Retirement age for servers [Archive] - Glock Talk

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jprj
09-28-2011, 02:38
This may vary depending on so many factors... but what about you? What do you use as basis and what becomes your retiring age for your servers? For unix based and for windows based...

HerrGlock
09-28-2011, 03:06
I'm just now replacing my Ultra 2 servers. I got them about 1995ish.

WIN servers? Not likely.

tous
09-28-2011, 03:11
I generally assume a five-year life for front-line servers. At that point, they get replaced and cycled into less resource-intensive domain roles or into a lab. At that point the maintenance costs more than the device is worth.

I still have PE 2600 and PE 2800 servers still being useful, but they are off maintenance and if they break, they're spare parts.

wct097
09-28-2011, 08:30
We pretty much replace them when they go out of warranty. Sometimes we pay to extend the warranty if it's just too much of a hassle. I have a couple PE2650's in my basement that we decommissioned. I use them for toying with Linux, but they suck too much power to keep on all the time. I think I figured they were $25-30 a month additional on my electric bill.

Linux3
09-28-2011, 13:45
If you buy a Solaris server from Sun, well Oracle it's built to last. I think the same can be said for most Unix servers, IBM, HP whatever. They are usually large and very redundant. You don't buy one of these systems based on price. That's the key. You buy these servers to run a specific OS and or application.

Usually Win servers, like from Dell and such, are price sensitive and thus made from cheaper parts. Plus if you are going to have to upgrade the O.S. every 3 ~ 5 years you might as well replace the hardware.

I have a mail and backup DNS server running Red Hat 6.1 and it's been up since 1997.

Clearcase and license server is a Sun from around 1995.

Main DNS, NIS and NFS is a kind of new Sun running Solaris 9 and I think I bought it in 2007 and it shows no signs of needing to be retired.

I think you CAN get quality MS servers but people usually don't.

tous
09-29-2011, 02:29
If you buy a Solaris server from Sun, well Oracle it's built to last. I think the same can be said for most Unix servers, IBM, HP whatever. They are usually large and very redundant. You don't buy one of these systems based on price. That's the key. You buy these servers to run a specific OS and or application.

Usually Win servers, like from Dell and such, are price sensitive and thus made from cheaper parts. Plus if you are going to have to upgrade the O.S. every 3 ~ 5 years you might as well replace the hardware.

I have a mail and backup DNS server running Red Hat 6.1 and it's been up since 1997.

Clearcase and license server is a Sun from around 1995.

Main DNS, NIS and NFS is a kind of new Sun running Solaris 9 and I think I bought it in 2007 and it shows no signs of needing to be retired.

I think you CAN get quality MS servers but people usually don't.

So, if I Linux on a Proliant, it lasts 50 years, but if install Windows Server it suddenly becomes cheaply made and won't last 3 years? :headscratch:

Linux3
09-29-2011, 11:47
So, if I Linux on a Proliant, it lasts 50 years, but if install Windows Server it suddenly becomes cheaply made and won't last 3 years?
That is not what I said at all.
Read it again. Especially the last line.

tous
09-29-2011, 12:10
That is not what I said at all.
Read it again. Especially the last line.

I read it completely, amigo.

You think I can get quality Windows servers?

Though they serve me well and reliably, I shall remove my three racks of DELL servers immediately and replace them all with Solaris servers from 1997. :upeyes:

HerrGlock
09-29-2011, 12:26
Hmmm, I'm wondering if I should preemptively replace my SparcStation IPX that's my primary time server for the network. It's from 1992. Still works great, though.

wct097
09-29-2011, 12:34
Hmmm, I'm wondering if I should preemptively replace my SparcStation IPX that's my primary time server for the network. It's from 1992. Still works great, though.

I wouldn't want to pay maintenance on a device that old. I also wouldn't want production systems on any device that's out of maintenance. Our iSeries is still pretty cheap maintenance-wise, so we'll continue running it for another couple years, despite having purchased them in 2005. Our Dells aren't breaking down, but it's more cost effective to replace them with higher end equipment than to keep maintenance contracts on older machines.

tous
09-29-2011, 13:02
I wouldn't want to pay maintenance on a device that old. I also wouldn't want production systems on any device that's out of maintenance. Our iSeries is still pretty cheap maintenance-wise, so we'll continue running it for another couple years, despite having purchased them in 2005. Our Dells aren't breaking down, but it's more cost effective to replace them with higher end equipment than to keep maintenance contracts on older machines.

Well said, amigo. :thumbsup:

I only buy the initial three-year maintenance and when that expires, those machines get moved to a non-mission critical role and if they fail and it makes economic sense to repair them, I do.

I think my next evolution will be to blades, but that's a few years off.

JK-linux
09-29-2011, 13:37
.....

sappy13
10-01-2011, 07:42
we typically replace clients servers at the 3 year mark when they run out of warranty. We have a couple who are pushing well beyond their years and its noticeable. Our office server is a clients old ml350 g5 series. Its only real function is a file server and ltsp server, so we are waiting to replace it until we have a critical need.

BarrySDCA
10-01-2011, 08:17
2 years max. It's all about density and a 2 year old server can not do nearly as much as a new server, so we are wasting rack space and power.

2 years...max, with upgrades in between.

gh0st614
10-01-2011, 23:59
This may vary depending on so many factors... but what about you? What do you use as basis and what becomes your retiring age for your servers? For unix based and for windows based...

I used to sell alot of SDRAM for servers just last year

G33
10-02-2011, 01:05
Cabana boys wear out also.
:supergrin:

Wait...servers are...nevermind.
:whistling:

rball
10-02-2011, 08:28
I drop my servers as soon as they start spilling hot coffee on the customers, and complaining about not getting time off and benefits.