LAAAAG! I need some help here. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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hamster
07-27-2011, 09:23
Every day, my home broadband connection experiences huge lag spikes and slowdowns that aren't resolved until I reboot the cable modem (Time warner).

I've had Time Warner out to check the connection. In addition, I've done the following:

1. Switched Cable modem
2. Switched Router
3. Disconnected every networked device one by one
4. I'm going to move next month so that will see if its something to do with the house or my internal network.

These slowdowns are driving me crazy because not only my pings to sites like google.com go from 40ms to 500ms+ but my download speed goes from 30mbit/sec down to .03mbit/sec.

This makes everything from my work VPN connection to our netflix service damned near unusable. Its like somebody swaps my cable connection for a 56k modem 3 times a day.

Any ideas? Anyone been through something like this?

m2hmghb
07-27-2011, 10:29
You could be having issues with traffic on the node or it could be someone backfeeding onto the cable line with a bad connector. Only way to find out is to have techs check for utilization and so on. I would recommend you ask them to check the house to see if there is an issue there and DOCUMENT the times and the ping results. The best way to do it is to copy and paste from the site to a file you keep. IT took me a while to get mine figured out. Good luck, and remember perseverance is the key.

joeroket
07-27-2011, 16:13
This sounds like a defective Modem and not a line congestion. Modems when they go bad will become out of sync and cause bandwidth and connectivity issues until it is power cycled. There may be an issue with your modem or it could be on the providers end. I had this same issue a number of years back and the equipment on the providers side was bad but it took about 2 months for them to figure it out.

gemeinschaft
07-27-2011, 16:28
Pinging alone will only tell you so much.

I prefer to perform a Traceroute. Many times, this will let you know WHERE the latency is occurring.

For instance, my cable can get really slow and instead of 12 hops to Google.com, it is more like 30-50 hops.

I have literally seen where I am being routed through New Jersey in order for me to connect to my office just 6 blocks away here in Houston... ?????

When I had U-verse, I never had issues with bad routing... Now, I am back on Comcast as U-verse is not available and I sometimes have issues like you are describing.

I found out through experience that Comcast's DNS server suck, so I sorted that out by using Google's DNS service (8.8.8.8; 8.8.4.4).

Please post a copy of the Traceroute to Google before and during the issues that you are experiencing.

handyman
07-27-2011, 17:40
Firmware update might help.

wrenrj1
07-27-2011, 17:47
You could be having issues with traffic on the node or it could be someone backfeeding onto the cable line with a bad connector. Only way to find out is to have techs check for utilization and so on. I would recommend you ask them to check the house to see if there is an issue there and DOCUMENT the times and the ping results. The best way to do it is to copy and paste from the site to a file you keep. IT took me a while to get ne figured out. Good luck, and remember perseverance is the key.

We are with TWC as well. We had a rogue modem in our line (for lack of a better description) somewhere in our neighborhood that caused our modem to dramatically slow down, and even disconnect. TWC had to isolate the modem which was a process of elimination. I don't know how many modems they changed out (including mine) or how many blinking yellow lights I saw one night on top of trucks in my neighborhood trying to isolate the problem. It was like SWARM! SWARM! SWARM!

hamster
07-27-2011, 19:54
Yeah, I've had the time warner guys out many times but they always hook up and find "no problem" because It never happens after a power cycle and of course the first thing those script monkeys do is power cycle.

I'm moving in about a month, so I'll probably just deal, but I suspect you all are right and the issue is somewhere between my modem and provider.

hamster
07-27-2011, 20:15
Duplicate post removed.

hamster
07-27-2011, 20:16
Update. I may have found the culprit.

I did a tracrert to google.com and saw that the lag starts between router and modem. I have replaced both pieces and had time Warner confirm strong signal. So before I throw up my hands I decided to think about the network sync or packet storm issues someone here mentioned. All my wired computers and printers are attached to the switch on the router so theoretically a bad device should be a non issue. On the wired side though things behave more like on an old hub, where a bad device can cause big problems.

So, I had the wife sit at her computer and run a looped ping to google.com. All returns were 400ms+. Then I started unplugging wireless devices one by one. iPad, phones, roku, vizio tv etc. Finally I decided to unplug my baby's night vision web cab (in crib). Not wanting to wake him I killed power to his room at the circuit breaker. Immediately the pings dropped to 30ms!!

There are only two things in his room. 1 the webcam and 2 an ancient 900mhz analog baby monitor. One of those two things may be the culprit. To confirm I will need to wait till the Internet craps out again and unplug them individually. I'm betting it's the sharkx webcam.

If that is the case, I will connect it via a wired connection and kill the wireless on it to see if it helps

I will keep y'all posted about this hypothesis.

gemeinschaft
07-27-2011, 20:20
Update. I may have found the culprit.

I did a tracrert to google.com and saw that the lag starts between router and modem. I have replaced both pieces and had time Warner confirm strong signal. So before I throw up my hands I decided to think about the network sync or packet storm issues someone here mentioned. All my wired computers and printers are attached to the switch on the router so theoretically a bad device should be a non issue. On the wired side though things behave more like on an old hub, where a bad device can cause big problems.

So, I had the wife sit at her computer and run a looped ping to google.com. All returns were 400ms+. Then I started unplugging wireless devices one by one. iPad, phones, roku, vizio tv etc. Finally I decided to unplug my baby's night vision web cab (in crib). Not wanting to wake him I killed power to his room at the circuit breaker. Immediately the pings dropped to 30ms!!

There are only two things in his room. 1 the webcam and 2 an ancient 900mhz analog baby monitor. One of those two things may be the culprit. To confirm I will need to wait till the Internet craps out again and unplug them individually. I'm betting it's the sharkx webcam.

If that is the case, I will connect it via a wired connection and kill the wireless on it to see if it helps

I will keep y'all posted about this hypothesis.


I am thinking that the webcam may be the culprit, but I am not convinced that simply running a wired connection will make it any better... I guess you could try, but first I would just eliminate it from the equation first and see if you have issues.

I would also like to add that unless your Router has a Control Plane Policing Policy like an expensive Cisco Router, then a Denial of Service (DoS) attack could easily originate from a wired or wireless device. It really wouldn't matter which.

Sounds like you are on the right track.

hamster
07-27-2011, 20:27
I am thinking that the webcam may be the culprit, but I am not convinced that simply running a wired connection will make it any better... I guess you could try, but first I would just eliminate it from the equation first and see if you have issues.

Ok, well luckily my internet connection crapped out again. 400ms pings + super slow downloads from test sites like www.speakeasy.net/speedtest

I snuck into the baby's room and unpluged the webcam. Bam instant 30ms pings and 30+mbit/sec download speeds again. Unless there is something more complex going on, I think I've got my culprit.

I'm going to keep watching my connection tonight and tomorrow to see if it remains stable with the webcam off. Then I'll disable the webcam's wireless function and see if it also misbehaves in wired mode.

If so, I'll have to run a firmware update and hope it gets fixed, or figure some clever way to isolate it on my network.

Thanks for all your help guys, you got me to start my thought process fresh and begin again from square one.

Very embarrassing for me since I'm an IT consultant. :) albeit in Business Intelligence not networking.

gemeinschaft
07-27-2011, 20:29
Ok, well luckily my internet connection crapped out again. 400ms pings + super slow downloads from test sites like www.speakeasy.net/speedtest

I snuck into the baby's room and unpluged the webcam. Bam instant 30ms pings and 30+mbit/sec download speeds again. Unless there is something more complex going on, I think I've got my culprit.

I'm going to keep watching my connection tonight and tomorrow to see if it remains stable with the webcam off. Then I'll disable the webcam's wireless function and see if it also misbehaves in wired mode.

If so, I'll have to run a firmware update and hope it gets fixed, or figure some clever way to isolate it on my network.

Thanks for all your help guys, you got me to start my thought process fresh and begin again from square one.

Very embarrassing for me since I'm an IT consultant. :) albeit in Business Intelligence not networking.

Now turn on the webcam and see if the problem comes back :)

If you go into your router management console, you should be able to see what IP address the Webcam is located at.

Hit it with Ping requests and see if it goes flaky and craps all over the network. :whistling:

hamster
07-27-2011, 20:39
Now turn on the webcam and see if the problem comes back :)

If you go into your router management console, you should be able to see what IP address the Webcam is located at.

Hit it with Ping requests and see if it goes flaky and craps all over the network. :whistling:

I'll give that a try tomorrow after work. It is on a static IP so it will be easy to try out. For now I'm going to just enjoy a stable connection so I can enjoy an episode of "Married with Children" on Netflix.

PS. Sorry for the double post earlier. Damned iPad.

Linux3
07-27-2011, 21:14
Pinging alone will only tell you so much.
I prefer to perform a Traceroute. Many times, this will let you know WHERE the latency is occurring.
For instance, my cable can get really slow and instead of 12 hops to Google.com, it is more like 30-50 hops.
I found out through experience that Comcast's DNS server suck, so I sorted that out by using Google's DNS service (8.8.8.8; 8.8.4.4).

This was going to be my suggestion too.
OK, it may be the webcam but.
My Time Warner RR connection started getting really slow. I replaced the modem and the router and still no joy.
Then I changed from TW DNS to google and life is good again.
Funny, it use to work just fine. I think TW did something they are not admitting.

gemeinschaft
07-27-2011, 21:42
This was going to be my suggestion too.
OK, it may be the webcam but.
My Time Warner RR connection started getting really slow. I replaced the modem and the router and still no joy.
Then I changed from TW DNS to google and life is good again.
Funny, it use to work just fine. I think TW did something they are not admitting.

Great minds think alike. :whistling:

hamster
07-28-2011, 06:09
Great minds think alike. :whistling:

I've actually been on the Google DNS servers for nearly 2 years now (since I first heard about them) because Time Warner is so useless. It really speeds up my load times on websites etc.