I think I may have upset a senior officer...just don't know how? Advice ple [Archive] - Glock Talk

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scprotector1
08-21-2011, 12:32
So I'm a probationary patrolman for my dept. My probation ends in October which is a little over a month away. Ive not had any problems with senior officers since I started until yesterday. A call came in just out of my area for a threatening phone call, the wife was at a local bar when her husband calls and threatens to go over there and kill her and the security (http://realpolice.net/private-security.shtml) guard. Two senior officers get dispatched and i disregard the backup and start heading enroute. I just so happen to get there first and let dispatch know Im getting off, right at that moment the senior officer gets there and advises she is off. We both approach the complainant at the same time and the complainant goes right up to me and starts explaining the whole story to me. Im hearing her out and she begins telling me about previous incidents that don't have any significance as to why we are here now. I ask her "I understand ma'am but why are we here now?" At this point the senior officer shoots a glance my way which I return, we make eye contact for maybe 2 seconds and she then looks back at the complainant. Awkward...at this point she finishes her story and Im about to ask her if she wishes to file a report and press charges and possibly stay somewhere else for the night, when the senior officer butts in looks at me and says: "So do you have anything else to add?" I reply "What do you mean?" she replies "Well are you going to interview her? Ask questions? Do you even know what to do?" I reply "Im going to ask if she wants to press charges and have some place to stay for the night." She then looks at the complainant and says "Ok thats what i'm trying to get at, I'll be conducting the interview from here on out and you can direct all questions to me, he is just my backup." At this point I'm obviously fuming and really want to tell her off but I hold my tongue and keep my composure for the remainder of the call which she ended up taking. After the call was finished she didn't even say a word to me and went right back to her car and took off. I'm not sure if I did anything wrong here, maybe some of you senior guys can help me out? Was she upset because complainant talked to the backup rookie when she was primary? Was it because I was handling the call differently than her? She ended up going the same route I was going to take anyway so I'm stumped. Any advice guys?

ateamer
08-21-2011, 12:51
Sounds like she saw it as her beat, her call. If you are the cover officer and the person starts telling the story to you, you can tell him/her "well, you need to talk to that officer - she's handling this call, I'm just here to help with what she needs." Or you can ask the primary officer "mind if I take this one?"

Try and meet with the officer and ask her what the deal was. Emphasize that you are trying to learn and want to fit in, and don't want to make the same mistake twice.

Or it could be that she is just a pushy know-it-all. Let me guess: She has somewhere around four years on, no more than 10 years, isn't an FTO and never was one, is not anywhere at the top of her shift for self-initiated activity, doesn't have an infectious, highly positive attitude and is not regarded by her peers or the new guys as any kind of a leader.

SpoiledBySig
08-21-2011, 12:56
Her badge weighs the same as yours. A true experienced "Senior Officer" would be more than happy to let you take charge of the call and the paperwork that comes with it. :supergrin:

I wouldn't worry about it too much. She'll come around, or you'll come around.

msu_grad_121
08-21-2011, 12:58
Not 100% sure without being there and seeing how the interaction went, or how she is. When I started as a reserve, I worked with a full time female officer who used to get SO peeved when someone would address me instead of her. She was decent enough to let me know, so from there on out I'd make a point to tell everyone that she was my supervisor, and let her decide if she wanted to take the statement or if she wanted me to do it.

When I went full time, I got a rep pretty quick for being a run jumper, for good or bad. The one thing I learned to do was to gather prelim info and let the primary officer know what I had, and ask if they wanted me to continue the interview or take over. It sounds like she got upset due to you jumping her run instead of deferring to her, or it could be because the complainant talked to a man instead of her, like the full timer I used to work with, who knows.

Did you ever consider just asking her outright? She might respect you for being upfront, and it would remove all doubt one way or the other. Just be prepared for whatever she says.

Sharky7
08-21-2011, 13:02
Sounds like she was just mad because she felt like you were stepping on her call. If you haven't experienced it yet, you soon will. You will go on a call where you are the "primary" and someone takes over and does all kinds of crap you wouldn't have done or don't agree with.....they then hand you some notes on a sheet of paper as they are walking back to their squad car calling 10-8, expecting you to take the paper even though they did all the work/pissed on your call/mucked it up/wanted to "play" at your call, but not willing to do any work.

If you catch it, you clean it.

If she was standing right next to you while the victim/caller was talking to you, she was probably just cranked up you were asking the questions. If it is a non emergency/non exigent situation point the victim to the primary and say "fill this officer in on what happened." If you got a fresh offender fleeing though, do your thing, grab as much info as quickly as possible and get it out on the radio.

collim1
08-21-2011, 13:20
I wouldn't worry about it.

I've only met one female officer in my whole career that I actually liked.

flame on...but its the truth.

merlynusn
08-21-2011, 14:13
Just ask her. I typically don't mind it if someone jumps my call. But if they jump it, they better take the paper that goes with it. If they start being all stupid and doing things that don't make sense, then I usually jump back in and take it over again. I know I usually end up jumping calls. Not because I'm better than anyone else, but I usually get there first and start talking to them. Or I make first contact instead of standing there like an idiot waiting for them to talk first.

Patchman
08-21-2011, 14:17
You've gotten some good, solid, practical advise so far.

Talk to the female officer. Sometimes guy LEOs are a little overprotective of female LEOs and end up trying to help too much. Not fair to the female LEO. So in the future, nothing wrong with telling the witness/complainant "she's handling this."

danielspdx
08-21-2011, 14:32
Some people are very protective of their calls while some will do anything to pawn their call off on someone else. I don't like eating someone's calls, and I want to take mine no matter how messy they look.

Being a tall, older looking white male (I've had gray hair for at least 10 years now, I'm 41, 6'4/270), many people automatically start talking to me instead of another officer on a call, especially if the other officer is female or young looking.

If I'm the cover, the primary is on scene and the situation is calmed down enough, I always politely stop the person from talking to me and explain I'm assisting the other officer, then ask the primary what they want me to do.

It really depends on your department culture and how things are done, but I don't advise assuming control of another officer's call unless you are asked to do so, or you're the first one on scene and too far into it to let it go.

This has been a good experience for you, as you've seen how protective people can be of their calls, and how they may react. Learn from it and move on. We've all done stupid things while on a call, and we all can continue to learn no matter how much time we have one. Don't sweat it.

BL33D 4 M3
08-21-2011, 14:43
Good advice so far. I would just add...You can't change what has been done but from here on out, don't handle HER work. Most seasoned cops would have bought you lunch for taking their call. Keep up the hustle rookie, you'll do fine.

Pepper45
08-21-2011, 14:47
It's kind of surprising, reading all the answers here. I guess we have a much more laid back style here. If someone asks a few questions on a call that isn't theirs, it's no big deal. If someone thinks that junior is stepping on their toes, we deal with it after everything is said and done. Or, if junior is really running an issue, we stick him with the paper, and explain later that it isn't cool to jump someone else's call without taking the paper too.

If I were in your shoes, I would watch myself around that particular officer. Apologize now for jumping her call, but ask her to let you know about any mistakes you make, outside of the public eye, and to take you aside. Tell her you know you're the new guy, and going to make mistakes, but you'd prefer if she could tell you about them in private. Then just go out and do your job.

OFCJIM40
08-21-2011, 15:00
I'm of the mindset that I don't care for call jumpers unless it's one of my buddies. I work on a larger PD and I know a PD's can be different. You just have to know where you fit in with each Officer. Some of my team mates have become my best friends and our working relationship reflects that where really no wrong can be done between the two of us. But the situation of senior and new and not buddies is a situation I am very familiar with, with me being the senior.

My feeling is don't muck up my call. If you are backup and you take the roll as primary then get ready to buy the call. If it's a crappy call like above, most Senior would be happy to dump it. So if you're already acting as primary and you want to take the call, then all you got to say is, "would you like me to take this for you, it's kind of a mess and it's been a long night" or something to that effect. I've worked with a few call jumpers and it annoys me when they get all the preliminary info, don't take the call, then they want to give me the 10 minute rundown. But now I still have to talk to the parties on scene to make sure you were accurate. Just slows down the process. Also make sure you are aware of the friendships between two Officers. Were they maybe friends. I don't mind going to crappy calls with guys I like and trust. Now if a newbie disregards my friend enroute to a crappy call, you get on scene and want to act like primary but aren't going to take the paper, then yes there could be issues.

4949shooter
08-21-2011, 15:04
Sounds like she was miffed for no reason.

If she had any real experience she would realize theat some female victims feel more comfortable talking to a male officer. Some female victims feel more comfortable talking to a female officer. It all depends on the victim.

It sounds like she needs to get over herself.

CW Mock
08-21-2011, 15:32
... when the senior officer butts in looks at me and says: "So do you have anything else to add?" I reply "What do you mean?" she replies "Well are you going to interview her? Ask questions? Do you even know what to do?" I reply "Im going to ask if she wants to press charges and have some place to stay for the night." She then looks at the complainant and says "Ok thats what i'm trying to get at, I'll be conducting the interview from here on out and you can direct all questions to me, he is just my backup."

Real cops don't do this kind of crap in front of the public. If she's bent, then she can save it for the locker room or parking lot, but NEVER on the call in front of suspects or victims. Jebus.

ray9898
08-21-2011, 16:20
Just ask her. "Hey...whats up with that call the other day. I could tell you got pissed at me. What did I do?"

All these people talking about an officer getting mad at another for taking the paper. I have never seen that, dodging the paper is what gets you around here.

snoris
08-21-2011, 17:03
I worked for 23 years for a large municipal department as a reserve officer before I went full-time early this year for another agency. I was fortunate that because I was out on the street nearly every Saturday night for all those years, I earned a fair amount of respect from the full-time officers. I worked alone for most of my career there, and was expected to handle my own calls just like the full-time officers.

That being said, I was always very careful about jumping calls. When I did answer a call as the cover officer when I'd "called off" one of the assigned elements, I tried to get there just as the other officer pulled up and let that officer take the lead. If the complainant tried to talk to me instead of the full-time officer (which sometimes happened because of my rank within our unit), I'd immediately say, "I just showed up to be an extra pair of hands if I'm needed. This officer will take care of you."

Dragoon44
08-21-2011, 17:38
Sounds like she was miffed for no reason.

If she had any real experience she would realize theat some female victims feel more comfortable talking to a male officer. Some female victims feel more comfortable talking to a female officer. It all depends on the victim.

It sounds like she needs to get over herself.

+1 though I think she had a reason, but it was a bad one. From the way the situation was described she got upset that the woman chose to talk to him rather than her. There are plenty of female cops with "something to prove" attitudes like that and they really resent it when a complainant chooses to talk to a male officer rather than them.

WarCry
08-21-2011, 17:41
It's kind of surprising, reading all the answers here. I guess we have a much more laid back style here. If someone asks a few questions on a call that isn't theirs, it's no big deal. If someone thinks that junior is stepping on their toes, we deal with it after everything is said and done. Or, if junior is really running an issue, we stick him with the paper, and explain later that it isn't cool to jump someone else's call without taking the paper too.

If I were in your shoes, I would watch myself around that particular officer. Apologize now for jumping her call, but ask her to let you know about any mistakes you make, outside of the public eye, and to take you aside. Tell her you know you're the new guy, and going to make mistakes, but you'd prefer if she could tell you about them in private. Then just go out and do your job.

This was my thought right here. I'm not a cop, but I do work customer service. Different customers, different issues, but whatever the work, dealing with customers have some of the same rules regardless. Number one of those is you don't air internal issues - such as not liking the way a co-worker handled something - in front of the customers, EVER. And you CERTAINLY don't pull the whole "Well, I'll help you. That guy's new and doesn't know his ass from a hole in the ground" kinda crap. Frankly, if I'm on the job for a week or a decade, the customer should NEVER know the difference, and my peers shouldn't take it on themselves to point it out.

You may have been in the wrong. I don't know and, it seems, neither do you. So that's priority 1, find out that the deal was. But a very close #2 is "can we keep it professional and out of the public eye next time."

Just imagine you get a call two, three years from now for the same person. You will have seen 400,000 people in the meantime, so you won't remember her, but she WILL remember you, and will be in the mindset of "That's the guy that doesn't know sh**, I need someone else."

scprotector1
08-21-2011, 17:52
Thanks for all the advice guys, if there is another incident ill definitely inform the complainant that she is primary and that if SHE doesn't mind Ill take the call.

mntrpr
08-21-2011, 18:49
Real cops don't do this kind of crap in front of the public. If she's bent, then she can save it for the locker room or parking lot, but NEVER on the call in front of suspects or victims. Jebus.

Huge +1
Same goes for real supervisors.......oh wait, I'm dreaming......

txleapd
08-21-2011, 19:08
Her badge weighs the same as yours. A true experienced "Senior Officer" would be more than happy to let you take charge of the call and the paperwork that comes with it. :supergrin:


I agree. You're welcome to take a call from me, a write the report, anytime.

Sharky7
08-21-2011, 19:24
I agree. You're welcome to take a call from me, a write the report, anytime.

I agree.....when I am busier than a one legged man at a butt kicking contest and a new guy gets on the radio and says he will take the call for me - definitely makes me happy. I remember stuff like that too and will help out the new guy as much as I can.

I'm always cautious of call-jumpers on calls though. We got quite a few people at my department who just like to play and then leave as quickly as possible leaving you with the mess and paper.

Actually had another officer the other day poke his head in and ask if I needed a hand on my case because he wasn't busy. When I told the officer I could use help with evidence and getting the complaints ready, he made up an excuse to leave.....he just wanted to do the "cool" stuff like sit in on the interview or be there when we use the bad guy as an informant to do a dope deal later in the night. He had no interest in actually helping.....just playing. His loss, if he would have helped I would have got him involved in the fun stuff later.

indigent
08-21-2011, 19:33
I agree. You're welcome to take a call from me, a write the report, anytime.

With what your northside units have been bringing to the "north side jail" keep your reports to yourself. The crazys and drunks can go downtown.



I work with a medic like that. She's hot to trot to run the calls in our facility but dumps her paperwork off on us senior medics because she "isn't good at report writing". Burns me up every time.

Keep your head up and do your job. Sounds like you've got your head screwed on right. Don't let one persons bad attitude and ego ruin it for you.

ateamer
08-21-2011, 19:43
I agree. You're welcome to take a call from me, a write the report, anytime.
I learned that early on. When I started we still had a pretty good sized reserve program, and a number of Level I reserves (solo). One of them was a female (gender, though, is inconsequential, as some of my best partners have been women), pushy, know-it-all, and loved to show up at a call and take over. She thought, apparently, that she knew more because she had been with the office for longer, even though a fulltimer worked more hours in a month than she had in a year of being a reserve. I had no problem at all stepping out of the way and letting her handle when she'd show up at my calls. If she wanted it, fine. You take the info, you take the paper.

Oh, and after a few more months as a reserve, she got hired as a CO at our jail. And got washed out from training. And had already been dropped from the reserve program, because someone who is employed in one capacity cannot volunteer in another capacity for the same agency. FLSA violation.

Dukeboy01
08-21-2011, 20:06
*Insert vulgar mysoginistic comment that would earn me an infraction here*

Seriously, WTF. Somebody wants to jump a call, they can have it. There's plenty of work to go around.

Agent6-3/8
08-21-2011, 20:28
Its plainly obvious to me that she got pissed because the complainant came straight to you. Perhaps she believed the complainant did so because you're a male and she's a female. To further piss her off, you're still a boot.

Many, perhaps even the majority of female cops I've met are intolerable *****es. They seem to feel they need to act that way to compensate for their lack of a johnson. Ok, maybe that was a bit harsh. Lets say they feel like they get less respect because they're female and have to be overly agressive and overbearing to make up for it.

bccop
08-21-2011, 20:52
Or it could be that she is just a pushy know-it-all. Let me guess: She has somewhere around four years on, no more than 10 years, isn't an FTO and never was one, is not anywhere at the top of her shift for self-initiated activity, doesn't have an infectious, highly positive attitude and is not regarded by her peers or the new guys as any kind of a leader.

Have you heard what others think of her? I think ateamer called it.

Her badge weighs the same as yours. A true experienced "Senior Officer" would be more than happy to let you take charge of the call and the paperwork that comes with it. :supergrin:

Sounds like you did things right. Around here if a rookie wants to take a call like this and I don't have to write it up I would be happy. :cool:

AZLawDawg
08-21-2011, 22:54
So I'm a probationary patrolman for my dept. My probation ends in October which is a little over a month away. Ive not had any problems with senior officers since I started until yesterday. A call came in just out of my area for a threatening phone call, the wife was at a local bar when her husband calls and threatens to go over there and kill her and the security (http://realpolice.net/private-security.shtml) guard. Two senior officers get dispatched and i disregard the backup and start heading enroute. I just so happen to get there first and let dispatch know Im getting off, right at that moment the senior officer gets there and advises she is off. We both approach the complainant at the same time and the complainant goes right up to me and starts explaining the whole story to me. Im hearing her out and she begins telling me about previous incidents that don't have any significance as to why we are here now. I ask her "I understand ma'am but why are we here now?" At this point the senior officer shoots a glance my way which I return, we make eye contact for maybe 2 seconds and she then looks back at the complainant. Awkward...at this point she finishes her story and Im about to ask her if she wishes to file a report and press charges and possibly stay somewhere else for the night, when the senior officer butts in looks at me and says: "So do you have anything else to add?" I reply "What do you mean?" she replies "Well are you going to interview her? Ask questions? Do you even know what to do?" I reply "Im going to ask if she wants to press charges and have some place to stay for the night." She then looks at the complainant and says "Ok thats what i'm trying to get at, I'll be conducting the interview from here on out and you can direct all questions to me, he is just my backup." At this point I'm obviously fuming and really want to tell her off but I hold my tongue and keep my composure for the remainder of the call which she ended up taking. After the call was finished she didn't even say a word to me and went right back to her car and took off. I'm not sure if I did anything wrong here, maybe some of you senior guys can help me out? Was she upset because complainant talked to the backup rookie when she was primary? Was it because I was handling the call differently than her? She ended up going the same route I was going to take anyway so I'm stumped. Any advice guys?

Don't sweat it, it happens.

jedi573
08-21-2011, 23:04
Overthinking stuff like this can stress you out more quickly than the street itself will.

Keep your head down and do your job the best you can. Quiet confidence goes a long way. If you handled it incorrectly, you'll know it soon enough. If you were right and she was wrong, then there's a chance your teammates will let you know that as well.

Be the best you can and don't let the little things get you down. :)

Andy

scprotector1
08-21-2011, 23:30
Have you heard what others think of her? I think ateamer called it.



Sounds like you did things right. Around here if a rookie wants to take a call like this and I don't have to write it up I would be happy. :cool:

Yeah actually i just got through getting off shift and talking to some fellow officers about it even some sgt's got in on it. ateamer called it perfectly: nobody can stand her or most of the females for that matter. Its the unfortunate truth.

COLOSHOOTR
08-22-2011, 00:43
I wouldn't worry about it.

I've only met one female officer in my whole career that I actually liked.

flame on...but its the truth.

It's sad but it's totally true. There is only one that I work with that anyone really likes. The other is known a Sybil due to her multiple personalities....

scprotector1, don't sweat it brother.... You seem to be doing the job better then she is. You were doing the right thing asking questions sifting though the BS from the past that ment nothing. Our job is to deal with the problem at hand not to listen to her life story. If that female officers is one of those ones who makes a 10 minute call into a 2hr one by listening to the drama let her. Just don't jump her calls anymore. Cover her as needed but don't assume a primary role. Just sit back and be a good COVER Officer by watching her back and yours. If it's not a hot call sit down the street and let her get there first that way she gets to be in charge and get her ego boost.

Then when October comes tell her to piss off!!!

MeefZah
08-22-2011, 06:03
*Insert vulgar mysoginistic comment that would earn me an infraction here*



I was appropriately sanctioned.

seanmac45
08-22-2011, 06:14
Next time she acts that way towards you in front of a complainant or perp just smile

MeefZah
08-22-2011, 06:25
In all seriousness, address it with her out of the public eye and away from any other peers.

Be polite, be respectable, find out if she has other issues with you or if it is just this one.

I know I've been on scenes with a part timer or a new guy and they were asking all the wrong questions and generally wasting time; in those cases it's just more efficient to cut the guy off and take over the Q & A and let the new guy figure out from your line of questioning how they should have been handling it. No need to even explain it to them later, because you just demonstrated it to them.

You gotta remember most (good) cops have a low tolerance for BS in any form, even if it is coming from a co-worker.

Panzergrenadier1979
08-22-2011, 07:52
At my PD the call etiquette is that the dispatched officer has the right to take the call if they really want it. If another officer is close by and is likely to arrive first, then they usually get on the PD radio channel and alert the dispatched officer that they are at the scene PRIOR to alerting the dispatcher. Later, the first-arriving officer and the originally-dispatched officer work it out between them as to who gets to handle the paper.

I had a similar situation, with a different out-come, earlier this past week. A female officer was dispatched to a crash in her zone. I happened to be closer then she was and I was first on the scene. I figured that I would start gathering information to make her job easier when she arrived. It turns out that the offending vehicle missed a turn at high speed and drove through a front yard knocking down bushes, a small tree and leaving car parts scattered through the grass. The vehicle fled the scene leaving a trail of fluids behind it. I broadcast a vehicle description and the direction of travel and the dispatched officer (who was en route) canvassed the area for the vehicle.

A neighboring department heard the description of the vehicle and alerted us to the fact that that they are looking for the same vehicle from a drug transaction that took place 45 minutes prior to the crash. Meanwhile, Iíve interview all the witnesses and the property owner and photographed the scene. Iím thinking to myself that it would be extremely lame of me to now dump the actual report on the dispatched officer considering that Iíd gathered all the info.

The dispatched officer finally arrives on scene. A couple minutes later another neighboring agency calls out that they have located the damaged vehicle in their jurisdiction and that they are out with the driver. The dispatched officer tells me to go to the scene; Iím off like a shot. Short story is that the 21 y/o driver has vehicle damage in all the right places, reeks of alcoholic beverage, can barely stand or speak, refuses SFST, and refuses a legal blood draw. I book him for his second DUI.

I met up with the originally dispatched officer later and she told me that our supervisor had just chewed her out for letting me take the arrest when the call was in her area of responsibility. She was very upset about it and I felt terrible. I really donít know what to say about the whole situation: I felt that she and I worked as a team; she looked for the offending vehicle and I processed the scene. A DUI arrest was made and I got all the paperwork related to the vehicle crash and the arrest.

This female officer has no ego and is very easy-going. She and I donít work together all that often, but when we do, we get along very well. The way we operated on this case was typical of any other call.

Iíve asked myself, should I have simply not gone to the crash? When I arrived first, should I have just sat in my car and waited for the dispatched officer to arrive? I feel that we did what we had to do at the time, considering the circumstances.

4949shooter
08-22-2011, 15:33
No, you don't sit in the car and wait. During that time, you gathered valuable information be proceeding to speak with the caller. The sooner the information gets out to other officers in the area, the sooner the perp, or violator, can be caught.

Good police work trumps minor protocol.

SpoiledBySig
08-22-2011, 15:44
No, you don't sit in the car and wait. During that time, you gathered valuable information be proceeding to speak with the caller. The sooner the information gets out to other officers in the area, the sooner the perp, or violator, can be caught.

Good police work trumps minor protocol.

Have to admit...that's a great "spot-on" analysis.

We really are there to help the people (victims) and not have minor silly squabbles in front of them. :cool:

4949shooter
08-22-2011, 18:05
I thank you, Sir.

Straight Pipe
08-22-2011, 19:07
"We both approach the complainant at the same time and the complainant goes right up to me and starts explaining the whole story to me"
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I take it you're a male?

Sounds like sister got her painties in a wad because the complaintant chose a man instead of someone trying to act like one.

But that's just a guess.

PS: FWIW, whenever a complaintant singles out an individual officer for whatever reason we just go with the flow, unless the other officer has some kind of expertise that is needed.

EOD3
08-22-2011, 19:46
Its plainly obvious to me that she got pissed because the complainant came straight to you. Perhaps she believed the complainant did so because you're a male and she's a female. To further piss her off, you're still a boot.

Many, perhaps even the majority of female cops I've met are intolerable *****es. They seem to feel they need to act that way to compensate for their lack of a johnson. Ok, maybe that was a bit harsh. Lets say they feel like they get less respect because they're female and have to be overly agressive and overbearing to make up for it.

There may be another explanation but this one rings true to me. It was even worse at the dawn of affirmative action.

merlynusn
08-23-2011, 08:16
Panzer, you did the right thing. I agree with you that it would have sucked to dump that bowl of crap on the other officer after you did all the work. It sounds like you two did do well working as a team. Typically in that circumstance, one of us would do the paper and the other handle the DWI.

steveksux
08-24-2011, 00:19
I'd pull her aside and ask what she'd have wanted you to do instead, might as well try to bury the hatchet. If that doesn't work.... Taser malfunction. Don't mention "Shenanigans", whatever you do.

By the way. Take my advice at your own risk, not an LEO. I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn, but did watch Super Troopers and Reno 911.

Randy

ggarciatx
08-24-2011, 07:11
You exhibited something that she does not have. Command Presence. Upon seeing you both, that complainant knew immediately who she was going to talk to. It has happened to me before and I have seen it happen to other officers at calls. It is weird how people tend to choose who they are going to talk to. I had one lady who flat out refused to talk to one officer cause he called her "mam" when he walked up to her. Don't take it as a bad thing, take it as they felt confident enough to pour themselves out to you.

9x94
08-24-2011, 07:21
Once you have some experience and are more comfortable with your coworkers you will learn how different Officers handle situations. Until then, in my opinion you have two options if you are the backup Officer:

1. Act like the backup Officer and let the primary handle the call. If someone looks directly at you and asks you a question while the primary is standing next to you I would suggest you look towards the primary and give them the opportunity to answer the question and take the lead. Obviously if it's an in progress call we are talking about a different situation.

2. Take the lead like you did in the situation you described and expect to take the paper. It is annoying when another Officer wants to ask questions, make statements, and otherwise steer a call in a particular direction (which may not agree with the actual primary Officer's opinion) and then expect to walk away and leave the primary to clean up the mess.

If you get a chance you could always just ask the primary as you are walking up to the call. Something like "Hey, I could use the experience; do you mind if I take the lead on this one?"

Either way, it sounds like you are eager and aggressive- which is a good thing. Keep learning and keep up the good work!

Cochese
08-24-2011, 10:17
Show her your O face. She figure things out quickly from there out.

MeefZah
08-24-2011, 11:47
Show her your O face. She figure things out quickly from there out.

Toeing the ban line, bro. I already got my nastygram from the moderators. :supergrin:

DaBigBR
08-24-2011, 13:10
So I guess any mention of the "bone rollercoaster" is out...

Cochese
08-24-2011, 15:42
Toeing the ban line, bro. I already got my nastygram from the moderators. :supergrin:

This is CopTalk not GNG.... thankfully.

jpa
08-24-2011, 23:42
Yeah, it sounds like you stepped on the groin region where her pecker would be if she had one. If you take over and start acting as primary, you get the paper. I'm surprised she didn't go back to her car, call 10-8 and advise dispatch you would be handling and drive away.

DFinch
08-25-2011, 04:10
She's primary, you're cover. You approached at the same time. Victim went straight to you (common, and annoying to female officers because this happens a lot). Just tell the victim it's the other officer's call and then adjust from there. You wouldn't have had to if it was my call because I would have already jumped in and taken over the questioning. Her approach was unnecessary and rude.

There are "culture" differences with different agencies, also. Sometimes the boot is expected to take the call. Some officers hate people jumping their calls, others will gladly let you take the paper. You have to work that stuff out between you.

Fernman
08-25-2011, 11:00
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51GTQMXTHDL._SL500_AA300_PIbundle-2,TopRight,0,0_AA300_SH20_.jpg?

Big House
08-25-2011, 11:42
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51GTQMXTHDL._SL500_AA300_PIbundle-2,TopRight,0,0_AA300_SH20_.jpg?

Ouch! That's going to leave a mark. Pun intended.