Considering reloading? [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Considering reloading?


malleable
09-30-2011, 17:11
I just bought some WWB .38 special FMJ 100 round packs at wally world, with tax it came to $40 box (OUCH). If i started reloading what am i looking at per round?
If i only want to load .38 special range rounds, and i shoot max 5k rounds a year, what idiot proof reloader would you recommend for a total newb?
I believe in buy once-cry once, so I'm not going to sweat a few dollars for a better product but don't want to overbuy or get something with a huge learning curve. Thanks

Colorado4Wheel
09-30-2011, 17:31
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1027887

5K rounds a year is less then 500 a month. MOST people once they start reloading end up shooting more. So you may end up loading up to 10K rounds a year. It's not uncommon. 5K rounds could be done on a Single Stage if your not too limited with time. 10K is going to get old on a Single Stage IMHO.

Do you shoot much/any rifle?

Good Luck with your choice. Lots of recent threads about this topic.

malleable
09-30-2011, 17:58
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1027887

5K rounds a year is less then 500 a month. MOST people once they start reloading end up shooting more. So you may end up loading up to 10K rounds a year. It's not uncommon. 5K rounds could be done on a Single Stage if your not too limited with time. 10K is going to get old on a Single Stage IMHO.

Do you shoot much/any rifle?

Good Luck with your choice. Lots of recent threads about this topic.

Thanks, I will do a search. No, I don't do any rifle. I'm 50 yoa and just shoot for fun. I saw a video from a guy named Jerry Miculek and that's what hooked me? I have a GP100 3" for range and home protection, but I'm far from proficient with it.
Just curious, as I don't even know what a single stage is, I guess I should have done more research before posting.

unclebob
09-30-2011, 18:01
Get the book the ABC of reloading.

Dasglockenspiel
09-30-2011, 18:06
Malleable:

Ideally it would be smart to find a friend that reloads and spend some time with him while he reloads so that you start understanding the basics. Too often, folks buy what they think they want and end up not purchasing the right gear.

You will definately shot more often, more consistently and more accurately.

I load 6 calibers for competitive shooters and the inexpensive but reliable press, dies and scale performs fine.

Good luck!

Dasglockenspiel.

Colorado4Wheel
09-30-2011, 18:24
Thanks, I will do a search. No, I don't do any rifle. I'm 50 yoa and just shoot for fun. I saw a video from a Jerry Miculek and that's what hooked me? I have a GP100 3" for range and home protection, but I'm far from proficient with it.
Just curious, as I don't even know what a single stage is, I guess I should have done more research before posting.

Basically, reloading is pretty simple. You take a clean piece of brass. Using a press you deprime and size it (ussually at the same time). Sizing makes the case smaller, like it was before it stretched when you fired the cartridge. You have a couple ways to prime. Using a hand tool or a press. After you prime it you fill it with powder and lightly flare the case (usually at the same time). Then you seat the bullet and crimp the case.

So a single stage does each step separately in batches. A progressive does each step in unison. So 4 stations do it all at the same time. Very nice, much faster. Lee CLASSIC Turret dies each step separately, but it automatically indexes between steps and you do it all on the press.

http://s145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/?action=view&current=LCTVideoBetter.mp4

That is a little video of a LCT in action. Plus, my singing at the end.

Get a Reloading manual and start reading. It will start to make sense. For the record. Dillon has excellent instructions. Reading them will give you a little idea what the process looks like.

http://www.dillonhelp.com/manuals/english/Dillon-RL550B-Manual-May-2007.pdf

You tube has a ton of videos. It can all be overwhelming. I prefer to read and learn, then watch some videos.

michael e
09-30-2011, 18:27
Lee has a few set ups that are pretty cheap. I have a a pro 1000, used it for years and its good, and cheaper than most. Like others said, get the book read it and see if you really want to do it. You will end up shooting alot more, so you really will not be saving money, just get to shoot alot more.

unclebob
09-30-2011, 18:38
Malleable:

Ideally it would be smart to find a friend that reloads and spend some time with him while he reloads so that you start understanding the basics. Too often, folks buy what they think they want and end up not purchasing the right gear.

You will definately shot more often, more consistently and more accurately.

I load 6 calibers for competitive shooters and the inexpensive but reliable press, dies and scale performs fine.

Good luck!

Dasglockenspiel.
I agree with you to find someone that knows how to reload. But the person also has to remember that just because a person reloads does not mean that that person knows how to reload. Also just because a person post a video on You Tube mean that they know what they are doing also. Granted there are some good ones and some that we will just leave it at that.

malleable
09-30-2011, 18:40
Thanks' to all who responded. I'm sure these newbie questions become quite monotonous.
but we all had to learn sometime.

firefighter4215
09-30-2011, 18:40
I have a Lee Classic Turret press. You'll find mixed reviews here about Lee equipment. I've had zero problems with the LCT, though I'm not trying to reload 200 rounds per hour either. Regardless, buying bulk 125 grain lead bullets from the Missouri Bullet company and CCI 500 primers locally for $29.99/1000, I'm reloading 38 special for somewhere between $5.50 and $6 a box. Others may do it cheaper, but that's as cheap as I've been able to get, and I'm very happy with that. If you're willing to shoot lead, a savings of $15 a box will add up in a hurry.

Colorado4Wheel
09-30-2011, 19:07
I have a Lee Classic Turret press. You'll find mixed reviews here about Lee equipment. I've had zero problems with the LCT,

Most people don't complain about the LCT. Everyone can find something about a press to improve but for the money the LCT is a nice little press.

jfrey
09-30-2011, 19:54
Do your homework and check out the Dillon Square Deal B if all you're gonna load is .38 spl. It is a heck of a machine and comes complete with dies and set at the factory to load which ever caliber you order it for. Don't let folks tell you you can't learn to load on a progressive press. That's a bunch of bull. Just read the instructions a couple of times and pay attention to what you are doing. The SDB is a progressive but you can also load one round at a time if you want. That defeats the purpose but it can be done. Dillon has fantastic customer support and warranty. The SDB is a little more money up front but well worth the investment.

You may intend to only load 5000 rounds a year but that may become a lot more once you get started. I loaded 10,000 the first year I had mine.

Get a loading manual or two, some lead bullets and a can of Unique powder and get to loading. Everyone has their favorite powder but there is hardly a loading bench that has been around a while that doesn't have a can of Unique setting around somewhere.

malleable
09-30-2011, 20:01
Do your homework and check out the Dillon Square Deal B if all you're gonna load is .38 spl. It is a heck of a machine and comes complete with dies and set at the factory to load which ever caliber you order it for. Don't let folks tell you you can't learn to load on a progressive press. That's a bunch of bull. Just read the instructions a couple of times and pay attention to what you are doing. The SDB is a progressive but you can also load one round at a time if you want. That defeats the purpose but it can be done. Dillon has fantastic customer support and warranty. The SDB is a little more money up front but well worth the investment.

You may intend to only load 5000 rounds a year but that may become a lot more once you get started. I loaded 10,000 the first year I had mine.

Get a loading manual or two, some lead bullets and a can of Unique powder and get to loading. Everyone has their favorite powder but there is hardly a loading bench that has been around a while that doesn't have a can of Unique setting around somewhere.

Thanks, I'll research that.
How much space would I need to allocate for a basic station?

frankmako
09-30-2011, 20:07
you can start out on a single stage press. find a good used one. then if things go good, you can build from there. later on you can move up to a dillon 550. the dillon 550 is not more money over the square deal and does a whole lot more. ther are several internet site and books to read before you buy. do your homework before you buy.

Colorado4Wheel
09-30-2011, 20:10
Not much for the press. A press can easily be mounted on a station that is 24" wide. Then another area for some general type of stuff (sorting, inspecting, etc.). A 48" wide 36" tall base cabinet would work. Put a Dillon on a strong mount and your basically set. That puts the press at 44". Good for stool/seated loading. I prefer standing so I have mine at 47". I also like my work bench at 40". I hate bending over even a little. I am 5'10"

jfrey
09-30-2011, 20:44
I have 2 SDB presses set up on an old office desk that measures 24X40 inches. You don't need a lot of room, just make sure what ever is stable and doesn't shake when you pull the lever. I store the extra stuff in the drawers. It is really convenient.

Just FYi, the SDB is a better deal than the 550 if all you are going to load is straight walled pistol ammo. First, the SDB has automatic indexing of the loading stage, the 550 doesn't. Non automatic indexing can and has caused double charging of ammo with small volume powders if you aren't paying real close attention. Second, the SDB comes with Dillon proprietary dies already installed, the 550 doesn't. The dies for the 550 are extra. The SDB works really well on the strong mount base.

All my rifle loading is done on a single stage press since it is a lot more meticulous than pistol loading. The only advantage of the 550 is being able to load rifle ammo on it. I have two SDB's, one for .45 ACP/.45 LC and large primer ammo. The second is for 9mm and small primer ammo. The only thing I have to change is the location of my stool. I assure you, if they weren't any good, John Taffin wouldn't be using the exact same setup for the same purpose.

Colorado4Wheel
09-30-2011, 20:59
SDB is tiny. That is the biggest issue with it for me. With out a casefeeder auto indexing is not that big a deal. I prefer it not have Dillon Only dies as well. I like the flexibility of using other dies. Everyone is different.

dkf
09-30-2011, 21:07
Wow. Didn't know the SDB uses proprietary dies. Definatly a deal breaker for me. Learn something new everyday.

DWARREN123
09-30-2011, 21:11
Don't look at costs. Look at it as another hobby that saves some money. Reloading is fun and relaxing for me and I make good inexpensive ammo. :wavey:

LawScholar
09-30-2011, 21:22
I'm also examining reloading. What is the best top end, rock solid, HK of reloading equipment?

Shadyscott69
09-30-2011, 21:32
I'm also examining reloading. What is the best top end, rock solid, HK of reloading equipment?

Dillon 1050

nitesite10mm
09-30-2011, 22:06
I just bought some WWB .38 special FMJ 100 round packs at wally world, with tax it came to $40 box (OUCH). If i started reloading what am i looking at per round? Thanks

After several years of reloading and buying bullets (immediate savings and fun as well) I got into casting my own lead bullets. The .38-Special is particularly easy and economical to cast bullets for.

So to answer your question, after first getting the hang of reloading you might want to make the jump to include bullet casting. Then 100 loaded rounds of .38-Special won't cost $40, it'll cost more like $6 or so if you can scrounge some cheap/free lead.

Used wheel weights are something you should start immediately start trying to save. Someday you'll either start casting or you can easily sell them to an eager buyer.

fredj338
09-30-2011, 22:08
Thanks, I'll research that.
How much space would I need to allocate for a basic station?

I agree, you can't do enough research. The ABCs &/or a good reloading manual like the Speer #14 or Lyman #49, go along way to explaining the processs & equip. For a one gun guy, I wouldn't even recommend reloading @ 5K rds a year, BUT, considering cost of factory 38sp @ that amount is $2000, you can certainly save a bit of money reloading. You do NOT however need a progressive press. Many will tell you to buy one anyway, but just not needed if you have any amount of time available. The Lee Classic turret is a good way to go, the Hornady LNL w/o case feeder or a Dillon 550 would be the progressive route. While I like the little SDB, it is only limited to handgun & while you don't shoot any rifle now, you might later. Space, well I used to reload in a coat closet in college, 24"X36". So you don't need much space.
Cost, well my revolvers live on lead bullets & you can make 38sp for about $10/100 using commercial 158grSLWC, $13/100 using plated. Beats $40 for crappy WWB.:dunno:

freakshow10mm
09-30-2011, 22:09
Dillon 1050
Well, H&K's customer service is a death sentence compared to Dillon's.

freakshow10mm
09-30-2011, 22:16
I just bought some WWB .38 special FMJ 100 round packs at wally world, with tax it came to $40 box (OUCH). If i started reloading what am i looking at per round?
If i only want to load .38 special range rounds, and i shoot max 5k rounds a year, what idiot proof reloader would you recommend for a total newb?
I believe in buy once-cry once, so I'm not going to sweat a few dollars for a better product but don't want to overbuy or get something with a huge learning curve. Thanks
Eventually you will want a case feeder. Look to the dillon 650 or 1050.

You say 5,000 rounds per year, but if you're shooting a revolver you get more satisfaction out of shooting lead bullets, so double that at least. Lead SWC (semi-wadcutter) bullets from Missouri Bullet Co. are $65 per thousand and $13 shipping for up to 65lbs (almost 3,000 bullets worth). Berry's Plated bullets are $100 and jacketed even more expensive. Shooting lead saves you $35 and that savings pays for your primers and a bit of powder too.

Just a rough estimate, reloading with about 5gr of powder at $25/lb (7,000gr in a pound), $30 per 1,000 primers, and $69 bullets from Missouri Bullet Co will run you about $117 per thousand rounds. You'll get about 10-12 shots out of each piece of brass so it's essentially "free". You just cut your per round cost to a quarter of factory ammunition.

You have two choices:

1) Load 5,000 rounds a year at a less cost per round and only be that good of a shooter that saves money.
2) Load 20,000 ronds a year at a less cost per round and be THAT much better of a shooter because you get more shooting (read: experience) for the same dollar investment in components. In other words, shooting cheaper ammunition allows you to shoot more for the same price.

G36_Me
10-01-2011, 07:58
so many factors, but I think there is a 'for sure' answer.

Start with a single stage press. I would guess that all the experienced people on this forum have and still use their single presses. You learn how to reload on one and you will use it for life. You may never advance to a progressive press; you might.

as the previous poster mentioned, this can be a hobby (vs. a high volume chore). For me its a hobby and have never moved to a progressive although I've looked at them a 100 times. i shoot several times a week and have no issues keeping up with my needs using a single stage. Since the kids are older and out of the house, I have time. I actually have very little money invested in my reloading equipment. I couldn't afford it earlier in life and now not sure how efficient I want or need to be.

your money will not be throw away

if I had a friend close by with a progressive and could learn from them, I'd probably get one, but haven't bugged anyone to learn

ramble, ramble, ramble... done typing Good luck

edit: not done rambling I load .380 auto, .38 spl, .357 mag, 9mm and 45 ACP on my single stage

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2011, 16:35
Never really found the need for a single stage when loading pistol. Especially with a 550 or a LCT.

malleable
10-01-2011, 16:47
I just got back from the library, so I'll start reading and get a foundation before asking anymore questions. I appreciate all the replies.

motorcycleman
10-01-2011, 16:55
I'm a gonna do that too!!

malleable
10-01-2011, 18:42
Assuming that you don't have a stockpile and need to purchase, where do you buy your brass, bullets, & primers online?

fredj338
10-01-2011, 21:07
Assuming that you don't have a stockpile and need to purchase, where do you buy your brass, bullets, & primers online?

There are several good place to do large on-line comp orders. The problem is hazmat fees, so you have to order at least 10 units (1# of powder or 1K primers=1 unit) to make the HM & shipping practical. Go to the stickie on list of suppliers. Most handgun brass can be bought as once fired, a far better deal than buying new.

PrecisionRifleman
10-01-2011, 21:20
I taught myself to handload by reading, reading, practical application, and reading some more. I recommend staying away from max loads (and always work loads up) until you have become familiar with what you are doing and are familiar with working with whatever scale you decide to use. I also highly recommend purchasing a decent chronograph as this is really the only way a reloader has to gauge how hot a round is being pushed in your particular barrel/chamber.

One of the most important things in regards to safety is staying organized. That is especially true if and when you start loading more than one caliber, and using multiple primers/powders. I use a single stage press since I mostly load for high power long range precision rifle and I want to control every aspect of the reloading process to ensure I am preparing and loading the rounds as consistently as possible.

I do agree with others when stated it is best to have a person who can mentor you. This will absolutely help you buy what you need instead of buying packages with a bunch of things you may not need. Reloading is expensive in regards to the initial cost of purchase so for many this is an important consideration. I also agree with those that say you will offset your savings in cost v.s factory ammunition because you will without a doubt shoot a lot more.

That being said handloading has made it affordable for me to hit the long range rifle range on a consistent basis (firing 308Win & 300 Win mag) allowing me to get back up to and past the skill level I was at when serving as Scout Sniper in the USMC. The only way to become extremely proficient at your craft is to get trigger time, and reloading absolutely is conducive to being able to do that without breaking the bank.

Have fun & Stay safe! :D

G36_Me
10-02-2011, 10:13
Never really found the need for a single stage when loading pistol. Especially with a 550 or a LCT.

To the OP, I would listen to Colorado4Wheel before I would listen to me. Colorado, Fred, Jack and a few others (Jack if you can figure out when he's pulling your leg or not).

Enjoy; this is one of my favorite forums on GT.

Colorado4Wheel
10-02-2011, 10:22
I don't know about that. Some people really hate what I say.

fredj338
10-02-2011, 15:18
I don't know about that. Some people really hate what I say.

Not true Steve. You like the 650 & hate the LFCD, what's to hate about that?:supergrin:

RustyFN
10-02-2011, 17:34
Never really found the need for a single stage when loading pistol. Especially with a 550 or a LCT.

Same for me. I have never owned a single stage. I started with the lee classic turret.

thorn137
10-02-2011, 17:48
Quick FYI: Dillon is not the only company that offers a case feeder.

thorn

unclebob
10-02-2011, 18:16
Quick FYI: Dillon is not the only company that offers a case feeder.

thorn

Have you ever compared a Hornady case feeder to a Dillon? In my option they are not even in the same league.

freakshow10mm
10-02-2011, 18:28
Quick FYI: Dillon is not the only company that offers a case feeder.

thorn
Quick FYI: Hornady can't hold a candle to Dillon.

jfrey
10-02-2011, 19:35
Since Dillon doesn't make a case feeder for the SDB press, mine consists of my thumb and forefinger. Cheap, came with the hand, and works every time no matter what caliber.

I couldn't resist.
jfrey

Beanie-Bean
10-02-2011, 19:47
^^^

I have the same casefeeder for my 550, and it also works for all calibers :) It even works with the Hornady, too!

jfrey
10-03-2011, 17:19
Well Beanie, I think we can call ours the "universal" case feeder. Doesn't matter what color the Koolaid.

unclebob
10-03-2011, 17:34
There are a lot of pressís that use that very same case feeder.