Will you go to hell for Cremation [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Bilbo Bagins
08-01-2011, 14:19
The more I think about what I want to have done when I die, the more I think I want to get cremated.

As a Catholic/christian is it OK?

barstoolguru
08-01-2011, 14:36
no, but I will for other things I did...... some one said you go to heven for the view and you go to hell for the company

Vic Hays
08-01-2011, 14:47
Cremation is not going to make any difference to God.

Like the Bible says, dust and ashes.

Genesis 3:19 In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread Til youn return to the ground, For out of it you were taken; For dust you are, And to dust you shall return.

Genesis 18:27 Then Abraham answered and said, "indeed now, I who am but dust and ashes have taken it upon myself to speak to the Lord:

Schabesbert
08-01-2011, 14:49
The more I think about what I want to have done when I die, the more I think I want to get cremated.

As a Catholic/christian is it OK?

Always go to the definitive source:
From the Catechism (http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s2c2a5.htm#2301):

The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.

The Church had forbade cremation in times past since it was a pagan practice which was intended as a public demonstration of the denial of the resurrection.

For a good explaination from 1917 (before this prohibition was lifted), see the Catholic Encyclopedia (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04481c.htm).

Norske
08-01-2011, 14:50
Is everyone whose body was either lost or buried at sea automatically dmd because their remains were not buried on land?

I think not.

A human being consists of a physical body and something else we know exists but cannot really define, which is generally called a "soul".

Despite attestations to the contrary, we still do not know where the soul comes from before we are born or where it goes after we die.

But in either case, if God exists, he will judge your Soul.

NOT what became of your body after you leave it. :cool:

Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust. All flesh is grass. :supergrin:




\\

SPIN2010
08-01-2011, 14:57
No, that will not be a reason.

Paul7
08-01-2011, 15:01
Always go to the definitive source:
From the Catechism (http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s2c2a5.htm#2301):

The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.


That makes a lot of sense. These days, a lot of people can't afford a $10,000 funeral. I would think the remains of a buried Christian of 1,500 years ago would be about the same of a recent cremated Christian today.

Sarge1400
08-01-2011, 22:12
Burial in general, and embalming in particular, make absolutely no sense to me. Every time I drive past a cemetery I wonder "what the heck are we saving them for?".
When I'm dead, cremate me, and I don't care what happens to the ashes. It's not like I'm going to know anyway.

barstoolguru
08-01-2011, 23:08
I had an uncle that worked in for a whiskey distillery and he fell in the still and drowned. In his will he had stated he wanted to be cremated, it took them 4 days to put out the fire <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

NorthCarolinaLiberty
08-01-2011, 23:50
Do ashes burn?

Brucev
08-02-2011, 06:44
The more I think about what I want to have done when I die, the more I think I want to get cremated.

As a Catholic/christian is it OK?

Without any reservation... No. All manner of after-life customs have at one time or another prevailed since earliest times. Scripture does not describe a practice that is to be normative. The customs of O.T. era believers or N.T. era Christians were not uniform and are not normative for our era.

herose
08-02-2011, 06:54
Told my wife that when I die rent a helicopter and toss me out in the middle of the Smoky Mountains. It'll be cheaper and well bears and coyotes gotta eat too.

achysklic
08-02-2011, 06:59
Why not just donate your body to Medical science? It's a free way to go.......

heyTJ
08-02-2011, 07:06
Burial in general, and embalming in particular, make absolutely no sense to me. Every time I drive past a cemetery I wonder "what the heck are we saving them for?".
When I'm dead, cremate me, and I don't care what happens to the ashes. It's not like I'm going to know anyway.

To funny, I think this would be a great place to put in a golf course.

BuckeyePPC
08-02-2011, 09:08
To funny, I think this would be a great place to put in a golf course.

A friend of mine, her son, and I spread some of her father's ashes into a sand trap at her father's favorite golf course. It was the sand trap her father and his friends often hit into. He wanted to be near his friends and knew this would be the place they would step into the most often.

My father's ashes was spread into the pacific ocean off Black Sand Beach on the Big Island. It was one of his favorite places. Planted a coconut near the place we spread his ashes. It was growing quite well the last time I was there.

Woofie
08-02-2011, 10:10
Burial in general, and embalming in particular, make absolutely no sense to me. Every time I drive past a cemetery I wonder "what the heck are we saving them for?".
When I'm dead, cremate me, and I don't care what happens to the ashes. It's not like I'm going to know anyway.

It can be very difficult to cremate someone you love.

Sarge1400
08-02-2011, 10:23
It can be very difficult to cremate someone you love.

Why would it be any more difficult than putting them in a box in the ground?

Woofie
08-02-2011, 11:12
Why would it be any more difficult than putting them in a box in the ground?

It's an emotional thing. If cremation isn't the norm in your family, making that decision is a tough one.

heyTJ
08-02-2011, 12:19
It's an emotional thing. If cremation isn't the norm in your family, making that decision is a tough one.


This is the reason the decision needs to be made prior to your death.

Woofie
08-02-2011, 12:28
This is the reason the decision needs to be made prior to your death.

Too many people aren't comfortable planning for their own death. It's an awful disservice to place on those you leave behind, but it happens.

RC-RAMIE
08-02-2011, 12:43
Too many people aren't comfortable planning for their own death. It's an awful disservice to place on those you leave behind, but it happens.

Its a decision as a adult you don't leave for other people to chose my mom and dad are doing cremation it was not my choice they made for themselves and are the first I know of in my family to make that choice.

Glock30Eric
08-02-2011, 12:51
Cremation is not going to make any difference to God.

Like the Bible says, dust and ashes.

Genesis 3:19 In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread Til youn return to the ground, For out of it you were taken; For dust you are, And to dust you shall return.

Genesis 18:27 Then Abraham answered and said, "indeed now, I who am but dust and ashes have taken it upon myself to speak to the Lord:

Right on!

Cremation is not a sin, therefore it will not send you to hell.

FifthFreedom
08-03-2011, 14:52
The more I think about what I want to have done when I die, the more I think I want to get cremated.

As a Catholic/christian is it OK?

Various views of cremation by various religions:

http://www.giftofireland.com/Religionandcremation.htm

ArtificialGrape
08-03-2011, 15:35
Too many people aren't comfortable planning for their own death. It's an awful disservice to place on those you leave behind, but it happens.
I agree. I have made it clear to my wife that my preference would be to be cremated, but my wife is very in tune to the emotional needs of our children, and I trust her implicitly in this regard. If I die while any of our children are still young and she believes that they would benefit from the closure of being able to visit a cemetery plot, then have me buried, but once I'm dead, I don't really care.

-ArtificialGrape
I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.–-Mark Twain

Ogreon
08-03-2011, 18:00
Told my wife that when I die rent a helicopter and toss me out in the middle of the Smoky Mountains. It'll be cheaper and well bears and coyotes gotta eat too.

I picture some poor guy in a hospital saying, "I was hiking through the Smoky Mountains..."

Woofie
08-03-2011, 19:07
I agree. I have made it clear to my wife that my preference would be to be cremated, but my wife is very in tune to the emotional needs of our children, and I trust her implicitly in this regard. If I die while any of our children are still young and she believes that they would benefit from the closure of being able to visit a cemetery plot, then have me buried, but once I'm dead, I don't really care.

-ArtificialGrape
I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.-Mark Twain



I want to be gotten rid of as cheaply as possible, but if anyone objects to that, I plan to have the money saved to pay for whatever will make whatever kids and grandkids I have comfortable.

Bilbo Bagins
08-03-2011, 20:40
Burial in general, and embalming in particular, make absolutely no sense to me. Every time I drive past a cemetery I wonder "what the heck are we saving them for?".
When I'm dead, cremate me, and I don't care what happens to the ashes. It's not like I'm going to know anyway.

That is a reason why I considered it. My grandparents were buried in a Philadelphia cemetery a few decades back. Back then it was a nice neighborhood. Now its a ghetto, and I "pack heavy" just to visit them. When I die no one will visit them. You figure in less that 100 years your grave site will be a forgotten marker that maybe your great great grandchildren might once in their lifetime if you are lucky. It does seem to be a complete waste of money and land.

ArtificialGrape
08-03-2011, 20:57
That is a reason why I considered it. My grandparents were buried in a Philadelphia cemetery a few decades back. Back then it was a nice neighborhood. Now its a ghetto, and I "pack heavy" just to visit them. When I die no one will visit them. You figure in less that 100 years your grave site will be a forgotten marker that maybe your great great grandchildren might once in their lifetime if you are lucky. It does seem to be a complete waste of money and land.
Yep, just drag me outside on Bring Out Your Dead Day and be done with it. :cool:

THplanes
08-04-2011, 02:01
Yep, just drag me outside on Bring Out Your Dead Day and be done with it. :cool:

I don't know about todays situation but it use to be there was always a need for cadavers for use in science, medical, and dental schools. If you're not too old and broken down you might consider this. My lab group thought we had a hot young chick cadaver. Turns out she was 83. :embarassed:

eracer
08-04-2011, 06:57
Check out this link: Holy Smoke Ammo (http://www.myholysmoke.com/Our_Services.html)
(http://www.mademansion.com/holy-smoke-ammo/)

Ogreon
08-04-2011, 16:20
You figure in less that 100 years your grave site will be a forgotten marker that maybe your great great grandchildren might once in their lifetime if you are lucky. It does seem to be a complete waste of money and land.

In 1000 years, someone will build over your grave. You are then required to haunt them. It's a venerable cycle. Life. Death. Terror.

Hardly a waste.

steveksux
08-06-2011, 12:38
No, you won't go to hell.

Not unless you try to teach Cremationism is science class.

Randy

steveksux
08-06-2011, 12:39
I don't know about todays situation but it use to be there was always a need for cadavers for use in science, medical, and dental schools. If you're not too old and broken down you might consider this. My lab group thought we had a hot young chick cadaver. Turns out she was 83. :embarassed:Ok, so she wasn't young, how hot was she?

Randy

Kingarthurhk
08-13-2011, 09:01
That makes a lot of sense. These days, a lot of people can't afford a $10,000 funeral. I would think the remains of a buried Christian of 1,500 years ago would be about the same of a recent cremated Christian today.

What happens to your body after death is very often not your choice. It is usually left to your immediate relatives. Either way, you will have no knowledge of it, as you would be dead. My father-in-law very recently died, and I just got back from my in-laws the 9th of this month after the memorial service. He was cremated. That was the easiest way to transport his body from California (where he died) to Minnesota. However, in true form, he was late to his own funeral. The ashes did not arrive in time for the service.

Is cremation a salvation issue? No. He had no choice in what happened to his body. He was dead. He collapsed of a sudden heart valve anuerysm. He collapsed, told my mother-in-law he loved her and died. That was his last thought in this world until the resurection. He went from a nerdy, quirky Finn to a pile of ashes in a few days.

I spent a week up there trying to help out my wife and mother-in-law as best we could. I had to go back to work in Texas. My wife and children are still up there.

So, that is the story of men on earth. One day you are wondering around enjoying life. The next you are a pile of ashes. In that respect it is a cautionary tale. It becomes that much mroe important:

Joshua 24:15, "But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

Paul7
08-13-2011, 09:14
What happens to your body after death is very often not your choice. It is usually left to your immediate relatives. Either way, you will have no knowledge of it, as you would be dead. My father-in-law very recently died, and I just got back from my in-laws the 9th of this month after the memorial service. He was cremated. That was the easiest way to transport his body from California (where he died) to Minnesota. However, in true form, he was late to his own funeral. The ashes did not arrive in time for the service.

Is cremation a salvation issue? No. He had no choice in what happened to his body. He was dead. He collapsed of a sudden heart valve anuerysm. He collapsed, told my mother-in-law he loved her and died. That was his last thought in this world until the resurection. He went from a nerdy, quirky Finn to a pile of ashes in a few days.

I spent a week up there trying to help out my wife and mother-in-law as best we could. I had to go back to work in Texas. My wife and children are still up there.

So, that is the story of men on earth. One day you are wondering around enjoying life. The next you are a pile of ashes. In that respect it is a cautionary tale. It becomes that much mroe important:

Joshua 24:15, "But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

Well said. None of us are guaranteed tomorrow.

Kaybe
08-13-2011, 09:29
Holy Smoke Ammo! What a cool concept. Thanks for posting that. I would prefer to be shot out of an Abrams cannon, but not really my call. God can speak the universe into existence, He can handle ashes. Check out Ezekiel 37.

steveksux
08-13-2011, 10:26
What happens to your body after death is very often not your choice. It is usually left to your immediate relatives. Either way, you will have no knowledge of it, as you would be dead. My father-in-law very recently died, and I just got back from my in-laws the 9th of this month after the memorial service. He was cremated. That was the easiest way to transport his body from California (where he died) to Minnesota. However, in true form, he was late to his own funeral. The ashes did not arrive in time for the service.

Is cremation a salvation issue? No. He had no choice in what happened to his body. He was dead. He collapsed of a sudden heart valve anuerysm. He collapsed, told my mother-in-law he loved her and died. That was his last thought in this world until the resurection. He went from a nerdy, quirky Finn to a pile of ashes in a few days.

I spent a week up there trying to help out my wife and mother-in-law as best we could. I had to go back to work in Texas. My wife and children are still up there.Very sorry to hear of your loss, I hope she comes to find comfort in his last words. I would hope to have the same opportunity in my last moments on Earth. We should all be so careful to say that early and often just in case we don't...

Randy

ArtificialGrape
08-13-2011, 11:22
My father-in-law very recently died...

Is cremation a salvation issue? No. He had no choice in what happened to his body. He was dead.
First, I am sorry to hear of your loss.

Second, I didn't want to pass up the opportunity for us to agree. *Assuming there is an afterlife with a Heaven and Hell* I agree that it would be unjust to leave ultimate salvation out of one's control. Otherwise one could lead a holy life deserving salvation, die, and have an ignorant or malicious next of kin condemn them to hell with cremation.

Kingarthurhk
08-13-2011, 11:35
Very sorry to hear of your loss, I hope she comes to find comfort in his last words. I would hope to have the same opportunity in my last moments on Earth. We should all be so careful to say that early and often just in case we don't...

Randy

Thank you. That was my wife's regret is that she hadn't had a chance to talk to her father before he died. My wife and I traditionally tell each other at the end of each phone conversation, no matter how trivial that we love each other. Most people say, "Goodbye" at the end of a phone call. Ours is typically, "Okay, love you."

I would hope my last moments on earth would be a peaceful passing. We often don't get a choice in that. I remember when I was having problems with my potassium (before being properly diagnosed and medicated) that the lack of it was cauing havoc with my body. I remember one day being very tired, it was about dusk, laying on the bed, the air was comfortably cool. My wife was there, and I felt myself fading (from life). I felt peace and comfort there, I wasn't afraid. My wife on the other hand wasn't having it. She prayed over me, and put her hand on chest. Like bolt of electricity I was yanked back into the land of the living and energetic.

Had I died then, I would have passed peacefully, but she and God had a different plan. So, with the help of modern medicine and tiny little pills, my previously unmanifested genetic condition has been kept in check.

Potassium is a strange element in the human body. Too much, your heart stops. Too little, your heart stops. Not to mention it messes with your nervous system, digestive system, and can cause you to have a TIA (minature stroke).

My grandfather, who was kind enough to pass on the condition, would often be exerting himself on the ranch and just pass out. There was no good diagnosis in those days: simply eat a bannana a day with some orange juice. Honestly, I am suprised he lived as long as he did with that time bomb running around inside him.

Long diatribe short, if I could choose a way to die, when I have to go, the above story would be how I would want to go. I have looked death in the eye time and time again with rollovers, you name it. It gives you a very different perspective on things.

steveksux
08-13-2011, 12:44
Thank you. That was my wife's regret is that she hadn't had a chance to talk to her father before he died. My wife and I traditionally tell each other at the end of each phone conversation, no matter how trivial that we love each other. Most people say, "Goodbye" at the end of a phone call. Ours is typically, "Okay, love you."We kiss every time we part in case its the last time also. By we I mean her and I, not you and me... so simmer down there.... :tongueout:

But seriously, hope she finds a way through that, can't imagine losing a spouse. Obviously, I've only been married once.

Randy

Kingarthurhk
08-13-2011, 12:58
We kiss every time we part in case its the last time also. By we I mean her and I, not you and me... so simmer down there.... :tongueout:

But seriously, hope she finds a way through that, can't imagine losing a spouse. Obviously, I've only been married once.

Randy

We have a similar tradition. If I am leaving the house to go some place, it is usually with a hug and a kiss. My wife and I have been married 12 years this December, and we don't plan on remarrying should one pass before the other. Though, when we went to the revolving Remada resturant that we dated in, had one of our anniversaries in, and went there again this time around-she did not appreciate the fact that I pointed out we are "old". We were 20 somethings when we first went to that restuarants, now the last mile marker of 30 is in the rear view mirror. Watching the 20 somethings in the resturaunt, I felt my age accutely.

But, I told her, that I loved her and looked forward to growing old with her. Observing all the dysfunctional relationships that abounded on that trip, I was glad that ours has turned out to be fairly normal.

However, I do agree with the bumper sticker, "Getting old is not for wussies." But, as long as I can still shoot my glock straight, I'll be alright. It may be like a decrepit Eastwood in "Gran Torino" but I'll be a feisty old man.:supergrin: