What have you done health-wise this week? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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quake
08-15-2011, 19:45
Thought for a thread, brought on by posts in several threads dealing with health and fitness. Like the main "what have you done this week" thread, but kept more to fitness, health, and wellness issues. New workouts started, goals reached (marathons run, new personal-best in some category, etc), preventive steps taken (dental work, lasik, appendectomies, whatever). The idea is to back away somewhat from the "tactical" and gear-oriented things that are the most fun to discuss and end up getting the most bandwidth.


To start it off - in the last two weeks we've added a Total Gym and a speed bag in the shop. We already had a heavy bag and weights, and the honest fact is that while I've lifted weights for quite a while, I can't claim to be genuinely "in really good shape". I'm strong, but lacking in cardio; which goes right to a couple of the most likely threats I personally face - heart problems and/or stroke. I've really taken to the total gym for ab & cardio work; my sons make fun of me because I don't incline it as steep as they do, but I want to build up reps rather than plain strength at this point. They're young (one's not even in his 20's yet), so let them build their muscles. I've accepted that I'll never be a greyhound; just not possible with the genetic makeup that I (and my sons) have, but while I've got the same 50-inch chest I've had for a quarter-century or so, I'm getting darn tired of not having my 36" waist anymore and want it back. I had it for 30+ years and lost it just a few years ago; and it's my own fault & my own doing. I've passed the point of "wanting" it back and "wishing" I had it back; I've finally "decided" I'm getting it back.


So, what have you done this week to make yourself a better, healthier, more capable prepper...?

Newcop761
08-15-2011, 20:03
Not exactly an improvement...I got food poisoning at the county fair. The wife and kids didn't. I treated myself with liquids, the BRAT diet, and some Lomotil. Still this knocked me on my back for a day.

arabianights
08-15-2011, 20:49
i went to gym today and did 20 minutes on elliptical trainer

Bolster
08-15-2011, 20:58
A good thread idea. I'm doing 35m on the orbital, about 5 days a week. Alternate days stretching or lifting. Just read at my age I'm not supposed to lift every other day anymore. :crying:

TangoFoxtrot
08-16-2011, 02:43
Q: What have you done health-wise this week?

What I do almost everyday stretch , light lifting, and some cardio.

freedom790
08-16-2011, 03:27
Ran a Susan G Komen 5k a couple days ago. Finished 215 out of 2000+ runners. Not my fastest time, but under the circumstances I was satisfied.

BobbyT
08-16-2011, 04:27
- 15 min warmup on the stationary bike, where I fell just shy of my 5 mile goal
- cycled through all my "push" workouts on weights
- couple hundred hits on the heavy bag to drain whatever energy was left in my arms

Tomorrow it'll be:
- 15 min warmup on the elliptical, shooting for 2.4 miles
- cycle through all the "pull" workouts on weights
- couple hundred hits on the heavy bag to drain whatever energy is left in my arms

Maine1
08-16-2011, 05:28
ran 2.6 miles one day.
ran sprints the next.
weights yesterday.
running again tomorrow.

SPIN2010
08-16-2011, 05:40
Thirty five miles on the mountain bicycle and eight miles on the hoof, alternating days. I also now walk about seven miles a day a work (new job).

bdcochran
08-16-2011, 06:50
1. had a cancer removed two weeks ago.
2. spent 9-12 and 2-5:30 in the dental chair one day last week
3. made next Monday appointment for dentist and gastro inspection.

Other than that, I still do aerobics, 1 hour of weightlifting every day. I also am taking 4 dance classes a week.

UtahBen
08-16-2011, 08:21
I have been doing daily walks on some of the mountain trails around here, usually 3-5 miles, 5 days a week. We have also been eating tons of vegetables and fruits with all the gardens producing well. It has made me feel much better and I have been much less stressed about all the bad news the media has been putting out as of late.

dissthis
08-16-2011, 13:50
I do CrossFit 5-6 days a week...training for the "unknown and the unknowable"...check out www.crossfit.com for more info...

Basically CrossFit is circuit training as well as Olympic lifts...rope/wall climbs, moving large loads over distances quickly...body weight exercises, running, running carrying irregular objects...

All the above is great conditioning especially for a crisis...

mac66
08-16-2011, 15:08
I'm up to 25 miles every other day on my bicycle. I am the fastest 280lb fat guy in town. I used to be the fastest 300lb fat guy but "ride more, weigh less" seems to be working. I go to the gym on days I don't ride.

Akita
08-16-2011, 15:58
Q: What have you done health-wise this week?

What I do almost everyday stretch , light lifting, and some cardio.

Same here.

mes228
08-17-2011, 05:05
Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

cyrsequipment
08-17-2011, 05:50
Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

I understand what you are getting at with your comment, but I think you have taken your theory a bit too far in the opposite direction as the common perception.

Many people are only looking for the "result" of fitness and the appearance of health. So they neglect what it takes to truely get there. But in order to get there (and maintain it once you are there) some attention has to be paid to real health. Once someone gets serious about fitness, they are usually exposed to proper nutrition and lifestyle and a good percentage take those lessons seriously.

Nutrition and general health do require as much maintainence as 6-pack abs (not that I would know about the 6-pack abs part :crying: ) so I am sure that you are correct that some people only worry about how they look. I'm also sure that many peole do go beyond the "looks" and at least pay equal attention to real health along with their appearance.

Dexters
08-17-2011, 06:16
So, what have you done this week to make yourself a better, healthier, more capable prepper...?

I exercise regularly - bike 50 miles about 3x a week or I'm hiking and doing some weights (but not regularly enough).

This is a great topic by the way. I think there is too much emphasis on things in S&P.

If SHTF being healthy and staying healthy will be the most important things. Being overweight puts stress on your body, can make some injuries more likely and just limits what you can do.

mes228
08-17-2011, 07:31
It's not "theory" from my perspective. I've owned a health related company for many years (we own two businesses). Yes, my experience, does differ from the way media presents health. I suspect most everyone on this board has parents, or relatives that lived to be 80-90 years old - and never exercised a day in their life. As an aside go to any nursing home and one thing will be immediately obvious if you take notice. Is that the strapping, muscular, large man in his prior youth, probably isn't there. He's already long dead or very ill, or on oxygen over in the corner.

Where I really see dysfunction in males is the early age they become impotent. The premier Japanese porn star is 74 years old, I've read of a Russian that's even older. A growing number of Americans are impotent by about 50 or less. Especially the athletes. Why is this important? Because a healthy male is not impotent, or has little or no desire. The very first thing that poor overall health impacts is sex drive and ability. There seems to be no age that a healthy male automatically becomes impotent. You might be surprised what percent of males are taking pills for impotency at 40 or so. Yet many look to be the picture of health. We are a very unhealthy society. Gyms are full of people that are physically fit, yet unhealthy. I'm not against being physically fit. It's just a different thing than health, and it's just not a substitute for health.

Dexters
08-17-2011, 08:07
It's not "theory" from my perspective. I've owned a health related company for many years (we own two businesses). Yes, my experience, does differ from the way media presents health. I suspect most everyone on this board has parents, or relatives that lived to be 80-90 years old - and never exercised a day in their life. As an aside go to any nursing home and one thing will be immediately obvious if you take notice. Is that the strapping, muscular, large man in his prior youth, probably isn't there. He's already long dead or very ill, or on oxygen over in the corner.

Where I really see dysfunction in males is the early age they become impotent. The premier Japanese porn star is 74 years old, I've read of a Russian that's even older. A growing number of Americans are impotent by about 50 or less. Especially the athletes. Why is this important? Because a healthy male is not impotent, or has little or no desire. The very first thing that poor overall health impacts is sex drive and ability. There seems to be no age that a healthy male automatically becomes impotent. You might be surprised what percent of males are taking pills for impotency at 40 or so. Yet many look to be the picture of health. We are a very unhealthy society. Gyms are full of people that are physically fit, yet unhealthy. I'm not against being physically fit. It's just a different thing than health, and it's just not a substitute for health.

I'm not following you when you say a person can be fit yet unhealthy.

It would probably help me understand if you could tell me what you mean by a healthy person and what you recommend as a healthy lifestyle.

mes228
08-17-2011, 08:42
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.

quake
08-17-2011, 09:45
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.
Very strongly agree with all the above; to me it boils down to the fact that we tend to look at reversing symptoms instead of treating causes.

Fat & sedentary? Take a stimulant pill.
Impotent 30 years early? Take a boner pill.
Back hurts chronically? Take a pain-blocking pill.

None of those solves the cause, they just try to reverse the symptom. The best analogy I've heard for people who regularly take otc pain drugs like tylenol & such (and I mean regularly as a part of life; not someone who injured themselves yesterday), is that it's like cutting the wire that goes to the "check engine" light in your car because as we all know, that light shouldn't be constantly on. Made the symptom go away, but didn't do a thing to address the real issue, and we're still truckin on with the same problem but now we can blissfully ignore it.



Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

I also largely agree with you on health & fitness not being synonymous; including the "overdoers" of the fitness thing with things up to and including steroids & drugs, being ruined in short order. Moving toward a worthy-sounding goal the wrong way can do more harm than good. Losing weight would be a good idea for many (probably most) americans; but losing weight isn't inherently a good or healthy thing in and of itself - crack & heroin addicts lose weight. I do think there's a lot of overlap between the areas of health & fitness even in cases of unintentional cause & effect. Quitting smoking is one example imo - it's definitely good for you health-wise, but it also greatly contributes to better fitness as well.

Not sure how to say it properly, but I tend to see the overdoers and under-doers of the 'fitness' aspect (whether it's the hulks who poison themselves with steroids, the string-beans who starve their bodies of proteins, or the Jabba's who gorge their bodies with sugars) as being two examples of the same problem - lack of balance, and often lack of knowledge as well. The overdoers tend to focus on the appearance and/or psychological gratification of the next accomplishment rather than on their health; and the under-doers focus on either physical gratification or else focus on nothing at all and just "let themselves go" without any intentional thought about it at all.

Fwiw, one of the most-missed things imo in our society health-wise is nutrients & trace nutrients. I may have said it here before, but I see food overall as the fuel in our tank, but it's the trace nutrients that serve as the spark plug to accomplish something with that fuel; and we as a society aren't getting near the nutrients we used to. Even non-processed foods today have fewer nutrients in them than the same foods did a few decades ago, and it's (imo) largely due to our treating the soil the way the fitness overdoers treat their bodies - pushing for visible affirmation without regard to the core benefit - with nitrate- and chemical-based fertilizers. Not knocking farmers; I grew up on a family farm, and they're just responding to demand the way any business does, but the fact is that many nutrients (especially trace minerals) are lower in density in our current crops than they were 20, 40, or 60 years ago. Examples of what I'm getting at:

http://www.suite101.com/content/decl...tables-a153662


...
Representative changes in nutrients from foods grown in 1999 versus those grown in 1950 include:

A 38% decrease in riboflavin
A 15% decrease in ascorbic acid
A 16% decrease in calcium
A 9% decrease in phosphorus
A 15% decrease in iron
A 6% decrease in protein content
A slight increase (0.6%) in water content
There were no statistically significant differences in vitamin A, thiamin, niacin, fat, or carbohydrate content


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37396355...ies-dwindling/


http://www.agricultureinformation.co...nutrients.html

I'm not panicking about it the way some are, but I suspect a lot of folks aren't aware of it. I just try to allow for it, with colloidal minerals, couple tablespoons a day of blackstrap molasses (for iron - my family tends to run deficient), simple things like that, that help make a difference.

All this long ramble is just my attempt to say that there's a lot to it, and there's a lot we can do to tune up and maintain our primary vehicle - our body - if we'll take a little time to just think about it, learn about it, and just do it (so to speak :supergrin: ); but many don't want to be bothered with it. One thing that has stuck with me for a long time was (of all things) a tv commercial from the 70's. It was Cher; don't recall what she was promoting - probably weight watchers, jenny craig, etc - but it was during all the opec/shortage/gas-rationing nonsense going on back then, and she made the comment that "people pay more attention to what they put into their car's gas tank, than what they put into their bodies". Simple as it was, that simple line has stuck with me all this time, and it's still nearly as true now as it was back then.

mes228
08-17-2011, 10:38
Much of the current drive to physical fitness stems from the obesity of our peoples. In my opinion it's darn hard to really become excessively "fat" if if you eat "real" foods. Doesn't matter how much you eat. By real food I'm speaking of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, meats. It's the processed stuff that produces obesity in the overwhelming majority of cases. Real food has a balance of fiber content.

So in general it's very hard to eat enough beans, peas, spinach, real whole grain bread to, etc. to become really excessively fat. The fiber prevents it. I personally feel Americans are maybe getting 1/10 the fiber they really need to be healthy in their diets. And I'm not talking "cellulose" added in fake bread & food products (read that on the label as "added saw dust" which has increased about 50% in the last year or so). I agree 100% with the statement on trace minerals etc. So I suggest a diet of a variety of foods that will spoil - just consume them before they spoil. Avoid as much processed, packaged foods as possible. Way too much refined sugar too.

One more thing and I'll shut up. Americans eat too little real "fat" and way too much fake fat. Avoid anything "hydrogenated" or modern man made concoctions. Real fat is good for you and should be about 30% of the calories you consume. Real butter, real oils, even real "lard" is way better than some of the synthetic concoctions scientist have cooked up. If it's not been consumed for at least a few thousands of years stay away from it. Overall if it's a "real" natural product your body can handle it ie use it or eliminate it. That's just not the case for artificial things.

Kieller
08-17-2011, 11:17
Interesting points you bring up mes228. I never thought of there being a difference between healthy and fit yet I think you hit the nail in the head.

As far as being fit this week, I am continuing to take martial arts classes with the wife which is a great workout.

As for being healthy, we have been eating as much fruit and veggies as we can, some of them coming from our own garden. We are also trimming down the number of times we eat out every week. Saves $$$ and is much more healthy since we typically cook with non-processed foods.

Good thread Quake!

quake
08-17-2011, 11:21
...One more thing and I'll shut up. Americans eat too little real "fat" and way too much fake fat.
Don't shut up; preach it brother... :cool:

Ever see a fat person with Parkinson's? I haven't. The brain is largely made of fat, and to deprive the brain of fats is akin to depriving the muscles of protein. Muscles need protein, and the brain needs fat. After my father in law had a quadruple bypass, he laid off all fats almost completely for 8-10 months - the doctor told him to, and doctor knows best. :upeyes: He gradually got dumber-&-slower and dumber-&-slower as time went on; to the point where he finally couldn't deny it himself anymore, did a little research and started doing exactly as you say - taking in natural fats and just avoiding the saturated and hydrogenized stuff. One of the long-term problems of many mountain men and pioneers was lack of fat in the diet. Wild rabbits, deer, and jerked meat just don't provide what the body needs in the way of fats; that's why the more "round" animals were so prized for food.


From the Health Sciences Institute: http://hsionline.com/2005/07/14/dietary-fat-intake-may-lower-your-risk-of-developing-parkinsons-2/
The data revealed a significant link between a reduced risk of Parkinsons and the highest intake of total fat, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

Ok.. off the soapbox now and back to work for me... :embarassed:

Dexters
08-17-2011, 14:24
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I appreciate it and agree with what you say.

Javelin
08-17-2011, 14:29
The big killer for men and obesity is belly fat. It is clinically proven to put you in the ground ahead of schedule.

At the VERY LEAST keep that belly fat off by avoiding sugar & excess carbs (like the kind found in pastries, cakes, pancakes, and white bread). Also sugar drinks like juice, sodas, etc. are also gut busters.

Your belly will dwindle over time if you cut out some of the crap you should not be eating anyway.... and just enjoy life & your thin waist line.

:wavey:

cyrsequipment
08-17-2011, 14:43
The impotency issue is generally caused by cholesterol (those arteries can get clogged too). People need to address their whole health not just their appearance.

quake
08-24-2011, 15:04
Been working on the total gym, mostly ab obliques. Up to 80 reps - 40 each side - three days a week. (I'm only home three days a week.)

Picked up material to put up a chinup bar out there as well. Just using a four-foot section of black-iron pipe, off the open ceiling trusses.

bdcochran
08-24-2011, 16:43
I went to UCLA Dental School at 9 am on Monday to finish the dental school plan for my teeth. For the first time in 6 years, I am "finished" - and will start again with a cleaning in a couple of months.

I went to Kaiser in the afternoon to the gastro guy who gave two prescriptions. Had a basal cell cancer removed about three weeks ago as well.

Get old is the pits - but it is better than the alternative.

Normally, I do 1/2 hour of stretching and 1 hour of weightlifting each day. I also take 4-5 hours of dance lessons a week.

jdavionic
08-24-2011, 17:05
Same thing I always do...lift weights, cardio usually by playing basketball, ...all of these instead of lunch at work.

It's the same routine that I've been doing since I graduated college. I'm now 47 and in good shape (for me, at least). Not overweight. Stronger than I've ever been. Endurance is great. What I've seen over the years is that once you let yourself get out of shape, it's really hard to get back into shape. So it's best not to let it happen in the first place.

poodleshooter1
08-24-2011, 17:22
Up to 19 pullups and 73 pushups almost 180 lbs

http://www.healthtipexchange.com/

Captain Boogie
08-25-2011, 14:17
Day 25 of Dan John's 40 day workout. http://tasfitness.blogspot.com/2011/06/i-wrote-this-article-for-dan-john.html http://http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/the_40day_program

Seems too good to be true.. however, after 20 days of this workout and occasional treadmill runs during night shift, I upped my APFT score by 50 points. I also do some morning push ups but nothing extreme.

quake
09-27-2011, 13:57
Had one piece of good news when I went to the doctor yesterday after disconnecting a tendon in a finger Saturday. (Carrying a baby grand piano - four guys on one side, and me & my oldest son on the other; and we're the ones walking backwards up the steps. Even at church, they profile us yetis...)

Anyway, when they did the normal doctor-office stuff, my blood pressure came in at 128 over 69. Pretty good for an past-middle-age redneck after a pot of coffee on a Monday. :cool:

Have to keep working on the total gym and the chinup bar. It seems to be working.

bdcochran
09-27-2011, 14:59
I did the full workout in the gym today, just like yesterday and Sunday. Have neck pain, but will not take medicine until later today after I go visit and help a friend who is dying from cancer.

The girlfriend is unusual and so I will comment. We are at retirement age. We do the dance lessons together. She goes to her own gym nearly every day. She also plays two hours of tennis on Saturday and two hours on Sunday. Eventually, I will be roped into doing tennis even though I lack balance.

quake
09-27-2011, 19:40
...The girlfriend is unusual and so I will comment. We are at retirement age. We do the dance lessons together...

Not a bad thing at all. My father will be 88 in a few months and still goes dancing at least once a week. No girlfriend right now - my most-recent stepmother (my third; quite a bit of energy for an older guy... :dunno:) passed away not quite two years ago, and he's still "batching it" so to speak.

fourdeuce2
09-29-2011, 12:02
I kept breathing. That's one of the most important things you can do for your health. :tongueout:

Warp
09-30-2011, 18:26
Every Week (just a matter of how many times): Lift heavy weights.

quake
09-24-2012, 09:03
Went just over 30 minutes nonstop on the elliptical walker; first time I've hit that mark in a long time. I've really cut back on the weightlifting the last few months and instead am trying to focus on 'fitness' rather than just plain old strength. Someone here or on some other forum made a comment a while back that they were trying to become "more of a spinner and less of a masher", and that phrasing stuck with me; seems like a good idea in my personal circumstances. Age, weight, genetic tendencies, etc; in my current personal situation, it seems a prudent change.

DoctaGlockta
09-24-2012, 12:31
Did my usual workout routine today but am going to my first 'crossfit' training class tomorrow. Really don't know what to expect. Hope it increases my overall strength and improves flexibility.

PettyOfficer
09-24-2012, 12:49
Just had 20 hot wings for lunch, but I did finish them off with celery.

Hahah, but I'll go running later tonight.

gunslinger3
09-26-2012, 11:43
I have a Stairmaster at home. So I step level 9 (150 flights/3 miles) two days then run 5K the third day. Rest the forth and then repeat. Pull ups and push ups on the workout days.

Besides walking my GSD daily :cool:

ETA: Also have not had a soda since last February.

MrGlock21
09-27-2012, 01:56
I have been drinking beer. There are studies which suggest that beer will flush the kidneys which is a good thing.
Beer also is on record for providing vitamin B6, B12, ect, and beer will raise the level of joy in one's life which translates into lowering blood pressure.

Some insist that ale is more beneficial, but I prefer lager. :beer::cheers:

BobbyT
09-27-2012, 05:11
Ok the "fit vs healthy" hypotheticals here are more than a little overboard.

Can you be fit with some internal problems? Sure. Is it at all likely you're a ticking time bomb if you're ripped? No way.

Ranting about some miniscule fraction of an already small number of ripped people being unhealthy is like hearing the media go on about the "epidemic" of girls with anorexia. Yes there are a couple of cases, but given how massively outweighed they are by EVERYONE ELSE it's a joke to try to shift the focus to that "problem".

Most people eat far more calories than they use, aren't physically active, and continue to store away excess fat. Gaining muscle and losing fat, getting stronger while dropping their mile times, is about the most positive thing they can do for themselves.

Fitness and health may not be identical, but the correlation has to be 90+%.

NOLA_glock
09-27-2012, 13:38
A friend of mine and I run about 6 miles a week, and I do overall free-weight exercises every other day.

I lost 40 lbs before leaving my job for school about 2.5 years ago, and slowly gained about 30 back once in school (pretty active job, combined with getting careless with how much I ate). Last semester and over the summer, I dropped them again, and have been much more vigilant about my intake.

Kevin108
09-27-2012, 21:59
I realized how carried away I'd gotten with drinking Diet Pepsi this week. I kept finding better deals on bigger cartons and that led me to continually drinking more and more. I decided I was tired of it and starting Monday, I've had one can with lunch and another with dinner and that's how it's gone all week. Bottled water is free while at work and at home, we have a through-the-door dispenser on the refrigerator. For the last few months, I was putting away 36 cans in a week or so. I've been nowhere near as thirsty or hungry this week. Energy levels and sleep have been the same. Assuming I keep it up (looks very likely), I'll also save $20-$30 this month.

Simpleman71
09-28-2012, 19:51
I lift weights 2 hours a day five days a week, cardio 4 days a week split up between biking, running 3-6 miles. I am 41 years old an in the best shape of my life. I don't eat fried or junk food, no alcohol or tobacco. I've even noticed that my fitness level gives me an edge during my uspsa matches. Lots of overweight people trying to run those stages.

pugman
10-09-2012, 11:44
Just finished my first Tough Mudder about a month ago; spent 11 months training and went from not being able to run 20 minutes on a treadmill to completing a 11.5 mile course, attempting every obstacle (just didn't have the reach for the rings). During training I was in the gym 1-2 hours a day 6-7 days a week.

Spent about 3 weeks staying out of the gym..just started getting back in 8-9 days ago.

Now the goal is to up my time for the next go around. We finished below average in 2 hours 32 minutes but I always felt I needed to save myself - now that I know what to expect I'm sure I will shave 15 minutes off my time - 7 months and counting

Like Simpleman I'm in the best shape of my life at 43 - unlike Simple I eat and drink whatever the heck I want - I just generally don't want a lot of crappy food (and I don't smoke and a 6 pack usually lasts a week or more). I endulge in fast food about once a month (I just get a craving for it)

My routine is cardio/weights & cardio/yoga alternating days. I was surprised how much the yoga helped with the mudder. The cardio only day is what I call a long burn...90 minutes on a treadmill, 8-9 miles...1000-1100 calories burned (well, at least its what the machine says).

My big problem is I want lean muscle so on many of the machines I think I've peaked

bdcochran
10-09-2012, 15:39
Health is the absence of disease.

Physical fitness is not the same concept. Physical fitness may retard or prevent certain diseases.

Some exercises are specific to certain sports or to rehabilitation.

General strength conditioning exercises need only be done once a week or about every ten days.

Cutting off food is more effective than thinking that a person will burn significant amounts of calories through exercise. This is why I see people at the YMCA daily who exercise, but look like they are about to deliver twins -and they are either males or females over the age of 50!

Get rid of the television set, get rid of the refrigerator, only walk to the supermarket and carry back what you can carry, walk the stairs. Gee! Sounds like the typical Frenchman in Paris.

In the former Chunking, Red China, elevators in apartment complexes are not programmed to stop before the 10th floor. The woman with the best legs I have every seen was a tour guide who lived on the 9th floor with her husband.

Today, I did over 2 hours at the YMCA. I have multiple doctor and dentist appointment scheduled for the balance of the month. Health is not the same as physical fitness, they overlap only in a small part.

pugman
10-09-2012, 16:03
Health is the absence of disease.

Physical fitness is not the same concept. Physical fitness may retard or prevent certain diseases.

Agree.

General strength conditioning exercises need only be done once a week or about every ten days.

This depends on your goal. I was going to the gym 5-6 days a week while training; left for about three weeks and just got back into it. I can feel I have lost a step in regards to what I was lifting before. It won't take long to get back to where I was at - but if your goal is strength conditioning once a week will not cut it. And I guarantee the next day you will feel like a pile of wet newspaper.

Cutting off food is more effective than thinking that a person will burn significant amounts of calories through exercise. This is why I see people at the YMCA daily who exercise, but look like they are about to deliver twins -and they are either males or females over the age of 50!

I see these types all the time - they are either 1) not doing the right types of cardio 2) not doing it reach a target heart rate 3) not doing it each time or long enough.

Edit: 4) You are seeing them at the gym and they are socializing. I see a LOT of these folks. They go to the gym...but they don't go to workout. They hit a machine, set some low weight, do a few reps, move to another machine, check out the TVs - they are there 30-60 minutes and don't do anything. For the record, my very small gym makes it impossible not to notice these people (I go to a SNAP Fitness in a strip mall)

A coworker of mine walks 2-3 miles a night and can't understand why she isn't losing weight. The walking IS good for her and burns calories but she isn't reaching a "burn zone." A rule of thumb is a 180# person burns 100 calories per mile walked. Come back and say you "earned" a piece of cake or drink a coke instead of a zero calorie water and you have blown it.

YMMV, but I was running a lot (to me at least) to condition for my race. Anywhere from 30-40 miles a week. I would run 8-9 miles on a treadmill and the machine said I was burning upwards of 1100 calories in those 90 minutes. Doing this several times a week along with my regular exercise and I could eat whatever I wanted....

Like sit down and eat a half gallon of ice cream. I'm 5'8 and a trim 185-190#s.

This said, I just read the "perfect" amount of exercise time is 30 minutes (not the hour they tote.) On average, people who exercise 30 minutes a day tend to do more stuff after the exercise. Those doing an hour generally came home and hit the couch. Overall, the people doing 30 minutes did it more intensively, hit better heart rates and burned more calories through a normal day.

wlkjr
10-09-2012, 17:39
Having my gall bladder sucked out tomorrow, does that count?:wow:

Carry16
10-09-2012, 18:46
Took a CPR/AED course at the American Red Cross today, completed CERT training about 2 weeks ago and I'm currently in a 2 week First Responder class.

thesurefire
10-10-2012, 07:04
Well I've noticed a few things aren't quite as I like them, so starting Monday morning I've cut out alcohol and am doing 3 simple workouts a week on MWF. 2 down 1 to go.

Scarlett Harlot
10-10-2012, 07:13
Started the radiation treatments for my prostate cancer yesterday. It was either that or take up joggin. Chose the nuclear option.

RWBlue
10-10-2012, 14:55
I have been using 150# hand grippers. 5x5, I have also been using rubber bands for the opposite direction. I need to build up this area to help with carpel tunnel.

I have been using a ball for a chair again at work. This should build up the core.

I haven't been riding because it has been cold and wet.

ric0123
10-15-2012, 22:21
I've gone a week without drinking any coca cola. I was a 3 coke a day guy.

Louisville Glocker
10-15-2012, 22:28
Lifting 3x / week, about 45 minutes,
Coaching soccer 2x/ week, hour workouts (I run with the kids, so my legs feel it)
Martial Arts as much as possible, including sparring weekly.

Also, vegetarian diet. Plenty of home-cooked, non-processed meals.

Doing ok for a 46 year old. I've got three boys, ages 1,4,9, so they keep me moving. We do sports daily, whether it is basketball, baseball, biking, running, or soccer (see above). Even on my days "off," my kids see to it that I get a workout in. I used to run marathons, but now I'm just doing easy runs here and there when I can fit them in....

bdcochran
10-21-2012, 03:00
Did 9 - 5:30 on Wednesday in dental chair. Then 1 hour of dance instruction. Followed by removal of the gall bladder at Kaiser Hospital. Now at home.:wavey:

kirgi08
10-21-2012, 10:26
:wow:

quake
11-09-2013, 21:03
At the risk of resurrecting a dead thread, it was either this or start a new one so....

Had a real reminder of the importance of natural, non-pharmaceutical medicine knowledge; ie, herbals, naturals, holistics, whatever we want to call them. Before I tell the result, the situation:

Short version - I thought I'd gone diabetic. Sunday afternoon a couple weeks ago, after a too-large dessert, I was just flat dizzy. Physically, head-rush dizzy, all afternoon. I made a point of avoiding sugar the rest of the day, took some zinc & other supplements, and it got a little better; but didn't go away completely. Frankly, while I was angry about crossing the diabetic threshold, I can't honestly say I was shocked, as I'm overweight & over fifty. Not hugely overweight, but some, not denying that; I've gone up two pants sizes in 30 years or so.

Anyway, dealt with what seemed like a perpetual headrush and worsened eyesight that Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday; finally getting to my herbalist (who we affectionately call 'the witchdoctor') on Wednesday afternoon. Told him that I thought I'd gone diabetic and the reasons I thought so. After talking for just a minute & asking me a few more questions, he smiled & said, "You're not diabetic. You have a bladder infection." OK, that did sort of shock me. Shouldn't have; this guy has pulled full-on miracles out of his hat more than once for my family, but it did. Short version is that an infection meant my bladder had fermenting liquids building up in it, and I was basically walking around drunk without drinking anything. He suggested (and sold me) a supplement of zinc, rosehips, cranberry, and horehound, and told me to double-dose on them initially because of my existing infection and my size. I started taking them Wednesday afternoon. By lunch Thursday I was completely sober for the first time in days, and within a week, I was feeling better than I had in over a month, my eyesight was better than it'd been since before this all started, and it struck me how far "down" I'd been without realizing it. My secretary even noticed how much better I was recalling things than I had been for a while previously.

All that is to say that a simple herbal/mineral supplement - when applied with some knowledge - made a huge difference in my quality of life, and saved me from a doctor visit and likely some drugs I'd have been given. (Ever notice that 99% of the time, a "modern" doctor has exactly two answers? They either drug you cut on you; that's their solution almost always.)

Anyway, while not everyone is going to raise medicinal herbs or search the forest for them, some reading to obtain a knowledge base of the subject matter of minerals, supplements, etc can be time very-well spent.

Warp
11-09-2013, 21:06
Any specific reading suggestions on that topic?

RWBlue
11-09-2013, 22:59
Anyway, while not everyone is going to raise medicinal herbs or search the forest for them, some reading to obtain a knowledge base of the subject matter of minerals, supplements, etc can be time very-well spent.

herbs are the same as md prescribed pills.

You can eat willow bark or take it in pill form.
You can eat an orange or take vitamin C in pill form.

quake
11-10-2013, 14:53
Any specific reading suggestions on that topic?
Best off the top of my head would be "The Herb Book" if it's still available. My copy is from the 70's. Also, the herbalist I mentioned above has three or four very good self-published books, but I don't know if he sells them on his website or not; would very well worth checking it out & even calling their number if you can't find them. (Barry is a little eccentric and doesn't take phone calls, but the lady who works for him does & could tell you if his books are still available.)

herbs are the same as md prescribed pills.

You can eat willow bark or take it in pill form.
You can eat an orange or take vitamin C in pill form.

True to a degree - willow bark vs. aspirin pills, etc; but very often the things a doctor uses are far different, not only in formulation, but in approach, than any natural curative.

A personal example - when our youngest son was born, he had a reaction any time metal touched his skin. He'd have little red rings on his skin everywhere the snaps on his one-piece baby outfits touched his skin. This went on for probably 8-10 years, with my wife sewing patches over the snaps, etc; even to the age where she was sewing patches over the inside part of his jeans' buttons, or he'd get a red spot where that metal touched him. Over those years (bearing in mind, my wife worked at Children's Hospital and we'd never heard of this herbalist at the time) we'd had him in to see doctors many times. They tried all kinds of allergy treatments, steroid creams, all kinds of things; none of which helped much. One conversation with the herbalist and he suggested it might be a thyroid (iirc) issue. Had our son start taking kelp and in less than a week was completely symptom-free; after years (and thousands of dollars) spent on doctor visits and "modern" treatments.

Not meaning to completely bash modern medicine, because there's been huge, life-saving progress made in the field. Just suggesting that it's a good idea to have a personal knowledge base and skillset in that area; not much different than having the knowledge & ability to make a loaf of bread. I like store-bought bread, but think it's a good idea to be able to make our own if need be.