How do you fight job burnout/ dept. burnout [Archive] - Glock Talk

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BIGGUNS911
09-13-2011, 10:54
I am into my 8Th year with the same department and I am finding it harder and harder to have a good outlook regarding my job. I am involved in training and other things in the department. I am hard worker and do my job well but all of that is not doing it for me. It seems like every week we have some new rule or regulation or problem that we get the shotgun effect to solve it. At one point I was with the administration and believed they were doing their best. Now Iím not a positive about that.

I no longer like going to work and I hate that. I love my job and want to improve my department and community but I found each time I attempt to improve something I get kicked in the face. I have to work extra hard to get things done and got not respect or credit once it is done. A simple thanks would make things a lot better but those seem to hard for the administration to give out.

So what do you all do when you get into a funk and need help pulling out of it?

DaBigBR
09-13-2011, 11:08
There is something to be said about loving what you do and hating where you do it.

I just completed my eighth year. The last year has been the only bad one, and the next one looks to be much worse. The biggest lesson that I've learned in the last twelve months is that you get the exact same check whether you work your ass off or don't get off of it. It's the guys that work their asses off that attract the most attention.

Last winter I took two weeks off, which ended up getting me something like 18 consecutive days with no work. The girlfriend and I drove across the country. No work phone calls, no work email, nothing. It was awesome. Looking forward to doing it again.

Hoser423
09-13-2011, 11:32
Do you want the good news first, or the bad news ?

Good news- Lots of guys will post lots of solid tips, based on what's helped them. Learn from guys who have been through it. It does get better. Focus on the people you can help in the job and focus on what helps you...

Bad news- Sometimes you just have to ride it out, and I'm not sure any one thing will fix the burnout. I'm there now/again/still.

Ajon412
09-13-2011, 11:35
Welcome to the club.....I decided a long time ago that I was not going to let ANYONE, ANYBODY OR ANYTHING take away my enthusiasm for doing my job, PERIOD !!!! Now with that being said, it sounds like you need a change of scenery. Take some time off to get a different perspective on things. If you can, try not to think about "the job" too much when you're off (notice I said "try"...:rofl:.). Trust me, it can be done as DaBigBR mentioned...

Now, as far as trying to improve your department, that's another problem.......As long as you've made an conscientious effort to make a difference and/or positive changes, at least you can say that you've tried, as oppose to just sitting on the sidelines and complaining about issues. Persistence sometimes pays off, but on the other hand, it may not. It all depends on how strongly you feel about the changes you'd like to make and how much you're willing to sacrifice to make them. It also sounds like you may have a leadership problem at your department (most do)..That, I'm afraid, has to change at the top. Remember, you may not have control over how things are done at your department, but you do have control on how you deal with it. I hope this helps....:wavey:

fastbolt
09-13-2011, 12:03
Might be any number of influences going on at the same time ...

Things like your age relative to the age of the admin/exec staff, for one thing.

"Improving your dept & community", huh? Laudable. Commendable, even. That your own vision statement? ;)

Yours may be just one opinion, though, and not necessarily the one that's responsible for steering the ship over the long course of its voyage.

Your agency have a peer counselor program? It might be handy to speak with someone about things that are bugging you before they have an adverse effect upon your work.

I remember being told (in an early in-service training/psych profile class) that making it past the critical 5 year point was just the first potential "crisis" point, and that the next one came along somewhere around almost 10 years on the job ... and then about every 5 years thereafter. Maybe so. It certainly seemed that some burnout could be seen making its appearance in cycles among folks I knew in the job over time, myself included.

It's also not uncommon to hear some younger folks who are expressing job dissatisfaction point out how they work so hard (and even so much harder than their peers) and would like some credit for their efforts. Some also claim others receive more credit for less effort. Well, if you got into this line of work for the accolades and positive feedback, you may not have read the job description all the way to the end. ;)

There's some wisdom in the old saying to "work smarter, not harder", even (especially) in police work.

I remember looking back at the frustrations of my first 8-10 year period after I'd reached my 15+ year point. Very little of what I looked back upon seemed like it had been worth my time to get worked up about and become frustrated.

Then again, at the 25 year point I found myself looking back at the previous 10 years and again wondering why I'd gotten annoyed and bothered by some of the things I'd let cause me some frustration (which really only came to my attention when listening to the complaints of some less senior folks who had finally reached the 15+ year point in their careers).

I decided to pull the plug on my career shy of the 30 year point, myself. I still felt good about things and everything I'd accomplished and contributed to my agency, but it was time to return more attention to my family and decide how I wanted to spend the rest of my life.

Besides, I'd reached that age and time in-service where I was seeing increasingly more instances of folks who worked long past the time they were fully vested in their retirement, but continued to work and in many instances had become embittered people, compared to a growing number of folks I knew who had retired and were really enjoying themselves. A surprising number of folks from this second group seemingly looked and acted years younger than I'd remembered seeing when they were still working, too. I wanted to join that group. I didn't want to become an embittered 30, 35, 40 or 45 year veteran who finally took resentments off into retirement.

Our careers pass more quickly than we might suspect.

Now, I did some paid consulting and some volunteer work after I retired, but only because it was convenient and was asked of me. It didn't take long for the paid consulting to become a bit tiresome, but I found it was satisfying to continue volunteering from time to time with some training issues. I was happier than I'd been before retirement, too.

Sure, look for ways to help improve your dept and the quality of service you help provide to your community, but don't think it's your job to do so alone, or even to define the vision for how those goals are going to be best accomplished. Pull with the dept, not against it. Everybody will benefit. Don't let work environment frustrations take years off your life. Don't let them follow you home, either.

It really is just a job, you know, as much as we like to throw around words like career, profession, calling, etc. ;)

You going to be one of those folks who define themselves by their career choice and path, or as the person you are outside of your employment?

collim1
09-13-2011, 13:27
After all these years I think I have figured it out. You must be really lousy at your job, then you are a sure thing for a promotion. Being really stupid and not having any education helps. Then you must take out all of you frustration caused by your own inadequacies on everyone else, especially college educated officers cause we all know a college education doesn't help with anything. You must also develop a condition where the word "yes" is your only response to anything. Eventually though, you will get a top notch online "Master's Degree" in Public Relations, then you will be unstoppable.

nikerret
09-13-2011, 14:03
When you figue it out, let me know. I'll keep reading and trying things until something works.

Our new mandate is to drive around. Stop arresting people and drive around.

The Dept. I work for has always had issues, they all do. When I got here, all the major issues were started by three of the "leaders". Now, all the major issues are the same three "leaders" plus a few of the profession fellating dbags they have recruited.

Out of tweny-some full-time LEO's, I know of eight who are looking for other places to work just to get away from the crap-storm here. This includes our entire detective staff and one of the shift "leaders" (of course, the only one I have any respect for).

If anone is interested in readng about some specific examples of our level of excellence, I would love to type out some examples. I doubt anyone would believe some of them actually happened as posted.

Ajon412
09-13-2011, 14:12
When you figue it out, let me know. I'll keep reading and trying things until something works.

Our new mandate is to drive around. Stop arresting people and drive around.

The Dept. I work for has always had issues, they all do. When I got here, all the major issues were started by three of the "leaders". Now, all the major issues are the same three "leaders" plus a few of the profession fellating dbags they have recruited.

Out of tweny-some full-time LEO's, I know of eight who are looking for other places to work just to get away from the crap-storm here. This includes our entire detective staff and one of the shift "leaders" (of course, the only one I have any respect for).

If anone is interested in readng about some specific examples of our level of excellence, I would love to type out some examples. I doubt anyone would believe some of them actually happened as posted.

:rofl::rofl:.....Oh, do tell.....

ashtxsniper
09-13-2011, 14:19
Fighting burnout now. Vacation didnt help, wished I could find a way to get rid of it.

cowboywannabe
09-13-2011, 14:32
for most its impossible to do anything other than ride it out. the reason being that most are at smaller agencies that do not have room for lateral changes to break up the monotany(sp?) of what ever rut youre in.

low pay, poor benefits, inadequate manpower, and so on doesnt give one much to look forward to when they come in to work.

busting your hump only to get beat down by the system doesnt help either when you see sloths promoted or moved into easy jobs while youre still on rotating shifts with weekends and holidays.....


all i can say is do it for your kids, they count on you.

if you dont have kids, leave the dept. youre at and go to another that offers you more.
you cant love a job that doesnt love you back.

trdvet
09-13-2011, 15:23
Become a ROD.
Quit.
Transfer to a new division.
Suck it up and continue to be miserable.

Good luck to you, we've all been there.

Vigilant
09-13-2011, 15:48
Don't laugh too hard. North Carolina Department of Correction is hiring. Some camps are better than others. Different people like different custody levels. But stick the first couple years out, make Sergeant or get into Programs, and it's a pretty good way to go IMO. Kind of like being on the opposite side of the same coin as LE. The pay is not as good, but compared to some of the horror stories I have read here about benefits and job security, it starts to look a whole lot better.

Might be worth a thought, especially for someone who is about to hang it up, but can't imagine doing anything else.

CJStudent
09-13-2011, 16:04
Don't laugh too hard. North Carolina Department of Correction is hiring. Some camps are better than others. Different people like different custody levels. But stick the first couple years out, make Sergeant or get into Programs, and it's a pretty good way to go IMO. Kind of like being on the opposite side of the same coin as LE. The pay is not as good, but compared to some of the horror stories I have read here about benefits and job security, it starts to look a whole lot better.

Might be worth a thought, especially for someone who is about to hang it up, but can't imagine doing anything else.

So is BOP, for that matter. We have a lot of former local cops where I work at.

pal2511
09-13-2011, 16:30
Ive been at this local SMALL agency for about 3 years. Some days I am burned out. Worked at my first agency in MO for a little over 5 years and it was a large agency with many positions but I stuck with the same one. Now I am looking at basically 9 years on the job in October if you don't count my little break I had in between MO and KS.

Lately I have been burned out bickering with the bosses. I wanted to change things when I first started because it appeared things were ass backwards. Some of the people at my department appeared to be lazy and not too functional and some of those are downright dangerous. I tell myself though I have 30 second commute to work. I get to take as many breaks as I want and I don't get *****ed at for taking a hour lunch or 5 minute lunch. I don't get told to write tickets or not to write tickets and no one looks at how many arrests I have done.

For the last couple weeks I have told myself also I get paid the same rather I work my butt off or not. Hell if i don't do much besides the minimum I stay out of managements hair. Do what you can during your shift and remember you have to go home and live with yourself. As long as your doing something good for the community and yourself than you will be fine

pal2511
09-13-2011, 16:31
Also take a long vacation away from work and out of town if possible.

:) I try to take a 3 or 4 day vacation every few months rather than one huge one a year.

DaBigBR
09-13-2011, 18:12
And remember this: somebody always has it worse. There are a lot of unemployed and underemployed cops out there these days...and most of them would take your job if they could, and nobody would miss you if you were gone.

packsaddle
09-13-2011, 20:59
had a retired big city cop once tell me that the city breeds insanity.

i'm partial to the rural SO anyway.

good balance of calls/no calls.

no micromanagement from the brass (if there is any brass).

if things get crazy or stupid i can just take a drive through the scenic countryside to clear my mind.

gazing at the abundant wildlife and/or stars in the sky has a therapeutic effect.

yes, the pay is low and yes there are always one or two idiots in the department but those things are to be expected.

country folks are generally friendly and will wave to you most of the time while driving down the country roads.

there's just something about having coffee in the morning with a bunch of farmers/ranchers in a small town cafe that helps bring everything into proper perspective.

maybe a change of scenery is all you need.

COLOSHOOTR
09-14-2011, 02:25
It's best to look at it the way all the old timers with 20 plus years end up looking at it.... Just say, "F it I don't care."

Believe me I work for one of the worst Departments you can work for right now. No training, no movement, poor staffing, no equipment budget, crappy cars, horrible MDT software that makes reports take hours and the media here hates us. We also have a command staff that really does not care about us, only cares about stats, and will not defend us even if our actions were within policy.....

The problem is I make pretty good money and will end up taking a pretty good pay cut to go anywhere else. At first it was driving me crazy and I was ticked off wanting to leave. Then listened to the senior guys and learned to just go with the flow, handle my calls and not work my tail off increasing my chances of getting hurt. You get paid the same if you go hit it and haul in 10 BG's or if you take your time, handle your calls and do a few reports.

scottydl
09-14-2011, 07:37
I am feeling really thankful about my situation right NOW... but less than a year ago (and for several years before that) I was in your situation, and quite disgruntled with my agency at the time.

My solution was to quit and go somewhere else. Granted, that was a long process and only happened after a lot of contemplation, praying, and discussions with my wife (make sure your family is supportive of any move you make). It was scary to make a move after 9 years, at an agency where I had always planned on staying my entire career. But things were only getting worse and I wasn't willing to "go down with the ship" so to speak.

I took a decent pay cut up front, but my wife and I budgeted for it and I will easily make it up (and more) in 3-4 years.

Just do some research and make sure you are considering all your options.

DaBigBR
09-14-2011, 08:55
The other thing that I'll add is that administrations tend to come and go. You'll see several of them if you stick it out long enough. I was told in college that the average tenure for a Chief of Police is four years, and I believe it. So many of these guys jump agencies and so many of them get run out or canned by the city administration that time is on your side. I've been in eight years and am on my second admin and know for a fact that I'll be seeing a new one next year.

BIGGUNS911
09-14-2011, 08:58
Wow, thank you all very much for the helpful advise. I will keep my head up and keep working at it. It makes some of it better to know others are or have been in my same shoes. I am taking a few weeks off at the end of the month and going out of state. It will be great and hopefully after the first week I can have my mind off work and just enjoy my time. Thanks again to everyone for you help!! :wavey:

AngryBassets
09-14-2011, 09:08
If anone is interested in readng about some specific examples of our level of excellence, I would love to type out some examples. I doubt anyone would believe some of them actually happened as posted.

I was off basically all summer, and during that time some...changes were made.

If I didn't have the perspective that almost 18 years as a cop has given me, then I'd be going completely insane. It's amazing how unbelievably out-of-touch, selfish, incompetent and cruel management can affect a department. I honestly would believe what you could type, and no doubt top it.

Sadly, for me, the issues are at my level or above. Fortunately for the grunts, they have it decent right now...oh, other than the fat governor passing a law he said he wouldn't that is basically cutting our take home pay by at least 10-20%.

One must be aware, however, that whatever I'm/we/you are going through is temporary.

While things are bad, do your shift and leave. My issues, hopefully if they play out the way I'm PRAYING they do, will be resolved within 6 months to a year, facilitated by a very small number of retirements.

I could go on all day about burn-out. It's cyclic. I've been through it twice: once, about 8-9 years on, then about 4 years later as a sgt. Now, as a Lt, I see it rearing it's head again, however I'm keep in mind this too, will pass. Oddly enough, each time, it's the result of the "actions" of one creature.

Dragoon44
09-14-2011, 18:00
1. Don't take the job home with you, leave it at the office. The quickest way to burnout is to take the job home and fret over slights or injustices.

2. If you have been on the job more than a few years you should know by now that the world isn't fair. expecting it to be is just going to lead to continued disappointment and dissatisfaction.

3. Just do you job and don't worry about how others ( particularly admins) do theirs.

Anyone that takes the job home with them and frets over things will eventually become "that guy" the sniveling, whining, malcontent.

Learn to separate your professional life from your personal life, Don't bring the office home. That was one rule that was iron clad for me. it did frustrate my wife some as I would not talk about the job at home PERIOD.

Don't hang out or have grip sessions with the guys that are burned out, they will only drag you down.

Hack
09-14-2011, 20:40
So is BOP, for that matter. We have a lot of former local cops where I work at.

Cops, military, other correctional agencies, and any combination of those. Few come in on degree alone where I am at.

lwt210
09-15-2011, 12:33
Believe me I work for one of the worst Departments you can work for right now. No training, no movement, poor staffing, no equipment budget, crappy cars, horrible MDT software that makes reports take hours and the media here hates us. We also have a command staff that really does not care about us, only cares about stats, and will not defend us even if our actions were within policy.....

.

I thought that was police work in general now?

merlynusn
09-15-2011, 12:45
The other thing that I'll add is that administrations tend to come and go. You'll see several of them if you stick it out long enough. I was told in college that the average tenure for a Chief of Police is four years, and I believe it. So many of these guys jump agencies and so many of them get run out or canned by the city administration that time is on your side. I've been in eight years and am on my second admin and know for a fact that I'll be seeing a new one next year.

The only problem with that is that even though the Chief may leave, all the "wonderful" people he promoted are still there for many more years to come.

shootindave
09-15-2011, 12:47
http://thepintglass.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/beer-friend.gif

JBaird22
09-17-2011, 22:06
I've been in nearing 10 years (it'll be 10 in February). I still love being a cop, I'm still proud when I am able to help a new guy get his feet under him and learn the right way to be a cop and I love working with the new guys that are hard chargers.

With that said, I can honestly say that I hate my job. I took a promotion last year and while I am a great leader, I hate being a supervisor. I hate the politics. I hate the false friendships and all the backstabbing and buddy f-ing that goes with it. I would give my right arm to be a slick sleeve again. Soon there could be a 3 stripe position opening up. Guess who won't take it and has two thumbs? This guy. I've decided for other reasons to look for a slick sleeve job somewhere else. Admins do come and go.

Find a new guy and watch them do the job. Think back about all the things that made you enjoy coming to work when you were new. I have one new guy on my shift that has a blue flame shooting from his backside and it is truly inspiring. Not to the other slugs on his shift but to me. For me though, its time to get out of my current work place as I have gone as far as I wish to go and the only way for a different change of scenery is to go up in rank and that's not me.

Good luck fighting the burnout. Someone else suggested not talking to guys that are burnt out. I'd second that. It brings you way down.

cowboywannabe
09-17-2011, 22:38
1. Don't take the job home with you, leave it at the office. The quickest way to burnout is to take the job home and fret over slights or injustices.

2. If you have been on the job more than a few years you should know by now that the world isn't fair. expecting it to be is just going to lead to continued disappointment and dissatisfaction.

3. Just do you job and don't worry about how others ( particularly admins) do theirs.

Anyone that takes the job home with them and frets over things will eventually become "that guy" the sniveling, whining, malcontent.

Learn to separate your professional life from your personal life, Don't bring the office home. That was one rule that was iron clad for me. it did frustrate my wife some as I would not talk about the job at home PERIOD.

Don't hang out or have grip sessions with the guys that are burned out, they will only drag you down.

this is about the best post for you bro.

jeager
09-17-2011, 22:55
retire as chief and then get hired as interim chief

DoogieHowser
09-18-2011, 04:29
I am the choir. I drag myself in by the collar most days, the best thing is long vacations and as Dragoon said avoid the malcontents at your own dept. I'm sure we all have a 'smiley' as we call ours, the guy who could get a bonus and find some way to make it sound like the end of the world.

4949shooter
09-18-2011, 04:51
Some great advice has been given here.

It sounds like you are too attached to your community to change departments. Fair enough. Switching agencies was never an option for me either.

I agree with the advice of not associating with other burned out guys.

I agree with the advice that "burn out" can sometimes be cyclical. It depends on YOU, being able to pull yourself out of it on your own. You sound like a Type A achiever. It will be hard for the department to "beat down" a guy like yourself.

Switching jobs in the department might be a help. Have you ever considered a stint in the detective bureau?

Sometimes a promotion can bring a guy out of the burn out out phase. But these are usually the types of guys who couldn't bring themselves out of it.

Do you have a hobby? Something you enjoy that can get your mind off things? My hobbies are hunting and shooting..

Unfortunately, hard work does not always get you an attaboy. I have found that some admin types won't give out praise due to various factors, such as jealousy, having their own competence (or lack of same) being threatened by someone such as yourself, lack of leadership, etc. You do the job to the best of your ability because that's the type of cop YOU are.

In the end, it's about how you can look at yourself in the mirror every day. Your colleages, as well as the people in your community, will respect you for it.

Hack
09-18-2011, 04:52
I am the choir. I drag myself in by the collar most days, the best thing is long vacations and as Dragoon said avoid the malcontents at your own dept. I'm sure we all have a 'smiley' as we call ours, the guy who could get a bonus and find some way to make it sound like the end of the world.

I am a mix of things when it comes to burn out syndrome. I think I can speak like most people when it comes to this. Sometimes you have those days where that one song runs through your mind: "Mama said, 'That there'll be days like this ... '. Yet, I keep going. One year between deaths in family and near family on both my wife's side and my own, and just getting tired of putting up with "stoopid", I was taking more personal days than usual. Here lately I get a little knotted up from time to time but manage to come out of it al right, with God's help. For me that is what it takes, a reliance on God, those whom I get along with OK, and then my supportive family. Church even helps a little bit concerning work, in knowing that even though all of man kind is inherently evil that there is redemption for him if he goes along with God's plan for life.

I also look at how old I am getting, and how close it is to retirement. I have just a little over five years if I want to go a little early. Or, I can hang in for a few more and get my maximum in for myself. Right now it seems making retirement is that one major goal I have left. It helps me to stay motivated to go to work, instead of just piss everything away. And, I still like helping out the new guy, and encouraging him. I get a little charge out of it.

After this career I will have to do something else somewhere. I don't think I will do LE again, unless maybe there is a sheriffs department somewhere that doesn't mind a mature fellow with a lot of experience on a part time basis. I'll have my retirement benefits starting to kick in by then, so I will only work a place for the pay to supplement our travel habit, and add a little to the ultimate retirement package for after I hit the late sixties. Heck, I may just go back to work for the state in a different capacity and boost that retirement check a little.

krathis
09-18-2011, 08:59
I used to think switching departments would solve the problem but really, it amounted to a different circus, but the same clowns. The job really is not what it used to be.
If you're serious about a change, I suggest utilizing your educational reimbursement to get your bachelors (or masters) and put a plan together to move on. If you're not sure if your new gig will work out, maintain a reserve status somewhere so your certification will remain active.

collim1
09-18-2011, 13:01
http://thepintglass.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/beer-friend.gif

Been down that road, only helps for a little while then makes it much worse.

op2k
09-18-2011, 18:23
I'm afraid I will be of little help. I happen to be one of the few at my agency who sees everything with happy glasses.....and we're at a low morale point at my agency now. I've been here for 10 years now, and have seen the good times come and go. I started to feel burned out last year and then I became an FTO. It has re-lit a fire under me being around so many motivated young (and not so young) officers. It also made me realize how lazy some of my co-workers are.

I didn't see if it was suggested but is changing shifts an option? Sometimes a change of scenery shift-wise can change your view. Remember, it's hard to soar like an eagle when your surrounded by turkeys. I vote for riding it out, it'll eventually be worth it.

wprebeck
09-18-2011, 18:58
The other thing that I'll add is that administrations tend to come and go. You'll see several of them if you stick it out long enough. I was told in college that the average tenure for a Chief of Police is four years, and I believe it. So many of these guys jump agencies and so many of them get run out or canned by the city administration that time is on your side. I've been in eight years and am on my second admin and know for a fact that I'll be seeing a new one next year.

Amateur.

11.5 years as of 9/17, and 6 bosses, counting interim directors (two of those). My pre-vacation burnout is upon me, as we speak. My annuals (weget two per year) are in May and November. May is fine, its my anniversary, but November is for hunting. More time in tthe field = more sanity. I just got back in from a dove hunt, got early wood duck from this Wednesday thru Sunday, and crossbow opens for deer/turkey first weekend in October.

Thatscwhat keeps me sane. Timein the woods, away from scum and society in general. I despise people, and can't wait for 3/17/2020.

BIGGUNS911
09-18-2011, 19:25
You all are giving such great advice. I have come to the point in my career that I do not do so well with the BS stuff like I did just a few years back. I fell as if getting kicked down is not cool and is not okay.

The most resent issue I am seeing is the weekly change is rules. Itís does not seem as if one week can go past with out some new rule coming it. I look at it as if one screws up that take care of the one and not have a shotgun effect on all. I am a man and if I am the one that screw something up I would expect to be held accountable for it. I suppose that is not how all look at it but I expect it out of them.

The other issueís I see is making a rule that is contrary to a rule you made at the beginning of the year. In this case it is ticket righting. At the start of the year it was all about numbers, write more tickets. They encouraged us to work the highways and such. County roadways in my area have little traffic. This last week they decided to change this all around and punish us for working the highway. No we are to put an emphasizes on county roadway and stay off the highways. I say what do you want, chose one and stick with it.

It pisses me off to not end right now, I do what they want and I get kicked in the balls. So I have got a bad attitude about it. I will not turn on my radar on the highways. I take county roadways from city to city even it if takes half an hour longer (barring emergency calls). Over the past several days I have not written a ticket, this is way out of the norm for me. At the end of the month when I am called on the low ticket numbers I am going to tell them I have been working county roadway.

I hope my trip this next month will help me get a better view of things but I donít know. But thank you all for you help and it makes me feel much better knowing others have issues like I do.

CodyBoy
09-18-2011, 20:50
Not a LEO but most jobs come with what you're dealing with.

I once asked " Well, I don't understand why it is done this way"


The response from management was "It is not for you to understand"

I wanted to hit the m..... f'er in his mouth, but I refrained.

There are a lot of things I just dont give a damn about anymore. Although it is hard not too.

However the way you deal with it, is what you need to look at.

I still struggle with this daily, but getting better at it.