Competition Elec. ProChrono en route [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Beanie-Bean
09-30-2011, 21:58
Had to jump on the $20 discount on this one before it went bye-bye. Also ordered some nice Starline 10mm brass, since the Starline site stated that they were going to be out until about 10/31.

Since I'll be using the chrono to check my loads, I have to ask the preferred method of mounting and setting up something like this. Checked some of the videos out, and it looks like you have to shoot through the two "V" arms at a set distance.

1. At what distance do you setup your chrono when checking velocity?

2. Are the fps listed in the loading manual velocity at the muzzle? Or at a set distance?

3. Do you setup on a tripod? Or on a table or barrel? I'm a bit worried about damaging my Manfrotto tripod which I have for my cameras. The videos I watched had the units setup different ways, and I don't know how level they need to be to get good readings.

Yup, it was down to this ProChrono, or the Millenium 2. The M2 just looked like it was going to be a hassle to get setup and working, and the ProChrono was just about half the cost.

Boxerglocker
09-30-2011, 22:13
The CE PRO CHRONO is a great, I own one as well. I use a cheap Walmart tripod that I bought several years back for less than $20. It has a hook at the bottom that I hang a sandbag to give it more weight and stability.

For pistol 8-12 feet is a good distance depending on caliber, for rifle I push it out to 15 or so. Most books give muzzle velocity, if you build a shield with a hole to shoot through you can get closer. For my purposes the distance given about assure compliance with PF/velocity requirements for my loads.

If you do any indoor shooting, which I do in the winter... I highly recommend the LED light kit. It works great... though you have to be able to plug it in. I was going to build a rechargeable power supply for it but at my range haven't had the need yet as the staff are pretty accommodating to me and there are a couple of lane close enough to an outlet that I can plug into to with a 25 ft extension cord.

fredj338
10-01-2011, 08:17
Muzzle vel & 10-15ft from the muzzle, same thing really. I use a camera tripod, if you shoot that @ 10ft, you should spend your money on more ammo not a chrono. As long as the light is decent, & the unit not too close to the muzzle, you shoule get good reasings.

Beanie-Bean
10-01-2011, 09:01
if you shoot that @ 10ft, you should spend your money on more ammo not a chrono.

Haha...you got me there! I haven't seen one up close and in person yet, so I don't know how big the "v" part is, actually.

I'll take your advice and BG's recommendations and will just set it up on a cheap-o Wally world special tripod.

Beanie-Bean
10-01-2011, 09:05
Boxerglocker,

I won't shoot any 10mm indoors, because e range guys are always waiting right behind me to sweep up spent brass. Because of that, I've preferred shooting outdoors. Not too much snow down here so it's really not too bad to practice outdoors.

fredj338
10-01-2011, 21:11
Haha...you got me there! I haven't seen one up close and in person yet, so I don't know how big the "v" part is, actually.

I'll take your advice and BG's recommendations and will just set it up on a cheap-o Wally world special tripod.

The better chronographs have good screens & allow accuracy testing over the screens for simultanious vel readings. The Chrony line, not as easy. Many will shoot their chrony's, some will shoot their screens, but I don;t know anyone that whacked their tripod.:wow:

Brian Lee
10-01-2011, 21:45
I use a heavy duty camcorder tripod with lots of leveling adjustments on it. Super easy to set it up just right & quickly no matter what the height I'm shooting from.

My Pro Chrono usually works well outside without even using the plastic sun shades, which means you don't need to have the steel bars in there either since holding up the shades or the LED lights is all they are really for. Just make sure you shoot centered over the top of it & it'll work fine. I shot one of my steel bars & ended up gluing plastic back together before I realized it worked well (and with lower risk) without the shades on it.

I also never regretted buying the debris shield they sell for those Pro Chrono's. I usually shoot with the muzzle about 8 feet behind the Chrono, and I've had crap spitting out of the gun that has done damage to the shield, which I'm glad isn't on the front face of the Chronograph.

Beanie-Bean
10-02-2011, 03:06
Many will shoot their chrony's, some will shoot their screens, but I don;t know anyone that whacked their tripod.

I am just worried about blasting my nice tripod that I picked up for my photographic gear. I'll sacrifice a cheapie tripod any day of the week.

I use a heavy duty camcorder tripod with lots of leveling adjustments on it. Super easy to set it up just right & quickly no matter what the height I'm shooting from.

My Pro Chrono usually works well outside without even using the plastic sun shades, which means you don't need to have the steel bars in there either since holding up the shades or the LED lights is all they are really for. Just make sure you shoot centered over the top of it & it'll work fine. I shot one of my steel bars & ended up gluing plastic back together before I realized it worked well (and with lower risk) without the shades on it.

I also never regretted buying the debris shield they sell for those Pro Chrono's. I usually shoot with the muzzle about 8 feet behind the Chrono, and I've had crap spitting out of the gun that has done damage to the shield, which I'm glad isn't on the front face of the Chronograph.

Thanks for the good info, Brian--I'll probably use my heavy-duty stand once my comfort level is good with the chronograph setup. I suppose that I
should have picked up the debris shield when I ordered mine.

Jim Watson
10-02-2011, 07:33
The start screen should be 10 feet from the gun so that muzzle blast does not affect the reading. A big rifle might have to be even farther back.

There used to be a lot of discussion about converting "instrumental velocity" to "muzzle velocity" but the loss over 10 feet is so little that nobody worries about it any more. Things were different when the screen spacing had to be a lot more than 2 feet.

I have seen (and done) several chronograph hits but never one so far off as to hit the tripod. Shooting off sandbags is a good idea to protect your investment. Most of the busted ones have come from offhand shooting.

I wish somebody made a tripod with remote adjustments. The main nuisance of setting up a chronograph is getting it aligned with the line of fire from the shooting position to the target. Place the tripod, sit at the bench, check the alignment, get up, tweak the tripod, recheck, get back up, etc, etc.