Loading .223 on a Lee Classic Turret [Archive] - Glock Talk

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steelhorses
08-18-2011, 12:21
Hi,

I've always reloaded using a single stage press so am familiar with the various steps required. My son just got a Lee Classic Turret press kit from kemph. We are in the process of dialing it in to load .223

One thing befuddles me, maybe it's a dumb noob question but here goes.

Stage one does depriming and sizing of he brass. It also has the attachment to prime the resized case then moves on to stage two - the powder drop station.

At what point would you do your case trimming deburr chamfering? I've always done that on the sized deprimed case so I know it'll be in spec.

If you have to size then remove to trim what's the point of using a turret/progressive loader for rifle reloading? I can see the utility doing pistol rounds since I almost never trim those.

freedom790
08-18-2011, 12:28
I do everything in batches. Size/Deprime on stage one for a couple hours, then trim/debur/chamfer on the case prep center, then charge with chargemaster, then back to the press to set bullet. The only advantage I've found to having a turret press for rifle is I don't have to remove dies.

argy1182
08-18-2011, 12:34
I do everything in batches. Size/Deprime on stage one for a couple hours, then trim/debur/chamfer on the case prep center, then charge with chargemaster, then back to the press to set bullet. The only advantage I've found to having a turret press for rifle is I don't have to remove dies.

+1
I remove the indexing bar from my turret and just do about 50 round batches. You don't get the full use of the turret, but you don't have to go through the pain of swapping dies each step of the way.

steelhorses
08-18-2011, 13:01
OK, thought maybe I was doing it wrong :) we really like the turret for the reasons mentioned - not having to change the dies out. It's built like a tank! Only criticism about it so far is is the primer gizmo is hard to use especially when it gets low. Powder drop comes within +/- .2 grains so that is cool for just average plinking ammo.

Maybe I'll just measure cases before sizing and sort out the ones that won't need trimming and run those thru all the stages and get the speed benefits of a turret. Do the ones that will need trimming as batches

ColoCG
08-18-2011, 14:06
OK, thought maybe I was doing it wrong :) we really like the turret for the reasons mentioned - not having to change the dies out. It's built like a tank! Only criticism about it so far is is the primer gizmo is hard to use especially when it gets low. Powder drop comes within +/- .2 grains so that is cool for just average plinking ammo.

Maybe I'll just measure cases before sizing and sort out the ones that won't need trimming and run those thru all the stages and get the speed benefits of a turret. Do the ones that will need trimming as batches


You need to measure your cases after you lube and resize them, that is when they grow in length.

You can resize, then measure, trim if needed, chamfer, debur, clean primer pockets. Then pull your sizer die, prime and run thru the rest of dies as normal.

You might also want to look into the RCBS X sizer die. It restricts the length the cases can grow.It can save you some extra work.

polizei1
08-18-2011, 14:17
Check this out if you haven't already. You might not need it, but it's fun to watch anyway!

http://ultimatereloader.com/2010/08/05/lee-classic-turret-loading-223-remington-part-i

ursoboostd
08-18-2011, 15:15
You need to measure your cases after you lube and resize them, that is when they grow in length.


I've found cases grow from .001-.003 after resize. So I just move my tolerance of brass size down to 1.756" Then I load on a progressive. -Wade-

PCJim
08-18-2011, 16:03
I load on a 550b. While obviously not the same, the steps I use would work on your LCT.

These steps are performed in a batch mode of 200+ cases at a time: tumble, lube, resize/deprime, brief tumble (to remove the lube), resize (Possum Hollow Kwick Trimmer with the powder adapter), deburr, chamfer, swage primer pocket (Dillon Super Swage). Then, back to the press...

On the 550b, I use a universal depriming die in station one for the sole purpose of insuring the flash hole is clear. You could do the same on your LCT. Prime and powder the case, and seat the bullet. Next case.....

It basically becomes two separate processes with the press, obviously requiring off press work. That's what we're stuck with, unless you have a press like the Dillon 1050 with a loaded toolhead.

Colorado4Wheel
08-18-2011, 16:40
If you had a Dillon Trimmer you could reload .223 in two batch's on a 550/650/1050. Assuming now crimped primers when using the 550/650. First time through you size, deprime, trim. Second pass you load. No debur/camfer. For long distance stuff that would not be a great idea to skip it I hear.

steelhorses
08-18-2011, 17:48
I've found cases grow from .001-.003 after resize. So I just move my tolerance of brass size down to 1.756" Then I load on a progressive. -Wade-

That's what I was thinking. Set cases 1.755 or longer aside for a separate sizing/trimming batch. I have my trimmer set to a case length of 1.755 anyways.

Cases shorter I'm thinking just run thru without trimming to save time. This is just gonna be practice ammo. Not trying to make super accurate long range stuff.

ColoCG
08-18-2011, 17:58
I've found cases grow from .001-.003 after resize. So I just move my tolerance of brass size down to 1.756" Then I load on a progressive. -Wade-


Yea that can work too, I just trim mine to 1.740" and use the RCBS X Die and never trim again.

RustyFN
08-18-2011, 18:47
I size the cases and then check and trim. Then I load like this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOpN9iYOyE8

steelhorses
08-19-2011, 11:28
Yea that can work too, I just trim mine to 1.740" and use the RCBS X Die and never trim again.

I remember all the hoopla when the x-dies first came out. That may be what I need to get. Have you experienced the increased case life also? I remember reading where some guy did extensive testing and was getting up to 15 reloads of his .308 brass using the x-dies

ColoCG
08-19-2011, 14:50
I couldn't say about the extended case life. I have about 4k or 5k rounds of brass that I have been rotating thru. The most times that I loaded some is maybe 4 or 5. But it works and they seem to be in good shape.

It wouldn't surprise me if you could get extended use out of the brass with moderate charges. You might have to measure the case necks ocasionally to make sure they weren't getting to thick. If so they might need the necks turned.