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fireguy129
09-01-2011, 08:07
specifically, running electronics on a portable generator. After Irene blew through this weekend, we ran into problems at my fire station. Our power was out, but we still needed to function. We're considering a decent size generator for the lighting in a few areas, heat in the winter if possible, and communications i.e. base radio and pc with internet. What hazards are there with portable generators regarding electronics and how do we mitigate them? I checked inverter generators but they don't seem to have the wattage. Is there something we should be looking for to even out the power to make it safe for electronics?

ArmoryDoc
09-01-2011, 09:27
Tagged for interest.

Unistat
09-01-2011, 10:12
For computer systems there are "power conditioners (http://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp=gsih&cp=18&gs_id=1f&xhr=t&q=power+conditioners&qe=cG93ZXIgY29uZGl0aW9uZXJz&qesig=j18SXTewz0MxpRwNUS7ooQ&pkc=AFgZ2tlNOlWCw3TEBXBcgQ2kF3lDx8U2GKnVLGiccgF_rLiqpLbCpkTvGinH0j-5qK5p0ohIQkjvOc5QjBEddpjzuSeHd8VGOQ&pf=p&sclient=psy&safe=off&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=power+conditioners&aq=0&aqi=g5&aql=f&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=fade450b8f6ca990&biw=1366&bih=660)" that smooth out the surges on the line. They are most often used with automatic battery back-ups. I only have experience with the home/small office variety and I suspect you will need a more industrial scale version.

On the level you're talking about, it might be something that is incorporated into the circuit breaker box. You probably need to talk to a real electrician.

BTW, most power strip "surge protectors" are 100% worthless to stop power surges.

ric0123
09-01-2011, 16:47
Generally speaking, most generators don't put out a very clean AC wave form (known as a sine wave or modified sine wave). Also, generally speaking, most devices don't care.

There are exceptions.

Anything with a transformer is going to run hot and its life will be shortened. Has anyone bought a cheap power inverter to run their laptop in the car, only to find that their laptop's power supply dies after several months? Notice they run hot? That's why.

Modified sine wave. True sine wave inverters exist, but are expensive.

Generators are similar. Again, brands are different, some have cleaner outputs (Honda is pretty clean from what I hear) than others, but also, your lights won't care. Also, over short durations, your transformers won't care. Nothing is probably going to explode due to a dirty output

Also, same as Inverters, gennys are rated in peak output and constant output. Peak output really doesn't mean much, look for the 'sustained' output.

The peak output is for spikes. Think of a circular saw (corded). The instant you pull the trigger, there is a huge spike to get the motor running. 3 seconds after that, the draw drops once the motor is spinning. That's the difference between peak and constant. Anything with a pump/motor is going to have a spike, so if you're using this for power tools or something like that.. keep an eye on it, but the 'constant' output is going to be more relevant for day to day use

Big Bird
09-03-2011, 21:43
FWIW, the Honda Generators have clean power and use inverters.

janice6
09-03-2011, 22:00
The key items to look for are: 60 Hz sinusoidal controlled frequency, Regulated 110 VAC and 220 VAC, Sufficient wattage rating to allow for your intended load with a reserve. Be sure you have an exhaust sealed unit, so you can either run it indoors or with a remote extension exhaust pipe. (either/or).

Not to be ignored is the sound level produced by the unit. You can get very quiet or very noisy ones. Sound is rated in db's. pick the lowest. You may want to look for noise filters on the output power.

The power is produced at a cost of X gallons of fuel per hour (at the rated load). Try to get the largest on board tank so you don't have to be filling it all the time.

Good luck.

Bolster
09-03-2011, 22:51
I did a lot of research before purchasing a Honda EU2000i, and one of the things that sold me on it was the ability to run sensitive AC electronics. (It will not run DC electronics! Only good for charging batteries.) Course it's not big enough to run the refrigerator, so I guess I'll have to eat my computer instead.

Quote (http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/hdfilmstrip4lg.html): "Honda's sine-wave inverter technology provides smoother, higher quality power flow that is ideal for frequency and voltage fluctuation-sensitive equipment such as HD Camcorders, laptop computers, back up hard drives, and HMI ballasts. Honda's inverter technology accomplishes this by taking the raw power produced by the generator and passes it through a microprocessor controlled multi-step process to condition it...The inverter cleans and stabilizes the the power to make it equal to or better than household power with a waveform distortion factor of less than 2.5%."

This is COOL, somebody has a comparison of wave forms by various generators & other power sources HERE (http://www.jkovach.net/projects/powerquality/).

I will say it's shockingly quiet. I could hardly believe it.

BTW, most power strip "surge protectors" are 100% worthless to stop power surges.

What?! Crap. I did not know that. Isn't that what the bastages sell them for, protecting against surges?

Be sure you have an exhaust sealed unit, so you can either run it indoors or with a remote extension exhaust pipe. (either/or).

Does not compute...do you mean, run it OUTdoors or with a remote...?

janice6
09-03-2011, 23:32
I did a lot of research before purchasing a Honda EU2000i, and one of the things that sold me on it was the ability to run sensitive AC electronics. (It will not run DC electronics! Only good for charging batteries.) Course it's not big enough to run the refrigerator, so I guess I'll have to eat my computer instead.

Quote (http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/hdfilmstrip4lg.html): "Honda's sine-wave inverter technology provides smoother, higher quality power flow that is ideal for frequency and voltage fluctuation-sensitive equipment such as HD Camcorders, laptop computers, back up hard drives, and HMI ballasts. Honda's inverter technology accomplishes this by taking the raw power produced by the generator and passes it through a microprocessor controlled multi-step process to condition it...The inverter cleans and stabilizes the the power to make it equal to or better than household power with a waveform distortion factor of less than 2.5%."

This is COOL, somebody has a comparison of wave forms by various generators & other power sources HERE (http://www.jkovach.net/projects/powerquality/).

I will say it's shockingly quiet. I could hardly believe it.





What?! Crap. I did not know that. Isn't that what the bastages sell them for, protecting against surges?



Does not compute...do you mean, run it OUTdoors or with a remote...?


You're right. I didn't make that clear. Yes, either indoors with a remote exhaust or outdoors.....


This was my checkoff list when I bought them (a bunch) for remote location testing systems.

(We ran Kilowatt lasers, sensitive electronic spectrum analysis, and computers on them)

powderhead
09-04-2011, 07:40
I use a generator quite a bit. I bought mine at Sam;s Club for about $1000. It's called a Black Max. Honda powered, but who knows who made the generator portion? I couldn't afford a full Honda at the 8,000 watts I wanted. The price of one was near twice what I paid for mine. I think so far I'm pleased with what I have, as I use it to power my 220 volt mig when I am out of the shop, the whole house during power outages, and I can throw it in the back of the truck and take it to the neighbors when they need help.

LongGun1
09-04-2011, 09:46
specifically, running electronics on a portable generator. After Irene blew through this weekend, we ran into problems at my fire station. Our power was out, but we still needed to function. We're considering a decent size generator for the lighting in a few areas, heat in the winter if possible, and communications i.e. base radio and pc with internet. What hazards are there with portable generators regarding electronics and how do we mitigate them? I checked inverter generators but they don't seem to have the wattage. Is there something we should be looking for to even out the power to make it safe for electronics?


You may want to consider a system like this....

(a thread about my last hurricane induced grid power outage

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=919392 )

..for a 'total solution' for your issues.


An inverter-based backup power system consists of..

... a microprocessor-controlled sine-wave inverter..

..a battery bank ..

..and if you want longer periods of backup... a electric start generator (preferably diesel or piped natural gas).


Basically.....this is how a solid state true sine wave utility grade inverter/charger setup with generator backup operates.

The inverter syncs the output with a generator if needed to give the nominal & surge ratings of both, but normally everything is running off of the inverter(s) when grid power is down. Seamless automation of the generator when needed. If the grid power goes off, the switchover time is in milliseconds with NO felt loss of power, versus the several seconds without power which is needed for the genset to spool up. 24/7 backup power without the noise & excessive expense of running a genset 24/7.

When the batteries are drained to a programmed DOD (depth of discharge) level & grid power is out;.. the Inverter/charger will automatically start the genset, warm up the genset, bring it on-line, charge the battery bank, then bring the genset off line, let it cool down, then turn it off without any intervention from the user.

The inverter will also exercise the genset on programmed intervals (monthly) & give an indication if the genset did not start/run properly.

I installed a Trace/Xantrex PP-SW4048/D Inverter/Charger (2 of the SW4048 Inverter/Chargers in a stacked configuration for 220 VAC) in my house the late 1990's & works great. My inverter setup alone provides 8KW nominal/20KW Surge + 8KW Genset/24KW Surge Genset (Total combined Inverters + Genset 16KW nominal/44KW surge).



The reasons in favor for a Inverter based system are....

Automation...as it exercises your genset once a month to make sure it will work when needed & will generate a "Error" if the genset does not pass the monthly check / warm-up.

People tend to forget the monthly check...computerized automation does not.
It will also start the genset if the battery bank is needing charging and/or if the inverter is incapable of supporting the load & extra power is needed


Seamless integration of power....with a inverter based system transfer of power upon "Grid Failure" is so quick most would be unaware it has happened. No resetting of alarm clocks/microwave clocks/VCR clocks,etc....

It also keeps compressors from "short cycling" in the event of short duration outages like are experienced during an ice storm, etc...

Also the surges preceding storms, brownouts, overvolt/undervolt/out of spec CPS (frequency) issues are resolved before damage can be done to expensive home appliances & sensitive electronics


Longevity for Long Term Outage......most gensets providing power 24/7 would need a oil/filter change after 4 days vs. approx 1 month (depending on KWH needed) between oil/filter changes with inverter integration.

Also the fuel cost is much more per KWH used with generator alone setup vs. a genset with inverter integration


Noise......many locations have noise ordinances affecting night time use & a inverter can "block out" times that are objectionable for genset operation. You can get very quiet gensets/enclosures but they are more expensive.

Also during an extended blackout, houses with generators running at night present themselves to be a target for looters.... & worse.



YMMV

Unistat
09-04-2011, 12:36
What?! Crap. I did not know that. Isn't that what the bastages sell them for, protecting against surges?

Next time you're in a store, look at the package carefully. Rarely do they say "surge protector." That's just a common name we call them, they are really just power strips. The fuses in them are to prevent a fire if the strip gets overloaded or shorts out, like a GFI. Think about how movies from the 50's joke about the outlet with a bunch of adapters plugged in sparking. That's what the power strips prevent.

In a a real power surge, their is nothing to prevent power from spiking through the strip, and if there is a lightning stike, forget it. You stuff is smoked.

LongGun1
09-04-2011, 13:07
Next time you're in a store, look at the package carefully. Rarely do they say "surge protector." That's just a common name we call them, they are really just power strips. The fuses in them are to prevent a fire if the strip gets overloaded or shorts out, like a GFI. Think about how movies from the 50's joke about the outlet with a bunch of adapters plugged in sparking. That's what the power strips prevent.

In a a real power surge, their is nothing to prevent power from spiking through the strip, and if there is a lightning stike, forget it. You stuff is smoked.


If it is a true surge protector..

..then it will have at least one MOV (metal oxide varistor) or SOV (silicon oxide varistor) for protection.

At any voltage above spec...the MOV will shunt the excess..

..and in the case of a severe event..

..the MOV will 'crowbar' (sacrificial permanent short circuit) to ground & trip the breaker.

In case of the latter...either repair or replacement will be necessary.


Problem is...the rise time on these transient events can be faster than the device can respond..

..and the clamping or shunt voltage can be well above wall voltage.


That being said....MOV/SOV protection devices are much better than nothing..

..especially with the better designed surge protection units.


Proper grounding & shielding combined with layers of cascaded MOV or SOV protection (i.e. Delta) ..

..along with gas tube devices (i.e. Polyphaser)

.. can greatly reduce your exposure to lightning induced spikes & surges.

kirgi08
09-04-2011, 13:17
LG-1 was my guide for genny use.Listen.'08.

Tippyman
09-04-2011, 15:08
I purchased the Honda EU2000i for the reasons already stated, but I wanted more than 2000W power.

So, I bought a second one and a parallel kit. Now I have 4000W of power, it's still clean power, it's still fuel efficient, still silent, and I can grab one and go if need be.

Not to mention, if one catastrophically fails, I at least have one 2000W generator to use as backup to keep the food alive.

Bolster
09-04-2011, 17:37
So, I bought a second one and a parallel kit.

That's the way to do it. Built in redundancy, and scalability. You fortunate dawg. I would love to get a second, myself. Not sure how many other generators allow you to tether together like that.

bdcochran
09-04-2011, 23:22
Thanks for bringing up generators. I have a new generac 4000 watt unit in the wrap since 1987. I will be copying the manuals tomorrow and trying to download a copy of the manual into my computer manuals subdirectory tomorrow. I have been trying to put all appliance/electronic goods manuals into a subdirectory as well as making paper copies that are wrapped in protective plastic sleeves.

UtahIrishman
09-04-2011, 23:32
I purchased the Honda EU2000i for the reasons already stated, but I wanted more than 2000W power.

So, I bought a second one and a parallel kit. Now I have 4000W of power, it's still clean power, it's still fuel efficient, still silent, and I can grab one and go if need be.

Not to mention, if one catastrophically fails, I at least have one 2000W generator to use as backup to keep the food alive.

I thought they discontinued the parallel kit? I have a EU2000i as well and when I went to look for the parallel kit (this was a couple years ago) the local Honda dealer said it had been discontinued?

R_W
09-05-2011, 08:14
I haven't seen the parallel CORD in a while, but I have seen the higher dollar KIT that includes the 120/240 high-amp plug.

UtahIrishman
09-05-2011, 11:36
I haven't seen the parallel CORD in a while, but I have seen the higher dollar KIT that includes the 120/240 high-amp plug.

Thanks...I should've looked before I asked...you are correct

I just Googled and found them. Maybe they weren't available at the time.

Sorry about the diversion...back on topic now

Tippyman
09-05-2011, 12:07
I haven't seen the parallel CORD in a while, but I have seen the higher dollar KIT that includes the 120/240 high-amp plug.

The parallel cord is what I am referring to, sorry.

They were in stock at my local Honda House. I didn't see the need to invest in the "kit."

In stock at Northern, FYI. http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200332497_200332497?cm_ite=16679&cm_pla=Generators%3EGenerator%20Accessories&cm_cat=Google&cm_ven=Aggregates

R_W
09-05-2011, 12:11
Sorry about the diversion...back on topic now

Worthy diversion, as that is a key feature that people use to justify the Honda price premium.

Tippyman
09-05-2011, 16:39
Worthy diversion, as that is a key feature that people use to justify the Honda price premium.

Noise and fuel efficiency are the other two.

I don't want everyone in the world knowing that I have a generator after the 4th/5th day of no power and they feel they deserve some of my electricity. I also hate going to the gas station during a crisis and don't want to have to fill up everyday.

Restless28
09-05-2011, 17:54
I have a cheap ETQ, but my goal is parallel Hondas in 2012.

cowboy1964
09-05-2011, 18:11
Even the quietest Hondas make noise when they have load on them.

Check out the sound level comparison here:

http://www.hondapowerequipment.com/products/Generators/

I'd like to get an EU2000i but man $1300? I need a lot of other preps first.

Tippyman
09-05-2011, 19:19
Even the quietest Hondas make noise when they have load on them.

Check out the sound level comparison here:

http://www.hondapowerequipment.com/products/Generators/

I'd like to get an EU2000i but man $1300? I need a lot of other preps first.

$1300 may be MSRP but going rate around here is $1050. And that is during peak "Irene panic."

glockster99
09-05-2011, 19:37
Tag for info...thx all

R_W
09-05-2011, 20:55
Even the quietest Hondas make noise when they have load on them.


The noise of a generator carries a LONG way in the silence of a blackout.

kirgi08
09-05-2011, 21:25
Thats why mine is in a sound pit.'08.

Bolster
09-05-2011, 21:31
The noise of a generator carries a LONG way in the silence of a blackout.

Not here on Los Angeles. I can hardly hear my generator at all, over the sound of gangland gunfire, the breaking of store windows, innocent citizens getting beat up, people being raped, and cops burning rubber to get somewhere safe.

cowboy1964
09-05-2011, 21:52
Not here on Los Angeles. I can hardly hear my generator at all, over the sound of gangland gunfire, the breaking of store windows, innocent citizens getting beat up, people being raped, and cops burning rubber to get somewhere safe.

:rofl:

cowboy1964
09-05-2011, 21:53
The other night we had a power blip and the one streetlight went out. Man is the street DARK without that light. A gen may be worth having just to run emergency OUTDOOR lighting.

Anyone have one of the little Yamaha gens? Couple of hundred cheaper, just as quiet and efficient, and you can pair two just like the Hondas.

LongGun1
09-05-2011, 22:38
Not here on Los Angeles. I can hardly hear my generator at all, over the sound of gangland gunfire, the breaking of store windows, innocent citizens getting beat up, people being raped, and cops burning rubber to get somewhere safe.




:rofl: :supergrin:



Have you ever considered someplace like Montana? :tongueout:

cowboy1964
09-06-2011, 12:09
I'm looking at whole house generators. They cost less than I thought they would. Of course installation is where they really nail ya. If you sub out the electrical and plumbing work for a reasonable price it seems like this would be the way to go.

R_W
09-06-2011, 16:59
I'm looking at whole house generators. They cost less than I thought they would. Of course installation is where they really nail ya. If you sub out the electrical and plumbing work for a reasonable price it seems like this would be the way to go.

The other gotcha on those was the manifold pressure on the NG or propane was different than normal domestic supply. They may have fixed that since I looked at them...

That plus they have been shutting down the NG pipe in disasters lately. A backup genny does little good if it is tied to another grid.

cowboy1964
09-06-2011, 17:38
The other gotcha on those was the manifold pressure on the NG or propane was different than normal domestic supply. They may have fixed that since I looked at them...

That plus they have been shutting down the NG pipe in disasters lately. A backup genny does little good if it is tied to another grid.

I would only get a dual-fuel gen.

I'm looking at some Yahama portables that are TRI-fuel. Gas, propane, or NG.

secamp32
09-07-2011, 21:09
specifically, running electronics on a portable generator. After Irene blew through this weekend, we ran into problems at my fire station. Our power was out, but we still needed to function. We're considering a decent size generator for the lighting in a few areas, heat in the winter if possible, and communications i.e. base radio and pc with internet. What hazards are there with portable generators regarding electronics and how do we mitigate them? I checked inverter generators but they don't seem to have the wattage. Is there something we should be looking for to even out the power to make it safe for electronics?

If you are going to run the computer and radios off a non inverter generator you should probably connected them thru an online ups system. Online UPSs cost more then a standby ups but it filters the power going thru it. You need to determine your wattage requirements to see if you can get by with a portable unit that you connect when the power goes out or if you need a larger standby system. You need to decide which fuel is best for you, NG, propane, diesel or gas? NG is nice as long as the NG grid is up. Propane is easier to store than gas or diesel and doesn't require storage treatment. If you have your own diesel pumps for the trucks then that might be the best solution for you. Gas is the most common fuel for small generators. I would certainly consider dual or tri fuel units.
You should make sure that you exercise your generator under a load every month or 2 or it might not startup when you really need it. Most standby generators will automatically run at a certain interval but you need to check and make sure it is actually doing that. I know of hospital that though their generators were running weekly but nobody bothered to check on them and when the power went out they were standing around in the dark.
Honda is the gold standard in portable generators. Everyone love them but you will pay big $$ for them. If you are looking to go cheap, a lot of people on the web love their Champion Power Equipment generators. (disclaimer, I have no personal experience with them, only what I have read on the web) They are an American company that designs the equipment and has them built in China. Apparently you can actually get parts and service compared to the typical China generator like the one I bought that has virtually no support (unless I want to carry it to china for service):wavey:

cowboy1964
09-07-2011, 21:26
From what I'm reading Yamaha competes very well with Honda in the portable area and in fact may be a bit nicer. Bonus is they are slightly less expensive.

It looks like it's relatively easy to convert a gas-only unit to tri-fuel. There appear to be companies that sell units already converted. They say it doesn't affect the warranty.

Raiden
09-08-2011, 18:16
I'm a chronic cheapskate, so I have a really spartan generator - but I get by just fine with it. It's a small Steele brand 1000 peak-watts / 850 running-watts (though I'd say 700W is more reasonable), 1.5 HP OHV 2 stroke gas powered generator that's been fairly reliable. I added an improvised muffler to quiet it down. It's just enough to get some lights on, charge some electronics and batteries, and power a Sunpentown brand portable marine "refrigerator" with ice maker (essentially a big wheeled cooler with 12v plug, and a small section to accommodate 4 ice trays). The insulated chest keeps items cool in an indoor setting, only having to run it a few times a day. I was able to produce enough ice to keep my fridge and freezer cold for 3 days during a bad outage - I had enough fuel that I could have done so, along with two lights and charging a few small electronics, for about 7 days. It's not the ideal remote mountain retreat option, but works well for my modest needs. I've gotten through several storm seasons, in one piece and without losing any of my food to spoilage.

Before I was running the marine fridge with ice maker, I used a portable ice maker that could even run off of a car battery for two days without recharging the battery. I couldn't make enough ice for both the fridge and freezer, but the stuff in the fridge I didn't immediately consume ended up being fine in a cooler that I re-stocked with ice on a daily basis. With the generator, and the gas I usually keep on hand, I could have probably had run this setup for a week and a half - though I could have consumed most of the stuff in the freezer and cooler well before then.

Storing gasoline has always been a problem for me, due to local ordinances and limited detached storage space. As well, because I don't use gasoline much, anything I store often gets skunky in a month or two. Funds permitting, I'm definitely gonna upgrade to a larger generator, and switch to propane. Storing propane is much easier for me, and I use it far more frequently when camping or cooking out.

Bolster
09-12-2011, 09:13
Not a rec, just a heads up, this 7000 watt gen heavily discounted at Costco

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Productgroup.aspx?Prodid=11603110

kirgi08
09-12-2011, 09:27
When one buys a genny one also needs ta buy "parts" ta fix said genny.We went diesel as main and some subbie powered gas as b/ups.Kiss is the mantra,the diesels are that,and the slant units are quite well built.'08.

Bolster
09-12-2011, 11:31
What's the story with CARB compliance on a generator? Is it a restriction only in Cali-stupid-fornia? Is it a pain, or is it no big deal?

cowboy1964
09-12-2011, 12:15
What's the story with CARB compliance on a generator? Is it a restriction only in Cali-stupid-fornia? Is it a pain, or is it no big deal?

Yes it's CA only. Hence the name "CARB", heh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Air_Resources_Board

kirgi08
09-12-2011, 12:44
See above.'08. :faint:

Dirk Pitt
09-12-2011, 14:24
Not knocking anyone for their priorities but the amount of effort I see making sure one has clean power waves to run computers just baffles me. The only time I have used my generator for "real" was to power my fridge and keep the food going.

All the emphasis on pc's, and other elctrical gadgetry just seems way down the list to me on the importance ladder right underneath eating and security.

Just my .02 Cents woth.

cowboy1964
09-12-2011, 14:27
Why not get clean power if you can? Why risk damaging anything?

crimsonaudio
09-12-2011, 15:12
Not knocking anyone for their priorities but the amount of effort I see making sure one has clean power waves to run computers just baffles me. The only time I have used my generator for "real" was to power my fridge and keep the food going.

All the emphasis on pc's, and other elctrical gadgetry just seems way down the list to me on the importance ladder right underneath eating and security.

Just my .02 Cents woth.
Yah, there's no way one might want to get news and information during an extended power outage or major SHTF event. </sarcasm>

fx77
09-12-2011, 16:51
Constant power failures in storms in my AO
Installed a 160 Kw natural gas powered generator and a transfer switch.
Had no elec for 6 days after the recent hurricane..the generator took care of al my needs at home..of course the cable was down so no internet...or TV. But lost no food and was not otherwise inconvenienced. Gald I did it.
The company who manufactured it is Katolight

Dirk Pitt
09-12-2011, 16:54
Yah, there's no way one might want to get news and information during an extended power outage or major SHTF event. </sarcasm>

And folks here wonder why my post count is low after being on board for over ten years. I can sit with a portable radio with a nine volt battery or in my car and get all the news I need.

I offered my opinion and it is worth the same amount as everyone else opinion that posts here, the same amount you paid for it.

psk1
09-12-2011, 17:26
If you are into preping in a serieus way you will want a diesel generator running at 1800 rmp they cost about 4000-5000 dollars for a 5000 watt one but if you only worry about power outages for a week or 2 most any that were discussed in this threed will do. just my 2 cents worth:)

wjv
09-12-2011, 17:30
Not knocking anyone for their priorities but the amount of effort I see making sure one has clean power waves to run computers just baffles me. The only time I have used my generator for "real" was to power my fridge and keep the food going.

If you own an RV/Camper you want clean power -
- AC
- Microwave
- Charger
- Fridge
- Furnace
- TV/Radio

And a PC

ALL have circuit boards that could be effected by bad power.

cowboy1964
09-12-2011, 17:52
Anyone have comments on Aurora Generators? American made diesels at a good price.

http://www.auroragenerators.com/

Bolster
09-12-2011, 18:06
It would appear to be enviro-socialist meddling at its finest.

Yes it's CA only. Hence the name "CARB", heh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Air_Resources_Board

LongGun1
09-12-2011, 19:24
If you are into preping in a serieus way you will want a diesel generator running at 1800 rmp they cost about 4000-5000 dollars for a 5000 watt one but if you only worry about power outages for a week or 2 most any that were discussed in this threed will do. just my 2 cents worth:)


+1 :thumbsup:

Both of my 8 KW Diesel Gensets are 1,800 rpm units..

..and by stocking long lasting (storage life) farm diesel diesel bought cheap, stabilized & stored properly..

..I paid about the same for the fuel (42.5 cents per gallon) than just the taxes cost on gasoline.

Also...gasoline (even if stabilized) will store only a very small fraction of the time of diesel..

..so rotation is an absolute necessity.


That + other factors tends to limit the amount of gasoline that can be (safely) stored.


On the other hand...

I can run gensets (& tractor) for years just on the diesel (oil, filters, spares) currently stocked.


But, so far they have not been needed..

..as the setup mentioned in my previous post..

.. has kept the power flowing for seconds, minutes, hours & for days until the grid came back up..

..normally without even knowing the grid was down..

..likely many hundreds of times since it was installed.

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y235/LG1/71669877207_0_ALB-1.jpg