Would you trust a former drug dealer? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Detectorist
09-14-2011, 09:08
Let me start this out by saying that I think dealers are the scum of the earth. I've always hated them.

Neighbor served 7 years for dealing. Said he could have done 65 years if it wasn't for his Dad selling his house to pay for a $250,000 lawyer. I don't know any more details.

He wants to go into business with me. Construction type of enterprise. he has customers lined up.

I say I could never trust a guy like that.

Glockdude1
09-14-2011, 09:11
No way you can trust him.

I am biased, I work in a federal prison, I don't trust any of them!!!

:cool:

DaBigBR
09-14-2011, 09:14
Nope.

msu_grad_121
09-14-2011, 09:50
Sounds like he didn't learn his lesson so much as just did his time. Granted, he's supposedly "square with the house," but I don't think I could trust him with a business.

Detectorist
09-14-2011, 10:08
yea, you folks just reinforced what I felt. It's a no go.

One other question. Does the prohibition against felons owning firearms also prohibit them from shooting a firearm? I saw this guy a week ago shoot a raccoon with a .22 rifle.

Unistat
09-14-2011, 10:28
Is this a trick question? Of course I wouldn't trust him.

As for the firearm, I believe a felony conviction prohibits one from possessing a firearm, regardless of ownership. I'm not a LEO or lawyer so take it for what it's worth.

Morris
09-14-2011, 10:33
Provided it's a real .22 and not an air rifle.

That being said, you see the big red flags waving furiously? That's me, waving them and it ain't for the bullfight.

Sharky7
09-14-2011, 11:38
You think he is being truthful about the potential of 65 years and even the fact he did 7 years - which means he probably got sentenced to 14-15 years?

If so, you should have nothing to do with this guy and any business with him. The guy had to have some serious priors as well as a big case to get that much time. To get sentenced to that much time for dope means that is not a one time mistake.

Go to the department of corrections website for your state and do an inmate search, it might show what the charge was he was convicted for and any priors he did time for as well. Or if your states attorney office has a case locate function, you might be able to find out there as well.

Nine Shooter
09-14-2011, 11:51
Is this a trick question? Of course I wouldn't trust him.

As for the firearm, I believe a felony conviction prohibits one from possessing a firearm, regardless of ownership. I'm not a LEO or lawyer so take it for what it's worth.

You are correct about possession. They just have to exercise control over it or be able to.

1 old 0311
09-14-2011, 14:31
Hussein, in his book, admits to using AND SELLING drugs. Look how good he turned out:whistling::whistling::whistling:

Sam Spade
09-14-2011, 14:50
Of course you can trust him----to be just what he is.

Re: firearms. A convicted felon who hasn't had his civil rights restored (don't worry, he hasn't) can't touch a firearm or be in control of it in any manner whatsoever. It's not just a prohibition against "ownership".

Blankshooter
09-14-2011, 15:05
So . . . let me get this straight . . . you're asking if someone who has a long standing and federally recorded history of making poor life decisions including putting himself, his family, and those around him at risk could be trusted?

I think you already know that answer.

RocPO
09-14-2011, 15:43
Don't worry.... he's been rehabilitated.




I hope you noted the sarcasm.

DWARREN123
09-14-2011, 16:17
No way would I trust them!

Bruce M
09-14-2011, 17:16
I am not going to be as vehemently negative as the other posters, if for no reason other than I do believe that some can be rehabilitated. That said, my belief is that the true numbers of those rehabilitated are usually measured in single digit percentages. I would not get involved with someoene like this beyond any extent to which I could afford to kiss any money goodbye, or to the extent to which I could afford to have my reputation sullied. (I.E. I might loan him a hammer knowing full well that I probably would not see it again and I might have to testify or explain how my hammer ended up as a weapon.)

michael e
09-14-2011, 17:28
It sounds like you dont really know this person, I would not go into business with someone I dont know.

Detectorist
09-14-2011, 17:34
Of course you can trust him----to be just what he is.

Re: firearms. A convicted felon who hasn't had his civil rights restored (don't worry, he hasn't) can't touch a firearm or be in control of it in any manner whatsoever. It's not just a prohibition against "ownership".

Thanks, Sam. So, I've already witnessed him committing another crime. Doesn't bode well for him.

Glockdude1
09-14-2011, 18:02
Rehabilitated criminals are easy to spot. Just look for the grave marker in the cemetery.

:cool:

Dragoon44
09-14-2011, 18:11
No I would not trust him. And if he has so many people lined up why hasn't he started his own construction business?

More than likely he is still in the drug business or trying to get back in it and wants to use your business as a cover.

Cav
09-14-2011, 18:17
IMHO depends on the person.

I have dealt with a few "criminals" that I could trust. I have dealt with a few officers I could not trust.

If you want to look at peoples past, look at Obama and where he is today. A majority of Americans trusted him, even when he wrote about his drug dealings.

BarrySDCA
09-14-2011, 19:31
Let me start this out by saying that I think dealers are the scum of the earth. I've always hated them.

Neighbor served 7 years for dealing. Said he could have done 65 years if it wasn't for his Dad selling his house to pay for a $250,000 lawyer. I don't know any more details.

He wants to go into business with me. Construction type of enterprise. he has customers lined up.

I say I could never trust a guy like that.

Has he already obtained a contractors license? that would have a lot to do with what I would do. If he is not already licensed then no chance.

PinkoCommie
09-14-2011, 19:49
Would you taste a piece of **** if it told you that it was a strawberry?

Patchman
09-14-2011, 20:03
If he himself admits he could have gotten a 65 year sentence (instead of the 7) but for the expensive mouthpiece, I'd have to wonder how deep he really was into that life. And that money and lifestyle is hard to walk away from.

Sounds like he's just looking for a "legit" frontman and business to launder money.

Hack
09-14-2011, 20:12
yea, you folks just reinforced what I felt. It's a no go.

One other question. Does the prohibition against felons owning firearms also prohibit them from shooting a firearm? I saw this guy a week ago shoot a raccoon with a .22 rifle.

They are not even supposed to be around a loaded cartridge. We have had those come in on that alone, as well as being in the vicinity of a person where he had immediate access. So, if you saw something telling the BATFE might be a start.

Hack
09-14-2011, 20:22
IMHO depends on the person.

I have dealt with a few "criminals" that I could trust. I have dealt with a few officers I could not trust.

If you want to look at peoples past, look at Obama and where he is today. A majority of Americans trusted him, even when he wrote about his drug dealings.

I have to go with this. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who contribute to the recidivism rate by falling into old habits, old tendencies. Therefore is the reason that trust has to be gained over time, over observation of the person, his life habits. I don't even immediately trust people whom I don't know whether they are former inmates are not, which mean I subscribe to a universal code of not trusting people until I know them, their history, and then maybe I will begin to trust them.

There are inmates who actually make life decisions while incarcerated concerning becoming a Christian, or renewing their Jewish faith who actually make an effort to behave well inside, and later as they are released on the outside. But, the old tendencies may raise up and tempt them. How they deal with that in the long term will help in my decision concerning any type of trust.

Also, I have levels of trust. Those I trust implicitly, those I trust minimally, and all points in-between. This includes fellow officers, brother officers in other agencies, and so on.

Of course, whilst they are inside the secure confines of a prison my trust is very minimal if at all.

AA#5
09-14-2011, 20:40
I worked for a large retail outlet. There was one employee "Tom" I couldn't get along with - he was rude to me from my first day - ordering me around like he was the boss, etc. (he wasn't). I spoke to the owner & he said, "He's a nice, honest person when you get to know him....he's a former cocaine addict who's completely turned his life around....he's one of the most devoted employees we've ever had.....he'd do anything to help our business." I just said, "Ooooookkkaay."

A few months later, I overheard the owner's wife crying in her office. I asked her husband what was wrong. He said, "We just found out "Tom" has embezzled over $200,000.00 from us & we're seeing the D.A. today."

Hack
09-14-2011, 20:43
That is how some criminals operate. Gain your trust, set the hook, and they have their prey. Always keep that in mind when dealing with released inmates, or inmates on the inside.

fla2760
09-14-2011, 20:47
No way you should trust him, a drug dealer is looking for shortcuts to wealth that mindset will be carried over into whatever type "business" this guy is pitching. Run the other way.

Narc1911
09-14-2011, 21:40
**** no.

I work with dope dealers as CI's and targets all day every day. They are all liars and cheats.

merlynusn
09-15-2011, 12:37
To jump on the bandwagon. NO!

If he had that many connections, he'd already be in business. He'd already have his contractor's license. He'd already have business permits, etc.

The charge here is "Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon." Yes, ammunition goes toward that as well. He you have seen him firing a weapon, then he is in violation of the above charge, which I believe carries 5 years in the federal system if they take it that route instead of the state route.

Now, if he's had his rights restored, then that wouldn't be a violation. But I don't think that's very common and he'd probably tell you that he was convicted, but then had his rights restored.

Cochese
09-15-2011, 13:29
Mega pass!!!!!

NecoDude
09-15-2011, 14:37
Not only no but hell no... Do you know how to tell if that felon is lying to you? If his lips are moving, he's lying.

series1811
09-15-2011, 15:00
To save time, why not just write him out a check for your life savings?

Sarcasm aside, no, no, no. Will not have a happy ending in all likelihood.

Mayhem like Me
09-16-2011, 07:54
yea, you folks just reinforced what I felt. It's a no go.

One other question. Does the prohibition against felons owning firearms also prohibit them from shooting a firearm? I saw this guy a week ago shoot a raccoon with a .22 rifle.

if he's a convicted felon he just commited another felony,,, stay far away from him, I mean don't ever even be in the same car with this guy, don't go in public with him don't go to his house ,don't let your wife or family in his home or car don't let him in your home.. don't take calls from him...you get the picture.

Mayhem like Me
09-16-2011, 07:56
Would you taste a piece of **** if it told you that it was a strawberry?

LMAO....


let me paint for you a realistic scenario, you two together in a car you passenger he driving, he gets pulled, then during stop is arrested for whatever they search car find drugs under your seat you go to jail cause the guy driving "swears " its your dope...

RVER
09-16-2011, 14:26
Sure you can...

1) Make sure that you are a FULL business partner. 2) Make sure to pay off in full any automobiles, boats, planes and properties (especially the cars, boats and planes as they move really well at auction). 3) Work really, really hard to make as much CASH as you can and keep the majority of it at your house, preferably in $1000.00 rubber banded rolls... Do this and within two years you and your new business partner will be publicly recognized by county, state and federal authorities...

DON'T DO IT. LISTEN TO WHAT THE OTHERS HAVE TOLD YOU.

District18
09-17-2011, 10:02
Nope. There ain't much worse than a person who poisons members of their own community.

berto62
09-18-2011, 09:13
Nope. There ain't much worse than a person who poisons members of their own community.

Could you not say the same about the owners of the Haji Mart? beer and cigs are bad for you too

Mayhem like Me
09-18-2011, 09:32
Maybe it's different where you live, I don't see many break in's to fuel the Swisher Sweet and MD 20/20 habit.

wrenrj1
09-18-2011, 09:42
:tongueout:Does he know anything about construction?

Texas357
09-20-2011, 22:16
Sounds like he's just looking for a "legit" frontman and business to launder money.

+1.

A local guy in the construction business got killed recently. Looks like a professional hit. Some speculation his gravel yard was being used for drug smuggling.