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CheddarB
10-01-2011, 16:41
Ok I have been thinking about getting into reloading for a while now just never seriously considered it. but with me shooting .357sig,40sw,45acp and this ever burning itch to buy a 10mm has really got me thinking about it day and night.. one of my dads friends reloads and he said that if it isn't a dillon you wish it would be.. I have found a xl650 with case hopper. .380acp 9mm,40sw,45acp all "quick change" setups for 1800.00, is that a bit high for what he is selling? I was looking at the 550b's, but this seems like a nicer machine.. I am usually the "spend once cry once" type guy and it seems already setup for 3 calibers that I would load for.. what I am asking is this a good deal? and is this the type of press that I would probably never need to upgrade? any thoughts and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Boxerglocker
10-01-2011, 16:51
Dillon gear at 80 percent of retail used is a good deal. Price it out on the Brian Enos website and she where you come up.

Hawker Man
10-01-2011, 16:51
Get on Dillon's web page and do the math.

Frank V
10-01-2011, 19:19
I'm not sure of the value of the press & set up you are talking about, but I bought a used Dillon 550. I called Dillon & told them I'd bought a used 550 & would the warranty still be good. The Rep's words were darn right, we warrant our presses not the buyer. I can tell you if you buy a used Dillon & anything is wrong with it they will repair it. They have one of he best warranty programs in the gun business. Buy Dillon with confidence.
Frank

RustyFN
10-01-2011, 19:44
I have found a xl650 with case hopper. .380acp 9mm,40sw,45acp all "quick change" setups for 1800.00, is that a bit high for what he is selling?

For everything you have listed it would cost $1,408.45 at Brian Enos and it's all new. This is what I figured,

Dillon 650
four die sets
case feeder
two case feeder plates
three quick change kits

Not sure how much more is included in the used set up.

unclebob
10-01-2011, 20:15
I came up with 1675.00 and that is with just about everything Strong mount, roller handle, bullet tray etc. If it has everything 1340.00 would be more like it.

frankmako
10-01-2011, 20:27
i got two 550 and they have never given me any problems. check the prices over at dillon and enos to see what a new one goes for.

unclebob
10-01-2011, 20:32
Ops forgot the dies. So that would be another 252.00. So I would say he is selling it for what he paid for it.

fredj338
10-01-2011, 21:04
I can't argue w/ wanting to purchase a quality, few hassles progressive like the 650. Priced as stated, the owner is a bit high, get him down to $1300-1400 & it's a good deal. Reload on it for 5yrs & you can sell it for what you paid today.

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2011, 21:13
650 would be a great first press. Very nice indeed.

Tpro
10-01-2011, 21:24
My question is this; Why would anyone sell the Dillon 650? Unless they dies of course, but this is the Cadillac of presses. Can't imagine some one selling one.:cool::tongueout:

fredj338
10-02-2011, 09:41
My question is this; Why would anyone sell the Dillon 650? Unless they dies of course, but this is the Cadillac of presses. Can't imagine some one selling one.:cool::tongueout:
The recent admins wet blanket on the economy has cost many good jobs. So if you need $1500 to pay the bills, you can always buy another press when you start working again. It's likely why they are asking pretty much retail.:dunno:

Tpro
10-02-2011, 10:41
The recent admins wet blanket on the economy has cost many good jobs. So if you need $1500 to pay the bills, you can always buy another press when you start working again. It's likely why they are asking pretty much retail.:dunno:

I get that. My question is who is the fool that will over pay for that? I never pay 80% of retail for anything used. No matter what it is. It's stupid. For 20% I'll buy new, regardless of warranty. He may need to pay bills. He just wouldn't do it at my expense.

ave8er
10-02-2011, 11:48
My question is this; Why would anyone sell the Dillon 650? Unless they dies of course, but this is the Cadillac of presses. Can't imagine some one selling one.:cool::tongueout:

the guy that wants to move up to a 1050 :wavey: If I was loading a bunch of 9mm I would step up to 1050 for the primer swaging damn crimped primers are a PITA

unclebob
10-02-2011, 11:50
the guy that wants to move up to a 1050 :wavey: If I was loading a bunch of 9mm I would step up to 1050 for the primer swaging damn crimped primers are a PITA

Great if that is all you shoot.

fredj338
10-02-2011, 15:16
I get that. My question is who is the fool that will over pay for that? I never pay 80% of retail for anything used. No matter what it is. It's stupid. For 20% I'll buy new, regardless of warranty. He may need to pay bills. He just wouldn't do it at my expense.
Got it, I agree. The guy wants his money back. I see it all the time. Most people think their stuff is worth more when they sell it & your stuff is worth less when they are buying it.:dunno:

Tpro
10-02-2011, 23:47
Got it, I agree. The guy wants his money back. I see it all the time. Most people think their stuff is worth more when they sell it & your stuff is worth less when they are buying it.:dunno:


Yup!:wavey:

CheddarB
10-07-2011, 20:34
thank you all for your reply's and input, I was thinking about contacting him and seeing what his bottom dollar is.. I just got another .357sig and that damn 10mm keeps looking better and better by the day...

UncleBob- do you reload? if so is there a good local source for reloading supply's? (I am in the FWB area) or is it better to stick with on-line retailers?

unclebob
10-07-2011, 21:13
thank you all for your reply's and input, I was thinking about contacting him and seeing what his bottom dollar is.. I just got another .357sig and that damn 10mm keeps looking better and better by the day...

UncleBob- do you reload? if so is there a good local source for reloading supply's? (I am in the FWB area) or is it better to stick with on-line retailers?

Yes I reload. It depends powder and primers I get from Graf on Sons or Powder Valley. Bullets, one of the people that I shoot and travel with for GSSF matches is an X-Treme dealer. Two to three times a year he does an order of what people want. If I Just want to try a different powder I go to Patriot Arms.

marksmenscorner
12-01-2011, 16:33
Hi Chedder

Dillion makes a fine press I have reloaded for years and own both a dillion and a lee progressive, I find that I use my Lee loadmaster for most of my reloading needs and the price was a lot less, The dies are great and customer service is number one,

just a thought, Don't buy just because that brand is sold near by, Most co. will ship to your door in 3 to five days, check on line for the equipment that fits your needs and budget

CheddarB
12-01-2011, 16:55
Marksmen- thanks for your reply, I am trying to find out what my options are. but I generally like to "buy once cry once" I don't like to mess around and get something that might save me some money up front but then I end up getting what I wanted in the first place and take a loss on what I first bought..

F106 Fan
12-01-2011, 17:15
I have a couple of Dillon 550B's so I know a good deal about changing calibers on 550B's. I know exactly nothing about changing calibers on an XL 650.

I suggest you read the User Manual and see what the process is like. As you are getting caliber conversion kits in the package, it must be fairly easy. Still, better to know before you go.

http://www.dillonhelp.com/manuals/english/Dillon-XL650-Manual-May-2007.pdf

I do know that changing calibers on a Dillon 1050 is theoretically possible. I don't intend to ever find out. There are just too many adjustments.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
12-01-2011, 17:34
550 is easy enough
650 is a little more time consuming. To imply that either is hard is to say the user is not really that competent. Neither are hard. Neither require you to "adjust" the parts you removed and replaced (beyond the shellplate on both).

Beanie-Bean
12-01-2011, 18:31
Hmm...seems like you could possibly get a better deal buying new. Anyhow, there are some excellent resources here in the Reloading section. I wasn't going to start reloading until next year, and was planning on just buying a few pieces at a time until I had enough to start.

Fast forward...these guys have been instrumental in helping me get the reloading bug going. Now, I'm just hurting to know how much I've spent on factory ammo, when I could have been creating my own at home.

I hope that you can get a better price, but the XL650 would be an excellent press, whether a first press or not. Plus, the Dillon no-BS warranty will keep you good as long as you have the press.

snowwdog
12-01-2011, 19:43
i agree he wants to much. The 650 was my first press then a rock chucker for rifle stuff. I could not imagine loading on anything else but a dillion. Mine has been going strong for 10 years. Few broken/lost parts but dillion is always there to save my butt.

thorn137
12-01-2011, 21:05
I would not advise paying $1800 for a used first press. Probably not a new one, either.

You can get a perfectly fine =-> very high quality press in the $400-500 range. Now that doesn't come with a case feeder, but after 6K rounds of 9mm, I still don't find myself needing to spend a few hundred dollars on case feeding. I simply don't reload THAT many rounds at a time to need one.

It's fine to pay once, cry once - but $1800 is too much paying for a new reloader.

thorn

Shadyscott69
12-01-2011, 21:13
I have a couple of Dillon 550B's so I know a good deal about changing calibers on 550B's. I know exactly nothing about changing calibers on an XL 650.

I suggest you read the User Manual and see what the process is like. As you are getting caliber conversion kits in the package, it must be fairly easy. Still, better to know before you go.

http://www.dillonhelp.com/manuals/english/Dillon-XL650-Manual-May-2007.pdf

I do know that changing calibers on a Dillon 1050 is theoretically possible. I don't intend to ever find out. There are just too many adjustments.

Richard


Changing on the 1050 is actually pretty easy if you aren't changing primer sizes. Takes about 30 minutes at most. If you are changing primer sizes, it sucks.

F106 Fan
12-01-2011, 23:34
Changing on the 1050 is actually pretty easy if you aren't changing primer sizes. Takes about 30 minutes at most. If you are changing primer sizes, it sucks.

And I would be... I load .45 ACP and 9mm. I haven't convinced myself to consider using small pistol primers in .45 ACP.

Some time this month I will get the 1050 for 9mm. I plan to have it before Christmas. My grandson has a couple of weeks off from school and we can burn up a whole lot of ammo in a short period of time. I need to get that loader very soon!

Richard

unclebob
12-02-2011, 08:03
And I would be... I load .45 ACP and 9mm. I haven't convinced myself to consider using small pistol primers in .45 ACP.

Some time this month I will get the 1050 for 9mm. I plan to have it before Christmas. My grandson has a couple of weeks off from school and we can burn up a whole lot of ammo in a short period of time. I need to get that loader very soon!

Richard

Unless you will be shooting 50,000 thousand or more rounds a year. Or have a lot of crimped brass I would go with the 650 with case feeder. I load at about 100rds. in 7 minutes. And I was shooting between 20,000 and 30,000 thousand a year. Conversions the way I do it takes between 7 to 10 minutes. If you need to load even faster on the 650 get a bullet feeder. And without doing the math, probably cheaper than the 1050. To me the only way that a 1050 would make any since is that I only loaded one caliber on that press and loaded a lot of it.

ron59
12-02-2011, 08:42
I think $1800 is a lot for a used press as well. New one (with casefeeder) is only $900 or so, not sure all the extra dies and stuff for extra calibers are worth near a thousand?

Unless that price is an everything price that includes tumbler, media separator, good scale, calipers, case gauges... all the stuff that one needs ancillary to the press. Then maybe it's a better deal.

rpgman
12-02-2011, 10:21
Unless you will be shooting 50,000 thousand or more rounds a year. Or have a lot of crimped brass I would go with the 650 with case feeder. I load at about 100rds. in 7 minutes. And I was shooting between 20,000 and 30,000 thousand a year. Conversions the way I do it takes between 7 to 10 minutes. If you need to load even faster on the 650 get a bullet feeder. And without doing the math, probably cheaper than the 1050. To me the only way that a 1050 would make any since is that I only loaded one caliber on that press and loaded a lot of it.

Bob, since I will be getting my xl650 tomorrow, I ordered the additional stuff for doing .40 cal (it's coming with 9mm), like the quick change kit, and the Caliber Conversion Kit.

So, is there a way ur changing the calibers differently, than how they say in the manual? I've read it a number of times, but haven't yet done it.

If you have some 'secrets' for changing calibers on the xl650, I would love if you would expand on the way you do it. I'll be changing from 9mm to .40.

thanks,
Greg

F106 Fan
12-02-2011, 10:35
Unless you will be shooting 50,000 thousand or more rounds a year. Or have a lot of crimped brass I would go with the 650 with case feeder. I load at about 100rds. in 7 minutes. And I was shooting between 20,000 and 30,000 thousand a year. Conversions the way I do it takes between 7 to 10 minutes. If you need to load even faster on the 650 get a bullet feeder. And without doing the math, probably cheaper than the 1050. To me the only way that a 1050 would make any since is that I only loaded one caliber on that press and loaded a lot of it.

I have given a lot of thought to the XL650 vs 1050 and I just can't get past the crimped primers. Not a lot of them, perhaps 5%. So, 5 times out of every 100 operations, I have to stop and think: I'm about to do something different, this round isn't like the last round, how do I protect that loaded case? Sure, I have a plan; I just don't like having the interruption.

It is particularly problematic if the primer is jammed into the pocket, preventing the case from being removed from the shellplate. Now the only solution is to remove the loaded case and decap again. Then insert and decap a new case, reinsert the loaded case and index the plate. What a PITA! I don't see it being any better on the XL650. In fact, it might be worse with automatic indexing! Having never use an XL650, I don't have any idea what might be involved in recovering from this condition.

Right now we 3 shooters are using 2 - .45's and 1 - 9mm. That will change to 1 - .45 and 2 - 9mm as I plan to buy something for shooting IDPA. I sure don't plan to play in a 9mm sandbox with an overpowered .45. I could see the 3 of us all shooting 9mm by next summer. If we all decide to compete, we will be burning through a BUNCH of 9mm. So, the 550B is out of the question. Changing the caliber on the existing 1050 is also out of the question. There are far too many adjustments what with having to exchange the primer system.

I have NEVER gotten the throughput quoted by other users. But when I think about time, I include the time to verify the press settings, pick up primers, look over empty cases (looking for Blazer brass); basically all of the time from the moment I enter the garage until the time I leave. I don't even come close! Sometimes I think people are quoting their burst rate, not their overall rate. Either that or I am just terribly slow. Probably just slow... Old age and all...

If the bullet feeder helps speed up an XL650, it will probably help the 1050 just as much. I might just move in that direction next year some time. I can see adding a feeder to at least one of the machines. Since FMJ is mandated for use by the grandson, the restriction that the feeder only works with FMJ should not be an issue. Of course, I still don't understand why it won't work with moly coated bullets but that's a separate question.

GioaJack has it right (in his video): At some point, ego gets in the way. There is no question the XL 650 will do the job but the 1050 is just so much 'cooler'. And who doesn't want the 'coolest'? Especially if it is only incrementally more expensive than something that is less 'cool'.

Richard

rpgman
12-02-2011, 10:55
Richard,

What cases are you finding that are crimped in 9mm? And, are you talking about picked up Brass from the range?

Just curious, because I load Win, Hornaday, Speer, WCC and WWG.
Greg

ron59
12-02-2011, 11:40
Richard,

What cases are you finding that are crimped in 9mm? And, are you talking about picked up Brass from the range?

Just curious, because I load Win, Hornaday, Speer, WCC and WWG.
Greg

WCC is crimped, I don't come across enough of those to keep them so I trash them. Forcing a primer in those can be tough if the crimp hasn't been removed from the primer hole. Similar (for me at least) as S&B.

F106 - After tumbling my brass, I sit down in front of the TV and eyeball each and every one. It can be done very quickly. I have a small LED (bright) flashlight. The first thing I do is make sure the inside isn't gunked up. As I pick up some brass outside, I want to make sure a rock or a bunch of dirt didn't get packed inside. If it did and didn't catch it... you now have a reduced space which will increase pressure. That's a kaboom waiting to happen.

I also came across a some brass that was Berdan primed... two flash holes. This was before I started inspecting my brass and led to it being a requirement. I broke a decapping pin because of it. So now my inspection includes insuring one flash hole.

Lastly... there's some brass out there where the flash hole is smaller than normal. I don't think the decapping pin will even fit in there. That also gets discarded.

After a QUICK check of the inside, I roll it in my fingers checking for bad spots as I turn it to the headstamp and verify it is something I've heard of. If it's not one of the ones listed on the sticky, I trash that one too.

Lastly, I cull the .380s out.

I can do all this while watching TV or a movie or something. What does this do for me? Insures when I sit down at the press, my reloading time is going to be smooth and trouble free. And I've avoided letting a "plugged up" case slip by which could cause problems down the line (the kaboom factor I mentioned earlier).

Bit of a pain, but more than worth it. And I shoot 15,000 - 20,000 a year. I'd be willing to do the same thing if it rises to 25,000 as well. Just part of the deal for me.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 11:47
Richard it is real simple. At least for me. One of the ranges I shoot at is a military base. Lot of military spent brass. I bring it home but them on the bench base down. Then with a lighted magnifying light I grab a hand full so that Iím looking at the base of case and take out any of the crimped brass. My brass has a red sharpie on the base of the rounds so it is real easy to pick out my brass. When loading I have some brass that have been sized and primed and some that is only sized. If I come across a piece of brass that the primer does not want to go in I just stop reach in and pull it out. If it is crimped brass I just replace it with another piece of brass that has already been sized and primed. Takes about 10 seconds. I also load with no button in station 3. So it makes it real easy to pull a case out of there if the need arises.

rpgman
12-02-2011, 11:53
WCC is crimped, I don't come across enough of those to keep them so I trash them. Forcing a primer in those can be tough if the crimp hasn't been removed from the primer hole. Similar (for me at least) as S&B.

F106 - After tumbling my brass, I sit down in front of the TV and eyeball each and every one. It can be done very quickly. I have a small LED (bright) flashlight. The first thing I do is make sure the inside isn't gunked up. As I pick up some brass outside, I want to make sure a rock or a bunch of dirt didn't get packed inside. If it did and didn't catch it... you now have a reduced space which will increase pressure. That's a kaboom waiting to happen.

I also came across a some brass that was Berdan primed... two flash holes. This was before I started inspecting my brass and led to it being a requirement. I broke a decapping pin because of it. So now my inspection includes insuring one flash hole.

Lastly... there's some brass out there where the flash hole is smaller than normal. I don't think the decapping pin will even fit in there. That also gets discarded.

After a QUICK check of the inside, I roll it in my fingers checking for bad spots as I turn it to the headstamp and verify it is something I've heard of. If it's not one of the ones listed on the sticky, I trash that one too.

Lastly, I cull the .380s out.

I can do all this while watching TV or a movie or something. What does this do for me? Insures when I sit down at the press, my reloading time is going to be smooth and trouble free. And I've avoided letting a "plugged up" case slip by which could cause problems down the line (the kaboom factor I mentioned earlier).

Bit of a pain, but more than worth it. And I shoot 15,000 - 20,000 a year. I'd be willing to do the same thing if it rises to 25,000 as well. Just part of the deal for me.

I do the same thing while watching TV. Inspect and sort my Brass.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 12:06
I might add when I shoot on my other range I like to go around and pick up any brass left behind by other shooters. I then put down a mesh tarp for my brass. I do not mix the brass from what I pick up and my brass even though I do miss some brass and gets mixed in with mine. When Iím done shooting I go around and pick up brass that missed the tarp. Pick up the four corners of the tarp all the brass goes to the center. I then put the brass in a mesh bag. I then shake the bag to get rid of the sand and also listen for a tinny sound. If there is that means that there is a split case. When I come home they go into one of my tumblers with just walnut and a cut up dryer sheet. Latter they go into the other tumbler. Then when loading when the case is at station 3 when I look inside the case for powder Iím also looking for split case. A lot of times you will get a split case after it has been sized. Rifle brass is a different story.

F106 Fan
12-02-2011, 12:11
Guys, I know all of these processes will work. The thing is, I don't want to handle the brass; at all. Seperate by caliber, run through tumbler, dump into case feeder; that's all. I can't even imagine how to mark the loaded rounds with a Sharpie. I dump the output bin directly into 50 cal ammo cans. I don't handle the loaded rounds at all! I might look at them when I put them in the magazines.

FWIW, I tumble my brass for a LONG time! I usually leave it for about 6 hours. None of that 20 minute 'quick clean'.

We don't pick up brass that appears to be muddy. We lay down tarps such that we make every attempt to grab only our own brass but, sometimes, government issue brass slips in. Where I shoot, every public and private agency in the Sacramento area shoots. Some agencies you wouldn't even think should have guns. Or car keys...

Then there are the weekly matches (IDPA, IPSC, USPSA, etc.). These folks leave thousands of rounds of brass laying on the ground. Apparently the shooters can't pick up their brass until the entire match is complete and, by then, they have lost interest. Even expensive brass like 10mm and 38 Super is left laying in the dirt. I remember just figuring to lose the brass when I shot IPSC back in the early '80s. Just leave it...

The newest problem will be the once-fired brass I have bought from others. That's another 4000 cases that have to be handled. Just once, I hope!

I have that aluminum separator plate to separate .380 from 9mm. It works very well. I toss the .380 because I will never shoot enough of it to bother reloading. I do have the dies...

Richard

F106 Fan
12-02-2011, 12:19
I think part of my problem with the process is that I don't load just a couple of hundred rounds at a time. Today I will sit down and load about 2000 rounds - 1000 230 gr FMJ and 1000 230 gr LSWC. Tomorrow I will load 1000 230 gr LRN.

Then I won't reload again until I am nearly out of ammo. I don't really like reloading all that much and I just want to do it as seldom as possible and get it over as quickly as I can.

Except for rifle; I like reloading a few precision rifle shells. Maybe just 50 every once in a while.

Speaking of which, I better get started!

Richard

ron59
12-02-2011, 13:06
Long tumbles won't eliminate the berdan primed cases. Make sure you have some spare decapping pins.

Or those cases with the very tiny flash holes. One of my friends who also has a 550 called me a few weeks ago with a problem.... the small e-clip that holds the decapping pin had broke. I'm guessing he came across one of these. The decapping pin jams tightly in the hole, when you're lowering the shellplate it pulls down so tightly on the pin that it snapped that e-ring. Have some extras of those too.

Momma always said, "Lazy is as lazy does". :rofl::rofl:

I'm just kidding dude... enjoy.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 15:23
RPGMAN
Really it is quite simple. My change overs are from 9mm to 45acp. Yours with the same size primers is even simpler. For this I will go by what I have to do.
I first try if I know that Iím going to change over I try and empty the case feeder and primers when loading. If not replace the screw that is on the back of the case feeder that helps prevent the feeder from turning on the post with a thumb screw. Puller the feeder off and dump the cases out and change the plate if need be. But first I start out by removing the primer follower rod just to get it out of the way then remove the tool head. If not then start from the top, pull of the case feed tube and case feed adaptor put the adaptor in the box. Pull out the casefeed arm bushing then the case feed body bushing. Loosen the brass tip screw remove the shell plate. I then take out the locator pins and station 1 locator. As Iím taking these parts off they go into the box for them. I then R&R the primer magazine that is already set up for 45acp. When it is off I wipe down the platform. And every once in a while make sure that the two platform mount bolts are still tight. Also while the shell plate is off, put grease in the pawl spring and index pawl. It slows the index pawl down and helps prevent powder being kicked out of the case. Pull out your other conversion kit and put grease on the bottom of the station 1 locator and install it. Put on the shell plate and ejector wire run the bolt all the way down. Pull the handle back then lower the ram. With the Allen wrench in the bolt loosen the nut until the shell plate rotates. Keeping your hand on the Allen wrench raise and lower the ram for ease of the shell plate moving. I like to get it where the shell plate just turns then turn the Allen wrench about 1/16 more. Do not take your hand off the Allen wrench until you tighten the brass tip screw on the side of the ram. Then make sure the shell plate turns freely. Simpler than what it sounds. Now work your way back up the press installing all the other parts. The last thing to go on is the other tool head. You will need to adjust the primer locator tab for the case you are using. One of the advantages of another primer magazine assembly.
Your primer warning buzzer when you put it on, just leave it so it just slips on and off. No need to tighten it down.
You may or may not need to change out the feeder pistol plate. Some people have luck using the small for 9mm and 40.
When loading I like to stand just to the left of the press. So that I can look down inside the case for powder. And also a quick glance at station one to make sure there is a case or it is turned upside down. That is about all I look at. Donít worry about the other operations the press is doing it for you. I well every once in a while look at the powder check to make sure the needle is still in the center of the check rod sleeve.
Also standing to the left of the press if you should set off all the primers in the primer magazine you have the press column, powder measure, etc. between you and the primer magazine.
I also load without a locator pin, or button in station 3, makes it a lot easier to fix anything that goes wrong. Have not had a case fall out on me yet without the button installed.
Once you do a couple of change overs it get easier each time.
If something does not feel right stop and find out want is wrong. Especially seating primers. Also if a primer does not seat and is still in the primer disk make sure it drops out of the disk or you will have a primer jam.
I also do not change out the primer punch when I do large primers. Works just as well or better than the large punch.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 15:35
Long tumbles won't eliminate the berdan primed cases. Make sure you have some spare decapping pins.

Or those cases with the very tiny flash holes. One of my friends who also has a 550 called me a few weeks ago with a problem.... the small e-clip that holds the decapping pin had broke. I'm guessing he came across one of these. The decapping pin jams tightly in the hole, when you're lowering the shellplate it pulls down so tightly on the pin that it snapped that e-ring. Have some extras of those too.

Momma always said, "Lazy is as lazy does". :rofl::rofl:

I'm just kidding dude... enjoy.
Have not come across any Berdan primed case when loading. I have had the E clip snap because it wore out. Remember that E clips snaps down when it kicks out the primer. I don't remember if I have ever broken a Dillon decapping pin. RCBS a bunch. Have had the carbide ring pull out of the die. And Dillon replace that.

rpgman
12-02-2011, 17:04
thanks Bob for the reply and help.

I can't wait to get it setup tomorrow.
I have thousands of 9mm to load.

I'm sure I'll have to grease the pawl spring and index pawl when I first set it up.
Greg

RPGMAN
Really it is quite simple. My change overs are from 9mm to 45acp. Yours with the same size primers is even simpler. For this I will go by what I have to do.
I first try if I know that Iím going to change over I try and empty the case feeder and primers when loading. If not replace the screw that is on the back of the case feeder that helps prevent the feeder from turning on the post with a thumb screw. Puller the feeder off and dump the cases out and change the plate if need be. But first I start out by removing the primer follower rod just to get it out of the way then remove the tool head. If not then start from the top, pull of the case feed tube and case feed adaptor put the adaptor in the box. Pull out the casefeed arm bushing then the case feed body bushing. Loosen the brass tip screw remove the shell plate. I then take out the locator pins and station 1 locator. As Iím taking these parts off they go into the box for them. I then R&R the primer magazine that is already set up for 45acp. When it is off I wipe down the platform. And every once in a while make sure that the two platform mount bolts are still tight. Also while the shell plate is off, put grease in the pawl spring and index pawl. It slows the index pawl down and helps prevent powder being kicked out of the case. Pull out your other conversion kit and put grease on the bottom of the station 1 locator and install it. Put on the shell plate and ejector wire run the bolt all the way down. Pull the handle back then lower the ram. With the Allen wrench in the bolt loosen the nut until the shell plate rotates. Keeping your hand on the Allen wrench raise and lower the ram for ease of the shell plate moving. I like to get it where the shell plate just turns then turn the Allen wrench about 1/16 more. Do not take your hand off the Allen wrench until you tighten the brass tip screw on the side of the ram. Then make sure the shell plate turns freely. Simpler than what it sounds. Now work your way back up the press installing all the other parts. The last thing to go on is the other tool head. You will need to adjust the primer locator tab for the case you are using. One of the advantages of another primer magazine assembly.
Your primer warning buzzer when you put it on, just leave it so it just slips on and off. No need to tighten it down.
You may or may not need to change out the feeder pistol plate. Some people have luck using the small for 9mm and 40.
When loading I like to stand just to the left of the press. So that I can look down inside the case for powder. And also a quick glance at station one to make sure there is a case or it is turned upside down. That is about all I look at. Donít worry about the other operations the press is doing it for you. I well every once in a while look at the powder check to make sure the needle is still in the center of the check rod sleeve.
Also standing to the left of the press if you should set off all the primers in the primer magazine you have the press column, powder measure, etc. between you and the primer magazine.
I also load without a locator pin, or button in station 3, makes it a lot easier to fix anything that goes wrong. Have not had a case fall out on me yet without the button installed.
Once you do a couple of change overs it get easier each time.
If something does not feel right stop and find out want is wrong. Especially seating primers. Also if a primer does not seat and is still in the primer disk make sure it drops out of the disk or you will have a primer jam.
I also do not change out the primer punch when I do large primers. Works just as well or better than the large punch.

F106 Fan
12-02-2011, 17:20
Long tumbles won't eliminate the berdan primed cases. Make sure you have some spare decapping pins.

Or those cases with the very tiny flash holes. One of my friends who also has a 550 called me a few weeks ago with a problem.... the small e-clip that holds the decapping pin had broke. I'm guessing he came across one of these. The decapping pin jams tightly in the hole, when you're lowering the shellplate it pulls down so tightly on the pin that it snapped that e-ring. Have some extras of those too.

Momma always said, "Lazy is as lazy does". :rofl::rofl:

I'm just kidding dude... enjoy.


I haven't run across Berdan primed pistol cases. I see it quite a bit in NATO rifle. But I don't pick up brass for precision rifle. I buy Lapua brass new.

The nice thing about having a .45 ACP toolhead for the 550B is that I have a lot of spare parts!

Richard

ron59
12-02-2011, 17:54
Have not come across any Berdan primed case when loading. I have had the E clip snap because it wore out. Remember that E clips snaps down when it kicks out the primer. I don't remember if I have ever broken a Dillon decapping pin. RCBS a bunch. Have had the carbide ring pull out of the die. And Dillon replace that.

This dude has probably loaded less than 3000 9mm rounds. I don't think it "just wore out", mine has 40k on it and going strong.

the decapping pin I broke when I was trying to de-prime the Berdan cases. Stupid me thought it was just "tough" and used more force than I should have. Lesson learned on that one. But truthfully, it must've been only a few of those Berdan's I picked up (not the Blazer aluminum stuff either, this was a brass case)... I haven't seen any in a LONG time.

I still like doing my little examination phase. I've caught damaged brass I wouldn't have caught otherwise, plus all the S&B and WCC with the crimped primers that don't work well for me. I'd rather not have to stop and remove it mid-process, but have it eliminated beforehand.

But hey... we all find our own ways of doing things, just throwing my experiences out there in case somebody is interested.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 18:02
I'm sure I'll have to grease the pawl spring and index pawl when I first set it up.
Greg

Yep its just one of the tricks I learned in using the press. It also helps in cutting no more than 1/2 of a coil off on the index ball spring.I also found it helps to put grease on the case insert slide. Where the camming pin and also the casefeed arm. Also the indexer block. Do not take that piece off the press or loosen the screws.
Some of the little tricks are when you are ready to load reach in and pull the primer indexing arm 6 times. That will move the primer over the primer punch when the first case gets there.
If for some reasons you want to stop feeding primers take off the primer cam.
If for some reason you want to make the press manual indexing take out the index pawl under the shell plate.
Donít operate the press without the primer punch in place.
If something screws up and you have to take the cases out of the press. If it doesnít have a bullet on it dump the powder back in the powder measure.
Too dump powder out of the powder measure. Take off the fail safe rod put the two pins and pull of the tool head off. No need to take just the powder measure off. Unless you only have one and going on another tool head.
Remember the fail safe rod goes from left to right and get it as straight up and down as you can.
If you get media all over the work bench? Let me know and I will tell you how you can fix that.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 18:07
But hey... we all find our own ways of doing things, just throwing my experiences out there in case somebody is interested.

That is what all of us do here. Like they say there is more than one way to skin a cat.

rpgman
12-02-2011, 18:19
Thanks for all the great tips.
Can I get u to travel up to South Carolina to help me set it up n show me how it works?



Yep its just one of the tricks I learned in using the press. It also helps in cutting no more than 1/2 of a coil off on the index ball spring.I also found it helps to put grease on the case insert slide. Where the camming pin and also the casefeed arm. Also the indexer block. Do not take that piece off the press or loosen the screws.
Some of the little tricks are when you are ready to load reach in and pull the primer indexing arm 6 times. That will move the primer over the primer punch when the first case gets there.
If for some reasons you want to stop feeding primers take off the primer cam.
If for some reason you want to make the press manual indexing take out the index pawl under the shell plate.
Donít operate the press without the primer punch in place.
If something screws up and you have to take the cases out of the press. If it doesnít have a bullet on it dump the powder back in the powder measure.
Too dump powder out of the powder measure. Take off the fail safe rod put the two pins and pull of the tool head off. No need to take just the powder measure off. Unless you only have one and going on another tool head.
Remember the fail safe rod goes from left to right and get it as straight up and down as you can.
If you get media all over the work bench? Let me know and I will tell you how you can fix that.

unclebob
12-02-2011, 18:28
Thanks for all the great tips.
Can I get u to travel up to South Carolina to help me set it up n show me how it works?

Sorry, to bad you don't live south Florida or in the pan handle. I will be going down there in a couple of weeks.

GioaJack
12-02-2011, 18:32
That is what all of us do here. Like they say there is more than one way to skin a cat.

Now we're skinin' cats, that's off topic. MODERATOR... BANISH HIM!


Jack

F106 Fan
12-02-2011, 19:52
That is what all of us do here. Like they say there is more than one way to skin a cat.

There may well be more than one way to skin a cat but I can assure you the cat won't like any of them. :rofl:

Richard

PCJim
12-02-2011, 20:24
Sorry, to bad you don't live south Florida or in the pan handle. I will be going down there in a couple of weeks.

Heading down my way, uh? Panhandle getting a bit too cold for you? :supergrin:

I'd invite you to come to the club I belong to (TSSA) for an IDPA match, but I'm not sure yet of the holiday schedule.

unclebob
12-03-2011, 08:10
Heading down my way, uh? Panhandle getting a bit too cold for you? :supergrin:

I'd invite you to come to the club I belong to (TSSA) for an IDPA match, but I'm not sure yet of the holiday schedule.

Thanks for the invite, but I have never shoot IDPA. Have been wanting to try it but have never got around to do it.
The youngest boy lives in Orlando. He was up here for Thanksgiving so we are going down there for Christmas. At least that is want the plans are right now. Of course subject to change.

kostnerave
12-03-2011, 20:57
650 would be a great first press. Very nice indeed.

Do it and fast its a great press if you got the $$. If you don't borrow some and start saving real money every time you shoot. good luck:wavey:

kcbrown
12-05-2011, 05:48
Have not come across any Berdan primed case when loading. I have had the E clip snap because it wore out. Remember that E clips snaps down when it kicks out the primer. I don't remember if I have ever broken a Dillon decapping pin. RCBS a bunch. Have had the carbide ring pull out of the die. And Dillon replace that.

The E clip snapped on me today, and that's on a decapper that has perhaps 3000 rounds through it. I have to wonder if Dillon has a quality control problem with those. I'd think it would last quite a lot longer than that.

I love my 650, but it's not perfect. For example, the powder drop is messy -- it always spills a few grains of powder (Ramshot Silhouette, but it does the same with Titegroup) outside the case every pull of the handle, so I end up having to blow the shellplate clean every 50 to 100 rounds. I got to use a 550 recently and it didn't spill a single grain of powder outside the case. It got me wondering what the difference is between my powder drop and that one. I didn't notice any real difference between them. It's possible mine's machined poorly or something. I have the Uniquetek precision charging bar in mine but mine spilled powder the same way with the standard Dillon charging bar, so that's not the problem at all.

:dunno:


Since I broke an E clip and need a replacement, maybe I'll talk to Dillon about the powder drop, too.

ron59
12-05-2011, 08:57
I love my 650, but it's not perfect. For example, the powder drop is messy -- it always spills a few grains of powder (Ramshot Silhouette, but it does the same with Titegroup) outside the case every pull of the handle, so I end up having to blow the shellplate clean every 50 to 100 rounds. I got to use a 550 recently and it didn't spill a single grain of powder outside the case. It got me wondering what the difference is between my powder drop and that one. I didn't notice any real difference between them. It's possible mine's machined poorly or something. I have the Uniquetek precision charging bar in mine but mine spilled powder the same way with the standard Dillon charging bar, so that's not the problem at all.


That powder messiness will go away. Pretty sure the insert is sticking inside your case... when it finally breaks free, it's with a jerk and that is what makes the powder jump and go out. I would take mine apart and polish it occasionlly, but now after 40,000 rounds or so, it's not doing that anymore. It has been polished smooth from use.

HexHead
12-05-2011, 09:03
My question is this; Why would anyone sell the Dillon 650? Unless they dies of course, but this is the Cadillac of presses. Can't imagine some one selling one.:cool::tongueout:

Stepping up to a 1050?

HexHead
12-05-2011, 09:08
Unless you will be shooting 50,000 thousand or more rounds a year. Or have a lot of crimped brass I would go with the 650 with case feeder. I load at about 100rds. in 7 minutes. And I was shooting between 20,000 and 30,000 thousand a year. Conversions the way I do it takes between 7 to 10 minutes. If you need to load even faster on the 650 get a bullet feeder. And without doing the math, probably cheaper than the 1050. To me the only way that a 1050 would make any since is that I only loaded one caliber on that press and loaded a lot of it.

Also, keep in mind the 1050 does not have the lifetime no BS warranty.

F106 Fan
12-05-2011, 09:15
Also, keep in mind the 1050 does not have the lifetime no BS warranty.

True, and that's a big feature of the other presses. No BS means exactly that! Dillon is a great company to do business with.

If I break the 1050 (and I have mangled a couple of things), I expect to pay for the parts. No big deal so far.

Don't forget ego! I would rather just order the parts from the web site than explain how stupid I was when I broke something. Even on a 550B... As to a press just wearing out: not in my lifetime.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
12-05-2011, 09:31
You have a 1 year warranty. No BS for a year basically.