A month food supply - how and what? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Stupid
09-15-2011, 20:11
I am thinking to maintain a month's food supply.

1. What should I get?
2. How do I store them? I don't want to "rotate" them too often.

quake
09-15-2011, 20:26
Personal opinion - for a single month's supply, I'd just go with normal food that you use now & keep that much more of it. Especially if there's only two or three of you in the house, it'd be surprisingly easy to keep a month's worth on hand, and it might be surprising how little space it takes.

If you really did want to avoid the rotation completely and just put back some minimalist, bucketed-type things that would be good for years, I'd start with a bucket of rice and a bucket of lentils per person per month. You'd DEFINITELY want more variety than that, but that would suffice to keep body & soul together in a pinch.

bdcochran
09-15-2011, 20:35
No rotation. Ok. Jerky, hardtack, spam. Rotation after a few years - canned fruit, canned stew, canned fish.

NOTE - none of this has to be cooked. None of it has to be cleaned. I speculate that a good 75% of the people in my area would be dead in a month if denied food.

Add some vitamins, minerals like magnesium and potassium.

M1A Shooter
09-15-2011, 20:48
1 month for me would probably be almost all canned. id add a few cans of stuff you regularly eat and rotate it out. in my house its me and my wife and our 3 dogs, but they have their own stocked away too :).

if you add some rice to the mix, you can extend that month supply to two or so. we have actually split a can of chili over a cup of rice and its a cheap way to extend the food. similar can be done with pasta as well, depending on your taste.

some bisquick and powdered milk or pancake mix, just add water kind, and you are set for breads and breakfasts.

cowboy1964
09-15-2011, 21:19
A month isn't long. Almost everything you eat regularly that doesn't require refridgeration would be doable. Doesn't have to be all canned stuff. Crackers, cereal, dried fruits (raisins). Buy stuff you like and eat anyway.

Storage? A shelving unit or two is sufficient.

Don't forget water.

Dexters
09-16-2011, 06:15
Personal opinion - for a single month's supply, I'd just go with normal food that you use now & keep that much more of it. Especially if there's only two or three of you in the house, it'd be surprisingly easy to keep a month's worth on hand, and it might be surprising how little space it takes.



This is the simplest approach. Buy two cases of what you normally eat. After you are down to 1 case of something, buy another.
Simple.

UneasyRider
09-16-2011, 08:15
Personal opinion - for a single month's supply, I'd just go with normal food that you use now & keep that much more of it. Especially if there's only two or three of you in the house, it'd be surprisingly easy to keep a month's worth on hand, and it might be surprising how little space it takes.

If you really did want to avoid the rotation completely and just put back some minimalist, bucketed-type things that would be good for years, I'd start with a bucket of rice and a bucket of lentils per person per month. You'd DEFINITELY want more variety than that, but that would suffice to keep body & soul together in a pinch.

Good advice Quake.

paperairplane
09-16-2011, 11:11
Your 30 day stock should be durable items you eat everyday. Pasta, canned meat and vegetables, frozen items, peanut butter, dried fruit, rice, beans, oatmeal, etc.

If you are looking at no maintenance - get a couple cases of MRE's. 1 a day will keep you alive and kept cool will last 5+ years. Pricey, but works.

Or you could get a 50# bag of rice and a 50# sack of dry beans. Cheap, stores well, lasts long time - of course after a few days of nothing but rice and beans you may want to be dead.

Bilbo Bagins
09-16-2011, 11:48
Like Quake said, just that a look at what you already eat, and buy extra that is "shelf stable" meaning it has a decently long shelf life and does not require refrigeration.

Canned fruit and veggies
Soups & Stews
Pasta
Cereal (just get some parmalat or dry milk)
Peanut Butter
Oatmeal
Tuna

Create a pantry area, rotate into your regular kitchen food, and keep that pantry stocked. MRE and Mountain house is expensive, and some don't people like the taste. With beans and rice, its simple food that will keep you from starving, but you got to eat a lot to keep your body weight, and its not very nutritious. Just watch Survivor, all the contestants eat a diet of beans and rice, and even with occasional "award" feast, they all have massive weight loss in only 30 days. My problem also it people seem to make long term food preps then forget them. When the SHTF is when you realize that the MREs are way past expiration, or one for your mylar seal opened when you stored your rice, and 20lb of it is now spoiled.

We all go food shopping at least once a week, if your pantry is part of your family's daily meals, you know your stuff will be fresh, and as taste change so does your pantry, so you know your kids will eat it.

FireForged
09-16-2011, 12:07
Heck, for a month I would just store Tuna, Rice, SPAM, PintoBeans and peanut butter.

G29Reload
09-16-2011, 12:21
Rotating is a PIA, but there's no way around it. Don't be lazy, the price to pay would be devastating.

What's the point of going to the effort and the expense, only to have a large amount of S#$! and big fan show up on your doorstep, need the supplies and find as you dig into them with no other choice since the supermarket was looted and burned to the ground, only to find your cans of XYZ are spoiled, rancid, bland or devoid of any real nutrition.

Get over it, and rotate.

A month is better than nothing, but not enough. I went for a years worth and would feel nekid without at least SIX months.

quake
09-16-2011, 13:03
...A month is better than nothing, but not enough. I went for a years worth and would feel nekid without at least SIX months.
Fwiw, big +1 on that. (Although I thought it was spelled 'nekkid'... :cool: )

ratf51
09-16-2011, 14:26
Sit down and do up menus of what you actually eat for meals. Do as many different meals as possible, at least 2 weeks worth. This can be an eye opener as you actually think through what you eat on a regular basis. It is not difficult to stock your pantry with the foods you regularly consume and have a months worth of food if you plan it out. But I would recommend having some long-term storage foods in the mix for just in case. You gotta start somewhere.

Arvinator
09-16-2011, 14:29
I suggest you make a menu, and as suggested earlier, buy extra and rotate.
I keep canned soups, chili, tuna, corn, peas, beans, packaged corn bread & gravy, (Add water only) canned chicken, and a few cans of spam. I have dry goods of rice, beans, flour, corn meal, 2-3 jars of peanut butter, a spare box of crackers to rotate and six cases of ramen noodles.
Salt, sugar, few spices and chicken & beef bullion cubes to add flavor.
I also have 28 MRE's for me and my wife to eat 2 each a day, total 7 day supply. I also keep 28 gallons of water I rotate every 3 months.
I think it is a little over 30 day supply, but just what I have done for me and my wife..

Kevin108
09-16-2011, 15:23
If you don't want to rotate, buy canned goods. Note whichever expires first. When the time comes, donate it all to a food bank or local shelter a month before it expires and buy the same stuff again.

JYogi
09-17-2011, 08:48
I keep about 2 months worth of canned food on hand.
I take it every 3 years and donate it all to a shelter or
local food drive.
We do not really eat much canned food at all on a regular
basis but I like to be prepared in case.
When I donate it it works out to a few hundred dollars to replace
but I am doing something to help others and again have supplies
on hand if we need it.

bdcochran
09-17-2011, 09:53
The original question postulated no rotation.

Over the years, I have seen all kinds of postings about shelves that let cans roll down, rotation (probably not done). I do the donation to charity routine but I go further.

The pantry is not overloaded. I buy snap on clear plastic storage containers. Available at Office Depot and Lowes. Come in multiple sizes. I put tuna,canned soup, canned fruit, canned sphagetti sauce, canned stew, pasta, date marked flour, canned vegetables into separate see through containers. Theyare put in the garage out of heat. No mess in the kitchen cupboards. As I reduce the contents of a snap on container, I simply use a smaller container when possible. No lifting overhead. No pulling out cans from a shelf. No exposing the cans to kitchen heat. You know immediately what you have at a glance. The containers also stack very nicely.

Aceman
09-17-2011, 10:10
As always - almost all food questions need to start with water. A lot of the good long term food storage answer are "bucket of dried food" - which means lots of water.

But overall - I'd hit canned ravioli, green beans, and peaches/citrus hard. Maybe some ramen and rice.. Not "indefinite" sort of storage...but the cost is low and the rotation could go pretty long.

Ravioli+G-Beans+Peaches = .80 +.70 + .90 or so = $2.40 per meal x 30 = $72 or $150 for 2 of that per day.

Stupid
09-17-2011, 12:37
I keep about 2 months worth of canned food on hand.
I take it every 3 years and donate it all to a shelter or
local food drive.
We do not really eat much canned food at all on a regular
basis but I like to be prepared in case.
When I donate it it works out to a few hundred dollars to replace
but I am doing something to help others and again have supplies
on hand if we need it.

Care to provide a list of what you have? :-)

Stupid
09-17-2011, 12:41
Can I just store them in the house? The house gets pretty warm during the day without AC. Is that kind of temp swing OK?

kirgi08
09-17-2011, 12:52
Cool temps prolong food life greatly,a basement or the like really helps.'08.

Stupid
09-17-2011, 12:57
Cool temps prolong food life greatly,a basement or the like really helps.'08.

Don't have basement here. :-(

kirgi08
09-17-2011, 12:59
There are a lot of options,depends on where you live.'08.

Stupid
09-17-2011, 14:45
There are a lot of options,depends on where you live.'08.

For example?

kirgi08
09-17-2011, 15:17
Where do you live,it'll help me with options.'08.

Kevin108
09-17-2011, 15:40
Can I just store them in the house? The house gets pretty warm during the day without AC. Is that kind of temp swing OK?

I keep my stuff in a closet in a cheap book bag.

Aceman
09-18-2011, 07:14
$120 bones -

http://wisefoodstorage.com/gourmet-emergency-grab-and-go-food-kits.html

Stupid
09-18-2011, 17:05
$120 bones -

http://wisefoodstorage.com/gourmet-emergency-grab-and-go-food-kits.html

Have you tried their stuff?

Aceman
09-18-2011, 18:56
Not personally, but it is high on my to get list (after seeing Contagion). All available feedback suggests basically mountain house.

Also regarding canned food; the stuff will last YEARS. The big deal is to keep it dry (meaning NOT rusty) and watch for swelled cans. Many expiration dates will say a year or two - but I suspect it may last five or ten EASILY. Some things may not go as long....some longer.

I know I have five year plus cans of beans and such. Maybe fruit 2-3 years old.

pugman
09-20-2011, 11:43
Can I just store them in the house? The house gets pretty warm during the day without AC. Is that kind of temp swing OK?

According to the Canned Food Alliance (yes, such a thing does exist) canned food has a shelf life of at least two years from the date of processing. Canned food retains its safety and nutritional value well beyond two years, but it may have some variation in quality, such as a change of color and texture. Canning is a high-heat process that renders the food commercially sterile. Food safety is not an issue in products kept on the shelf or in the pantry for long periods of time. In fact, canned food has an almost indefinite shelf life at moderate temperatures (75 Fahrenheit and below). Canned food as old as 100 years has been found in sunken ships and it is still microbiologically safe. Basically they say if the can is intact, it is edible. Rust or dents do not affect the contents of the can as long as the can does not leak. If the can is leaking, however, or if the ends are bulged, the food should not be used.

UneasyRider
09-20-2011, 12:34
According to the Canned Food Alliance (yes, such a thing does exist) canned food has a shelf life of at least two years from the date of processing. Canned food retains its safety and nutritional value well beyond two years, but it may have some variation in quality, such as a change of color and texture. Canning is a high-heat process that renders the food commercially sterile. Food safety is not an issue in products kept on the shelf or in the pantry for long periods of time. In fact, canned food has an almost indefinite shelf life at moderate temperatures (75 Fahrenheit and below). Canned food as old as 100 years has been found in sunken ships and it is still microbiologically safe. Basically they say if the can is intact, it is edible. Rust or dents do not affect the contents of the can as long as the can does not leak. If the can is leaking, however, or if the ends are bulged, the food should not be used.

Good post I have read that same info and do not worry about cans unless I can see or smell something wrong.

Bilbo Bagins
09-20-2011, 13:56
Have you tried their stuff?

Check the top of the web site. Free Sample :whistling:

WolfNotSheep
09-23-2011, 11:57
Store what you eat, eat what you store. If you really like oatmeal or grits for breakfast then stock a big can or two of each. If you like soups or stews, try a can or two per day. Dinner could be the complete boxed meals that run about 3 bucks a pop. Store white rice, beans (split peas and lentils cook the quickest), crackers, peanut butter, spam, granola bars, trail mix, jerky....any of that stuff. Base what you store around actual meals. Write out a list of meals you can make just by boiling water or heating up and make 30 breakfasts, lunches, and dinner. Also, things like gatorade powder, instant coffee, multivitamins, tabasco, soy sauce, and seasoning salt REALLY come in handy.

bdcochran
09-23-2011, 15:33
Some observations.

You need to give a lot of thought to the matter. I read a book by an Army Captain who went from Normanday towards Germany. At some point, he came down with a strange ailment. The doctors did a work up. It turned out that he ate Army C rations exclusively for about 45 days! Everyone else in the Army seems to have eaten some variety.

Just for interest, I thought that a can of tuna fish, a can of vegetables and a can of fruit cocktail a day might do the trick. When I calculated the calories, I was short about 1500 a day for my normal activities. For two of us, we would be about 3000 calories a day short. I don't own a convenient woodlot, a garage filled with coleman fluid containers, or a small warehouse of propane containers. So, I ordered a case of 40 3600 calorie (government approved) food bars from an outfit in Canada.

Within 100 feet of my single family dwelling reside some 27 other people in single family dwellings. I don't feel like providing food to them. This means avoiding cooking smells, avoiding obvious food preparation, and eating discretely if and when shtf. The number 10 cans of foods are not for the first 30 days.