Cold, Hard Cash! [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Glock!9
07-29-2011, 16:33
How much is too much cash to have in your house?
where are the best places to secure it? and how?
I am trying to figure out the best play to keep it safe, yet accessible....
I do have a safe, but I am assuming that a home invader would force me to open that of he got the drop on me.
any thoughts?

ric0123
07-29-2011, 17:09
Tough one. I'm pondering the same thing. At my old place, I had a $100 bill stuck behind a painting on the wall. Not really sure what the reason was.

gotplastic
07-29-2011, 17:34
Someplace close to your exits so you can grab it on the way out if there's a fire or you need to BO. I keep it work important papers, etc.. all together in a small fireproof box that is well hidden but convenient to access.

racerford
07-29-2011, 17:54
Two months expenses.

Floor safe.

Bolster
07-29-2011, 18:02
All posters to this thread, please leave your home address and time of day you're not at home.

SilverCity
07-29-2011, 18:34
How much is too much cash to have in your house?
where are the best places to secure it? and how?
I am trying to figure out the best play to keep it safe, yet accessible....
I do have a safe, but I am assuming that a home invader would force me to open that of he got the drop on me.
any thoughts?

If a home invader gets the drop on you, you have much more to worry about than losing some cash...:shocked:

Keep the cash elsewhere, like in a "stash can" under the kitchen sink.

SC

RWBlue
07-29-2011, 18:43
I am thinking 1 or 2 trillion dollars to use to pay off the creditors.

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington D.C., District of Columbia 20500

RWBlue
07-29-2011, 18:53
On a more serious note.

1. Any money you have in hand is money that is not working for you. Additionally your home owners insurance will only pay for so much lost cash.
2. If you don't have cash, there are times when you will not be able to do things.
There needs to be a balance between 1 and 2.

Where to put the cash?
You have a couple options.
1. Hidden in plain sight. If you have a container that looks like something else, no one will bother it.
2. Hidden where no one will see it.



And of course, dead men tell no tails. If anyone knows what you have, you have to assume that everyone knows what you have.

Glock!9
07-29-2011, 19:31
If a home invader gets the drop on you, you have much more to worry about than losing some cash...:shocked:

Keep the cash elsewhere, like in a "stash can" under the kitchen sink.

SC

so there is no way anyone could ever get the drop on you? really? shower, sleeping?

RWBlue
07-29-2011, 19:40
so there is no way anyone could ever get the drop on you? really? shower, sleeping?

I didn't read that the way you did.

I read it as "If home invaders get the drop on me, I am more worried about getting killed.

Glock!9
07-29-2011, 19:44
I didn't read that the way you did.

I read it as "If home invaders get the drop on me, I am more worried about getting killed.

oh maybe your right lol....

Carry16
07-29-2011, 20:19
I suggest one of those small Sentry fireproof security boxes you can buy at Wal-mart for about $40, inside your fireproof gun cabinet. I feel pretty confident that even a bad fire will not get to my cash. A home invader is either going to die, or I will, so I'm not concerned with them making me open the safe.

dcc12
07-29-2011, 21:15
Cash in Firesafe= peace of mind
Cash in Firesafe in floor of gunsafe = secured peice of mind
Amount of Cash in Firesafe located in floor of gunsafe =No more than insurance will cover but enough to get by for a few months.= secure peice of mind.
Enough ammo to barter/hunt/defend for a year in another safe= priceless.

G29Reload
07-29-2011, 22:17
Hedge your bets.

Several locations in the house.

Safe deposit box at the bank.

Wallet stash.

etc

UneasyRider
07-30-2011, 09:20
$5,000 is not too much and not too little.

Will-21
07-30-2011, 11:00
Under $500.00 in $20.00 bills and smaller.

Some here, some there, gun safe, pantry, taped behind washing machine, under coffee table.

Bolster
07-30-2011, 11:28
I keep $100 in $5 bills in each of our cars (buried as deep as I can get them in a car) and another couple of hundred in the house, again in $5s and $10s. So I guess I could lay my hands on maybe $500 in small bills.

The small bills are for making last minute grocery purchases, immediately post-fan, when no change will be given due to nonfunctional registers. Or possibly for gas purchases...I could spurge the $100 on a partial tank of gas...?

smokeross
07-30-2011, 13:33
I bury mine in the back yard in plastic bottles so it won't be found with a metal detector. Sure is tough to dig up at minus 20 degrees though in January.

gosnmic
07-30-2011, 21:30
I bury mine in the back yard in plastic bottles so it won't be found with a metal detector. Sure is tough to dig up at minus 20 degrees though in January.

Wait - do you hide things in public spaces (see ISBN 1-893626-46-6 (http://www.amazon.com/How-Hide-Things-Public-Places/dp/1893626466)) (Wish I had an Amazon seller link to make $ off your purchases :P) ?!?! I just try to hide cash in my wallet but I can't seem to hide more than about $20-$40 at a time before it gets spent :rofl:

TangoFoxtrot
07-31-2011, 05:28
IMO I think the best way to hide cash is put it in a small fire resistant safe and hide it in your basement amongst the other junk you store there. I read somewhere that the fire and heat most likely will be more contained to the upper floors. Whether thats true or not...who knows.

RWBlue
07-31-2011, 09:26
IMO I think the best way to hide cash is put it in a small fire resistant safe and hide it in your basement amongst the other junk you store there. I read somewhere that the fire and heat most likely will be more contained to the upper floors. Whether thats true or not...who knows.

It is not true when the place burns to the ground.

If there is a fire and the fire department is called then the basement will end up with water in it. I assume that cash underwater will be ok.


But most fires are small. The kitchen catches on fire. The kitchen gets put out before the fire department shows up....

The basement is a good idea. A minor flood, it would still be there wet. Major flood, take it with me. Tornado, things in the basement should still be there after the tornado. Hurricane, I would take the cash with me. Wildfire, I would take the cash with me.

G-30Jet
07-31-2011, 13:22
Everyone has different needs. Regardless of the amount of money, just make the bills small denominations.

actionshooter10
08-01-2011, 04:07
3-6 months of expenses.

TangoFoxtrot
08-02-2011, 02:27
Hedge your bets.

Several locations in the house.

Safe deposit box at the bank.

Wallet stash.

etc


A bank is the last place on want my cash in a real SHTF senario.

kip435
08-03-2011, 10:53
assuming i had the appropriate safe, $10,000.
but keep in mind, during a large scale SHTF situation, traditional currencies will not do you any good.

wildcat455
08-03-2011, 12:12
Well, I used to keep 15K to pay all my monthly bills and mortgage for 1 year. I decided that I needed to expand my preps to cover a few more situations, and now I'm back to saving toward that number. Originally, this started out as an "out of work unexpectedly" fund.

The only danger I really see from continuing with this is if this currency is abandoned and becomes worthless for debts public and private, but I don't think that's going to happen overnight. I plan to continue on this path at least until I get wind the mortgage company is considering no longer accepting it as legal tender.

Donn57
08-03-2011, 17:37
I think it depends on what your SHTF scenario is. However, I can't really envision a situation where large sums of cash must be kept at home. Having cash in the immediate run up to or aftermath of a natural disaster is probably the only reason I can see for keeping a relatively modest cash stash. If the situation is so bad that cash is not available from the banks, the cash you have stashed is probably good only for starting fires.

Donn57
08-03-2011, 17:41
Well, I used to keep 15K to pay all my monthly bills and mortgage for 1 year. I decided that I needed to expand my preps to cover a few more situations, and now I'm back to saving toward that number. Originally, this started out as an "out of work unexpectedly" fund.

The only danger I really see from continuing with this is if this currency is abandoned and becomes worthless for debts public and private, but I don't think that's going to happen overnight. I plan to continue on this path at least until I get wind the mortgage company is considering no longer accepting it as legal tender.

No, it won't happen overnight and may not happen at all. What is more likely to happen and what can happen relatively quickly is massive inflation so the money you have stashed will no longer buy what you originally allowed for.

At any rate, having the money stashed at home won't make it worth more than if it was in the bank or an investment account.

racerford
08-03-2011, 18:55
I think it depends on what your SHTF scenario is. However, I can't really envision a situation where large sums of cash must be kept at home. Having cash in the immediate run up to or aftermath of a natural disaster is probably the only reason I can see for keeping a relatively modest cash stash. If the situation is so bad that cash is not available from the banks, the cash you have stashed is probably good only for starting fires.

A natural disaster is a perfect reason to have the cash. When it gets bad a modest amount may not be enough. What if that generator is now $1000 instead of $300 and you need it to keep a window unit running because the power is off and you sick mother is in the houe? And gasoline to run is $10 a gal from the only guy that has it and can run his pumps?

Banks may not be open because the power is out for weeks. Blizzards in the north can be brutal. Cash is your friend.

racerford
08-03-2011, 19:01
No, it won't happen overnight and may not happen at all. What is more likely to happen and what can happen relatively quickly is massive inflation so the money you have stashed will no longer buy what you originally allowed for.

At any rate, having the money stashed at home won't make it worth more than if it was in the bank or an investment account.

Inflation is not the only possible result. The Great Depression followed the path of bank runs, bank "holidays' and "DEFLATION". So if you had a lot of cash at home you were in pretty good shape compared to the rest. Of course we were on the Gold standard then so there was not good way to increase the money supply except by force exchange of gold coins in banks and homes for paper money. Then the change in the gold exchange rate. I am that could not have been a problem because we were on the gold standard and every one knows that there are not economic woes when you are on the gold standard as it is perfect in every way.

Never mind if you owe money when devaluation sets in, that you job will pay less and it will cost you relatively more to pay the money back.

Warp
08-03-2011, 20:53
How much is too much cash to have in your house?
where are the best places to secure it? and how?
I am trying to figure out the best play to keep it safe, yet accessible....
I do have a safe, but I am assuming that a home invader would force me to open that of he got the drop on me.
any thoughts?

If a home invader is in a position to force me to do stuff around my house some lost cash is not even worth worrying about.

so there is no way anyone could ever get the drop on you? really? shower, sleeping?

If you do it right it will be very unlikely...and even though still technically possible what the poster you quoted said is still 100% true...you have much bigger things to worry about than some cash.

Things I have done (and will discuss publicly) to help prevent this:

1. All doors and windows locked, including the one to the garage
2. Guard dog(s)
3. Proper exterior lighting
4. Monitored alarm covering all doors and windows
5. Cars and therefore garage door openers locked inside the garage
6. Unfriendly landscaping under most first floor windows
7. 6' privacy fence around back yard with locked gate, though neighbors still have line of site into much of the yard
8. No landscaping that provides concealment for approaches to the house.
Etc

ChuteTheMall
08-03-2011, 21:09
http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/3710/bisonmoneydual.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/bisonmoneydual.jpg/)

Whether from Bison or Eagle Creek, these easily hold ten or more bills of whatever denomination you prefer. Easily attached to a bug-out bag, or hidden in the belt loops of your bug-out pants, or anywhere.
http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/3590/eaglecreekallterrainmon.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/eaglecreekallterrainmon.jpg/)

Donn57
08-03-2011, 21:37
A natural disaster is a perfect reason to have the cash. When it gets bad a modest amount may not be enough. What if that generator is now $1000 instead of $300 and you need it to keep a window unit running because the power is off and you sick mother is in the houe? And gasoline to run is $10 a gal from the only guy that has it and can run his pumps?

Banks may not be open because the power is out for weeks. Blizzards in the north can be brutal. Cash is your friend.

Well, if you live in a place that is subject to such disasters and you don't already have a generator and fuel, you're not much of a prepper as that would be a basic preparation in those areas. Why would I put away money to buy a generator and fuel at inflated prices when I can do it in advance?

ChuteTheMall
08-03-2011, 21:55
Well, if you live in a place that is subject to such disasters and you don't already have a generator and fuel, you're not much of a prepper as that would be a basic preparation in those areas. Why would I put away money to buy a generator and fuel at inflated prices when I can do it in advance?

Some insomniac accidentally puts a bullet thru your noisy generator in the middle of the night.

Or whatever. Expenses happen. Cash is a useful tool.

Donn57
08-03-2011, 22:48
Some insomniac accidentally puts a bullet thru your noisy generator in the middle of the night.

Or whatever. Expenses happen. Cash is a useful tool.

I'm not sure where I indicated that cash wasn't useful in some situations. I just don't think that large amounts sitting around the house are necessary. If you've prepped properly for short-term SHTF situations, you won't need lots of cash laying around. In long-term SHTF scenarios, cash will likely become worthless quickly. Better to have invested it in supplies prior to the event.

Besides, as a life-long Florida resident, I've been in several hurricanes. It is my experience that it is hard enough to find supplies prior to the storm hitting. Ever try to find a battery the day before a hurricane hits? Once the storm passes, you're unlikely to find anything useful at any price.

But hey, counting my money by candlelight in the hot muggy darkness could be fun too.

RWBlue
08-04-2011, 08:27
http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/3710/bisonmoneydual.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/bisonmoneydual.jpg/)

Whether from Bison or Eagle Creek, these easily hold ten or more bills of whatever denomination you prefer. Easily attached to a bug-out bag, or hidden in the belt loops of your bug-out pants, or anywhere.
http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/3590/eaglecreekallterrainmon.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/eaglecreekallterrainmon.jpg/)

Is it stiff enough to use as a gun/ccw belt?

Warp
08-04-2011, 12:08
Is it stiff enough to use as a gun/ccw belt?

Based on those images I bet it isn't a very good carry belt.

wildcat455
08-04-2011, 21:27
No, it won't happen overnight and may not happen at all. What is more likely to happen and what can happen relatively quickly is massive inflation so the money you have stashed will no longer buy what you originally allowed for.

At any rate, having the money stashed at home won't make it worth more than if it was in the bank or an investment account.

I can see how my water bill, Electric bill, food bill, cell phone bill, insurance, etc could be raised.
But how does massive inflation affect a fixed rate mortgage payment? Taxes and insurance going up?

racerford
08-04-2011, 22:58
I can see how my water bill, Electric bill, food bill, cell phone bill, insurance, etc could be raised.
But how does massive inflation affect a fixed rate mortgage payment? Taxes and insurance going up?

If if your wage are going at something near inflation, then you mortgage (principal an dinterest payment) will become a smaller portion of your monthly income. You will be paying back the debt with cheaper dollars. You will be net ahead. Wages generally lead or follow inflation with a fairly high correlation. It could be very painful if they lag, as all your other expenses go up before your wages do and it makes it tight until the wages start moving up as well.

On the other hand inflation is very bad if you are on a fixed income or have fixed rate investments.