Need Opinions On Firestarting Tools [Archive] - Glock Talk

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TangoFoxtrot
08-01-2011, 03:02
Need your opinions on what is the best firestarting tool on the market?

UST Strikeforce, UST Blastmatch, Swedish Firesteel, Magnesium Blocks, ect.

Thanks in advance!

actionshooter10
08-01-2011, 04:04
I haven't used the strikeforce but the blastmatch is incredible. I would rank the swedish fire steel and magnesium blocks behind it in that order.

lawman800
08-02-2011, 00:28
I have a magnesium striker in my kit and tons of matches and a big jug of lighter fluid to get it going.

TangoFoxtrot
08-02-2011, 03:57
Someone gave me a Swedish firesteel but it has a real thin rod that might snap after awhile if too much pressure is put on it.

jdavionic
08-02-2011, 04:22
I just have the mag blocks. I've used them before with an old fixed blade knife and they work fine. It's certainly not as quick and unforgiving as a lighter, but it works. You've just got to have your setup for the fire prepared with a nice smaller tinder bundle to start it, then a larger gathering of small sticks, etc.

RatDrall
08-02-2011, 05:25
ESEE fire tool, it's a ferro rod with a hollow compartment in the rear to store wax soaked cotton balls, or whatever else you use to get a fire going in a pinch:

http://www.eseeknives.com/fire_kit.htm

Most fire starting tools are useless without a dry, ready tinder, which can be very hard to find when you REALLY need it.

ravenkeeper98
08-02-2011, 05:27
In Boy Scouts we used gun powder with small pieces of magnesium strips mixed in. Just kept it in an old 35mm film case. It would usually start wet wood very well.

smokeross
08-02-2011, 08:55
Just don't forget to include a few good old Zippo's with the little metal bottle of extra fuel with flints stored in the cap.

TangoFoxtrot
08-02-2011, 15:00
[QUOTE=ravenkeeper98;17717110]In Boy Scouts we used gun powder with small pieces of magnesium strips mixed in. Just kept it in an old 35mm film case. It would usually start wet wood very well

Wow that brings back memories. :supergrin:

Maine1
08-02-2011, 20:35
zippo as EDC, more lighter than people give it credit for. Also I carry ferro rods, and a little tinder, too.

MY TEOTWAWKI kit would be a nice tight zippo with a load of flints, extra wick, some fluid, two large ferro rods, and about 2# of tinder, Charcloth to replace it as needed.

TangoFoxtrot
08-03-2011, 02:26
Lighters are great until they get wet or when its really cold.

kirgi08
08-03-2011, 03:46
9v + steel wool.'08.

mes228
08-03-2011, 05:02
Huge "learning curve" with many fire starters. The Blastmatch will cast the hottest spark available, exactly where you want it, almost immediately. With no learning curve.

Big Bird
08-03-2011, 06:19
A bic lighter is the best and cheapest. Waterproof matches do a good job most of the time. A firesteel or magnesium is the backup to the first two. No reason to complicate something that's quite simple. I've made dozens and dozens of fires on wilderness survival training trips using nothing more than some flint and steel and a little char cloth.

But for 95% of all situations a bic lighter will get the job done--a $9 cigar store refilable butane lighter will work in the wind and cold with a hot flame!. Or you can buy one of those expensive windmill lighters.

Aceman
08-03-2011, 23:38
Please define best. Disposable BIC is pretty dang good almost all of the time...

kirgi08
08-03-2011, 23:45
Butane has Issues in cold weather.'08.

TangoFoxtrot
08-04-2011, 02:27
Yes it does! Found that out first hand.

barbedwiresmile
08-04-2011, 15:41
IMHO, tinder is of far greater importance in fire starting than te implement of spark/fire creation. I would gladly take superior tinder and an inferior firestarter over the opposite situation. As to what firestarter is "best"? My vote goes to a lighter in a ziploc bag. At current prices you can buy a crate of them.

syntaxerrorsix
08-05-2011, 12:53
I've got a dozen or so firesteels and three or four mag bars stuffed in various sheaths and bags.

I agree with BWS, tinder is more important. I keep a few chunks of pitch wood handy and every fire kit I have contains cotton balls soaked in petroleum jelly. Best wet or dry fire starter I've found.

LAWDOGKMS
08-05-2011, 13:19
I have to be honest, everytime I hear about all these fancy-firestarters, I think about all the killer "survival trips" I've been on, with simply a two-pack of bic lighters and a $2.00 magnesium firestarter (that I never used!)..

These trips, many of which are water based excursions in cold/wet environs, with two bic lighters separately double-plastic-bagged (in different packs in case I lose one) have been all I've ever needed..

A single bic lighter will start many fires for years, and will dry out if you get it wet..

Just sayin...

poodleshooter1
08-05-2011, 13:23
Because fire is so important, you should have multiple methods and nevery rely on just one method.

kirgi08
08-05-2011, 13:57
Agreed.'08.

ravenkeeper98
08-05-2011, 14:01
Wow that brings back memories. :supergrin:

Were you in Troop 509?

Bilbo Bagins
08-05-2011, 14:40
I have to be honest, everytime I hear about all these fancy-firestarters, I think about all the killer "survival trips" I've been on, with simply a two-pack of bic lighters and a $2.00 magnesium firestarter (that I never used!)..

These trips, many of which are water based excursions in cold/wet environs, with two bic lighters separately double-plastic-bagged (in different packs in case I lose one) have been all I've ever needed..

A single bic lighter will start many fires for years, and will dry out if you get it wet..

Just sayin...


+1 When I go camping and hiking my #1 fire tool is a Bic lighter. I also carry a few strike anywhere matches in a waterproof container and a swedish firesteel as backup. I like the firesteel because its light, compact, and very hard to break (no mechinical moving parts like Blastmatch). I just attach the firesteel to the key holder or inside zipper in all my backpacks.

Sorry, but I don't like playing Nutnfancy and lighting all my fires tactically. Bic lighter get it done 99% of the time, and as a ex-smoker the way to get a cold lighter to work is to breathe on it and shake it before lighting. Also fire steels are limited use, so if that is your sole fire starting tool and you use it regularly, it might crap out on you when you need it the most. One is None.

Bilbo Bagins
08-05-2011, 14:43
Someone gave me a Swedish firesteel but it has a real thin rod that might snap after awhile if too much pressure is put on it.

If its a blue key then that is the scout model. There is also a mini version. The regular model is pretty thick.

american lockpicker
08-05-2011, 15:06
I have these.

http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j415/al2011c250/Picture557.jpg

I prefer the Bic as its easy and quick to use.

Cavalry Doc
08-05-2011, 18:39
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41r1d0MIFOL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Aceman
08-05-2011, 22:18
I have to be honest, everytime I hear about all these fancy-firestarters, I think about all the killer "survival trips" I've been on, with simply a two-pack of bic lighters and a $2.00 magnesium firestarter (that I never used!)..

These trips, many of which are water based excursions in cold/wet environs, with two bic lighters separately double-plastic-bagged (in different packs in case I lose one) have been all I've ever needed..

A single bic lighter will start many fires for years, and will dry out if you get it wet..

Just sayin...

AMEN! Preach it to me brother!

TangoFoxtrot
08-06-2011, 04:40
Were you in Troop 509?

No actually 75th Ranger Troop.

TangoFoxtrot
08-06-2011, 04:44
I have 9v battery and steel wool, bic lighters, magnifying glass, mag bar and firesteel. I also keep cotton balls packed in petro jelly, Wetfire packs and tinder. Just looking into other fire tools and methods.

Edmund0804
08-31-2011, 06:36
Take a look at this guys firestarters! All Weather Firestarters.com

Cool video on starting fires

31F20
09-01-2011, 11:46
Ive got a drawer of full size Bics, 100 or so vasoline cotton balls, Calcium carbide, dryer lint, 0000 steel wool, 9v batteries, fire steel and Mayan dust. Also a few old med bottles with strike anywhere matches.

quake
09-01-2011, 13:26
While I dislike disposable things in general, my favorite firestarter is a disposable butane lighter. Can be had for $11-$12 per hundred at Sam's for generics. Favorite used to be a zippo when I smoked regularly, but now I smoke rarely enough that a zippo dries out between uses.

For backup I like a ferro rod, with or without magnesium, and carry a credit-card size fresnel lens in my wallet as a magnifier and firestarter both.

poodleshooter1
09-01-2011, 13:36
Huge "learning curve" with many fire starters. The Blastmatch will cast the hottest spark available, exactly where you want it, almost immediately. With no learning curve.

Which is virtually useless in the PNW where the cascades are almost constantly soacked in rain or burried in snow.

mes228
09-01-2011, 16:37
Poodleshooter, I beg to differ. There is no circumstance on earth that a Blastmatch does not work and work very well. In the Pacific Northwest it's a matter of tender. If dry tinder can be found in the forest, in your pack, in your billfold - you have a fire. I also suggest "Wetfire" as an adjunct to the Blastmatch. Together, there is no circumstance on earth that you cannot have a fire in 1/10 second. Using Wetfire as tender you would still need some sort of fuel ie twigs etc. to burn until the fire was big enough and hot enough to dry/burn the wet wood. I believe the Air Force still issues the Blastmatch to pilots as it's the "best available". I think the Air Force is correct.

LAWDOGKMS
09-01-2011, 17:06
Poodleshooter, I beg to differ. There is no circumstance on earth that a Blastmatch does not work and work very well. In the Pacific Northwest it's a matter of tender. If dry tinder can be found in the forest, in your pack, in your billfold - you have a fire. I also suggest "Wetfire" as an adjunct to the Blastmatch. Together, there is no circumstance on earth that you cannot have a fire in 1/10 second. Using Wetfire as tender you would still need some sort of fuel ie twigs etc. to burn until the fire was big enough and hot enough to dry/burn the wet wood. I believe the Air Force still issues the Blastmatch to pilots as it's the "best available". I think the Air Force is correct.

Ok..you peaked my interest and I watched a video of the Blastmatch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYRKzdSXH34

I'd still rather have a big lighter, but the blastmatch was PRETTY COOL and would make a good backup...

R_W
09-01-2011, 17:49
Butane lighters fail if cold or at elevation
Zippos dry out if not cared for (great EDC, not so great emergency kit unless you include the bottle of fuel)
Any of the firesteels create a hot spark, but not enough total heat to get damp tinder dry and started
Even boat matches fail in some conditions.

I carry all of the above things as they work within their limits. But most importantly I carry lots of tinder and tools to make firewood, including splitting wet wood to get to the dry.

Raiden
09-02-2011, 02:44
Most of my fires are started with a disposable butane lighter, but I turn to the BlastMatch for difficult fires. I typically have Swedish fire steels, waterproof matches, and an oil lighter as backups. When I'm just having fun, I sometimes like to use the fire piston with a bit of char cloth.

In a lot of my fires, the quality and quantity of tinder is often the biggest positive factor. Through work, I can usually get a fire started in some crappy situations. With WetFire tinder, I've never failed to get a good fire going in similarly stink-o situations.

If you can, experiment with different combinations. What works for one person, might not be the best solution for others. A Finnish pal of mine - a real fire whisperer who makes it seem effortless to start a fire in a rainforest - swears by the ol' magnesium block with a flint. I've never had much luck with 'em, myself. Thank goodness for the wide variety of options!

RatDrall
09-02-2011, 05:20
Which is virtually useless in the PNW where the cascades are almost constantly soacked in rain or burried in snow.

Logs tend to hide the dryer parts in the middle, which is really the only argument to keep a knife big enough for "batoning" when deep in the woods.

TangoFoxtrot
09-03-2011, 04:26
Picked up a Gerber Bear Grylls firestarter yesterday for $14 at Dick Sporting Goods. Not a bad size ferro rod for the price.

eracer
09-03-2011, 04:29
IMHO, tinder is of far greater importance in fire starting than te implement of spark/fire creation. I would gladly take superior tinder and an inferior firestarter over the opposite situation. As to what firestarter is "best"? My vote goes to a lighter in a ziploc bag. At current prices you can buy a crate of them.Note to self: Add Bic lighters and Ziploc bags to prep list. Buy now before the big run when Obama gets re-elected.

TangoFoxtrot
09-03-2011, 04:43
OOOPPPsss I though I was in the S/P forum.