Double check your digital caliper [Archive] - Glock Talk

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rquintana
09-14-2011, 14:57
I just started reloading and I opted for a digital caliper to check my OAL. When I first got my caliper i checked it on various things of known measurements. It was off by +/- .1 I figured the caliper was right (and it might be) and decided i was fine.

When reloading since I am a beginner I am checking the OAL of all rounds I make. I am loading 9mm and my low tolerance is 1.4". When i was checking my all my newly made ammo, I was getting a lot of 1.099" I fiddled with my seating die, machine etc..., but it kept doing the same thing. To make an already long story short, my caliper skips from 1.099 directly to 1.415.

This is just to let everyone know to really check your digital caliper before you use it. On mine it, it appears everything is fine over 1.415 (checked against many rulers) and below that, it is off by a wide margin. I am sending it in to get it replaced.

dwhite53
09-14-2011, 15:31
I'm currently using a set of verniers.

Looking to buy a dial set.

I hate batteries. They're always dead when you most need them.

All the Best,
D. white

njl
09-14-2011, 15:54
Check your numbers and make your post make sense. You're not loading 9mm to 1.4".

I have HF digital and dial calipers and they often disagree with each other by 0.001.

Boxerglocker
09-14-2011, 16:11
I just started reloading and I opted for a digital caliper to check my OAL. When I first got my caliper i checked it on various things of known measurements. It was off by +/- .1 I figured the caliper was right (and it might be) and decided i was fine.

When reloading since I am a beginner I am checking the OAL of all rounds I make. I am loading 9mm and my low tolerance is 1.4". When i was checking my all my newly made ammo, I was getting a lot of 1.099" I fiddled with my seating die, machine etc..., but it kept doing the same thing. To make an already long story short, my caliper skips from 1.099 directly to 1.415.

This is just to let everyone know to really check your digital caliper before you use it. On mine it, it appears everything is fine over 1.415 (checked against many rulers) and below that, it is off by a wide margin. I am sending it in to get it replaced.

Sounds like your caliper broke a tooth.

michael e
09-14-2011, 16:26
I just went and bought a new one after spending 8 dollars on batterys and that not fixing it. Went and got one from harbor freight for 10 bucks.

rquintana
09-14-2011, 16:56
Check your numbers and make your post make sense. You're not loading 9mm to 1.4".

I have HF digital and dial calipers and they often disagree with each other by 0.001.

you are right, I apologize. My low tolerance is 1.14, and my caliper goes from 1.099 to 1.1415. Sorry for that and thanks for catching it.

noylj
09-19-2011, 02:01
Just got a Hornady digital. It is only good for 0.0005", but that is all I need for COL readings. I caught myself a couple of times making an error reading the gauge and decided to go digital. Don't need much for COL readings and I always have the dial if I "need" it.

IndyGunFreak
09-19-2011, 05:36
Get dial calipers, no more batteries.... and they are almost just as fast when you know how to read them (which takes all of about 20sec to learn)

IndyGunFreak
09-19-2011, 09:51
I caught myself a couple of times making an error reading the gauge and decided to go digital.

http://www.wisc-online.com/objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=MSR4303

;) (Steve will love the test on that site..lol)

creophus
09-20-2011, 07:01
I started out with digital calipers but once the batteries ran out I didn't bother to replace them. Now I just use the dial calipers from Dillon.

I recommend them.

jmorris
09-20-2011, 07:39
Just got a Hornady digital. It is only good for 0.0005"


That is only the resolution they have, not the accuracy. Not that you need it for reloading but you would need a mic to get accuracy into the half/tenths range.

jmorris
09-20-2011, 07:46
I have more dial calipers than anything else as they are fast/easy to read and have no batteries.
The digital calipers I do have get stored without the battery in them or outside their original box. The reason most are dead when you go to use them is because you turned them on when you shut the lid and put them away.
Most of the verniers I have were passed down to me but everyone should know how to read them as they are the most cost effective way to measure long items (like 4') to .001

cole
09-20-2011, 22:54
I use digital. Never an issue. I case guage (or chamber check) and use the caliber in conjunction. I have a dial caliper as well I never use.

GioaJack
09-21-2011, 08:32
I use a certain body appendage to check OAL of my rounds... of course all I load are 30mm cannon shells. :whistling:


Jack

njl
09-21-2011, 08:41
I use a certain body appendage to check OAL of my rounds... of course all I load are 30mm cannon shells. :whistling:


Jack

Is that for checking OAL or cleaning out the primer pockets?

aaronmj
09-21-2011, 08:51
http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/NNSRIT2?PMAKA=86487592&PMPXNO=8738500&cm_re=ItemDetail-_-ResultListing-_-SearchResults

These will never fail you, obviously the battery runs out but not that often, maybe once a year.

If you have digital's, make SURE you don't get them wet unless they are coolant proof like the link I gave. If they aren't, they will skip and bounce around when wet. Dial calipers are all right, unless you get a very fine metal chip in the rack and it skips a tooth. Also, after extended use on the cheaper ones, they tend to not zero out when you open and close them multiple times, they bounce around +/- .010"..... from experience.

GioaJack
09-21-2011, 08:57
Is that for checking OAL or cleaning out the primer pockets?

Aren't you supposed to be at work? :fist:


Jack

IndyGunFreak
09-21-2011, 09:29
http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/NNSRIT2?PMAKA=86487592&PMPXNO=8738500&cm_re=ItemDetail-_-ResultListing-_-SearchResults

Nice calipers I'm sure, but $192!! I'm not sure them being waterproof has any real advantage for a reloader. At that price, if you get a pair wet, go buy a new pair, and you've only paid about 25% of the cost of those.

That's taking it a bit extreme to measure a few rounds here and there.

aaronmj
09-21-2011, 09:37
Nice calipers I'm sure, but $192!! I'm not sure them being waterproof has any real advantage for a reloader. At that price, if you get a pair wet, go buy a new pair, and you've only paid about 25% of the cost of those.

That's taking it a bit extreme to measure a few rounds here and there.


Yeah, this is true, they are expensive but you pay for what you get. I've been working in a machine shop for 16 years now and seen A LOT of calipers be bought, I know what ones last and which don't. The cheap $20 calipers are just that. Cheap. But I guess if your only using them a few times a year or whatever, they might hold up. I use calipers 5 days a week probably anywhere from 30-100 times a day. Maybe more.

IndyGunFreak
09-21-2011, 09:48
Yeah, this is true, they are expensive but you pay for what you get. I've been working in a machine shop for 16 years now and seen A LOT of calipers be bought, I know what ones last and which don't. The cheap $20 calipers are just that. Cheap. But I guess if your only using them a few times a year or whatever, they might hold up. I use calipers 5 days a week probably anywhere from 30-100 times a day. Maybe more.

Trust me, I totally understand that "you get what you pay for". I rarely cheap out on anything. However, there is such a thing as "overspending". If I want to get a boat for fishing, knowing I'll only use it a few times a year, a small 3k boat will be fine, rather than spending 20k on a boat.

I have no doubt that for someone that is using calipers for a living, those would have some use. However, for the hobbyist reloader, they are way way over priced.

I've had my $18 Dial Calipers for about 5-6yrs. I have a pair of $20 digitals that are about the same age.

cowboy1964
09-21-2011, 09:50
Batteries last forever in these things. Really don't see what the big deal is.

IndyGunFreak
09-21-2011, 09:58
Batteries last forever in these things. Really don't see what the big deal is.

I have nothing against Digital's. I just like Dial calipers because I don't have to worry about batteries, LCD failure, etc. When I've used Digital, it just seems the battery dies exactly when I need them, and don't have time to run off and buy new batteries.

To me, I apply the same logic to scales. It's very unlikely I'll ever have any problems out of my beam scale. An Electronic? Well, it'll go bad eventually, to think otherwise is crazy. I'd rather have a quality beam, than an electronic that might go out on me when I need it.

aaronmj
09-21-2011, 10:01
Trust me, I totally understand that "you get what you pay for". I rarely cheap out on anything. However, there is such a thing as "overspending". If I want to get a boat for fishing, knowing I'll only use it a few times a year, a small 3k boat will be fine, rather than spending 20k on a boat.

I have no doubt that for someone that is using calipers for a living, those would have some use. However, for the hobbyist reloader, they are way way over priced.

I've had my $18 Dial Calipers for about 5-6yrs. I have a pair of $20 digitals that are about the same age.


Yeah, that's why I added this "But I guess if your only using them a few times a year or whatever, they might hold up." I agree, you're probably better off but I'm just saying if anybody wanted a good quality pair that will last forever - for reloading - these are very nice. You can also buy them for I think $120 without waterproofing, same brand etc...

dtuns
09-21-2011, 10:11
Yeah, that's why I added this "But I guess if your only using them a few times a year or whatever, they might hold up." I agree, you're probably better off but I'm just saying if anybody wanted a good quality pair that will last forever - for reloading - these are very nice. You can also buy them for I think $120 without waterproofing, same brand etc...
you can get mitutoyo dial calipers on sale for $80 which will last. of coarse no matter what you spend if you drope them there junk

G36_Me
09-26-2011, 17:38
still use the same dial caliper from 35 years ago. last year bought a digital cause I felt inadequate after reading GT. still use the dial 99.9% of the time and no longer feel inadequate.

bdhawk
09-26-2011, 18:12
ok....possibly a dumb question.

you know, there are check weights for checking scales. is there anything out there to use to check your calipers? you know, an item with a known size that can be used to make sure your calipers are accurate.

IndyGunFreak
09-27-2011, 05:28
ok....possibly a dumb question.

you know, there are check weights for checking scales. is there anything out there to use to check your calipers? you know, an item with a known size that can be used to make sure your calipers are accurate.

Hmm, I think I just found a product to market.. ;)

IndyGunFreak
09-27-2011, 05:31
Yeah, that's why I added this "But I guess if your only using them a few times a year or whatever, they might hold up." I agree, you're probably better off but I'm just saying if anybody wanted a good quality pair that will last forever - for reloading - these are very nice. You can also buy them for I think $120 without waterproofing, same brand etc...

Even only using them a couple times a year, they are way overpriced for a hobbyist, that was my point, not how often they are used.

aaronmj
09-27-2011, 08:18
ok....possibly a dumb question.

you know, there are check weights for checking scales. is there anything out there to use to check your calipers? you know, an item with a known size that can be used to make sure your calipers are accurate.


Actually....


http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/NNSRIT2?PMAKA=87877379&PMPXNO=23310153&cm_re=ItemDetail-_-ResultListing-_-SearchResults


I just picked 1/4" but basically, if you buy any size gage block, you can check your caliper to make sure it is measuring to that standard. This is how you would calibrate a caliper/micrometer in a machine shop.

GioaJack
09-27-2011, 08:44
I don't know about newer dial calipers but my Craftsman caliper, (40 something years old) has a small, thin brass key that is almost shaped like a quarter, musical note that is used for zeroing the caliper.

It came with very detailed instruction on how to calibrate it.

I find the use of a wooden yardstick to be just as accurate. :whistling:


Jack

aaronmj
09-27-2011, 09:09
Yeah, a lot of the older stuff used to come with a "standard" but the new ones don't.

aaronmj
09-27-2011, 09:11
Speaking of that, that's another thing you could buy to check a caliper instead of a gage block - here's a 1" standard.

http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/NNSRIT2?PMAKA=06407019&PMPXNO=1755254&cm_re=ItemDetail-_-ResultListing-_-SearchResults

G36_Me
09-29-2011, 14:58
checked my digital caliber; thanks for the reco

haven't used for a long time and
the battery was starting to leak
cleaned it up and have to buy a new battery else I'll begin to feel inadequate again