About water... is this correct? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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UneasyRider
08-19-2011, 10:12
I have been asked to explain prepping to non preppers on a blog item by item. While there are many people who could do a better job at this I agreed and would like to give accurate information so could you please take a look at this and offer your comments pro and con. TIA.

Water is the most important of all preparations. In general you can only live 3 days without it. So if the city water supply suddenly stopped where would you get your water? You may have an irrigation well if the electricity is on and your pump is working or you may take some from one of the many ponds and sources of ground water but these are most likely sources of viruses, bacteria and parasites that can do more harm to you making you sick and dehydrated than they can help you. So how do you prepare for a no water situation?

Buy bottled water by the case, I pay 11 cents per bottle at Samís Club in a case of 35 bottles. How much you keep is up to you, how much storage space do you have? I keep 5 cases per person or more and rotate it by drinking a bottle or two each day using the first in first out system. Bottles are good to have for drinking water and making friends with thirsty neighbors.

55 Gallon food grade barrels are easily stored in the garage and can hold water to cook, clean yourself and flush your toilets. Pay particular attention to flushing your toilets because in the summer when itís hot in the house if you donít have electricity the smell of your full toilets will not be welcome. Donít forget that you will need a hand pump or siphon to get the water out of the barrels and that the water needs to be changed twice each year. When you fill up the barrels you will need a white (lead free) hose, your green garden hose will not do. If you buy used barrels make sure that you know what was in them before your water.

Ground water. If you run out of alternatives you can use ground water from that irrigation well or storm water runoff pond nearby. Can you get your water out of the irrigation well if there is no electricity? Will you be safe carrying water from a nearby pond? Well if you can get ground water you need to treat it before you drink it. You can treat it with fresh bleach at 8 drops per gallon, be aware that the active chemicals in bleach degrade by as much as 50% in a year so you will want to rotate your bleach or make your own from calcium hypochlorite a common pool shock if you know the correct proportions (google is your friend here). Either way you need to pre-filter your water through a coffee filter or other like method to eliminate the very small bacteria carriers that you will not see, and let it air out for 30 minutes so that some of the chemicals can evaporate, the longer the better as far as water taste is concerned.

You can also use a hiking and camping style water filter which can filter down to .2 microns and eliminate most but not all problems with your water but nothing beats boiling or pasteurization. Look into solar ovens which can bring water to a boil or pasteurize it for you at no cost but the oven, and work when set on a snow bank. Whatever else you do drink clean water.

lawman800
08-20-2011, 12:57
Tagged. No snow banks, wells, or lakes in los angeles... But I bought tons of water, bottles and jugs.

1 old 0311
08-20-2011, 13:06
Got a water heater? There is 40+ gallons. Also I THINK it was in Emergency Essentials where I saw a plastic bladder that goes into a bathtub and can hold, and dispense, 40-50 gallons without leaking out. There is 80+ gallons for the price of a cheap plastic bladder. Not a bad place to start.

kirgi08
08-20-2011, 14:56
Water was our main concern when we bought the bol,as you've seen we "think" we got it right.'08.

lawman800
08-20-2011, 16:33
How do you get water out of the heater?

Free Radical
08-20-2011, 16:36
How do you get water out of the heater?

There's a garden hose fitting at the bottom.

wjv
08-20-2011, 17:02
There's a garden hose fitting at the bottom.

If you don't drain the silt out of the bottom of the heater 1-2x per year, expect the first gallon or two to be undrinkable, but good for flushing a toilet.

Draining the silt out of the bottom of the heater 1-2x per year helps water heater last longer.

kirgi08
08-20-2011, 17:06
I wouldn't consider water heater h2o as potable,flush yes.'08.

Unistat
08-20-2011, 17:15
I wouldn't consider water heater h2o as potable,flush yes.'08.

Would you use hot water from the tap?

jdavionic
08-20-2011, 17:56
Perhaps I missed it, but did you cite how much water to allocate per person, per day?

jdavionic
08-20-2011, 18:01
Just one other comment. It seems when people are considering food choices for short-term emergencies, some focus almost exclusively on MREs, or dehydrated foods (e.g., Mountain House).

While I would say that either choice is only a short-term solution (e.g., I'd rather have pounds of rice, beans, MREs, dehydrated foods, canned veggies, canned meats, ....), I would say it's important to point out that dehydrated meals obviously require water...which will need to be figured into your water supply plan.

kirgi08
08-20-2011, 18:15
Would you use hot water from the tap?

My system yes,we don't have a conventional water heater.'08.

bdcochran
08-20-2011, 18:41
I represented a commercial bottled water company.

1. never use a recycled large plastic or glass water bottle. People store PCP, gasoline and other substances therein. Think about how you would get those substances out -
2. the plastic used in water containers purchased off the shelf in grocery stores is not the plastic that you want to have your water stored in long term. Hint - this is why a blue plastic water container bought at Walmart or a sporting goods store is going to be more than buying some 1 gallon Albertson containers with water in them already.
3. consider constructing a solar water distillation unit. My handyman said that he took me lens and was building the frame in his garage. I may get it before shtf.

Dexters
08-20-2011, 18:52
As others have said people who live in a house have more water than they think:
- Water heater and the water in the pipes that drain into it
- Ice in the refrigerator
- Bottled water
- Fruit juices
- Gatorade
- Soda
If you have advance warning you could:
- fill up tubs
- fill up pots
- fill up all other storage

UneasyRider
08-20-2011, 19:26
Just one other comment. It seems when people are considering food choices for short-term emergencies, some focus almost exclusively on MREs, or dehydrated foods (e.g., Mountain House).

While I would say that either choice is only a short-term solution (e.g., I'd rather have pounds of rice, beans, MREs, dehydrated foods, canned veggies, canned meats, ....), I would say it's important to point out that dehydrated meals obviously require water...which will need to be figured into your water supply plan.

Thanks, food is topic number two. I am going to write one each week for them. I started with water because it is so innocuolus and this is for non preppers.

BORNGEARHEAD
08-20-2011, 22:10
I've filled a few large bottles of water and keep them in the freezer as, 1. ice packs for any electrical disruption and, 2. drinkable/usable water.

Warp
08-21-2011, 00:26
Everybody should have, at minimum, a few gallons of drinking water per person specifically put back.

I have 14 Aquatainers in addition to the usual stuff you can find around a house. I wish we had more room and a basement but this is a good start. I also keep about 5 gallons in our primary vehicle (scepter container).

TangoFoxtrot
08-21-2011, 04:54
I have been asked to explain prepping to non preppers on a blog item by item. While there are many people who could do a better job at this I agreed and would like to give accurate information so could you please take a look at this and offer your comments pro and con. TIA.


Well done! :goodpost:

RatDrall
08-21-2011, 05:21
Calcium Hypochlorite is cheap, and has a loooooong shelf life. Anyone can buy a few bags at a pool supply store and store them in the buckets, with lids, that they will be using to make the bleach to purify their other water sources. I spent $10 for a 2.5 gallon bucket, a 5 gallon bucket, a lid, and a couple bags of the solid bleach granules.

I have 14 Aquatainers in addition to the usual stuff you can find around a house. I wish we had more room and a basement but this is a good start. I also keep about 5 gallons in our primary vehicle (scepter container).

A pic of how you store them, please? I have a few, and they dont stack as well as advertised...

UneasyRider
08-21-2011, 06:28
Well done! :goodpost:

Thanks.

1 old 0311
08-21-2011, 08:43
I wouldn't consider water heater h2o as potable,flush yes.'08.



Darn right. That water comes in on a 'special drinking line.':whistling::rofl::rofl::rofl:

G29Reload
08-21-2011, 08:57
What I want to know is, WHAT constitutes a "drop" of bleach? Isn't there a more accurate measure? How many tablespoons per 5 gals would be a better way. I dont have an eye dropper and wouldnt want bleach in if I did, the bleach would destroy the rubber bulb eventually.

Warp
08-21-2011, 09:14
Calcium Hypochlorite is cheap, and has a loooooong shelf life. Anyone can buy a few bags at a pool supply store and store them in the buckets, with lids, that they will be using to make the bleach to purify their other water sources. I spent $10 for a 2.5 gallon bucket, a 5 gallon bucket, a lid, and a couple bags of the solid bleach granules.



A pic of how you store them, please? I have a few, and they dont stack as well as advertised...

They are advertised as stacking? No, definitely NOT stacked.

I have them all on the floor in the bonus room, which we basically use as the basement we never had.

kirgi08
08-21-2011, 09:42
Darn right. That water comes in on a 'special drinking line.':whistling::rofl::rofl::rofl:

Depends on what type of system one runs,most folk don't even know howta "clean" their water system.There will be sediments and deposits in their water heater,thats why I tend ta avoid "using" that water as "potable".We have a well system and it's not a standard one.Our water has 2 different routes,look at it as arteries and veins.'08.

RatDrall
08-21-2011, 09:49
They are advertised as stacking? No, definitely NOT stacked.

I have them all on the floor in the bonus room, which we basically use as the basement we never had.

Yeah, they said "stackable", but definately aren't.

I'm going to have to build a simple shelf, as I have a set amount of space for them, and I got just enough to stack up in a row to the cieling. I wonder if there is a polymer shelving system somewhere with just the perfect dimensions? Off to the hardware store, again...

wrenrj1
08-21-2011, 10:06
Perhaps a little about simply filling a clear 2L bottle w/water and setting it in the sun for six-hours as an alternative when no chemicals are available.

Warp
08-21-2011, 10:07
Perhaps a little about simply filling a clear 2L bottle w/water and setting it in the sun for six-hours as an alternative when no chemicals are available.

...would that actually do anything worthwhile?

Kevin108
08-21-2011, 11:32
Constructive criticism for the OP:

I would run your article through Word or some other program to clean up your basic sentence structure and punctuation. You're missing some commas, you've got some run-on and incomplete sentences and other minor errors. You've put in great content though!

What I want to know is, WHAT constitutes a "drop" of bleach? Isn't there a more accurate measure? How many tablespoons per 5 gals would be a better way. I dont have an eye dropper and wouldnt want bleach in if I did, the bleach would destroy the rubber bulb eventually.

This link uses actual measurements. http://aedra.com/~sotto/shtf/water1.html

UneasyRider
08-21-2011, 13:11
Here is the end product that went online:

We call ourselves "preppers" because we prepare. People then ask, "What are you prepared for?" And it's a good question. Often it depends on where we live and what risks we may encounter that we wish to be prepared for. A good example is Florida and hurricanes. In Kansas it may be tornadoes and in California it may be earthquakes. The basic principles are the same as we are all limited by the bodies that we inhabit. I'll take you through some of the basics of prepping and they may not be what you might expect.


Water is the most important of all preparations. In general you can only live three days without water. So, if the city water supply suddenly stopped where would you get your water? You may have an irrigation well that requires electricity to work and there may be no electricity. You may take water from one of the many ponds and sources of ground water but these are also most likely sources of viruses, bacteria and parasites that can do more harm to you by making you sick and dehydrated than they can help you.


So how do you prepare for a no water situation? I buy bottled water by the case. I pay 11 cents per bottle at Sam's Club in a case of 35 bottles. How much you keep is up to you. How much storage space do you have? I keep five cases per person or more and rotate them by drinking a bottle or two each day using the first in first out system. Bottles are good to have for drinking water and for making friends with thirsty neighbors.


55 gallon food grade barrels are easily stored in the garage and can hold water to drink,cook, clean yourself and flush your toilets. Pay particular attention to flushing your toilets because in the summer when it's hot in the house if you don't have electricity, the smell of your full toilets will not be welcome. Don't forget that you will need a hand pump or siphon to get the water out of the barrels and that the water needs to be changed twice each year. When you fill up the barrels you will need a white (lead free) hose. Your green garden hose will not do. If you buy used barrels make sure that you know what was previously stored in them. In any event, wash them thoroughly using your hose before filling them with clean water.


If you run out of alternatives you can use ground water from that irrigation well or nearby storm water runoff pond. Can you get your water out of your irrigation well if there is no electricity? Will you be safe from other thirsty persons when carrying water from a nearby pond? Well if you can get ground water you still need to treat it before you drink it. You can treat it with fresh bleach at eight drops per gallon but be aware that the active chemicals in bleach degrade by as much as 50% in a year. So you will want to rotate your bleach. You may choose to make your own from calcium hypochlorite, a common pool shock, if you know the correct proportions (google is your friend here). Either way you need to pre-filter your water through a coffee filter or other like method to eliminate the very small bacteria carriers that you will not see. Let the water air for 30 minutes so that some of the smell and taste of the chemicals can evaporate.


You can also use a hiking and camping style water filter which can filter down to two microns and eliminate most but not all your water purifying problems, so this water still may need some treatment with chemicals, boiling or pasteurization. Boiling or pasteurization are the very best solution to water treatment but require a heat source. Look into solar ovens which can bring water to a boil or pasteurize it for you at no cost but the oven. Solar ovens can be set on a snow bank and still work.


Whatever you do...drink only clean water.

BORNGEARHEAD
08-21-2011, 13:27
...would that actually do anything worthwhile?

Yes it does. Google SODIS.

Black Smoke Trail
08-21-2011, 14:04
I recommend using calcium hypochlorite as opposed to bleach. It can be stored long term in glass mason jars with Tatler plastic reusable tops that will not corrode.

I keep about 30 gallons of emergency water that I have run through our Berkey water filter and then treated with bleach that gets used on a rotating basis. We keep a Crown Berkey for SHTF, a Royal Berkey for daily use, and have a Travel Berkey for backup.

Walter T. Kelley has some real nice 5 gallon containers that will withstand temps. upto 180 degrees. I am a beekeeper and us them for sugar syrup feeding my bees but they are great for water storage too and the containers come with a cap that is prethreaded to accept a spigot/valve.

https://kelleybees.com/Products/Detail/?id=3336333433363333&grouped=1

If you buy 30, you get the bulk discount price.

This is the valve/spigot that I use:

http://www.store.homebrew4less.com/prodinfo.asp?number=LD4884&variation=&gdftrk=gdfV23727_a_7c1745_a_7c7532_a_7c23055

Storage of potable water is a great thing upto a point. For the long term, the most important issue is to be capable and able to make more and a continuous source of clean, sanitary, potable water.

Another means of filter out unwanted matter is with a polyester wool filter. I use these for filtering bees wax. In candle making, anything larger than 1 micron can clog up the candle wick. These particular bag filters filter down to 0.5 micron. The 32 inch bag filters would probably work best for water filtration due to the large volumes being filtered:

http://www.filtersource.com/store/listCategoriesAndProducts.asp?idCategory=28

Hope this help out with your article. Looks good!

bdcochran
08-21-2011, 15:13
"Perhaps a little about simply filling a clear 2L bottle w/water and setting it in the sun for six-hours as an alternative when no chemicals are available. "

Ok. Let us assume that you have done that.

Have you removed the particles? No.

Have you raised the temperature above the boiling point? No.

So, whether you pee into a container or simply run your bottle through the slime in a swamp to fill it and then put it in the sun for 6 hours, have you accomplished much? NO.

M1A Shooter
08-21-2011, 18:05
i store some water bottles by the case for daily use. i keep a minimum of 2 cases per person on hand at all times. i have 6 or 8 5 gallon containers in my office that i use for longer storage and still be able to throw it in the truck if i have to leave. for bug in situations, i have a 375 gallon tote in the garage, which i plan to at least double. i also have rain barrels set up for producing more but still need to figure out a filter system. right now im thinking bucket berkey after coffee or cloth particulate filters. will also be adding a water bob bathtub bladder for non potable emergency storage. i also store 2lbs of calcium hypochlorite in a glass jar with a rubber seal.


good article.

M1A Shooter
08-21-2011, 18:07
also a good source for containers of various types for those in the KY area, or within driving distance if you want a bulk order.
http://www.lexingtoncontainercompany.com/

wrenrj1
08-21-2011, 18:33
"Perhaps a little about simply filling a clear 2L bottle w/water and setting it in the sun for six-hours as an alternative when no chemicals are available. "

Ok. Let us assume that you have done that.

Have you removed the particles? No.

Have you raised the temperature above the boiling point? No.

So, whether you pee into a container or simply run your bottle through the slime in a swamp to fill it and then put it in the sun for 6 hours, have you accomplished much? NO.

First, you live in LA and I'll cut you some slack:tongueout: Check out Youtube on this topic and you will see that you should obviously filter water prior to this process, that's kinda a dumb arse assumption on your part not too...

You do not need to raise the temperature above boiling. The sun kills the harmful bacteria over a several hour period.

While urine is 95% water, you are excreting byproducts of your body that are not bacteria, viruses, or parasites (if you are healthy by the way) but waste byproducts such as: urea, uric acid, creatinin, and sodium chloride (common salt), and over 100 other substances that are usually present, but only in trace (i.e. very small) quantities. These are chemicals, not the above and your body wan't to get rid of them, not keep them...

If you need water this is the final option, preferably other options as presented via chemicals would be the way to go.

certifiedfunds
08-21-2011, 20:30
Depends on what type of system one runs,most folk don't even know howta "clean" their water system.There will be sediments and deposits in their water heater,thats why I tend ta avoid "using" that water as "potable".We have a well system and it's not a standard one.Our water has 2 different routes,look at it as arteries and veins.'08.

Arguably, if you're down to drinking the 50 gallons or so in your water heater times are critical. That said, the sediments will be mostly mineral precipitates and would settle out in whatever vessel you empty it into. Ideal no, but why would the water not be safe to drink?

wjv
08-21-2011, 23:47
I stack the Aquatainers by putting plywood in between the layers. I don't stack them more than 2-3 high.

kirgi08
08-22-2011, 07:57
Arguably, if you're down to drinking the 50 gallons or so in your water heater times are critical. That said, the sediments will be mostly mineral precipitates and would settle out in whatever vessel you empty it into. Ideal no, but why would the water not be safe to drink?

I reckon my point is that we don't even count a water heater as a potable source,granted some may.We have an over abundance of water resources and it'd take something massive ta interfere with it.As ta sedimentary deposits not all are mineral based,it all depends on ones water system/service.

Water is way too vital ta take any chance with,so we don't.'08.

cowboy1964
08-22-2011, 12:23
There is far more crap in the 50 to 100 year old pipes bringing water to your house (not to mention the 50 to 100 year old pipes IN your house) than whatever is in your 5 year old water heater tank.

quake
08-22-2011, 13:30
...would that actually do anything worthwhile?

One way to increase efficiency of the sodis (called solar distillation but it's really pasteurization) approach is to paint half of the outside of the bottle flat black, to make it gather & hold solar heat better:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Sodisbottle-painted.jpg


Some of those laid out on a raised piece of sheetmetal (to keep them from rolling, keep them flat, and keep them out of bug-infested grass & dirt) in direct sunlight, can pasteurize a respectable amount of water. Bear in mind, this is only for biologics; it won't do anything for chemical or other contaminants.

To be certain about actual temp reached, there's a self-contained device called a wapi ("something-or-other pasteurization indicator"; several brands available) that indicates when a given temp is reached. It has wax in it, is hung vertically in a bottle with the wax at the top of the tube, and when it gets to the proper temp (something like 160F iirc...?) the wax melts and runs to the bottom of the tube so you know the temp was genuinely reached. To use it, the bottle has to be standing up, not laying down.

When it cools, the wax rehardens, and next time you use it you just hang it 180 degrees off the other way, so the wax is back on top, and so on.
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Wapi-waxpasteurizationdevice.jpg

UneasyRider
08-22-2011, 13:47
One way to increase efficiency of the sodis (called solar distillation but it's really pasteurization) approach is to paint half of the outside of the bottle flat black, to make it gather & hold solar heat better:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Sodisbottle-painted.jpg


Some of those laid out on a raised piece of sheetmetal (to keep them from rolling, keep them flat, and keep them out of bug-infested grass & dirt) in direct sunlight, can pasteurize a respectable amount of water. Bear in mind, this is only for biologics; it won't do anything for chemical or other contaminants.

To be certain about actual temp reached, there's a self-contained device called a wapi ("something-or-other pasteurization indicator"; several brands available) that indicates when a given temp is reached. It has wax in it, is hung vertically in a bottle with the wax at the top of the tube, and when it gets to the proper temp (something like 160F iirc...?) the wax melts and runs to the bottom of the tube so you know the temp was genuinely reached. To use it, the bottle has to be standing up, not laying down.

When it cools, the wax rehardens, and next time you use it you just hang it 180 degrees off the other way, so the wax is back on top, and so on.
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Wapi-waxpasteurizationdevice.jpg

That's exactly how it's done.

bdcochran
08-23-2011, 14:29
"First, you live in LA and I'll cut you some slack Check out Youtube on this topic and you will see that you should obviously filter water prior to this process, that's kinda a dumb arse assumption on your part not too.."

Thanks for the slack. I have filters, purification units, a reverse osmosis unit, painted bottles, getting a solar still built, chemicals, a marine distillation unit, fire starters, pool cleaning chemicals, and on and on. I also have the experience of dealing with water in such nice places as Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, Algeria, Iran, Columbia and other locales.

I want to deal with viruses as well as bacteria. Living near the ocean and in a desert environment, I also want to deal with particles in the soil. If it were just as simple as taking 2 liter bottles, painting them half black and leaving them in the sun, it would be done the world over. And yes, I have a few stored in the garage.

I came back from one extended trip with yellow stained teeth. The only way to get clean water was to take water in the form of hot tea. This is how most people in the world deal with water contamination problems. Now the problems are more than bacteria and viruses. The problems are heavy metals, runoff from fertilizer as well. I don't forward to obtaining my drinking water from Ballona Creek or the Los Angeles River if shtf, regardless of what method is attempted to make the water clean.

wrenrj1
08-23-2011, 18:22
"First, you live in LA and I'll cut you some slack Check out Youtube on this topic and you will see that you should obviously filter water prior to this process, that's kinda a dumb arse assumption on your part not too.."

Thanks for the slack. I have filters, purification units, a reverse osmosis unit, painted bottles, getting a solar still built, chemicals, a marine distillation unit, fire starters, pool cleaning chemicals, and on and on. I also have the experience of dealing with water in such nice places as Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, Algeria, Iran, Columbia and other locales.

I want to deal with viruses as well as bacteria. Living near the ocean and in a desert environment, I also want to deal with particles in the soil. If it were just as simple as taking 2 liter bottles, painting them half black and leaving them in the sun, it would be done the world over. And yes, I have a few stored in the garage.

I came back from one extended trip with yellow stained teeth. The only way to get clean water was to take water in the form of hot tea. This is how most people in the world deal with water contamination problems. Now the problems are more than bacteria and viruses. The problems are heavy metals, runoff from fertilizer as well. I don't forward to obtaining my drinking water from Ballona Creek or the Los Angeles River if shtf, regardless of what method is attempted to make the water clean.

Well...You still live in LA though....:tongueout:

All in good fun. Sounds like you're prepared!

Aceman
08-24-2011, 06:14
Just a few of my comments/approaches:

#1 HAVE STORED WATER - but also remember, you don't need "water" A stocked rack of Soda cans in the pantry/garage works too, provides sugar/caffiene for energy as well. 1 gal. pr person per day.

#2 Have the ability to quickly gather/store additional water: A waterbob for the tub, plastic soda bottles/milk jugs, etc...A large container such as a garbage can / liners or bags or plastic sheets (space blanket!), to capture water, rain, etc.

#3 Have the ability to purify water! Tablets or a filter are the best methods, but simple bleach and a dropper works also, and the ability to boil it is helpful also.

- know where your sources of "free standing water" are.

SilverCity
08-24-2011, 08:52
A few references to water filters...

A few if not several good water filters (portable and cannister-type) would be at the top of my list.

Berkey Lite or Katadyn with several black filters, PUR portables

We also have ~1000 gallons in polyethylene water tanks inside the garage.



SC

Angel
08-24-2011, 14:29
what about desal sea water?

bdcochran
08-24-2011, 16:39
For sea water, this is what you do.
1. gather a small rock, a cup, a wide plastic bucket or bowl that is deep enough to put the cup in, and a sheet of plastic wrap.
2. gather the sea water in the bowl.
3. put the cup in the bowl in the water in the center of the bowl, making sure that it doesn't tip over.
4. put plastic wrap across the top of the bowl.
5. put the small rock on top of the stretched plastic wrap in the middle.
6. put the whole unit outside in the sun.
The water will evaporate and then condensate where the rock is and drop down into the cup.

Angel
08-24-2011, 18:09
Thanks for that tip. But I would like a reliable method of getting at least 6 gallons per day of potable water from sea water. I figure 4 people for drinking and cooking. I don't mind spending around $500 for a device or system.
thanks

wrenrj1
08-24-2011, 18:20
Thanks for that tip. But I would like a reliable method of getting at least 6 gallons per day of potable water from sea water. I figure 4 people for drinking and cooking. I don't mind spending around $500 for a device or system.
thanks

Get a really big rock? :supergrin:

UneasyRider
08-24-2011, 19:21
Thanks for that tip. But I would like a reliable method of getting at least 6 gallons per day of potable water from sea water. I figure 4 people for drinking and cooking. I don't mind spending around $500 for a device or system.
thanks

Katadyne, gets pricey for the good stuff though.

http://shop.katadyn.com/dimg/thm/t340_bc7db71dfe5caee1c99c53fb96a21be3.jpg

kirgi08
08-24-2011, 23:26
How much is your water worth?.'08.

lawman800
08-25-2011, 01:26
My water is worth more than your life, if anyone is asking.

kirgi08
08-25-2011, 01:37
Stating,not asking.'08.

lawman800
08-25-2011, 02:15
Not meant toward you. I meant if any mutant zombie bikers come asking during the apocalypse, that's all he will hear before I make his head into a canoe. My water is my life at that point. It might also get me a girl that looks like Mila Kunis... Hey, it worked for Eli.

kirgi08
08-25-2011, 03:50
You ain't got an egress yet.'08. :faint:

lawman800
08-25-2011, 08:31
No egrets here. I drained the swamp.

certifiedfunds
08-25-2011, 08:50
Lots of egrets around here.

lawman800
08-25-2011, 13:21
I really try to live life without egrets. Life too short for egrets.

kirgi08
08-25-2011, 16:22
No egrets here. I drained the swamp.

Lots of egrets around here.

I really try to live life without egrets. Life too short for egrets.

Hey Larry and Shemp.'08. :psycho: :tongueout:

wrenrj1
08-25-2011, 18:51
Stating,not asking.'08.

You did use a question mark Kirgi08, not to split hairs...:supergrin:

SilverCity
08-25-2011, 20:28
It might also get me a girl that looks like Mila Kunis...

Caterina Murino can swim in my water supply, anytime.



SC

lawman800
08-26-2011, 09:04
If she swims in my water supply, we would be having some words... Good words... But still words.

certifiedfunds
08-26-2011, 11:48
Hey Larry and Shemp.'08. :psycho: :tongueout:

:rofl:

lawman800
08-26-2011, 13:32
Nyuck, nyuck, nyuck... Hey Moe!!!

kirgi08
08-26-2011, 13:39
Little slow on the uptake,ain't ya.'08. :honkie: