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OXCOPS
09-22-2011, 14:18
Has anyone had any experiences with Allied Barton as a company? A friend of mine was just promoted to a position at a fairly large distribution facility. They are looking to renew contracts with a security firm to for the facility.

He is a strong believer in hiring a company that trains and treats their employees well. That, if they do, those employees will reflect that attitude in their deaily interactions.

Not really looking at interactions with specific guards, but more interested in any dealings with the corporation (pay, employee culture, etc.).

OXCOPS
09-22-2011, 14:18
Oh, this will be a mix of armed and unarmed security staff.

CJStudent
09-22-2011, 15:39
The few of them I saw when I worked rent-a-cop work were a bunch of tools, to be honest. I was NOT impressed in the slightest. Frankly, there aren't a lot of security companies out there that I can truly recommend.

nikerret
09-22-2011, 15:50
I worked for them for a while. Not a good experience, especially, at first. Before you were hired, you had to sit through an eight hour training class, unpaid. Still not sure how they got away with that. Any further training was on-site and minimal.

I started as a fill in when they wre short somewhere and got to secure a lot of different sites.

If someone didn't show up for their shift, (happened a lot) I had to wait until they found someone or they said they wold fire me for abandoning my post. 16 hour eigh hour shifts weren't uncommon. My immediate boss tried to make me work a 24 hour shift at UPS one day, in the snow, because he couldn't find anyone else to help cover a weekend. He ended up coming out, himself, for the last eight hours and was all pissy about it.

There were some good gigs. The Lee Jean factory was good. Play onthe computer for six hours a night, walk the models to their cars, set the alarm on your way out.
I ended up working a loss prevention job at a clothing store for a majority of my time and quit the fill-in gig. That was pretty good; they just left me alone.

The worst jobs were at Fed-Ex and UPS. We did all the shipping and receiving of the trucks, including breaking all the seals at UPS. Fully understaffed, it wasn't uncommon to have a mile of trucks parked down the road waiting to get in or out while you worked by yourself or with one other guy. At Fed-Ex, we had to pat down every person leaving for items they may be stealing. At every shift change, the trucks wouldn't get checked for tweny to thirty minutes while we did pat-downs. Ass chewings came shortly after each pat-down.

My pay was $10 an hour with no experience. Horrid for the bad gigs, pretty good for the good gigs.

They will hire anyone to fill a slot as long as the person passes the background check and donates their eight hours for unpaid training.

When I got there, there were two different uniforms, one was a tan "cop" shirt and the other was like a suit. Shortly after I started, they added white "cop" shirts with shiny badges. They reiterated we were not the police while they proudly handed them out.

I was told to keep a few of each kind of uniform while I did the fill-in gig. After I started Loss Prevention, exclusively, they told me to keep the uniforms in case I was moved and needed them. When I quit, I tried to return all the uniforms. No one would take them and since they had recently fired my immediate boss, no one knew who I was. My parents still have a closet full of their uniforms they wouldn't accept back.


Securitas is about the same. I applied there before I got hired at AlliedBarton.


AlliedBarton as a company only seemed to care about putting a body at a job to collect the money. Didn't like the body they sent? They'll find a new one until one works out. When I got the LP gig, I was happy and the store was happy, to the point the store made a fit when someone would work for me. They even changed the hours they wanted LP so I could do it.

AlliedBaton lost the UPS contract while I was still employed there, got underbid (somehow).

They were quite clear they didn't want any action taken. Just call the police and be a presence. However, I knew a lot of guys who took it upon themselves to work armed, unofficially. Some of them scared the bejesuss out of me; serious nutsos.

At the end of the day, AB isn't the worst security comapny I worked for, but I only worked for two.
The stories of the other one are epic.

I would recommend a local company. I have seen some that are nutsos (other company I worked for, briefly) and others that are quite good. Ask around, the nutsos aren't hard to spot.

puckhead
09-22-2011, 15:59
I applied for them back when I was still looking to get a job. I applied because I was looking for anything to move closer to people I needed to be closer to. When they showed me around their complex and I met the people they were a bunch of jokers. Did not look professional and you could tell they were the geeks and wannabe cops who couldn't make it. Most of them had been there a while too. Kinda glad I didn't get it, although it would have been easy to move up the ranks.

CJStudent
09-22-2011, 16:01
I worked for them for a while. Not a good experience, especially, at first. Before you were hired, you had to sit through an eight hour training class, unpaid. Still not sure how they got away with that. Any further training was on-site and minimal.

I started as a fill in when they wre short somewhere and got to secure a lot of different sites.

If someone didn't show up for their shift, (happened a lot) I had to wait until they found someone or they said they wold fire me for abandoning my post. 16 hour eigh hour shifts weren't uncommon. My immediate boss tried to make me work a 24 hour shift at UPS one day, in the snow, because he couldn't find anyone else to help cover a weekend. He ended up coming out, himself, for the last eight hours and was all pissy about it.

There were some good gigs. The Lee Jean factory was good. Play onthe computer for six hours a night, walk the models to their cars, set the alarm on your way out.
I ended up working a loss prevention job at a clothing store for a majority of my time and quit the fill-in gig. That was pretty good; they just left me alone.

The worst jobs were at Fed-Ex and UPS. We did all the shipping and receiving of the trucks, including breaking all the seals at UPS. Fully understaffed, it wasn't uncommon to have a mile of trucks parked down the road waiting to get in or out while you worked by yourself or with one other guy. At Fed-Ex, we had to pat down every person leaving for items they may be stealing. At every shift change, the trucks wouldn't get checked for tweny to thirty minutes while we did pat-downs. Ass chewings came shortly after each pat-down.

My pay was $10 an hour with no experience. Horrid for the bad gigs, pretty good for the good gigs.

They will hire anyone to fill a slot as long as the person passes the background check and donates their eight hours for unpaid training.

When I got there, there were two different uniforms, one was a tan "cop" shirt and the other was like a suit. Shortly after I started, they added white "cop" shirts with shiny badges. They reiterated we were not the police while they proudly handed them out.

I was told to keep a few of each kind of uniform while I did the fill-in gig. After I started Loss Prevention, exclusively, they told me to keep the uniforms in case I was moved and needed them. When I quit, I tried to return all the uniforms. No one would take them and since they had recently fired my immediate boss, no one knew who I was. My parents still have a closet full of their uniforms they wouldn't accept back.


Securitas is about the same. I applied there before I got hired at AlliedBarton.


AlliedBarton as a company only seemed to care about putting a body at a job to collect the money. Didn't like the body they sent? They'll find a new one until one works out. When I got the LP gig, I was happy and the store was happy, to the point the store made a fit when someone would work for me. They even changed the hours they wanted LP so I could do it.

AlliedBaton lost the UPS contract while I was still employed there, got underbid (somehow).

They were quite clear they didn't want any action taken. Just call the police and be a presence. However, I knew a lot of guys who took it upon themselves to work armed, unofficially. Some of them scared the bejesuss out of me; serious nutsos.

At the end of the day, AB isn't the worst security comapny I worked for, but I only worked for two.
The stories of the other one are epic.

I would recommend a local company. I have seen some that are nutsos (other company I worked for, briefly) and others that are quite good. Ask around, the nutsos aren't hard to spot.

Sounds a lot like another security company I worked for for a short period of time (US Security Associates). The phrase "warm body in a uniform" seems to be a catch phrase in most security company HR departments.

nikerret
09-22-2011, 16:02
Kinda glad I didn't get it, although it would have been easy to move up the ranks.

All you needed was time. When your time was up, you could take a test to be Secutiry Officer II; big stuff happens then. Some of the real geezers had four stars, butter bars, and decorations. What did they do? They took a written test and managed to stay with the company.

msu_grad_121
09-22-2011, 16:20
I know two guys frm my academy class that are working for them at a nuclear power plant, and they seem pretty happy, but I've got to imagine the process for nuke plants HAS to be stricter than for watching a gate at some warehouse somewhere.

Right, wrong or indifferent, there aren't many security companies I can recommend. Most are the "body in a uniform" types.

Ajon412
09-22-2011, 19:13
I worked for them for a while. Not a good experience, especially, at first. Before you were hired, you had to sit through an eight hour training class, unpaid. Still not sure how they got away with that. Any further training was on-site and minimal.

I started as a fill in when they wre short somewhere and got to secure a lot of different sites.

If someone didn't show up for their shift, (happened a lot) I had to wait until they found someone or they said they wold fire me for abandoning my post. 16 hour eigh hour shifts weren't uncommon. My immediate boss tried to make me work a 24 hour shift at UPS one day, in the snow, because he couldn't find anyone else to help cover a weekend. He ended up coming out, himself, for the last eight hours and was all pissy about it.

This and then some.....I see they have the management philosophy system wide....:upeyes:

OXCOPS
09-23-2011, 08:28
He said that someone from the company called him yesterday to try to get the contract. Said the guy would be his account manager (?) and would be personally be responsible for hiring the staff for this facility. He has a meeting with this person today.

I also gave him a link to this thread. He only replied with expletives. :rofl:

Ajon412
09-23-2011, 08:56
He said that someone from the company called him yesterday to try to get the contract. Said the guy would be his account manager (?) and would be personally be responsible for hiring the staff for this facility. He has a meeting with this person today.

I also gave him a link to this thread. He only replied with expletives. :rofl:

It's a tad better if you're the site supervisor / account manager, but it's still a headache. That position is "do-able" and you can make it work. If your buddy doesn't have a job, then it's better than nothing. Just my .02...

Citroen
09-23-2011, 09:13
I have been Loss Prevention Manager or Asset Protection Manager for distribution centers for about 20 years. In the process I have used Allied/Barton as well as some other big name companies. THEY ARE PRETTY MUCH ALL THE SAME!

If your friend's employer is seeking perimeter security and has written their own Post Orders and Duties AND has someone from the company monitor compliance, then A/B might do a decent job. If your friends' company is seeking actual security and wants a better return on their investment, they need to go in-house!

When I took the job that I now have (over distribution centers for the corporation), the first thing I did was get rid of the contract "security" company and bring the functions in-house.

If your friend has an interest in actually discussing this directly, have him send me a PM and I will be glad to both e-mail and talk by telephone.

I would never rely on any contract security company to do an important job as all of them are pretty much the same. They just seek "billable hours" and will put any warm body on post to accomplish that - no matter what they tell you.
John

IGotIt
09-23-2011, 09:22
He said that someone from the company called him yesterday to try to get the contract. Said the guy would be his account manager (?) and would be personally be responsible for hiring the staff for this facility. He has a meeting with this person today.

I also gave him a link to this thread. He only replied with expletives. :rofl:

An account manager for a security company is a person who is assigned all the accounts in an area or district and is in charge of how those accounts are handled. They were also responsible to make sure that all the positions were manned at the contracted times, even if it meant taking off duty personnel from another location.

The company I used to work for had 4 account mangers who reported to the management.

The best scenario is for a company to have their own security. Even when you add in the costs all of the costs of an employee, it works out a bit better, and you have more reliable and accountable people than having outsiders.

What does a guy making $8 an hour care if someone slips by taking something from the warehouse. It's no skin off his nose, but an employee of the company itself has a lot more to lose.

nikerret
09-23-2011, 10:50
I also gave him a link to this thread. He only replied with expletives. :rofl:

I audibly laughed! I'm guessing he didn't have any questions for us...