Best back-up hardrive system/methods?? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Glock13
08-03-2011, 11:43
The wife just bought a new DSLR 18MP camera. So, we are going to need some new hard drives for storage and backup. I do not want to store them on my main HD in order not to clog things up. What are my best options if I want to have to 2 back-ups? I was thinking one portable USB hard drive and one regular hard drive in an external case? Any thoughts?

lightsareout
08-03-2011, 11:45
keep them on your hard drive, purchase carbonite and backup all of your important files to them. Keeping the only copy on an external hard drive is just asking for the drive to get dropped and you loose everything.

cgwahl
08-03-2011, 11:59
My suggestion is to backup to an external drive (or drives) and possibly use something like Carbonize/Mozy/Amazon S3/whatever else is out there to store them online. The latter will help give you an offsite backup.

Is up to you if you want to take them off your laptop drive as well though.



Another possibility is to have multiple drives and have one that gets copied daily and another that is done weekly (or whatever schedule works for you; me, my photos are backed up weekly) which is then kept in your trunk or something...but I've found making backups more of an automatic thing makes them more likely to get done since while you might be gung-ho about doing them for a month or two, over time you'll be lucky to do them monthly. The online backups are nice in that regard since they usually do them in the background.

However, backing up locally/online/whatever...be sure to make sure your backups are working and doing what you think they should be doing. Nothing worse than finding out at the worse possible moment that your backups were not actually successful.

shotgunred
08-03-2011, 16:03
If you Only keep your pictures in one place you will lose them. I never want to lose any pictures so I store one set on my hard drive. A second set on a portable hard drive and a third set on a remote computer. If you are going to edit your pictures it is important to keep a set of originals off the computer you edit on. Trust me on this I learned this the hard way.

Ogreon
08-03-2011, 16:05
If I were taking a lot of pictures, I would invest in a blu-ray burner.

Pierre!
08-03-2011, 18:46
There are several reasonable methods to backup that don't have to break you.

It does really depend on how much data you have.

Personally, I use Mozy Home for my critical business data. The initial seed to their servers took a week, possibly more.

The GREAT part about Mozy is that it will also backup to any local drive - USB or eSATA. So I added one of those to the mix, and it works like a charm.

When I need a file, or a virtual machine backup, it's right here! I don't have to wait for a 10Gb VM drive to download from the internet. Files recover FAST but...

If the house burns down, the Monsoons flood my office (almost happened) or the swamp cooler on the roof malfunctions and floods my office... all my critical business files are somewhere else encryped in the 'Cloud'.

Here is another reason I went with this added protection:
Surviving The Perfect Storm… The Data Protection Strategy Paid Off! (http://seeberconsultblog.com/surviving-the-perfect-storm%E2%80%A6-the-data-protection-strategy-paid-off/)

Here is an article on the type of Hard Drive Caddy or Dock Station I have been using:
Backup Storage – Inexpensive, Expandable, Portable, and Flexible! (http://seeberconsultblog.com/backup-storage-inexpensive-expandable-portable-and-flexible/)

If you are using Windows 7, you are in the sweet spot!

Any questions, give me a holler!

Happy Backup!
Patrick

IndyGunFreak
08-03-2011, 22:17
I'd go w/ a NAS, w/ 2, 2TB drives (assuming you have a router).

A Good Nas Enclosure, will run about 150 bucks.

2tb drives, you can probably find 5400rpm drives, for around 69-89 each, and 7200rpm drives for 95-115 each.

Set it up in Raid 1 (mirror). Anything added/removed on Drive A, will be added/removed on Drive B, with no work from you. This will give you redundancy, which is the key to backing up.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5637296

2 of these...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=7192141&CatId=4357

and you're in business.

If you have an old computer laying around, and you're a little handy with PC hardware, you could build you a NAS, just be careful about how you go about it.. It's not hard. Read my " What I done the last few days"... thread.. :rofl:

IGF

Mister_Beefy
08-03-2011, 22:53
If you are using Windows 7, you are in the sweet spot!




please provide more info on this.....

Pierre!
08-04-2011, 07:25
please provide more info on this.....

Windows 7 includes drive imaging, and it works. The tutorial I created is after I ran 5 or 6 image recoveries using Windows 7 x32 and x64 based systems.

The backup seems to be just as useful.

The 2 links I provided are articles I wrote on using the imaging process, and accessories that are quite useful for backups that will allow you to establish a library of hard drives for recovery purposes.

My whole house is now Windows 7, and it's pretty easy to manage - 7 systems are fully backed up.

HTH
Pierre

shotgunred
08-06-2011, 10:19
My off site back up is a friend's computer. I have a drive partition on one of his computers and he has the same on mine. No real cost involved but having the off site backup will save everything if the house burns down.

GAFinch
08-06-2011, 10:46
Keep your primary backup hard drive physically unplugged when you're not using it so it doesn't get hit by lightning. Store the 2nd hard drive at work or at your friend's/dad's house. Keep in mind, though, that if your region gets hit by a hurricane, both locations could get destroyed at the same time. Large online backup plans are getting very cheap, though use one only in addition to a physical hard drive backup.

the monk
08-06-2011, 12:02
Cheap and easy – The cheap way is to get a Pro Flickr account and upload all the pics and forget about it.

Setting yourself up for future growth -For onsite storage I would recommend you look at Drobo (www.drobo.com/professional.php (http://www.drobo.com/))


Get this one if you have another computer you can hook it up to to use as a network share - http://www.amazon.com/Data-Robotics-FireWire-Storage-DR04DD10/dp/B001CZ9ZEE

(http://www.amazon.com/Data-Robotics-FireWire-Storage-DR04DD10/dp/B001CZ9ZEE)
Get this one if you just want a stand along NAS (network attached storage) - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003GZ828I/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001CZ9ZEE&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=07FPRZH2C7R10875M37F

(http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003GZ828I/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001CZ9ZEE&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=07FPRZH2C7R10875M37F)
From there I would get Carbonite and back it all up into the cloud, then even if your house burns down you will still have your pictures.

Drjones
08-06-2011, 12:51
The wife just bought a new DSLR 18MP camera. So, we are going to need some new hard drives for storage and backup. I do not want to store them on my main HD in order not to clog things up. What are my best options if I want to have to 2 back-ups? I was thinking one portable USB hard drive and one regular hard drive in an external case? Any thoughts?


You need a NAS, for sure.

Assuming you pick the proper device & configuration (I'm a proponent of Netgear's ReadyNAS line) your photos will be mirrored over at least two drives, so when one of the drives dies, you lose no data; you simply swap out the failed drive with a new one, and the data gets mirrored again.

But since you still only have ONE copy of your data on the NAS, you then need to backup the NAS to an external USB drive, or to an offsite service, preferably both if you really care about keeping your memories safe.

Also, you have to have a battery backup attached to the NAS, as a power failure while you are transferring data WILL be catastrophic....I learned this the hard way.:faint:

EDIT TO ADD: Netgear's NAS have automatic backup scheduling, so you can schedule the device to back itself up to a USB drive on a schedule, whenever you like.

Netgear also offers their own off-site backup called ReadyNAS Vault. Not sure of the pricing, but I think it's pretty reasonable and seems to work fairly well from what I've read.

Drjones
08-06-2011, 12:53
If you have an old computer laying around, and you're a little handy with PC hardware, you could build you a NAS, just be careful about how you go about it.. It's not hard. Read my " What I done the last few days"... thread.. :rofl:

IGF


Dude, reading your thread sealed the deal AGAINST me trying to build my own NAS, as I was considering....and yet you're still recommending to people that they build their own??? :faint:

Obviously there are lots of people out there who have successfully built their own NAS, but your experience shows that there certainly still is a big margin for lots of error when going that route....I think moreso than when using an off-the-shelf solution.

BTW, someone above recommended DROBO.....from what I've read they are nice devices, but more expensive and with less features than many other NAS devices.

Again, I'm a big fan of the Netgear ReadyNAS.

IndyGunFreak
08-07-2011, 10:03
Dude, reading your thread sealed the deal AGAINST me trying to build my own NAS, as I was considering....and yet you're still recommending to people that they build their own??? :faint:.

Building your own NAS is fine, using FreeNas was my huge problem.

Open Filer ( a free program similar to FreeNAS) worked fine, I just didn't care for it. My NAS is running fine now on Ubuntu Server Edition.

One of the reasons I don't care for the ReadyNAS, etc.. is they are limited. Only 2 drives on most of the "home" models (yeah I know they have some uber expensive ones that have way more).

If something "goes bad" you're pretty much stuck buying a new one if its out of warranty. On a custom built NAS.. If the motherboard goes out, buy the cheapest motherboard you can find that fits your processor/memory. If the processor goes out, buy a new one. Memory? Get on Ebay, buy a few new ones.

If I was recommending something for someone not willing to use Linux (although it's very easy to use for just this), I would look at some of the options at NASLite. For the "basic" version that 99% of us would use, it's only $30 bucks.

http://www.serverelements.com/?target=NASLite-2

Did some Google searching on the above, and it got some pretty good reviews. I figured however, if I'm gonna build my own NAS, I might as well use free software to.. :)

Don't let my thread scare you, my thread was a result of sheer frustration with FreeNas. Had I started w/ Ubuntu Server, even needing to learn a bit about using the Server OS, I'd have been done in 3-4hrs tops.

IGF

ColCol
08-07-2011, 10:47
I have Vista Home Premium as my OS. I also have a separate "F" drive, as I call it, within the casing of the processor for the sole purpose of storing and editing photos. I copied all these to another computer for a backup...no problem.''

The other computer (older) has XP on it and the extra HDD for the back up photos. Use to I'd use Kanguru(Easy IDE) to back up my XP OS along with TruImage 9.0 but it won't work with Vista. TruImage 9.0 had a "Clone" feature I'd use to clone the entire drive about once a month and it did great with no problems and was entirely bootable.

What is a simplistic way of backing up Vista the way I did XP.? I'm no computer guru and am looking for a simple way to do this without all the incremental or differential backup options.

Kith
08-08-2011, 14:35
I just want to add that when it comes to backups, redundancy is king.

Having a portable hard drive in a bank safety deposit box in addition to anything else you might want to do is sound advice. Whatever you do, an off-site backup of some sort gets you past the larger issue of flood/fire/tornado or some kind of natural catastrophe.

I'll also add that the most stable medium is optical media (cd/dvd/blu-ray). As long as the physical disc itself is undamaged, the data is fine. Won't be erased by a magnet like a portable (non-SSD) hard drive can be, and doesn't have the potential of burning out like solid state devices do. Solid state memory (flash memory) has a finite number of read/write operations before it burns out - and while it's a lot, when it comes to backups it's something to consider.

Storing DSLR raw images on optical media is a daunting task, though, because each file is so large it takes a huge amount of media to back everything up.

Using an online service or any third party to store your backups takes control of the backup out of your hands and puts you at the mercy of someone else. I don't say this to recommend not doing it, but it should only be one part of your backup package and not the whole solution.

Just some thoughts to chew on as you make your decisions, added to some of the excellent advice given above.

Drjones
08-09-2011, 08:32
I just want to add that when it comes to backups, redundancy is king.

Having a portable hard drive in a bank safety deposit box in addition to anything else you might want to do is sound advice. Whatever you do, an off-site backup of some sort gets you past the larger issue of flood/fire/tornado or some kind of natural catastrophe.

Yes, very true. I'll also add that it doesn't matter how many off-site backups you have if they are outdated. Yes, it's a little bit of work to protect your stuff, but ya gotta do it!


I'll also add that the most stable medium is optical media (cd/dvd/blu-ray). As long as the physical disc itself is undamaged, the data is fine. Won't be erased by a magnet like a portable (non-SSD) hard drive can be, and doesn't have the potential of burning out like solid state devices do. Solid state memory (flash memory) has a finite number of read/write operations before it burns out - and while it's a lot, when it comes to backups it's something to consider.

I am not so sure that is correct. My understanding is that optical media can and do degrade rather quickly over time, especially when they are stored in average conditions; i.e.; simply sitting on your shelf.

I understand that if they are not stored flat - and are instead stored vertically like 99% of us store discs - that the layer where the data is actually stored can shift & distort over the years, rendering the data totally unreadable.

My understanding is that optical discs are quite sensitive to environmental factors and degrade rather easily.

I believe that hard drives are the best long-term storage format, and anyone who uses a flash drive as their only backup, frankly, deserves to lose their stuff. Flash drives are meant for easily moving around files, not for storing anything important.

And if you store your stuff where it stands any chance of getting passed over with a magnet, you seriously need to re-evaluate your situation. ;)

Kith
08-09-2011, 09:55
...
I am not so sure that is correct. My understanding is that optical media can and do degrade rather quickly over time, especially when they are stored in average conditions; i.e.; simply sitting on your shelf.

I understand that if they are not stored flat - and are instead stored vertically like 99% of us store discs - that the layer where the data is actually stored can shift & distort over the years, rendering the data totally unreadable.

My understanding is that optical discs are quite sensitive to environmental factors and degrade rather easily.

...

Yes, this is all true.

I probably should have explained the qualifier of "as long as the disc itself is undamaged..." a little better.

UV light (sunlight) is the other disc killer, past what I quoted you mentioning. The sunlight will break down the material the disc is made of and corrupt the data.

Keep your optical media in cd-binders that use acid free pages. Store the binders laying flat, in a cool, dry place.

Never mark them with a sharpie, as the chemicals in the marker can break down the disc as well. (this has happened to me, it takes years usually) Use markers specifically designed for marking cd's, or do what I do and use a lightscribe drive to label the discs.

The foil side of the disc is where the information is. Protect this side at all costs. You can use a Skip Dr. or something to fix the scratches in the clear plastic, but if the foil gets damaged or scratched, whatever information was on that spot is lost.

The laser makes pits in the foil that equate to dashes and dots, which is in turn binary computer code. This is how the information is stored and retrieved from the disc.

I still have cd's from a decade ago that work fine, and do see use. Optical storage can last a long time, but not if it's abused or not stored properly.

I absolutely agree that backups are a lot of work to keep current and valid, but even an older backup is better then no backup.

Drjones
08-09-2011, 13:12
:wavey:

Drjones
08-12-2011, 20:12
Hey, IGF, what sorts of read/write speeds are you seeing on the NAS'es you've built?

I'm growing increasingly frustrated & impatient with my NetGear ReadyNAS DUO - it's a great little device, streams HD video to my TV without a single hiccup ever, but for actual file & data transfers, I'm growing weary of around 30mb/sec., or less.

Just for giggles, I test drove an honest-to-goodness Dell T410 PowerEdge server w/Server 2008 that I have in here and got almost 200mb/sec file transfer rate. :faint::faint::faint::faint:

Are you anywhere near that with the NAS devices you've built?

JimmyN
08-13-2011, 04:35
What are my best options if I want to have to 2 back-ups? I was thinking one portable USB hard drive and one regular hard drive in an external case? Any thoughts?

Two backups is the safest way. And as protection against fire, floods, etc, one of the backups needs to be kept off site, either an online service, or a portable that you can keep somewhere else and updated periodically.


Hey, IGF, what sorts of read/write speeds are you seeing on the NAS'es you've built?

I posted some speed graphs from one of my FreeNAS boxes. I believe it was in IGF's thread about spending the day as a beta tester for iXsystem's latest attempt at an NAS which they call FreeNAS 8 (there are no 1 through 7 versions, they started with 8). But it's a different animal from the FreeNAS people have been using for years, a complete re-write, half done, broken and missing services, and plenty of bugs just to round things out. I'm a FreeBSD guy and even I don't want to tread out onto that thin ice. It's far from production ready, and they admit it, stick with .7.2 from the FreeNAS team.

I don't remember if I included just a file to file transfer. I think one graph did show a Blu-ray and DVD streaming out to two PC's, at the same time it was writing a bunch of small files being copied from a third PC. IIRC it peaked above 100mbps on the write while doing two simultaneous (45~50mbps) read operations streaming video. But streaming video isn't a good speed test since for DVD quality it's only going to need 7~10 mbps and HD quality 20~35mbps so it doesn't give any indication of what it's capable of doing.

I can copy some files and screen cap the graph if you want to see some file transfer speeds.

Edit: I forgot to add that yes I see speeds like that on the NAS's I've built. I get peaks over 300mbps and consistent 200mbps+ speeds copying files from an XP or a Windows7 system to a FreeNAS box. And those speeds are drive/controller limitations, rather than OS capability as I'm using old hardware on the FreeNAS boxes. SATA adapters plugged into regular PCI slots. If copying from one PC to FreeNAS, while copying from another PC to FreeNAS, but to a different drive/controller, the total throughput is even higher.

IndyGunFreak
08-13-2011, 09:05
First, I've not built a bunch of NAS's.. just this one, I've just dealt w/ OS problems.. :)

Yeah, my server isn't a fair example, it's all pretty old stuff. 30mbps does sound a little slow though.

Kobura
08-13-2011, 10:41
Having had a good name-brand (with properly filed attached-hardware warranty) power supply for my desktop, as well as a good APC battery backup system, even in the sticks where we lose our power with some degree of regularity (usually spells death for computers) I've never had a component failure.

As for storing your data, I'm not sure of the method, but the easiest and lowest-maintenance way might be mirroring a few DVD-RWs and just never closing them. It's not a tremendous amount of backup, but it's fairly durable and versatile.

If you want to go to the connected hardware route, a small/medium size solid state hard disk is no longer prohibitively expensive, and is physically VERY, VERY durable. Just make sure you've got enough electrical protection going on between your machine and the wall, and don't worry about removing and replacing it constantly.

Also if you have a laptop or some other type of machine, using the Briefcase feature of Windows 7 will automatically synchronize files placed in it between two or more computers that come into contact, and can be a useful feature for not only redundancy, but also productivity.

RWBlue
08-13-2011, 12:16
I have had good luck with Seagate. A small company I support has been using external USB hard drives for backups for many years. The Seagate 500MB drives were not the first ones, but they have survived the best.

Pierre!
08-13-2011, 15:14
Truthfully - There is really only one solution...

THE ONE YOU WILL USE!

The fancier we get, the more prone to failure we get...

This is why I believe that starting with the Hard Drive Dock Station with one or two compatible (read SATA interface) drives will give you the broadest depth with minimal cash to start up.

If you haven't read this article (http://seeberconsultblog.com/backup-storage-inexpensive-expandable-portable-and-flexible/) yet, and you still don't know what you want to do for your backup system - Read this, buy a HD Dock Station (USB & eSATA interface), an inexpensive OEM Hard Drive - AND START BACKING UP!!! :cool:

With Windows 7 you can combine your recovery Image AND your file backups to the same drive - no, it's not the best solution...

The BEST solution is to use ANY backup system you can afford!

Start easy, get a regular backup habit at the level you are comfortable... and if you don't have a backup NOW, TODAY... Stop procrastinating - the cost of the recovery of your data will be 5 to 10 TIMES the cost of the backup system you are thinking about, but you keep putting it off...

Yer just beggin for a tragedy!

Take Action Today!

{whew}...

Sorry, don't know where that came from... Haven't even had any rum for a while. :rofl:


Hope that helps someone out!
Patrick

Drjones
08-13-2011, 23:23
So I'm continuing to play around with this, and as some of you know, I just built myself a new PC.

I still have my old one hooked up & running, and I'm using Windows 7's built-in homegroup function.

Homegroup, in my experience, works very well. It does exactly what it says, which is to enable easy sharing of files & printers among attached & configured PC's.

Anyhow, just moving a few files around between my new & old PCs gives me transfer speeds of well above 60mbps, as high as 125 or so. Not quite as high as the Dell T410 server I have, but the price is better. ;)

Question:

What's wrong with getting a good RAID controller & turning my old PC into a NAS, but leave it running Windows 7 with homegroup??

I know Windows 7 pretty darn well, and the built-in backup & imaging function works quite well (it has saved my bacon once already!).

I understand it's perhaps not the intended use, but if it works....what do I care??

I've already had very odd & vexing permissions issues with my Netgear NAS, that would disappear in a Windows environment.

So what do you guys think?? Any substantial reason(s) not to just dedicate a full-on Windows 7 PC as my NAS??

Seems like the performance I would be happy with is there waiting for me, and my fears of dealing with and learning a whole new environment/OS (FreeNAS and others) is eliminated.

As long as the drives are all RAIDed and then backed up to external USB drives daily, what does it matter if I'm running FreeNAS, Netgear, or what??

Ok, continuing to mess with this as I'm composing this post; my old PC still has an SSD as boot drive, 2TB mechanical drive for storage.
I created & shared folders on each drive, curious if there would be a speed difference between the SSD & traditional drive. Oddly enough, the mechanical drive's transfer speeds were significantly faster than the SSD; SSD was around 70mbps read/write, the mechanical was over 90mbps.

Anyway, I'll stop rambling now, but let me know if my idea is viable or not...

IndyGunFreak
08-13-2011, 23:50
Question:

What's wrong with getting a good RAID controller & turning my old PC into a NAS, but leave it running Windows 7 with homegroup??


So what do you guys think?? Any substantial reason(s) not to just dedicate a full-on Windows 7 PC as my NAS?.

I don't see any reason it would be a problem.

You're comfortable with Win 7, as long as you don't mind all the bloat that windows adds to the mix.. sounds like a decent plan to me.

IGF

Drjones
08-14-2011, 00:17
Now the question that is arising; what do I use so that I can add more storage to my "NAS"?

My cursory reading tells me that with typical RAID types, you can't easily add more space to the array. I'll eventually want to have a lot of drives & storage capacity in this thing....

If I configure it initially with, say, 6 drives, how would I add more down the line?

Basically, what I'd want is to have sets of 2 mirrored drives; 2 drives for the OS & some data, 2 more for another volume, etc.

How do I accomplish this? I don't necessarily need to have one massive volume; I can easily live with 1 or 2TB volume sizes.

Am I making any sense?

EDIT:

Reading some more stuff seems to tell me that what I'm looking for is RAID1. Is that right?

Drjones
08-14-2011, 00:48
Kinda answered my own question here....upon further reading, Windows 7 supports several types of RAID natively; it's as easy as right-clicking on the disks in "disk management" utility and creating a mirrored volume.

Hmmm......looks like I might be on my way to a better, faster NAS!

Pierre!
08-14-2011, 01:25
Windows 7 as a NAS? Maybe so...

You should be a Microsoft Partner which will put you in the position of getting the Microsoft Action Pack - 10 copies of all of their software - $300/annual.. minimal certification when I started.

Or - Then there is TechNet...

One of the software OS's included *may* be the new Windows Home Server - Which will do Bare Metal backups on 10 systems connected to it along with shadow copy on shared folders...

My WHS runs my HomeSeer Home Automation software with Z-Wave and X10 devices (ran outta $$$ :steamed: or it would be my burglar alarm too!)

The big bummer about the new WHS is that they dropped the 'Drive Extender' software that allowed you to add any sized drive to the 'array'. In the new 'Vista Based' WHS you are responsible for your RAID volumes.

Most systems today will handle some RAID options. Your new board should handle RAID1 (mirrored) pretty easy and *speedy* with SATA 6Gb on the MoBo.

When you are ready for multiple RAID volumes, mixed and matched, you will pick up a $200+ Raid Controller. Then mixing RAID1 and RAID5 will actually work pretty well! :cool: And it should for the extra $$$... :rofl:

The other option touted for WHS is the DROBO Array - external RAID boxes. They are *very* proud of them however... so it's not on my list right now.

This gives you some pretty amazing options!

HomeGroups have been shown to degrade network performance, and if you got Windows networking down... What the Frack do you need a HomeGroup for??? Encryption on a network behind a firewall? In a SOHO?

I understand the ease of networking for the n00bie, but I did notice a major difference in file transfer rates and disabled it.

Windows 7 and Server 2008 were designed to use IPv6 to accelerate file transfers as well as keep network traffic moving quickly. In my experience it's Very Effective!

My whole environment is now IPv4 / IPv6, and data moves around pretty well!

I run my primary workhorse on Windows 7 and the primary drive is an AHCI RAID1 Array using the Mobo chipset. Would really like to have a 6Gb SATA RAID1 to handle this.

So - as you can see, there are LOTS of options out there for your needs.

All ya need is more $$$ :supergrin:

Now where are your benchmarks???:cool:

L8ter...
Patrick

Pierre!
08-14-2011, 01:39
Kinda answered my own question here....upon further reading, Windows 7 supports several types of RAID natively; it's as easy as right-clicking on the disks in "disk management" utility and creating a mirrored volume.

Hmmm......looks like I might be on my way to a better, faster NAS!

If this is the software RAID - I would not do it.

It will most likely pull a load on your processor.

Use the built in RAID on your MoBo - Probably has 0, 1, and 5 - and it will work well with just a few drives.

But again - Windows Soft-RAID has been in there since like... 2000? Win 2k that is...

Just never reviews well... and your last option if you really really need it.

Just my opinion, YMMV...

Patrick

gTWO
08-14-2011, 13:14
How do you guys with NAS or SAS protect against viruses? Or fires, or theft?

Just wondering...

I use a Thermaltake BlacX drive caddy, and 3 bare HD's. I clone my C drive to the backup HD, then use Acronis to backup the other 3 drives in my system to the backup drive. Then I pull the HD out, and store it either offsite, or in a fire vault in the basement. It takes about 2 1/2 hours to back up 93 GB on those 4 drives.

If my system dies, I unplug the current C:, plug in a backup drive, and I'm back online, with everything. I can then recover from viri from a clean disk, if I ever need to, as well. Or pull off any data files that have changed since the backup, if I need to (my data drives are not C:).

Pierre!
08-14-2011, 14:16
How do you guys with NAS or SAS protect against viruses? Or fires, or theft?

Just wondering...

I use a Thermaltake BlacX drive caddy, and 3 bare HD's. I clone my C drive to the backup HD, then use Acronis to backup the other 3 drives in my system to the backup drive. Then I pull the HD out, and store it either offsite, or in a fire vault in the basement. It takes about 2 1/2 hours to back up 93 GB on those 4 drives.

If my system dies, I unplug the current C:, plug in a backup drive, and I'm back online, with everything. I can then recover from viri from a clean disk, if I ever need to, as well. Or pull off any data files that have changed since the backup, if I need to (my data drives are not C:).

This is the system that I promote to all of my clients and readers.

It is the most affordable and flexible solution you can put in place! With the cost of hard drives you can expand and rotate your library out as needed.

Virus scanning is on the system that attaches to the NAS, SAN, or server. I have yet to have a virus on my Windows Home Server - the workstation that I use notifies me of infected files... and the infection never makes it to the server, NAS, or SAN.

Weekends I run maintenance which includes scanning network shares - bout once a month or so.

If you are minding your workstations correctly, your server, NAS, or SAN should never have an issue with infections.

Physical security issues? Oh Yah - if it's not offsite, it's a major concern.

Why do everything right, spend the money to do it right, and then monkey wrench the whole investment by not getting it out of the 'region'???

That is why I love Mozy - It writes to the external device I designate as a backup target, and it also takes it to the 'Cloud'... This makes local restores as easy as pulling it off the backup drive, but gets the critical data out of state.

For the really big operations? Either real time or scheduled 'snapshot' backups or replication ... and then there is the whole VMWare cluster balancing which makes a downed system due to hardware pretty much non-existent any more...

All about how much money you have, and what your data - or the loss of your data - is worth!

HTH

Patrick

wct097
08-15-2011, 05:58
If you care about your data, you'll have it backed up locally and off site.

JimmyN
08-15-2011, 09:41
If this is the software RAID - I would not do it.

It will most likely pull a load on your processor.

Use the built in RAID on your MoBo - Probably has 0, 1, and 5 - and it will work well with just a few drives.

But again - Windows Soft-RAID has been in there since like... 2000? Win 2k that is...

Just never reviews well... and your last option if you really really need it.

Just my opinion, YMMV...

Patrick

I agree and would avoid a software RAID with Windows. It's a large, CPU intensive OS to start with, tasking it with additionally handling a software RAID is not going to work as well as a hardware RAID. I run striped drives for games on a couple of XP systems for the speed increase loading maps, etc, but it's hardware RAID and Windows only sees it as a single drive.
I haven't had any problems with that.

wrenrj1
08-15-2011, 09:47
My record retention program:

1. Everything on IMac hard drive.
2. Backed up to external hard drive via "time capsule" daily
3. Two portable HD'S backed up monthly, one in the gun safe, the other in SD box at
bank.
4. Carbinite.

I figure that pictures in particular are irreplaceable might as well keep them safe.

IndyGunFreak
08-15-2011, 11:00
If this is the software RAID - I would not do it.

It will most likely pull a load on your processor.

Use the built in RAID on your MoBo - Probably has 0, 1, and 5 - and it will work well with just a few drives.

But again - Windows Soft-RAID has been in there since like... 2000? Win 2k that is...

Just never reviews well... and your last option if you really really need it.

Just my opinion, YMMV...

Patrick

i agree, I would not use soft-raid. Get a RAID card, or 2... and let them handle the set up. (RAID 1 is the easiest way to ensure that your data is not lost)

IndyGunFreak
08-17-2011, 08:43
Lian Li released a "NAS" case today, designed specifically for building a home NAS. 7-3.5in bays, 1-2.5in, no 5.25. Made for Mini-ITX, takes a standard ATX Power Supply. No junk on the front, just a power button.

No word on price yet, but I read somewhere it's probably gonna retail about $180.. ouch. Sure has some nice features though. I'm guessing we'll see Antec follow suit, then hopefully, some of the "cheaper" manufacturers will release some reasonably priced, NAS cases.

http://www.lian-li.com/v2/en/product/product06.php?pr_index=584&cl_index=1&sc_index=25&ss_index=64&g=spec

JimmyN
08-17-2011, 10:15
Lian Li released a "NAS" case today, designed specifically for building a home NAS. 7-3.5in bays, 1-2.5in, no 5.25. Made for Mini-ITX, takes a standard ATX Power Supply. No junk on the front, just a power button.

No word on price yet, but I read somewhere it's probably gonna retail about $180.. ouch. Sure has some nice features though. I'm guessing we'll see Antec follow suit, then hopefully, some of the "cheaper" manufacturers will release some reasonably priced, NAS cases.

http://www.lian-li.com/v2/en/product/product06.php?pr_index=584&cl_index=1&sc_index=25&ss_index=64&g=spec

I ordered one yesterday along with some other stuff, UPS shows it will be delivered tomorrow. Sale price is $69.00 and free shipping, normal price is $109.00. It's an e-blast or weekly special, I forget which, but the sale doesn't last long.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811112322

JimmyN
08-17-2011, 10:19
But maybe that's a different case. The one I ordered has 3- 5.25" externals, 6- 3.5" internals and 4- 2.5" internals. With two sets of rail adapters that will give me 9-3.5" bays and 4- 2.5".

Drjones
08-17-2011, 10:51
How well do those HD docks work?

I'd really like to get one, as it would be easier & much faster than the USB-to-SATA & IDE - cable that I'm using now.

What are the typical transfer rates for eSata anyway?

JimmyN
08-17-2011, 11:20
I think eSATA is SATA revision 2, 300MBps.

IndyGunFreak
08-17-2011, 13:15
But maybe that's a different case. The one I ordered has 3- 5.25" externals, 6- 3.5" internals and 4- 2.5" internals. With two sets of rail adapters that will give me 9-3.5" bays and 4- 2.5".

Yeah, the one I posted a link to, has no front side audio, no front side USB, external 5.25 or 3.5 bays.. All drive bays are internal. The only thing on the front, is the power button.

IGF