Let's hear your falling asleep on the job stories... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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DaBigBR
09-25-2011, 02:34
It happens to the best of us...was talking to a couple guys from other departments tonight as I try to get through my 18 hour shift.

Mine:

Several years ago dozed off sitting in a church parking lot. When I came to I had no idea when I got there, why I pulled in there, or how long I had been there. This pre-dated digital video and pre-event recording, so no way to tell. This was after working overnight, getting up for AM court, and then working 16 or so hours.

Last football season (college team in town, so home games are a mess) I had a couple days where I had to park it and walk a bit because I would have wrecked it if I stayed in it.

My personal favorites:

One of the guys I was talking to has a take-home car and pulled in to his driveway a little early and was waiting for off-duty time. He woke up a half hour later, still sitting in the driveway.

One practically legendary one was a deputy (now long retired) who fell asleep on his way home...while waiting for a train at a crossing. People were driving around him after the train cleared. This was before everybody and their cousin had a phone (and consequently a camera) on them at all times.

I'll post a couple more tomorrow...

collim1
09-25-2011, 02:41
I personally have never fallen asleep on duty, but we have one guy who is notorius for it. On several occasions we have found him behind a closed business snoozing, so we get 3-4 guys to drive up about 3ft from his driver door and all hit the sirens and air horns at once. Think back to the old cartoons where the drivers head comes therough the roof of the car.

Pretty darn funny.

Seriosuly though, it is a huge safety concern, and per our dept regs is "deriliction of duty" and totes a weeklong suspension if a admin type sees it.

Hack
09-25-2011, 03:14
Well, I cannot confirm or deny that has ever happened. But, those deer sure can be sneaky.:whistling: Some of us work sixteen hour days occasionally, with overtime duties usually. Other times it is a training day we may have to go in for as a group and then turn right around about eight hours later and go to work. Things can get interesting.

Kahr_Glockman
09-25-2011, 03:40
I know of an agency that will remain nameless that was around one of my previous cop jobs. They had a guy that would regularly fall asleep on duty in his vehicle and when the sun came up would drive back to the station. One day, his co-workers had gotten sick of him sleeping, so they got some aluminum foil and foiled all of his windows. It was 10 am before he woke up, and had some explaining to do when he wasn't at end of shift muster.

jpa
09-25-2011, 03:57
One department I dispatched for....I got a call for a burglar alarm while working graves. Tried to assign the zone car...no answer. Tried to assign the backup car....no answer. Tried to call the sgt...no answer. I tried each of their cell phones too...no answer. Now I'm getting worried, we're on a cluster band where our neighboring departments officers and dispatchers can hear our traffic and they're all like "WTF?" Officers from a neighboring dept volunteered to take the alarm since the business was near their border. I gave the info, then had my partner in dispatch take over for a sec while I went to get my personal Nextel to chirp one of the guys to check on him. Before I left dispatch I looked at the cameras and saw all three of their cars parked in the garage. So I went searching the station looking for them....I found the entire shift completely knocked out fast asleep in one of the offices. The only reason I even looked there was because the door was slightly ajar. The lights were out and every one of them was sawing some serious logs. I woke them up and sent the guys who were supposed to go to the call on their way. Then I talked to the sgt for a minute and we came to an understanding that if everyone is gonna be snoozing they should probably let dispatch know where they're going to be.

Working patrol, my FTO and I were cruising down a street in the industrial park. We see one of our cars at the end of a long straightaway parked next to a business and we figure he's running radar. My FTO was driving so he decided to check the calibration on our speedometer and the radar. We got right up to the car and not a peep out of the officer in the car on our sideband radio. We pull up next to him and the window is down and he's out like a light. He's got his sunglasses on and he's just slumped in his seat. We can see him breathing so we didn't worry about him, but my FTO wrote something on a post-it and left it on his chest. Then we drove off and he hit the siren as we left. He never told me what the post it said. The other guy sent a message by computer that said "Thanks." When I ran into him later he showed me the post it.

The post it said "Bang! You're dead."

HandyMan Hugh
09-25-2011, 04:10
I personally have never fallen asleep on duty, but we have one guy who is notorius for it. On several occasions we have found him behind a closed business snoozing, so we get 3-4 guys to drive up about 3ft from his driver door and all hit the sirens and air horns at once. Think back to the old cartoons where the drivers head comes therough the roof of the car.

Pretty darn funny.

Seriosuly though, it is a huge safety concern, and per our dept regs is "deriliction of duty" and totes a weeklong suspension if a admin type sees it.

Your sleepy friend should be checked for sleep apnea. He may be waking many many times during his normal sleeping hours. This can lead to serious health problems down the road. Things like heart disease and high blood pressure to name two. The effects of long term sleep apnea can be devastating. In the short term, your friend could lose his job because of sleeping on the job, or worse yet be ambushed while asleep. Talk to him and ask if he snores. Your friend may well not be aware that he is waking up so much.

Good Luck, keep me posted by PM if you wish. HM H

Sniff
09-25-2011, 04:30
A few years ago a friend of mine was parked up under a motorway bridge watching peak traffic one morning about 8.00am.

Nice warm sun coming in the windows. She had a bit of a stretch and a yawn after being up late studying for her commercial pilot's licence. Radio turned down and not much happening.

The next thing she knows her sergeant is knocking on the driver's window waking her up.

'Concerned' members of the public had reported her 'possibly unconcious' in her car and there was no response to the radio.

Too embarrassed / scared to admit she just fell asleep, she told the sergeant she wasn't feeling well and had the flu.

The angry and unbelieving Sergeant thinks "I'll teach you!" and drove her right across the city to her own family doctor, telling her "If you're sick, you can go to the doctor and get some medicine."

Sergeant waits outside while she sees the doctor.

Doctor asks "What's wrong with you?"

She says "Nothing! I just fell asleep sitting in the car after being up studying all night. I was too scared to tell my sergeant because he's such an angry man. I told him I had the flu and wasn't sleeping very well. He just drove me here to make me pay to see you."

Doctor says "OK. You are actually looking a bit tired and pale. Here's a note to say you need the rest of the week off work to recover."

She described the Sergeant as "Incandescent with rage" when she gave him the doctor's note.




Sniff

Hack
09-25-2011, 04:37
A few years ago a friend of mine was parked up under a motorway bridge watching peak traffic one morning about 8.00am.

Nice warm sun coming in the windows. She had a bit of a stretch and a yawn after being up late studying for her commercial pilot's licence. Radio turned down and not much happening.

The next thing she knows her sergeant is knocking on the driver's window waking her up.

'Concerned' members of the public had reported her 'possibly unconcious' in her car and there was no response to the radio.

Too embarrassed / scared to admit she just fell asleep, she told the sergeant she wasn't feeling well and had the flu.

The angry and unbelieving Sergeant thinks "I'll teach you!" and drove her right across the city to her own family doctor, telling her "If you're sick, you can go to the doctor and get some medicine."

Sergeant waits outside while she sees the doctor.

Doctor asks "What's wrong with you?"

She says "Nothing! I just fell asleep sitting in the car after being up studying all night. I was too scared to tell my sergeant because he's such an angry man. I told him I had the flu and wasn't sleeping very well. He just drove me here to make me pay to see you."

Doctor says "OK. You are actually looking a bit tired and pale. Here's a note to say you need the rest of the week off work to recover."

She described the Sergeant as "Incandescent with rage" when she gave him the doctor's note.




Sniff

Incandescent with rage.That is an interesting way to put it.:supergrin: I bet her SGT was slow to use that tactic on anyone else.:supergrin:

South Fla
09-25-2011, 04:50
I know I have told this story before, but here goes:

It was 3 days before Christmas in 2008 and we were on I-75 and stopped at a rest area in northern Florida. It was just about day light and found an FHP trooper sound asleep in the front seat of his unit. The motor was running,the parking lights were on and the unit was parked sideways across 2 spots.

I knocked on the window 3 different times to finally get him wake. He did wake up and you could see the sheer terror on his face, even though he was trying to pass it off like nothing. After making sure he was OK, I told him I was retired from the job and showed him my tin and reassured him that I wasn't going to rat him out, the color came back to his face again.

I'm glad I found him as opposed to some cop basher that would have called the station about him.

collim1
09-25-2011, 04:52
I know of an agency that will remain nameless that was around one of my previous cop jobs. They had a guy that would regularly fall asleep on duty in his vehicle and when the sun came up would drive back to the station. One day, his co-workers had gotten sick of him sleeping, so they got some aluminum foil and foiled all of his windows. It was 10 am before he woke up, and had some explaining to do when he wasn't at end of shift muster.

Thats funny.

DaBigBR
09-25-2011, 05:10
The best story I heard tonight:

An officer from one of the guys' departments went home for meal break and fell asleep sitting on his couch somewhere around 0400-0500 or so. He woke up at 10AM! They stagger their shifts (early and late cars on each shift), so somehow they just missed him at end of watch time. He snuck back to the station (with the car and everything), changed in the locker room, and went home. Nobody ever found out and he kept it a secret for years. Where the heck were the supervisors and dispatchers on that one?

Another one of mine:

I was going home at 0300 and was on my way out of town when I passed another one of our guys parked running radar...dead asleep on the side of the roadway. I was tempted to jar him awake and considered just leaving him, but I decided that the best course of action would have been to reach my baton in to the car, turn on all of the lights, and leave him. He woke up just as I was very quietly exiting my car. That one would have been epic.

A couple of thoughts:

I don't have a lot of good things to say about my first chief, but one of the things that I liked was that he was a realist and had worked his share of late nights. I was a reserve for the year that I worked for him, so I wasn't really affected, but he told the guys that worked overnight that if they ever felt that they were too tired to work to go in to the office and take a quick nap. He told them to turn their radio to the ops channel, turn the scan off, and crank the volume to the max. He said there was no point to risking injury to the officer or somebody else or damage to a vehicle and that as long as it (being too tired to work) wasn't a habitual problem, it was worth it to him.

For those that follow FRSC/FSN, there has been a lot of talk about officer fatigue lately and some of the research being done in that area. The unfortunate part, of course, is the trouble that many people are having getting departments to accept that things like secure rooms with cots to nap in and supervisor intervention policies that allow informal handling of occasional cases of severe fatigue are a good thing, but you know how that goes.

collim1
09-25-2011, 05:11
Your sleepy friend should be checked for sleep apnea. He may be waking many many times during his normal sleeping hours. This can lead to serious health problems down the road. Things like heart disease and high blood pressure to name two. The effects of long term sleep apnea can be devastating. In the short term, your friend could lose his job because of sleeping on the job, or worse yet be ambushed while asleep. Talk to him and ask if he snores. Your friend may well not be aware that he is waking up so much.

Good Luck, keep me posted by PM if you wish. HM H

It is most likely connected to health issues. He is now our permanent desk officer in the lobby. It got bad to the point it wasn't funny after a while. We played "find anthony" about once a week when he didn't answer the radio.

Aquanewt
09-25-2011, 05:46
We had a guy that we called "Rip van'' and last name. He'd wake up in a second if you called him but on midnight shift he'd zonk out a a traffic light. Got to the point that we ended up assigning him to a two man car and we never let him drive on midnight shift. Funny thing was if he was working 4x12 he could go another half shift if he had to with no problems.

Pepper45
09-25-2011, 06:07
My sergeants have been understanding. They've said that they'd rather we go into the report writing room, crank the portable, notify dispatch to call us on the back line if we have a call, and take 20-30 minutes to power nap. Wrapping a car around a pole or killing someone because screwed up training/court/mandatory OT has us sleep deprived is nuts, I'd much rather catch a quick nap and feel better for a few more hours.

pal2511
09-25-2011, 07:07
There has been a few times I have dozed off during the day but mostly nighttime. There is only SO much you can do during the night around here and after about an hour of driving I gotta see some light or talk to someone. I'm usually short on both.

Sometimes ive dozed off and looked at the clock and it was only for a minute or two but it felt like forever.

CAcop
09-25-2011, 07:14
We had a Sgt who used to fall asleep every single night for hours. He would also slepp at home during the day. Then he retired and was diagnosed with narcolepsy.

Once when I was dating a woman I wasn't getting much sleep so I would find a quiet place to rest for a bit on days. I dosed off once only to be woken up by a car pulling up to me. The driver was my now chief's daughter back when he was a Sgt. I think she had a thing for me back then. So happy I let that one go.

Two of our guys got called in to do OT over 09/11-12/2001 just in case. One drove the other slept. The passenger wakes up at a green light and looks over at the driver sound asleep with the car in park.

Dragoon44
09-25-2011, 07:18
My sergeants have been understanding. They've said that they'd rather we go into the report writing room, crank the portable, notify dispatch to call us on the back line if we have a call, and take 20-30 minutes to power nap. Wrapping a car around a pole or killing someone because screwed up training/court/mandatory OT has us sleep deprived is nuts, I'd much rather catch a quick nap and feel better for a few more hours.

This was my policy when running the midnight shift. I told them instead of looking for an out of way place to nap go to the Squad room. At least then we knew where they were.

unit 900
09-25-2011, 12:56
When I was sector sergeant on 12x8 shift , I fell asleep (rare occurrence) one early AM. One of the guys in my squad went on a scavenger hunt and found a life size baby doll head and put it under my driver side windshield wiper, with the eyes open. I awoke shortly thereafter and had my heartbeat go from 50 to 180 in about a millisecond.

I was also of the opinion I would rather my folks took a quick nap, pulled in driver to driver in a quiet area than fall asleep driving and sideswipe a few cars or get hurt. That concept stayed with me regardless of rank.

nikerret
09-25-2011, 13:03
When I came to midnights, the boss told me to come to the office and sleep, if Ineeded to. He didn't want an incident related to a lack of sleep that could be avoided.

We have one guy who sleeps for a few hours every night; I'm pretty sure. He doesn't even try to hide. His wife requires him to be up all day with the family. She's completely unrealistic and overdemanding. He needs another D, but can't afford it (or losing two mor kids like he did with his first two with his first X). Most days she allows him up to two hours of sleep during the work week.

_______
I've slept more than I'm proud to admit, but I gave in after some really close calls:

My worst was falling asleep after the sun came up one morning. I had th cruise control set at 70 MPH on the interstate. The last thing I remember was driving normally. I woke up in the grass median headed for a culvert. I instincively jerked the car back onto the roadway. I doubt I'll ever forget the look on the face of the guy driving the full size, red, Dodge extended cab in the right lane as I landed beside him in the left lane. I got off at the next exit and pulled onto the shoulder. I woke up several minutes later. I'd fallen asleep, again, accidently.

Another time, I pulled in my driveway to find somehting at the house to help keep me awake. I woke up thirty minutes after I was to be off duty. I'm glad to see that has happened to someone else. I slept a while longer than he did, though.

I've been so tired I hallucinated a few times.



We have a policy that we aren't to come to work without proper rest. However, it's not uncommon to only be scheuled eight hours off between twelve hour shifts with a possibility of court in the eight hours. We've been a man or two short (out of five scheduled) since I've come to midnights except for about nine months where we were fully staffed at five. I've been here three years. Now, the brass decided we can work one more less during the second half of our shift on weekends.

RetailNinja
09-25-2011, 13:33
I was 4 hours into a usual shift, watching the usual stop and rob in my usual spot sharpening a buddy's knife in the usual way when I must have nodded off. To this day, I don't know what happened - I was not tired, I was not ill, I wasn't anything other than waiting for the next violation to pull out.

I wake up to a bright light and find the entire plain clothes drug unit and Sgt all shining their spotlights on me, parked around me. Got a letter in the file for that one.

Agent6-3/8
09-25-2011, 13:53
I'd been out for about 20 hours, finally got home and went to bed. I got called back out about 2 hours later to sit on a construction detail...no one else was available... :upeyes: I nodded off while they were paving near me. Woke up and they were out of sight, way on down the road. :supergrin:

MakeMineA10mm
09-25-2011, 14:21
My confession:

When I was nearly-new, I was going to school during the day to get my LE degree and working nights. (The 3rd shift in my old dept. was a very tight group of guys, with a couple exceptions of guys who were crusty/unfriendly.) I worked at a county Sheriff's Dept. in the Midwest (cold and dark in Winter and hot and humid all Summer) when this happened.

It was January, and there was a guy who was going through a divorce and he lived in an unincorporated town in a subdivision that had lots of woods and gullies. His estranged wife came over to get the last few things, and he went off and threatened her and held her hostage for awhile. We were dispatched and had a stand-off with him that started on second shift, and rolled over to us.

We had the entire shift (5 guys) out there, and the decision was made to call in some OT and command officers. The Sheriff, Chief Dpty, a Capt., and three extra guys came on, and I ended up staying at the scene while some guys were assigned to go back to the road and handle calls. Media showed up thanks to their scanners, and we had all three major affiliates as well as some newspaper people there. Eventually the guy let the ex-wife go, but he threatened to commit suicide and said he'd shoot any officers he saw approaching the house.

About 0100, at 20-degrees F or so, the Sheriff finally decided he couldn't talk the guy out of anything else, and that he'd had a small victory of getting the wife out, so he called for a neighboring agency's SRT to come out and take over the situation and he (and most of the other command officers) went home. The SRT got there at about 0300 and relieved us on the perimeter. It was so nice to get out of standing in the cold woods in the middle of the night and get into a warm squad car! I got into the Sgt.'s car in the passenger seat, and my buddy got into the back. (Sgt. was sitting in the driver's seat.) We were doing our best to make fun of the SRT guys (while really being jealous that their dept. had one, while we didn't), and enjoying the heater in the car after freezing our butts off outside.

Somewhere around 0500, I awoke to my Sgt. saying, "hey, I think she wants to talk to us," and I turn to look out the window and to my horror it's one of the more famous (and attractive) TV reports knocking on my window (that my head was laying against...), with an obviously amused look on her cute face...
:faint:

Hoser423
09-25-2011, 14:22
On midnights... of course... I was just flat out exhausted. I parked on a gravel driveway/access to a golf course, kinda secluded by trees. Figured the gravel crunching would let me know if anybody got close. About 1hr later (swear I just blinked my eyes and the hour was gone) I look up and see the silhouette of another squad in the darkness. I can tell it's the boss cause it's a slicktop. Dooooooooooh.

There's no logical reason other than sleep to be where I'm sitting, so I figure no sense in trying to explain it away. I inch up, still not sure exactly what words I'll use to hang myself. I park right next to him and see he's out cold too. I say a quick prayer of thanks, inch ahead quietly as I can and let him rest. He never said a word, and I don't know if he even saw me because he was so tired himself.


Anybody ever catch a quick ZZZ and have a dream that they are falling asleep while driving ? That will mess with your mind.

South Fla
09-25-2011, 14:47
I've slept more than I'm proud to admit, .....

And anybody who says that they haven't either slept, or at lease dozed heavily, are either 1 of 2 things, a liar or somebody who just hasn't gotten caught yet.

:countingsheep:

Hack
09-25-2011, 14:59
And anybody who says that they haven't either slept, or at lease dozed heavily, are either 1 of 2 things, a liar or somebody who just hasn't gotten caught yet.

:countingsheep:

True dat.

msu_grad_121
09-25-2011, 15:28
:supergrin:And anybody who says that they haven't either slept, or at lease dozed heavily, are either 1 of 2 things, a liar or somebody who just hasn't gotten caught yet.

:countingsheep:

Indeed. I'm in the second group. Although I can say that I have never gone anywhere with the intention of sleeping, I have nodded off. I've just been lucky that no matter how tired I've been, it's been for like 20 minutes, and I've never gotten caught.

The worst story I ever heard was about an officer in a major Michigan department that fell asleep in the middle of writing a ticket. Supposedly, the motorist walked back to the squad car after something like half an hour and woke the officer up, who then proceeded to tear up the ticket.

Personally, I think it's an urban legend.

imaguy3
09-25-2011, 16:06
technically it's not falling asleep on duty... But I'm often dozing on the drive home. My scariest though was recently when I worked an 18 hour shift (0600-0000), took everything I had (and 2 energy drinks) to stay awake during the shift... however on the drive home is another story :-(

I have a half hour drive, all straight boring interstate, to get home... at O'dark thirty I was in the fast lane doing 80 (cruise control). All of a sudden I'm crossing the rumble strip on the shoulder after crossing two other lanes! I left a mess in pants but luckily got home safe...

JohnnyReb
09-25-2011, 18:44
A town police officer had his picture taken while sleeping. In a local rag sheet, it made the front page, with the caption "Cop Out".

Luckily, his administration did not hang him out to dry when contacted by the paper.

Picture included here.

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Sleepy-Cop-Wont-Face-Charges.html

andy4731
09-25-2011, 18:52
It once went like this;

"56 Young for the assignment"

. . .

"56 Young for the assignment"

. . .

BEEEEEEEEEEEEEPPPPPPPPPP

"6 Young, wake up!"

"Central, 6 Young, Send it."

:whistling:

x_out86
09-25-2011, 19:03
I might take the cake with with one just because of the sheer " oh s***" factor...

An officer of a neighboring agency parked in the turn around of the interstate early one morning and dozed off. An unknown amount of time later he was awoken by a citizen who knocked on his window to tell him about a fatal accident that they had witnessed about 3 miles up the interstate.

Uh oh.... This was also in the days before cell phones and digital cameras everywhere.

MeefZah
09-25-2011, 19:14
My county Sheriff's Office had a guy who worked midnights for years, and about once a year would wreck a car in a one vehicle / fail to control type of accident. I think his total was six cars before he sought other employment. The general consensus was that he was falling asleep while driving.

The same guy, maybe 8 or 10 years ago, fell asleep while sitting at a major intersection watching traffic. Day breaks, some motorist sees him, tried to wake him, and can't. The urgent 9-1-1 call comes in: "You have an officer dead in his car!"... Radio tried to raise him and eventually he wakes up, slobbers out an excuse to the disptcher and the citizen beating on his window, and drives off.

I have fallen asleep before, I will fall asleep again. It's the nature of the third shift beast, I expect. It was really hard to stay awake working the university PD in the summer time, there was absolutely nothing to do. I could sleep all day, go in to work, and within an hour of getting there I would be worn out already.

My personal "best" was when I was a brand new special deputy, just road cleared. I was taking a car out for 6 hours every night and then working my real job every day. It wore me out, but I was so excited to be a cop that I powered through for weeks. One morning, I was waiting for a few other officers to arrive at a breakfast spot, and since I was the first guy there I figured I'd busy myself running radar in a nearby school parking lot. This particular parking lot was cut out of a hillside, and at the edge of the pavement was the upslope of the hill. I was running radar in the flat part of the lot, and the next thing I knew, I was a quarter of the way up the hill. I had fallen asleep with my foot on the brake, my foot had then slipped off the brake, and the car had idled through the lot and rolled up the hill to a point where gravity was keeping it from rolling any higher up the hill. I can only guess I sat there for fifteen, twenty minutes before I woke up on my own.

Pepper45
09-25-2011, 19:14
Reality is, that no matter what we do, we can't always be fresh as a daisy for our shift. Staffing needs sometimes have us burning the candle at both ends, and while energy drinks, getting out of the car and walking around, and other things will help, they do nothing to address the real problem, sleep deprivation. Short cat naps will rejuvenate the body, allowing a few more hours of being alert and ready to go. If it's a continuing issue with certain officers, it needs to be addressed by the bosses. If it's an occasional thing like it is for 99.999% of all cops working night shift, it's to be expected. If it's not abused, and someone doesn't camp at the office to sleep half their shift, then what is it hurting? From the responses here, it seems that it would be most dangerous for officers in departments where the practice of short cat naps is frowned upon, and safest for departments where the supervisors are realists like Dragoon.

rookie1
09-25-2011, 19:35
I work 15000-2300 so fallins asleep isn't much of an issue. I have yet to fall asleep I will be going to late nights Oct. 4th and from what I am told the LT is known to fall asleep. We have a real comfy couch in the city break room and if you tell the supervisor your good to go down there during your "lunch" and take a nap. Others have stories of other officers sleeping in the back lot or other places. A officer at a neighboring agency got caught sleeping and his picture was taken and was ALL OVER the news. The department said that it is a personally issue and the results will be unknown to the department. A Sgt. from that department has a daughter at my department who said he will get a letter for it. A lot of comments on the news channels website wanted him fired.

pulaskipusher
09-25-2011, 19:46
I was freshly off of FTO and things were very quiet on a warm Saturday afternoon.
I was looking forward to a long weekend. I hadn't been sleeping well and went to the office for a big lunch.

The patrol room was being worked on so I went to my Sgt's office for my lunch and to do some busy work before my shift ended. After finishing my meal I realized I hadn't been so sleepy in months and seriously considered kicking my feet on the desk and closing my eyes for a quick catnap. After all I was alone and my sup was 60 miles away. I opted to do my busy work instead and see if that rejuvenated me.

I leaned over my computer and began to read a report when I heard somebody at the open door, it was none other than the Sheriff in the empty office on a Saturday!!! After a quick hello back and forth I thanked God I decided to keep my eyes open and feet off of the desk.

phuzz01
09-25-2011, 20:11
Anybody ever catch a quick ZZZ and have a dream that they are falling asleep while driving ? That will mess with your mind.

A few years ago, I was on my way home from a K9 call at 2:00am and was starting to hallucinate and nod off at the wheel. So I pulled off the side of the road into a dirt parking area. Of course, I fell asleep. When I woke up a few minutes later, all I saw in the pitch black was headlights rapidly approaching me. I thought that I had fallen asleep while driving and was about to have a crash. I began jamming my foot down on the brakes for a few seconds before I realized that I was parked on the side of the road and the car was driving by next to me on the road. That was scary...

South Fla
09-25-2011, 20:34
Cincinnati Enquirer video. (http://news.cincinnati.com/videonetwork/1149661783001/Cell-Phone-VIdeo-Allegedly-Shows-Sleeping-Cop?BCNextUpID=52271229001_0)

Cincinnati PD officer allegedly asleep in the front seat of his cruiser, during the day, with his emergency lights on.

CAcop
09-25-2011, 21:28
One of the stories reminded me of something that reportedly happened in the 70s. Back then we had Lts on every shift, even graves. A couple of guys working together went out to the yard to catch some Zs. When they woke up in the daylight they saw the Lt. parked across from them out cold. None of them spoke of it for a decade later when they could all laugh at the Lt's failed attempt at catching them sleeping. Although knowing that Lt I suspect it was a cover story for just wanting a power nap too and oversleeping.

Another one from the 70s was when an officer, later Sgt., fell asleep and did not wake up until an hour after his shift. No one had noticed him missing at the end of his shift. He put in for an hour of overtime.

msu_grad_121
09-25-2011, 22:03
He put in for an hour of overtime.

How does he walk around with stones that big?!

Defender77
09-26-2011, 01:24
I dunno, is that one hour of OT pay worth an investigation and possible reprimand if caught....

nikerret
09-26-2011, 02:12
I know an old Trooper who was late to mealtime becasue he crapped his pants when he woke up to a deer looking in his window.

MeefZah
09-26-2011, 06:32
...went to the office for a big lunch.


I try and avoid lots of carbs, turkey, big meals, and such when working because invariably, I want to go to sleep after.

DaBigBR
09-26-2011, 09:53
Some more...

We used to have a trooper around these parts that would get a couple hours a night. Every once in a while, he would manage to hit the emergency button on his radio. Again, pre-GPS in cars and all of that, the emergency button just made a bunch of noise in dispatch. Anyway, he'd hit the damn thing and state radio would start calling him. And calling him. And calling him. Eventually they would have to make an all-officers broadcast on a mutual aid channel to send the rest of us out looking for him. The deputies always knew where to look.

I have a buddy on another PD that used to come to the big multi-agency 0400 stop at Perkins and fall asleep at the table. There might be ten of us there and he would be out could sitting straight up with a plate of food in front of him. One time I stopped to drop something with him on my way home. We were talking window to window and he just kept dozing off in mid-sentence and then waking up a couple minutes later and continuing like it never happened. I told him that he absolutely had to go home and I'm pretty sure he did.

Same department as above has (or maybe had) a pretty ruthless approach to car accidents. Rumor was that if you had an at-fault while on probation, you were gone. If you have three at-faults in five years, rumor is that your gone, etc. New guy, fresh off of FTO and fresh to late-nights is writing a parking ticket (no parking on the street overnight, and this department is big on those overnight parking tickets), dozes off, and lets the car roll right in to the parked car. He didn't get canned, but the joke was always that his saving grace was that he was writing a parking ticket when it happened.

Cochese
09-26-2011, 10:24
Heh.

We have a sleep room at our headquarters. It's for officers to use when they are on lates/graves/deep nights and have a turn around court appearance etc. the next day.

It's also where I take my lunch break on occasion on graves.

larry_minn
09-26-2011, 15:15
Many yrs ago it was common for radios not to work that well, smaller depts not requireing checking in for every traffic stop, action. So a dispatcher 40 miles away would take traffic from a dozen small towns with a "local yokel" on patrol when he wanted. Needless to say it was not uncommon for a Officer to be out of contact for hrs, sometimes when going over log "Did (city name) Officer ever go off duty?" Phone call to wake him "I went off 6 hrs ago"

Well one night I saw a Officer sitting at counter sound asleep. (I knew him) He had his radio/flashlight on counter. I took them and found a phone to call the pay phone by that counter. (told you it was yrs ago) I let it ring and then came walking in (all innocent) To see him looking for his radio, flashlight franticly. :)

When he tells me I mention I saw some broken electronics outside as I walked in. Looked like some kids walki talki had been driven over. :)

series1811
09-27-2011, 13:53
We were staked out one night, waiting for a dealer to come home so we could hit his place and arrest him. We had been there a couple of hours when the guy finally showed up. After we were inside and had him hooked up, we looked around and saw we were missing one guy.

Found him. Snoring away in his car. :supergrin:

Reyn
09-27-2011, 17:33
I honestly find it hard to sleep sitting up unless i have been up a while. One night i did doze off and was dreaming i was at a buisness checking an alarm when all the sudden someone inside started pointing a flashlight at me .

It was my LT. He had pulled up to the front of my car and turned his takedown on in flash mode.

Milltown
09-27-2011, 18:27
I'll admit working corrections I've taken 15-20 minute naps when it is dead in the night. I set my alarm on my phone leave the radio near my head in case I was needed, never have been though. I feel it is better to sleep for a few minutes when it is dead than to be dragging ass when they bring somebody in.

I've also slept at the jail before when we were down people. Work til 0200 at corrections and then go down back and grab a spare cot and sleep til 0800 when I'm needed for transport

South Fla
09-27-2011, 18:49
I had a late case on a Friday and I stayed at the station to finish up so I could have the rest of the weekend off. But as usual, things always take longer than expected.

I was in my office with the door closed and I fell asleep at my desk. Granted I was "technically" off-shift, I was still asleep at my desk.

The office cleaning lady knocked on my door to take out my trash and it woke me up. I didn't get caught, that time, and I skipped the OT sheet.

Detectorist
09-27-2011, 18:58
Way back during the floods of '93, I volunteered to be a radio operator to help out. There were a few Police radio dead spots where no emergency communications could take place without Ham radios. I was assigned to this one young nice Officer. He'd been on 12hr shifts for over a month. He looked 40 years old but was only 27.

It was obvious he wasn't getting enough sleep. Had a 2yo and a new born. I was able to get some great sleep that week so when we got down to the levee, I asked him if he would like to catch some zzzzz'z for an hour or so while I stand lookout. He jumped all over that. Within 10 minutes of me getting out of the unit, he was sleeping.

An hour later I was going to wake him up but didn't have the heart to do it so I went back to watch the levee. I had one call from an LT asking for him and I told him that the Officer was filling out some paperwork But if he needed him I would walk the 100 yards to get him. In actuality, it was more like 100'. The Lt told me not to bother. lol

The poor guy slept a good 8 hours straight. When I told him that, he didn't believe me until he looked at his watch. lol

I certainly didn't want him driving without any sleep and it was no skin off my nose.

The only excitement were some 'noodlers' doing their thing close by.

Detectorist
09-27-2011, 19:03
Many yrs ago it was common for radios not to work that well, smaller depts not requireing checking in for every traffic stop, action. So a dispatcher 40 miles away would take traffic from a dozen small towns with a "local yokel" on patrol when he wanted. Needless to say it was not uncommon for a Officer to be out of contact for hrs, sometimes when going over log "Did (city name) Officer ever go off duty?" Phone call to wake him "I went off 6 hrs ago"

Well one night I saw a Officer sitting at counter sound asleep. (I knew him) He had his radio/flashlight on counter. I took them and found a phone to call the pay phone by that counter. (told you it was yrs ago) I let it ring and then came walking in (all innocent) To see him looking for his radio, flashlight franticly. :)

When he tells me I mention I saw some broken electronics outside as I walked in. Looked like some kids walki talki had been driven over. :)


:rofl::rofl:

opelwasp
09-27-2011, 19:04
I'll admit working corrections I've taken 15-20 minute naps when it is dead in the night. I set my alarm on my phone leave the radio near my head in case I was needed, never have been though. I feel it is better to sleep for a few minutes when it is dead than to be dragging ass when they bring somebody in.

I've also slept at the jail before when we were down people. Work til 0200 at corrections and then go down back and grab a spare cot and sleep til 0800 when I'm needed for transport

Deputies at my agency have been known to sleep in shifts in the control rooms, one asleep and one awake. Done it in the car too, always in pairs though. One watching while one sleeping.

Straight Pipe
09-27-2011, 20:07
huh, wha...

Panzergrenadier1979
09-28-2011, 06:35
Last week I was working 1800 to 0600. Around 0400 I was on station typing a DUI report when I fell asleep. However, I must have continued typing while in my dream-like state. I remember my head jerking up and it slowly dawning on me that I must have fallen asleep! I then look at my computer screen and I see that literally every word in my last paragraph is misspelled in some form or another. The kicker is the very last sentence; I wrote "....and the plains indians are no longer there." WTF!? :wow: I must have been dreaming about Dances With Wolves or something like that.... I have no idea. :dunno:

I'm glad I was behind a keyboard and not a steering wheel.....

DaBigBR
09-28-2011, 08:36
Last week I was working 1800 to 0600. Around 0400 I was on station typing a DUI report when I fell asleep. However, I must have continued typing while in my dream-like state. I remember my head jerking up and it slowly dawning on me that I must have fallen asleep! I then look at my computer screen and I see that literally every word in my last paragraph is misspelled in some form or another. The kicker is the very last sentence; I wrote "....and the plains indians are no longer there." WTF!? :wow: I must have been dreaming about Dances With Wolves or something like that.... I have no idea. :dunno:

I'm glad I was behind a keyboard and not a steering wheel.....

:rofl:

I make every effort not to write reports after about 0300 because they are so draining. I've definitely done something similar, but never quite like that.

msu_grad_121
09-28-2011, 09:51
Last week I was working 1800 to 0600. Around 0400 I was on station typing a DUI report when I fell asleep. However, I must have continued typing while in my dream-like state. I remember my head jerking up and it slowly dawning on me that I must have fallen asleep! I then look at my computer screen and I see that literally every word in my last paragraph is misspelled in some form or another. The kicker is the very last sentence; I wrote "....and the plains indians are no longer there." WTF!? :wow: I must have been dreaming about Dances With Wolves or something like that.... I have no idea. :dunno:

I'm glad I was behind a keyboard and not a steering wheel.....

:rofl:

That made me think of one I had a few months ago, while returning from IL taking their POWER test. Cliff's Notes: by the time this happened, I'd been awake for somewhere in the neighborhood of 38 hours, pulled of 94 to get some (more) Monster and nodded off at the gas station. Before I did, tho, I sent a mass text message to everyone in my phone that said "CHICKEN MUSKET." Still don't know what that means...

Speaking of sleep apnea, I had a Lt and another officer that had it. I hate to admit how comical I thought it was to watch them fall asleep on meal break and go face first into their food. And the officer ate soup every day!

MeefZah
09-28-2011, 11:57
I am going to insert the phrase "The Plains Indians are no longer there" in every report I write, from now on.

Lt Scott 14
09-28-2011, 16:29
After a promo to Cpl., one officer always had a chip on his shoulder with me. He and I pulled graveyard and after 2 hours would not respond to radio calls. I took and cleared 2 calls and began a search for the missing man. Found him in the alleyway by the school bus barn. His doors were locked, squad running, head back and "catching 40 winks".

My first thought was to call fire/ems and have him checked for vitals? Better yet, had dispatch call him to advise 10-94 on post(lunch/supper) can he signal 4(report to post).He responded "enroute". Got there and no dinner? WTF? My dispatcher and I asked if he wants to take a break, use the squad room. Safer and more professional than having the police commisioner catch you. Didn't rat him out.
His demeanor changed a little after that.

Milltown
09-28-2011, 21:36
Deputies at my agency have been known to sleep in shifts in the control rooms, one asleep and one awake. Done it in the car too, always in pairs though. One watching while one sleeping.

Before I started working there, they had 3 man shifts on nights they would do 4 hours in intake, control, and corrections. If it was your turn to be in control between 0200-0600 and it was quiet, which it usually was, you got to sleep for the 4 hours. So every 3 nights you got a 4 hour nap.

Chowser
09-28-2011, 22:34
it wasn't me, but my partner. i had to finish a report on the computer, so i told him to pull around behind a building because i got tired of the truck drivers seeing us and asking us for directions because they can't read the big sign that tells them where giant eagle's warehouse is.

he parked the cruiser in front of a brick building. real close for some reason.

anyways, i'm typing away, he dozed off.
next thing you know he wakes up, sees the brick wall and slams on his brakes while screaming.

i never laughed so hard in my life.

he thought he was still in drive.

----
we work 12 hr shifts. permanent days and nights.
on nights, we have a rule.
if you are feeling sleepy, don't crash the car, come back to station and sit in dispatch.
if you get a call, the dispatcher will make sure you get it.
i don't think i've ever nodded off at work, but i usually do on the way home. i have to open up all the windows and crank up the vents.
let's see, i worked sunday night. 6p-6a. i got up sunday (after working sat. night) at 2pm so i could spend some time with my wife and kids before my wife left town for work on monday. end of shift monday morning, i am on my way home. took vacation for the week because my wife is out of town.
so, i get home monday morning, get the kids off to school, finally go to bed right at 10am.
11am, phone rings, it's the LT. telling me to get in to work. someone just tboned one of our cruisers. officer hurt, other guy dead (he died while driving and t-boned a parked cruiser).
now, we don't have a total station or nothing fancy like that. we did the 2-mile long scene with tape! i didn't get out of there till past 10pm. i had to get everything done because i wasn't coming back while on vacation. crash recon done, police car was t-boned at approx 70mph. report finished. time to go home. been awake way too long.

halfway home, i couldn't take it anymore, pulled over (i live 12 miles from work) into the metroparks where i know the park rangers sit and told them to wake me in 3 hours.
thankfully my 20-yr old son was available to watch the little ones.
when you gotta sleep, you gotta sleep

25pd
09-29-2011, 18:03
Many, many years ago one of our patrol LT'S was spotted sleeping in his car in a cemetery- his squad members got a couple of blankets and covered the cars windows and let him sleep till after end of shift and then called him on the radio asking his 10-20 and when he was bringing in the patrol car for next shift!!!!he couldn't understand the call because to him it was still pitch black out and nite time---- wrong ,wrong,wrong. man, he never lived that one down for years and years. Oh the things you could do for entertainment back in the day before everything got P.C. and technical..............

walkin' trails
09-30-2011, 19:38
In the winter of 1990 I was on my first grave yard shift rotation on the border. I was assigned to sit on an X in the dry, paved levee channel. It was slow, the good time radio didn't work, and I lost the battle somewhere around 3AM. All of a sudden my Bronco started shaking hard. I popped it in gear and made a fast 360 trying to see who snuck up on me. The area was well let with stadium lights, and being paved, free of bushes or places to hide. There was nothing. Nevertheless I didn't have any problems staying awake. A few minutes later, someone called dispatch to ask about sensor traffic in a certain area. The dispatcher said that there had been no sensor alerts anywhere in the area since the earthquake....

I knew one guy who got caught so often that he was going to get disciplinary action. He decided to claim narcolepsy (spelling?). Found himself on light duty sitting in dispatch for several months while he was being medically evaluated.

rookie1
10-01-2011, 00:04
took vacation for the week because my wife is out of town.



Winning

Sharky7
10-01-2011, 00:38
Never fell asleep at on duty, but fell asleep at DUI court plenty of times. Trying that breath in really hard trick - or shake my head - or a few punches to the leg.....sometimes is not enough. I always feel bad in court with my head bobbing.

Back when I worked midnights, I would use my 30 minute lunch every now and then for a power nap. I would just lay down in my personal car and set my cell phone alarm and crank my radio to wake me up as well just in case. I miss the work of midnights, but don't miss being tired all the time. I'm thinking guys that do that work for too long take a few years off the end of their life - can't be good for the body for too long. I was always juggling sleep schedules and getting woken up for court non-sense.

Adjuster
10-02-2011, 03:54
LOL I wondered over here from GNG because I couldn't sleep. Great stories, I enjoyed reading this thread.