having problem loading 223 [Archive] - Glock Talk

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sigman69
09-11-2011, 09:08
Hello, l have loaded thousands of handgun ammo but never any rifle so I took the jump and started. I am having an issue though, the ammo is chambering in my STAG AR-15 but when I go to eject the live round by pulling the charging handle the live round is stuck in the gun....like really stuck to have to bang out the round...but feeds fine into the chamber. I did load about 35 rounds prior to this and they all functioned and fired in gun. Here is my setup

Lee turret press
lee 223 dies with FCD die
lyman case length gauge
mixed brass-military and commerical(mainly federal and remington)

all the cases are falling freely in the lyman case length gauge BUT on alot of the brass the rim is slightly above the hole...not fitting flush like the factory remington or hornady ammo i have. I have adjusted the dies per lee's instructions making sure the resizing die touches the shellholder, cases have been trimmed, although I noticed that some of the brass is shorter than others when dropping in lyman case gauge. I have adjusted up and down the resizing die to no luck on the cases that stick out slightly on the case length gauge.

I did order some SB dies 223 dies to see if this helps.
\
I am at a loss of why this is happening.

Please no crap about a lee turret press I just having shot enough for a blue setup yet...and I get dealer cost on hornady and lee stuff.


thanks,

ron59
09-11-2011, 09:14
I've never reloaded rifle, but sounds like your OAL too long?

XDRoX
09-11-2011, 09:21
You need to lower the sizing die even lower. And then lower some more. It should be making slight contact with the shell holder when a case is being sized, not just when there is no case inserted.

If that doesn't work, I'd chalk it up to bad brass or a bad die. Interesting to see of your new dies fix the problem.

Where did you get the brass? Is it once fired from your rifle? If it's from your rifle and you have your die as low as it will go, then I'd have to assume bad brass that's not behaving like it should be.

EDIT
Just reread and see that it's used brass not from your rifle. This is probably the problem. High pressured brass shot in guns with huge chambers and now you're not being able to completely get the cases back to spec.

Welcome to the wonderful world of reloading 223 :supergrin:

ColoCG
09-11-2011, 09:24
Either your bullets are seated to long and sticking in the rifleing, or if you are crimping them you are applying too much crimp which would cause the round to stick in the chamber.
Your gun could have an extra tight chamber and require a small base die.
I don't require a small base die in my AR15 and I also don't crimp the rounds.

You didn't mention what your col. is and whether you are crimping or not. This info could be helpfull to determin your problem.

Zombie Steve
09-11-2011, 09:25
I'm guessing you aren't pushing that shoulder back enough when resizing. I second the motion on lowering the sizing die. I'm unfamiliar with Lee dies, but on my rcbs dies, I screw the die in until it touches the shellplate, then lower the ram and screw the die in another 1/8 - 1/4 turn. The press cams over.

Zombie Steve
09-11-2011, 09:28
Either your bullets are seated to long and sticking in the rifleing, or if you are crimping them you are applying too much crimp which would cause the round to stick in the chamber.
Your gun could have an extra tight chamber and require a small base die.
I don't require a small base die in my AR15 and I also don't crimp the rounds.

You didn't mention what your col. is and whether you are crimping or not. This info could be helpfull to determin your problem.

Could be either of these as well... when I started loading .223, I'd crimp into a cannelure, and usually take things too far which would push the shoulder too much and cause a slight flare in the brass where the shoulder starts. They still fired, but who knows. :dunno:

Pics might help too.

chris in va
09-11-2011, 09:31
Trimming your cases? Made a dummy round yet? Does your lee die set have a full length sizing die, not just the collet die?

XDRoX
09-11-2011, 09:32
Also, go size some brass and see how they case gauge before any of the other steps. This will allow you to pinpoint the issue. My guess is that some of your resized brass will not case gauge.

ColoCG
09-11-2011, 09:33
Could be either of these as well... when I started loading .223, I'd crimp into a cannelure, and usually take things too far which would push the shoulder too much and cause a slight flare in the brass where the shoulder starts. They still fired, but who knows. :dunno:

Pics might help too.


Yeah, could be his adjusment on his seating die, like you and xdrox said too.

Zombie Steve
09-11-2011, 09:37
Please no crap about a lee turret press I just having shot enough for a blue setup yet...and I get dealer cost on hornady and lee stuff.


thanks,


I don't think anyone really cares. We just like ribbing each other.



I will bust on the FCD a little. :whistling:

And by the way...





























http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x214/sbecht/1976_ford_fiesta-pic-46743-1.jpg

:tongueout:

Boxerglocker
09-11-2011, 09:41
You need to lower the sizing die even lower. And then lower some more. It should be making slight contact with the shell holder when a case is being sized, not just when there is no case inserted.

If that doesn't work, I'd chalk it up to bad brass or a bad die. Interesting to see of your new dies fix the problem.

Where did you get the brass? Is it once fired from your rifle? If it's from your rifle and you have your die as low as it will go, then I'd have to assume bad brass that's not behaving like it should be.

EDIT
Just reread and see that it's used brass not from your rifle. This is probably the problem. High pressured brass shot in guns with huge chambers and now you're not being able to completely get the cases back to spec.

Welcome to the wonderful world of reloading 223 :supergrin:

:agree: Assuming you using a FL sizing die. If the rim of the case is not flush after sizing it's that the shoulder isn't pushed back far enough. You'll need to lower your sizing die so it just touches the shell plate and back it off quarter to half a turn. You should be able to use that Lyman case gauge to set your shoulder setback???? :dunno: I know the Dillons have machined ranges machined in, it's the one I use.

sigman69
09-11-2011, 09:58
http://www.lymanproducts.com/lyman/case-prep/rifle-headspace-gauges.php

here is what I am using on the resized cases to make sure that they seat correctly....ALL the cases drop in but the rim of the case sticks out slightly.

I do trim the cases,,in fact some of the cases are shortend too much I believe.

Thanks everyone for your input.

I have screwed down the resizing die almost all the way and then adjusted where I turn the die about 1/2 past where the shellholder and die touch.

sigman69
09-11-2011, 10:01
OAL is matches what is in hornady and hodgdon reloading manuals

ColoCG
09-11-2011, 10:19
OAL is matches what is in hornady and hodgdon reloading manuals


The OAL in those manuals is the Max OAL and may not be applicable to the bullet you are using. The .223 max case length is 1.760" and should be trimmed to 1.750". It won't hurt if it is slightly less. What weight and bullet type are you using? If your cases are not seating flush in the headspace gauge either you are not full length sizing enough or you might have burr's on the rim of the brass.

sigman69
09-11-2011, 10:59
[QUOTEWhat weight and bullet type are you using?[/QUOTE]

55gr remington fmj
federal primers

ColoCG
09-11-2011, 11:19
[QUOTEWhat weight and bullet type are you using?

55gr remington fmj
federal primers[/QUOTE]


With that bullet at a oal of 2.200" to 2.220" you shouldn't have a problem with length in your Stag, I think that has a Nato chamber.

I would still try to lower you sizing die a little more until your cases sit flush in your case gauge.

And make sure you aren't putting an excessive crimp with your FCD, this can cause bulging in the neck and shoulder area. (doubtful)

PCJim
09-11-2011, 11:47
I took a moment to read the instructions for your case gauge. It is a two step gauge, like most rifle gauges. If your rim is sticking outside the upper step, you are not setting your shoulder back far enough, and need to run your die deeper in the press. If you are already camming over, you may have a bad FL die.

One other thought... Have you magnet tested your brass to make sure it IS brass and not plated steel? If steel, the cases will not respond to the die the same way brass does, and could be a contributing source of the problem.

BENCH
09-12-2011, 16:51
I took a moment to read the instructions for your case gauge. It is a two step gauge, like most rifle gauges. If your rim is sticking outside the upper step, you are not setting your shoulder back far enough, and need to run your die deeper in the press. If you are already camming over, you may have a bad FL die.

One other thought... Have you magnet tested your brass to make sure it IS brass and not plated steel? If steel, the cases will not respond to the die the same way brass does, and could be a contributing source of the problem.


interesting, didn't know that.

blind noodle
09-12-2011, 23:00
I had this same exact problem with a .223.

I had once fired brass that was fired through a rifle with a much very loose chamber. FL resizing doesn't get the last 1/4 inch of the case, and in my case that was enough to not allow the rounds to feed properly.

If the once fired brass you're shooting is Lake City then there is a great chance it went through a machine gun with a loose chamber.

Boxerglocker
09-12-2011, 23:56
I had this same exact problem with a .223.

I had once fired brass that was fired through a rifle with a much very loose chamber. FL resizing doesn't get the last 1/4 inch of the case, and in my case that was enough to not allow the rounds to feed properly.

If the once fired brass you're shooting is Lake City then there is a great chance it went through a machine gun with a loose chamber.

Is you rifle a Mil-Spec or match chamber? That makes a difference, otherwise in most cases many will find that it's their dies not correctly set up. All I have loaded is once fired military, use a Dillon case gauge with standard Dillon dies. I have had an issue yet in my Mil-Spec Daniel Defense M4.

squirreld
09-13-2011, 19:07
Good advice listed above. My vote, excessive headspace, or said another way, resizer is not adjusted right.
In order to get a feel "by the numbers" of where to set your resizer, you need some cartridge headspace gauges.

For semi's, a good .003" shoulder setback is sufficient. As mentioned above, machine tolerance's will come into play. I have mine set to .005" setback. Some come out at .008", others at .002". Good enough.

I have the hornady headspace kit.

As boxer mentioned, mil spec chambers don't need a SB die. Tighter chambers usually do.