How did you start? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Skadoosh
09-07-2011, 18:37
Hey yall, new to this part of GT i dont reload, dont know how, or anybody that does. Did any of you guys teach your selves out of a book? is it hard to learn?

atakawow
09-07-2011, 18:56
Hey yall, new to this part of GT i dont reload, dont know how, or anybody that does. Did any of you guys teach your selves out of a book? is it hard to learn?

If you can read, you can learn it. Hard? No, not if you follow instructions and pay attention to every little details.

RustyFN
09-07-2011, 20:06
If you can read, you can learn it. Hard? No, not if you follow instructions and pay attention to every little details.

What he said. I started by buying a manual and reading it cover to cover. Then I asked quedtions on what I didn't quite understand. According to my needs and the calibers I was loading I got advice to start with the Lee classic turret press. It has been a great press over the last five years. I just bought a Dillon 550 to speed up a few calibers but the classic turret won't be going anywhere.

JuneyBooney
09-07-2011, 20:10
If you shoot reloads don't shoot shoot a Glock. Kaboom.

Colorado4Wheel
09-07-2011, 20:23
I started with a Lee CLASSIC Turret (it's good) and the Richard Lee Reloading manual (it sucks). That and some help from this forum and a decent dose of common sense was all that I needed. I still have all my digits. It's intimidating at the beginning but not that hard.

Colorado4Wheel
09-07-2011, 20:25
If you shoot reloads don't shoot shoot a Glock. Kaboom.

Ignorant or a Joke. I hope it's the latter.

michael e
09-07-2011, 20:27
My dads friend that lived down the street showed me how to . This was after I had read a few books and bought my setup. Reading gives you a good idea, but I liked being able to actually see it done and doing it.

crnama
09-07-2011, 20:27
I taught myself from books, this forum, and youtube. You will be surprised the detail you can get out of some videos on youtube. Seriously just take a look at the reloading forum and decide which press you want to buy and get started. The sooner you do it the sooner you will thank yourself.

GioaJack
09-07-2011, 20:34
Elmer Keith and I started together when we were in sixth-grade. We got expelled for dipping girl's pigtails in the ink wells and since we had a lot of time on our hands we decided to learn how to load and invent new calibers.

If truth be known Elmer wasn't really very smart, he though the decimal system was just a fad and he wanted us to work on something he called the 10mm. What a dummy... good thing I talked him out of it.


Jack

Three-Five-Seven
09-07-2011, 21:54
I started loading when I was 14 years old with a Lee Loader -- the kind you use a hammer to run. I made a lot of ammo with that thing and learned to shoot better because of it.

They were under ten bucks back then. They're not terribly expensive now.

Seriously, that tool will teach you the fundamentals of loading and will give you a close, hands-on experience of every stage of the process. Just wear safety glasses because every once in a while you'll set a primer off.

bush pilot
09-07-2011, 22:14
Elmer Keith and I started together when we were in sixth-grade. We got expelled for dipping girl's pigtails in the ink wells and since we had a lot of time on our hands we decided to learn how to load and invent new calibers.

If truth be known Elmer wasn't really very smart, he though the decimal system was just a fad and he wanted us to work on something he called the 10mm. What a dummy... good thing I talked him out of it.


Jack

Wasn't Elmer your younger brother? He mentioned you in his stories.

freakshow10mm
09-07-2011, 22:16
I did some research myself reading articles on the internet and in magazines. I entertained the idea for several years (4-5) before I actually moved forward. I gained the base knowledge of the process, then started hanging out here in this subforum to get more practical knowledge. I started handloading in my in-laws' basement (wife and I were living with them until we found a place when we moved to MI) on a Lee Handpress. My first loads were 10mm Auto using Blue Dot and 155gr Hornady XTP bullets loaded with Lee dies.

Most of my knowledge has come from veteran handloaders on forums and personal experience just trying different things.

Handloading is as technical as you want it to be. Basically you clean brass, resize it and remove the spent primer, seat a new primer, charge with the correct type and amount of powder (the tricky part is selection) and finally seat a bullet to the correct depth. My neighbor has only used one load for 40 years for his .45 ACP and that's all he shoots and loads.

Boxerglocker
09-07-2011, 22:40
I started with the ABC's of reloading, asking questions here. A Lee Classic Turret, several reloading books later... I was rolling. Moved onto a 2 SDB's in 4 calibers for 40K rounds then the XL650.

fredj338
09-07-2011, 23:35
WHen I started reloading 35yr ago, the only way to learn was read a book or three. Now we have the internet, DVDs, U-tube & NRA classes. All are good ways to learn. If you can pay attention & follow direction, reloading is pretty easy. You can get into serious trouble if you go off the page & start thinking you know more than the guys that write the books, but w/ enough exp, you can go well beyond the books too.

dougader
09-07-2011, 23:36
My brother-in-law and I started with a Dillon Square Deal B and a Lyman reloading manual. We started with 9mm and Bullseye powder.

After that I bought a Hornady single stage press that was on close-out at a local gun store, bought my own Lyman manual and started with 38 Special (WW231 powder) and 357 magnum (Hodgdon H110 powder)... from there it was more calibers, more powders and a Dillon 550B so I could afford to shoot more, practice more and compete in IPSC, IHMSA...

Like Freak said, you can make it as technical as you want or as simple as you want.

But its not really all that hard. You just need to study up a bit, read some good manuals and pay attention to detail.

The remark about Glocks and kabooms is very overstated. You can blow up any gun if you try hard enough or make a big enough mistake. I shot over 30,000 rounds through my G19/9mm and the vast majority of those loads were handloads with cast bullets. Oh yeah, I started casting bullets too.

Read more on cast bullets fired in Glocks. I ran mine before anybody knew better. Maybe I was lucky, but I also didn't run my loads at max pressure, riding the ragged edge either.

NW-Warlord
09-07-2011, 23:47
I went to the local gun store asked them about how to make my own ammo. 2 hours, and a lot of money later I was home with a Dillon 550 and way over my head.

It took me well over a week to figure out how to assemble the machine and make my first reloads. I was about to give up on the whole idea for awhile, good thing my first reloads worked out alright.

crsuribe
09-08-2011, 00:18
I learned and am still learning from this and other sites. So far I've loaded and fired over 2000 rounds without any incidents..

blind noodle
09-08-2011, 00:41
Same as most people here, except I had no place to reload. I bolted my press and powder measure to a piece of wood which I would c-clamp to the kitchen table when I wanted to crank out some rounds. Worked well. Loaded probably 5k like that.

Skadoosh
09-08-2011, 05:06
Thanks guys, lot of good info im sure ill start sometime within the next few years.

meleors
09-08-2011, 07:12
If you shoot reloads don't shoot shoot a Glock. Kaboom.

Glocks function fine with reloads. You will not have a problem shooting reloads through a Glock.
But you should never shoot (at) a Glock, reloads or not! :whistling:

DoctaGlockta
09-08-2011, 07:40
I started very soon after I purchased my first pistol about 2 years ago. Started with a Lee Thigh Master and 45acp. Then on to an LNL AP.

Gained most of my knowledge from the good folks here who tried to keep me from blowing myself up.

Welcome and good luck.

ColoCG
09-08-2011, 08:23
I started by buying the Speer manual #7 and reading it cover to cover many times and as many magazine articles as I could find.

I didn't know anyone else that loaded to ask for help. There was no internet or personal computers at that time.

I started loading .38's with a Lyman 310 tong tool, then progressed to .44mag. Since I started I have reloaded over 2 dozen different calibers at one time or another.

If you read enough info and start out slow and safe it isn't that hard. Just don't try to get in a hurry or try to push the limits.

Good Luck!

ustate
09-08-2011, 09:53
I started reading message boards like this one, also read the ABCs of reloading and started loading on a Lee Turret. Been over five years at it now and I love it.

ron59
09-08-2011, 11:51
I researched a few forums/blogs, read the ABC's. It still seemed "complicated" to me. Then I found this series of videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRZrbv_8kx4
5 of them, at 10 minutes each, for 50 minutes of knowledge.

Yes, this videos are *titled* "how to reload with dillon 550B". Yet he covers so much more than just the press. How to use a scale, a loadbook, how to setup an OAL die, a crimp die, etc. Believe it or not, regardless of which press you use, die setup is similar in all of them.

Watching him setup the press, then setup the dies, then show the entire reloading process... you could then use pretty much any single stage or progressive press out there.

Like I said, THESE videos were the primary media for taking the mystery out of reloading for me. That was over 2 years ago and I'm around 40,000 of 9mm reloaded on my own Dillon 550B since.

Skadoosh
09-08-2011, 13:22
I researched a few forums/blogs, read the ABC's. It still seemed "complicated" to me. Then I found this series of videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRZrbv_8kx4
5 of them, at 10 minutes each, for 50 minutes of knowledge.

Yes, this videos are *titled* "how to reload with dillon 550B". Yet he covers so much more than just the press. How to use a scale, a loadbook, how to setup an OAL die, a crimp die, etc. Believe it or not, regardless of which press you use, die setup is similar in all of them.

Watching him setup the press, then setup the dies, then show the entire reloading process... you could then use pretty much any single stage or progressive press out there.

Like I said, THESE videos were the primary media for taking the mystery out of reloading for me. That was over 2 years ago and I'm around 40,000 of 9mm reloaded on my own Dillon 550B since.
I never considered reloading 9mm, don't think it's worth it, how much do you save?

RustyFN
09-08-2011, 13:31
I never considered reloading 9mm, don't think it's worth it, how much do you save?

With bought bullets it cost me around $70 per 1,000 rounds and with my cast bullets it cost me around $25 per 1,000 rounds.

EL_NinO619
09-08-2011, 13:42
Self-taught. A lot of reading on the internet and just lurking in forums like this. Then pulled the trigger on a LEE SS kit and toke my time with every step of the process. My advice if you need it that is. Spend as much time listening learning and figuring out what equipment "YOU" need. And then invest in solid equiment the first time so you will not regret the purchase, but that does not mean you need a LnL or Dillon right away. Mainly watch your bargin shopping on all the little stuff like scale, tumblers, calipers etc. There is a lot of crap out there and a lot of stuff you don't need.

Boxerglocker
09-08-2011, 13:44
I never considered reloading 9mm, don't think it's worth it, how much do you save?

About $80 a thousand for my moly lead reloads and $110 for fmj. I can load 500 easily within 30 minutes on the Dillon XL650.

Skadoosh
09-08-2011, 14:06
About $80 a thousand for my moly lead reloads and $110 for fmj. I can load 500 easily within 30 minutes on the Dillon XL650.
:wow:

Boxerglocker
09-08-2011, 14:27
:wow:

Yeah, you can save in any caliber even 9mm. The "my time isn't worth it" arguement is negated by the investment in tooling. The 650 cost me roughly $1000.... I load 2K a month at $150 savings a K over buying factory and the press is paid off in 6-7 months.

Beanie-Bean
09-08-2011, 15:03
Started with the help of the good folks from this forum. Still cutting my teeth, and am reading up as much as I can, watching videos, scanning the forums...

I hope that you're having fun!

Colorado4Wheel
09-08-2011, 15:31
I just pay for Primers and Powder. It's about $3.00 per hundred at this point. Jack, Wisky and the others who cast their own are in the same boat. So yeah, it's worth it.

2TheRange
09-08-2011, 15:41
I started with online reading, youtube, Speer #13 manual and a Lee Classic turret. I've only had it for a few months and already wish I'd bought a Dillon 550B or Hornady Lock 'n Load.

It's fine, it's a hell of a lot of fun, but I'd like more production for the effort and time it takes. What I read online was, "if you don't shoot hundreds of rounds a week, you don't need a progressive." I don't shoot much at all compared to so many here but I've found now that the time I do have to spend reloading I would like to see more ammo ready when I'm done.

I've had a couple of days where I could've sneaked away to the range but didn't have any ammo loaded.

Colorado4Wheel
09-08-2011, 15:51
You will still be Glad you have the LCT, so don't get rid of it. It allows you to learn at a reasonable and safe pace. You should only have $200 invested in it and that is not a lot when it will allow you to do other tasks you may not want to do on a Progressive. I just got a LCT to pair up with my 650. I load 10mm and .380 on it. Yes, it's slow, especially compared to the 650 with the casefeeder. But it's faster then a SS and very cheap to load your seldom used calibers on.

IndyGunFreak
09-08-2011, 16:01
Yeah, you can save in any caliber even 9mm. The "my time isn't worth it" arguement is negated by the investment in tooling. The 650 cost me roughly $1000.... I load 2K a month at $150 savings a K over buying factory and the press is paid off in 6-7 months.

:agree:

If you don't want to make such a heavy investment to start, the LCT will get you rolling for under $400, and will get you in the 175-250rds per hour range. Personally, I agree w/ Steve on this, the LCT is the best press to learn on. It will allow you to go slow to learn, and when you've got the hang of things, you can speed it up quite a bit. It's a very versatile press.

The LCT is a great press for those "low volume" calibers that we all have, even when you move on to a faster(and more expensive) progressive press.

IGF

Steve Koski
09-08-2011, 16:16
Looking back on when I
Was a little nappy headed boy
Then my only worry
Was for Christmas what would be my toy
Even though we sometimes
Would not get a thing
We were happy with the
Joy the day would bring

Sneaking out the back door
To hang out with those hoodlum friends of mine
Greeted at the back door
With boy thought I told you not to go outside
Tryin' your best to bring the
Water to your eyes
Thinkin' it might stop her
From woopin' your behind

njl
09-08-2011, 18:08
Yeah, you can save in any caliber even 9mm. The "my time isn't worth it" arguement is negated by the investment in tooling. The 650 cost me roughly $1000.... I load 2K a month at $150 savings a K over buying factory and the press is paid off in 6-7 months.

If I could still buy 115gr Blazer for $92/1000 (plus shipping), reloading 9mm would be questionable...but it seems those days are long gone. Commercial 9mm seems to be at least $10/50 now, and I can load exactly what I want for about half that.

2TheRange
09-08-2011, 18:33
You will still be Glad you have the LCT, so don't get rid of it. It allows you to learn at a reasonable and safe pace. You should only have $200 invested in it and that is not a lot when it will allow you to do other tasks you may not want to do on a Progressive. I just got a LCT to pair up with my 650. I load 10mm and .380 on it. Yes, it's slow, especially compared to the 650 with the casefeeder. But it's faster then a SS and very cheap to load your seldom used calibers on.

Good points. It did allow me to learn and go slow at first, I forgot about that and I can see how the progressive would be a challenge just starting out. Also it is a very fine press for the money. It's funny how you obsess over the money when you are calculating buying but could care less after you are past that and reloading.

Also I do want to get a rife and get into reloading for that and as you say it's a perfect step up from the SS. Still allowing you to experience that slow meticulous process to try for the perfect load but being quite a few steps easier than a SS.

Colorado4Wheel
09-08-2011, 19:07
It's funny how you obsess over the money when you are calculating buying but could care less after you are past that and reloading.

And when you start actually buying the progressive it will start all over again. You will sweat over the price difference between the 650 and the LnL and the 550. It will be agonizing. Enjoy.

GioaJack
09-08-2011, 19:30
And when you start actually buying the progressive it will start all over again. You will sweet over the price difference between the 650 and the LnL and the 550. It will be agonizing. Enjoy.


While you're eating all those sweets don't forget to agonize over what press you'll get next.

(HA! I quoted it so you couldn't go back and edit then claim you never screwed up. :supergrin:)


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
09-08-2011, 19:36
I screw up all the time. Now it's time to hack the forum and fix this thing.

fredj338
09-09-2011, 00:59
BG must pull the handle way faster than I do. I can comfortably do 650-700rds/hr on my 650, 450 on my 550 sustained (not for 100rds in 7min).:whistling:

fredj338
09-09-2011, 00:59
I never considered reloading 9mm, don't think it's worth it, how much do you save?

Most will tell you, buy in bulk, you save about 1/2 of cheap factory 9mm. Worth it, if you shoot a lot it is.:rock: Yep, get into casting & you are shooting 9mm for less than 22lr if yo ucan get free or cheap alloy.

JayPap
09-09-2011, 14:52
Older shooter friend from work taught me and another co-worker in his garage.

He liked to toss a few back while teaching us.

For quality control we bought our own stuff and never looked back.

I joined Glocktalk in it's early years because it had the best reloading advice on the web.

Bren
09-09-2011, 14:59
Hey yall, new to this part of GT i dont reload, dont know how, or anybody that does. Did any of you guys teach your selves out of a book? is it hard to learn?

Yes. I bought the Lee manual and read a little about it, then I bought the Lee single stage package with all the stuff to reload and reloaded a little with it. Single stage is a good way to learn.

Later I got a Dillion 550B and a Lee turret press, but they all are better for different purposes, so if I was going to load up some rifle ammunition for hunting or competition, I'd still go back to that original single-stage press. They are all mounted side by side on my bench.

ursoboostd
09-09-2011, 17:32
I was at a mom and pops shooting range. The RO had a Rock Chucker mounted to a desk. I started asking questions and I was hooked before I walked out the door that day.

I bought and read ABC's of Reloading as advised by the nice guys here at GTR. I learned mostly on my own by trial/error and help from this forum. I started with a LCT and now I also have a Dillon 650. I learn something about reloading every time I turn around. -Wade-

Boxerglocker
09-09-2011, 17:41
BG must pull the handle way faster than I do. I can comfortably do 650-700rds/hr on my 650, 450 on my 550 sustained (not for 100rds in 7min).:whistling:

500 rounds in 30 minutes is 3.6 seconds each pull.... if you count it out in your head... one thousand one, one thousand two... it's actually a very comfortable pace. I have 5-6 primer tubes preloaded and a bin of previously deprimed and sized brass standing by just in case a crimped piece of brass gets past me into the second station. That's a easy switch and go one.

sancho13
09-09-2011, 17:54
My wife got me the lee anniversary kit one year for christmas. I never once said I wanted to reload or did it even cross my mind to reload....now im hooked. She also bought me a mr. beer kit years ago and I now have thousands of dollars in brewing equipment that I brew with when Im not reloading. A few months ago she bought me a cigar rolling kit with the moulds and a how to video for my birthday...yeah the ATF loves me

njl
09-09-2011, 18:39
I got tired of waiting for Jack to either die or be sent off to a nursing home (so I could inherit one of his presses) and went ahead and bought a RL550B via Brian Enos's web store a couple years ago. I bought and watched Dillon's video as well as some youtube videos. I read the relevant portions of the Speer #14 manual...and then I started making my own ammo.

PCJim
09-09-2011, 20:28
My wife got me the lee anniversary kit one year for christmas. I never once said I wanted to reload or did it even cross my mind to reload....now im hooked. She also bought me a mr. beer kit years ago and I now have thousands of dollars in brewing equipment that I brew with when Im not reloading. A few months ago she bought me a cigar rolling kit with the moulds and a how to video for my birthday...yeah the ATF loves me

If she's smart, she'll next be giving you a lapidary kit. :supergrin:

PCJim
09-09-2011, 20:33
I started out when I acquired some reloading equipment and books from the estate of a relative. Having just acquired an Ithica .243 and wanting to make my own deer loads, I studied those early Speer reloading manuals (8, 9 & 10) until I felt comfortable giving it a try. I found a RCBS RS2 beginner's kit at a local retailer and made my first rifle rounds. Very shortly after that came the 38s & 357s. That was almost thirty years ago.

Self taught, no mentors. Just very careful reading and no excessively hot loads.

Colorado4Wheel
09-09-2011, 20:41
A mentor can be a false comfort. Your trusting them with your life and well being. In the end, it's all on you if things go bad. Be sure you know what your doing. It's not that hard but some people think it's fine to take bigger risks then I would ever take. None of it is that hard. Just start easy and go slow.

G36_Me
09-09-2011, 22:42
Ron59, thanks for the link to the videos. Just watched them.

How did I get started? 35 years ago bought a RCBS single stage press. Used it for years. Put is away for 20 years as the kids were growing up (no time or money). Broke it out a few years ago and started all over again. Learned everything from the books that came in the RCBS Jr kit. Started out loading .38 Special.

Years later here I'm still using a Red single stage press and having a blast. Haven't gone to a progressive as now that I have the time I don't know what I'd do if I loaded too quickly. Back to the videos... I might give progressive some consideration.

Today I load tons of .45 ACP and 9mm Luger, don't load much .38 Spl since I don't shoot those guns much.

My advice if you're going to start and are a bit concerned, start with a single stage press. It's fun, less complicated and will keep you off the street.

Bello
09-10-2011, 11:07
i learned a lot here first then went out and spent thousands lol

rcd567
09-10-2011, 13:55
Taught myself about 35 years ago. Learned mostly from reading. If I remember correctly there were a couple magazines of the day that ran special editions on reloading. Bought a used RCBS press that I still use today. Wish I had a dollar for every round I've reloaded since those days. I'd be a rich man.

oneofthose
09-10-2011, 18:53
I started reading everything I could get my hands on, and asking questions at the gun club I belonged to at the time. I learned a lot reading this forum and posting questions here too. Ultimately, One of the old timers' at the club came over and helped me set up and walked me through it all.