of change when we bought the house. If we move within 3 years, we have to pay it back)

Agent6-3/8
07-20-2011, 07:56
Looks good to me. I've loaded for years on a similar setup of Lee products. What you ordered will allow you to load many thousand rounds for a relatively small investment.

I still use the Lee scale you ordered. Its not the best but it works for me. Its biggest flaw is that it doesn't like to hold zero, especially if exposed to the vibration of using your press.

deerhuntr88
07-21-2011, 16:07
Just loaded 10 rds of 4.0gr and 10rds of 4.2. The 4.2 shot a little better group so that's what I'm sticking with for now. I can't wait to get a bunch of rounds made and head out to the range.

WiskyT
07-21-2011, 16:38
Just loaded 10 rds of 4.0gr and 10rds of 4.2. The 4.2 shot a little better group so that's what I'm sticking with for now. I can't wait to get a bunch of rounds made and head out to the range.

See? You follow directions, keep it simple, and you make ammo. Thank you for restoring my faith in Mankind.

deerhuntr88
07-21-2011, 21:43
hahaha thanks. I'm not sure why some people make it seem so difficult. A little bit of research, some helpful tips from GT'ers and youtube and I'm ready to go. Haven't even gotten the Lyman's book yet...

Cobra64
07-21-2011, 21:48
Just loaded 10 rds of 4.0gr and 10rds of 4.2. The 4.2 shot a little better group so that's what I'm sticking with for now. I can't wait to get a bunch of rounds made and head out to the range.

Congrats! :cool:

Cobra64
07-21-2011, 21:49
hahaha thanks. I'm not sure why some people make it seem so difficult. A little bit of research, some helpful tips from GT'ers and youtube and I'm ready to go. Haven't even gotten the Lyman's book yet...

Yup, take it slow and easy... baby steps.

halfmoonclip
07-22-2011, 06:29
Deerhunter, couple tips from a guy who has been doing this a really long time...
-Good call on the Bullseye; it meters well and is very cost effective; you'll likely want to bump that load up a little after you experiment; it's a little carbony but that wipes off. When the time comes that you get another powder, only one can goes on the bench at a time.
-It is worthwhile seating and crimping on two different stages if possible; it makes adjustment much easier, and you aren't asking two things to happen at once (kinda like closing a door while you are trying to walk thru' it...); even when I was using a single stage, I kept an extra seating/crimping die in each caliber and did each separately, even if it meant another trip thru' the press.
-I have nothing but high praise for Lee dies; they are of excellent quality and reasonably priced; they are the only die maker who makes undersize carbide sizing dies for the increasingly common too-thin brass that then won't hold a bullet. I'm not crazy about their presses...
-Be careful when you start reloading .40s; they're at +P pressures right out the gate, and there have been problems in some guns.
-Keep good records; it lets you see what you did a long time ago, repeat what works and avoid a mistake a second time.
-Don't try to multitask while reloading.
-You are following that excellent advice to go slowly.

Remember my first trip to the range with ammo I'd cast and loaded myself; lot of satisfaction and it was great to shoot .38s for the price of .22s.

Cobra, nice loading setup, and your beam balance at eye level is a great idea. I'm skeptical of electronic balances, having had trouble with one. Keeping the scale off the bench also protects it from vibration. Nice job.

It's heartening to see a noob in the reloading game DH; seems most folks now are content to buy in bulk instead.
Moon

deerhuntr88
07-22-2011, 06:44
Thanks for the tips halfmoon, I'll keep it all in mind.

halfmoonclip
07-22-2011, 09:21
One last caveat on Bullseye; make sure you don't go below minimum or otherwise short charge a case. I had always dismissed it as something of an old reloader's tale, but Bullseye has a reputation for detonation under some odd circumstances. I was physically present when a buddy's son blew up an S&W M-60; topstrap gone, cylinder in three pieces, hole in the ceiling above his shooting booth, no harm to the shooter.
Smith more than stood behind the gun; IIRC they replaced it, or at least replaced it at cost. According to the tech, a double charge of Bullseye wouldn't blow up the gun, and a triple charge wouldn't fit; loads were 148 HBWC.
My own theory; my buddy skipped primers on some loaded rounds in his progressive press, giving time for some powder to dribble out the primer hole. When he discovered his mistake, he primed the cases, but I think the blowup round was waaaaaay light on powder.
Not a reason not to use Bullseye (I use virtually nothing else for handgun loads), but just make darn sure you don't go below minimum.
Moon

WiskyT
07-22-2011, 13:42
One last caveat on Bullseye; make sure you don't go below minimum or otherwise short charge a case. I had always dismissed it as something of an old reloader's tale, but Bullseye has a reputation for detonation under some odd circumstances. I was physically present when a buddy's son blew up an S&W M-60; topstrap gone, cylinder in three pieces, hole in the ceiling above his shooting booth, no harm to the shooter.
Smith more than stood behind the gun; IIRC they replaced it, or at least replaced it at cost. According to the tech, a double charge of Bullseye wouldn't blow up the gun, and a triple charge wouldn't fit; loads were 148 HBWC.
My own theory; my buddy skipped primers on some loaded rounds in his progressive press, giving time for some powder to dribble out the primer hole. When he discovered his mistake, he primed the cases, but I think the blowup round was waaaaaay light on powder.
Not a reason not to use Bullseye (I use virtually nothing else for handgun loads), but just make darn sure you don't go below minimum.
Moon

"Detonation" is a complete myth. Hercules proved this with thorough experimentation and backed it up with the fact that there is simply not enough chemical energy in an undercharged Bullseye round to blow up a gun. There is also plenty of room for a tripple charge of Bullseye under a 148 WC in a 38 case. Your friend either overloaded his round (likely) or the gun was somehow defective (unlikely). The NRA published the tests, which were done by Hercules and I believe and independent lab like HP White.

halfmoonclip
07-22-2011, 14:26
"Detonation" is a complete myth. Hercules proved this with thorough experimentation and backed it up with the fact that there is simply not enough chemical energy in an undercharged Bullseye round to blow up a gun. There is also plenty of room for a tripple charge of Bullseye under a 148 WC in a 38 case. Your friend either overloaded his round (likely) or the gun was somehow defective (unlikely). The NRA published the tests, which were done by Hercules and I believe and independent lab like HP White.

Okay, put me on the spot here; I got out the scale and trickled 8.1 grains of Bullseye, and then dumped it in a .38 casing. There's about half an inch of space on top of the powder remaining, so conceivably an 148 WC could be crammed in there, but the powder charge would be compressed. The Tech Rep from Smith was in error, as was I for repeating what a (presumably ) knowledgeable person told me. However, the fellow that made the loads is both careful and experienced, and I'm having a hard time believing he triple charged the case. :dunno:
I'll stick by my advice to the OP, tho...stay between the 'min' and 'max' on reloads; too light a charge can leave a bullet in the bore at a bare minimum.
Moon

Colorado4Wheel
07-22-2011, 15:16
You can fill a case nearly to the top with powder and compress the powder as you seat the bullet. Not hard to do at all.

WiskyT
07-22-2011, 15:18
Okay, put me on the spot here; I got out the scale and trickled 8.1 grains of Bullseye, and then dumped it in a .38 casing. There's about half an inch of space on top of the powder remaining, so conceivably an 148 WC could be crammed in there, but the powder charge would be compressed. The Tech Rep from Smith was in error, as was I for repeating what a (presumably ) knowledgeable person told me. However, the fellow that made the loads is both careful and experienced, and I'm having a hard time believing he triple charged the case. :dunno:
I'll stick by my advice to the OP, tho...stay between the 'min' and 'max' on reloads; too light a charge can leave a bullet in the bore at a bare minimum.
Moon

Your advice is good advice. Charges below minimum CAN cause problems like a bullet stuck in the bore.

Here is a thread that helps, but I couldn't find the exact article I wanted. Ed Harris is very knowledgable. He has the academic background, professional expirience, and plain common sense, to be considered a true authority on these things.

http://forums.handloads.com/archive/forum_posts.asp?TID=20360&get=last

unclebob
07-22-2011, 16:05
Naaa... just another wire to deal with. Balance beam scales always work and require no warm up either.
I have seen two balance beam scales that were wrong. And they were not cheap scales either. One was mine.

halfmoonclip
07-22-2011, 18:21
I have seen two balance beam scales that were wrong. And they were not cheap scales either. One was mine.

It is worth having checkweights and making sure your balance (of whatever type) is telling you the truth from time to time, and to have a double check on powder volume. Record the setting on your measure, and note if the same setting produces really different results the next time you use the data. The info also speeds setting up a powder measure by getting it 'pretty close' for a start.

WhiskyT, good link, and it brings back my own recollections of the debate. Many of us were shying away from using Bullseye because of widespread reports of gun blowups, which the Rifleman reports mostly laid to rest.

Then my friend's gun disassembled itself rather dramatically, and it reopened all those old discussions, and made me more willing to accept the
Tech's remarks as gospel.
It's not like a M-60 won't take a lot of abuse. Skeeter Skelton advocated defense loads of HBWC loaded backwards over what was arguably a magnum-pressure compressed quantity of 2400, and I can tell you empirically that didn't do a Model 60 any harm in modest quantities.

One thing for absolute certain with reloading; it isn't stupid-proof and there isn't much margin for 'oops'.
Moon

Cobra64
07-22-2011, 19:16
I have seen two balance beam scales that were wrong. And they were not cheap scales either. One was mine.

Somehow I ended up with two. :cool:

They are both dead on (with each other). Maybe they're both wrong. :dunno:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Gun%20Room/RELOADING/P1050001.jpg

deerhuntr88
08-27-2011, 23:20
Just ordered some .40 dies and Berry's plated 180gr bullets.

Anyone have a good recipe for this combo with bullseye? I figure I'll start with 5.0gr (Lymans gives 4.8gr as min) 1.115" OAL and work the powder up from there in .1-.2gr increments. (max load is 5.6 per the book) unless someone has a load that works best for them and can make this process much quicker.

atakawow
08-28-2011, 00:50
Just ordered some .40 dies and Berry's plated 180gr bullets.

Anyone have a good recipe for this combo with bullseye? I figure I'll start with 5.0gr (Lymans gives 4.8gr as min) 1.115" OAL and work the powder up from there in .1-.2gr increments. (max load is 5.6 per the book) unless someone has a load that works best for them and can make this process much quicker.

You are looking at the wrong loading data. That load you listed is for FMJ. Plated is more similar to lead.

My Lyman lists 5.0 gr of Bullseye is MAX, using a 175gr lead slug. Your load is treading deep water. I would not mess with it, not with the 40sw and Bullseye.

Back it down and work it up.

Fox
08-28-2011, 04:41
You may want to get started in casting bullets too.

Fox
08-28-2011, 04:45
My advise to new reloaders is to choose a gunpowder that will fill the case in a given load. If you should accidently double charge, then the gunpowder will spill over the case. No chance of any problems with overpressure that way.

StaTiK
08-28-2011, 08:54
My advise to new reloaders is to choose a gunpowder that will fill the case in a given load. If you should accidently double charge, then the gunpowder will spill over the case. No chance of any problems with overpressure that way.


Yes, but how does a new reloader know what powder will do this? Do you have a recommendation for the OP who is loading 9mm?

-StaTiK-

Zombie Steve
08-28-2011, 09:06
Everyone starting reloading should be issued an 8-pounder of this.

http://spinstage.http.internapcdn.net/Spinstage/userdocs/products/p_749011920_1.jpg

PCJim
08-28-2011, 20:10
I agree with Steve.

Unique is almost ALWAYS a good all-around powder for pistol/revolver calibers, especially so for beginners. It is very versatile, a medium burner that works well with lead, plated and jacketed bullets, and has enough fluff to make a double charge very obvious. It may not overflow the particular caliber's case, but if you're watching each case to insure a powder charge, you will definitely see a double charge of Unique.

GioaJack
08-28-2011, 20:59
Unique, you say, huh, never heard of it... must be a brand new powder.


Jack

deerhuntr88
08-29-2011, 18:15
I don't get it. Is 180gr not 180gr no matter what the bullet is made of? The max fps Lymans is showing is 844 with a JHP. Berry's says you can go over 1200fps with the way they make the bullets now. Copper is on the outside of a Plated bullet as well as with a FMJ, therefore they should move through the barrel very similarly.

Not trying to be rude at all, and I'm sure it sounds like noob questions, just trying to get a better understanding of the components here.

FYI: I use FMJ reload data for 9mm with great results. I actually had to seat my bullets a little deeper (to 1.135 from 1.150) with 4.2gr Bullseye because the shells were not ejecting like I wanted them to. Great groups, no real problems from my gun, just some Fail to feeds on my wife's gun partly due to the ammo and part because of her weak wrists...

Colorado4Wheel
08-29-2011, 18:39
10mm and .40 share the same bullets. It might be safe (with some load) to push a 180gr .40 bullet to 1200fps in a 10mm BUT NOT SAFE in any situation to do the same thing with a 180 gr bullet in a 40S&W.

WiskyT
08-29-2011, 19:01
I don't get it. Is 180gr not 180gr no matter what the bullet is made of? The max fps Lymans is showing is 844 with a JHP. Berry's says you can go over 1200fps with the way they make the bullets now. Copper is on the outside of a Plated bullet as well as with a FMJ, therefore they should move through the barrel very similarly.

Not trying to be rude at all, and I'm sure it sounds like noob questions, just trying to get a better understanding of the components here.

FYI: I use FMJ reload data for 9mm with great results. I actually had to seat my bullets a little deeper (to 1.135 from 1.150) with 4.2gr Bullseye because the shells were not ejecting like I wanted them to. Great groups, no real problems from my gun, just some Fail to feeds on my wife's gun partly due to the ammo and part because of her weak wrists...

In the olden days, manuals from powder manufacturers just listed bullet weight, not even shape, let alone whether it was cast or jacketed. So thrity years ago we wouldn't have been having this debate.

Then things got a bit more specific, and probably it's a good thing they did.

Then things got stupid specific, moslty to support one brand or another of bullet. Hercules became Alliant and is part of ATK which makes Speer bullets. So all data from Alliant is using specific Speer bullets. People with good intentions try to follow a recipe to the letter and give their advice based on that.

As a reloader, you have to decide, using your judgement, how literally you need to take every aspect of a recipe. If you're making chocolate chip cookies with Nestle' chips, the recipe might call for Domino sugar because maybe Nestle' owns Domino. Me, I'm crazy and would use Dixie Crystals if that's what I had lying around.

For me, I use cast data for cast, and jacketed data for jacketed and plated,BUT, I use starting data. I don't worry about using a Nosler JHP if the data calls for an XTP bullet. BTW, Gold Dots are plated bullets.

deerhuntr88
08-29-2011, 19:14
Thanks, I appreciate the info there... I just don't want to blow anything up... lol

Colorado4Wheel
08-29-2011, 19:17
4.9 grs. Assuming it's the same bullet profile and you also follow OAL recommendations (or longer).

deerhuntr88
08-29-2011, 19:37
4.9 grs. Assuming it's the same bullet profile and you also follow OAL recommendations (or longer).

Thanks Colorado. Yea, the bullet profile for a FP should be pretty close to a Hollow-point so that's where I came up with the OAL of 1.115"

Thanks again...