Building a new computer [Archive] - Glock Talk

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MySiK26
10-14-2011, 22:05
I'm going to start ordering parts I will need for a build. Will be mostly a home ent/gaming/school work rig. Any tips/tricks I should keep in mind once I start building this thing? This will be my first build.

Edit:

I scrapped some parts today from my old computer. Parts are a few years old but still work. From the old computer I pulled out a cd-rom drive, dvdrw drive, floppy drive, a 160 gb sata hdd, and one strip of five blue LED's with on/off button. That hard drive will probably stay for a while since I also have another cheap one one the way. I eventually want to get maybe (3) 250 GB and config them in raid. I'll probably keep the cd/dvd drives in addition to the new one I have coming in the mail, just have to have a backup if one dies.

They all fit in the case great. I wasn't so sure when I was reading about the tool-free drive bays, but went with the reviews. I have to say, I've taken it apart and looked around a few times and I'm really liking the case.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-1201-1319669512175.jpg

CitizenOfDreams
10-14-2011, 22:23
Do you need help with choosing the components or assembling them?

MySiK26
10-14-2011, 22:39
I've got almost all my components written down so far. I'm undecided on the video card(s) still. Only thing I've bought so far is the case. My experience is limited, but I have taken computers apart to replace hdd's, memory, fresh installs of windows, and I ran ubuntu for a while on a laptop and old pc. Was just wondering if there was anything i should keep in mind during assembly, that might save me some headaches and time.

CitizenOfDreams
10-14-2011, 23:26
Modern CPU heatsink mounts are a bit fragile and finicky. Other than that, it's all pretty straightforward, can't think of any special caveats. Just observe your regular electrical and electrostatic safety precautions.

After you assemble the computer, it's a good idea to check your RAM (memtest86+ bootable CD). I usually run continuous memory tests for a day or so, just to be sure.

When the OS is installed, put the CPU under 100% load and watch the heatsink/core temperatures. Modern CPUs run pretty hot, up to 90C core temperature under full load.

MySiK26
10-14-2011, 23:36
Thank you, I will def. Come back to this later!:wavey:

Sgt. Schultz
10-15-2011, 07:15
Go to Newegg and sign up for their e-mail alerts, E-BLAST, Guerilla deals, etc ... you can catch some great deals on parts.


Another site to watch ... http://www.techbargains.com/


.

Detectorist
10-15-2011, 07:25
Go to your local computer store, the one the system builders hang out at, and get your parts from them, if possible. I personally hate to deal with mail order companies, and don't have the time to do so.

Make sure you have figured out what you want and see if any local store has some special you can take advantage of. You may be able to get what you want in an off the shelf unit.

The economy being what it is, many computer manufacturers have cut their profit to the bone.

You would be in hog's heaven if you lived close to a Tiger Direct store.

pal2511
10-15-2011, 08:52
Go to your local computer store, the one the system builders hang out at, and get your parts from them, if possible. I personally hate to deal with mail order companies, and don't have the time to do so.

Make sure you have figured out what you want and see if any local store has some special you can take advantage of. You may be able to get what you want in an off the shelf unit.

The economy being what it is, many computer manufacturers have cut their profit to the bone.

You would be in hog's heaven if you lived close to a Tiger Direct store.

I hear the Intel I5 2500k is a pretty good cpu for the money. If you have a Microcenter nearby they are there for a good price.

I second the notion for newegg.com

Also make sure whatever video card you chooses fits in your case. I am in the market for a new video card also for under $200

Check out tomshardware.com for some reviews and they have a big forum there. I used to read the site often when it first came out years ago but just got back into the pc game lately.

Watch for electrostatic and do the memtest as the other person posted. Make sure your power supply has all the proper sata or molex power plugs for everything. Make sure you order the right interface on your dvd writer because most of the new mobos don't have IDE I don't think.

If your case has front usb 3.0 with internal headers make sure your mobo has that if you want front usb ports that are 3.0

pal2511
10-15-2011, 08:53
Modern CPU heatsink mounts are a bit fragile and finicky. Other than that, it's all pretty straightforward, can't think of any special caveats. Just observe your regular electrical and electrostatic safety precautions.

After you assemble the computer, it's a good idea to check your RAM (memtest86+ bootable CD). I usually run continuous memory tests for a day or so, just to be sure.

When the OS is installed, put the CPU under 100% load and watch the heatsink/core temperatures. Modern CPUs run pretty hot, up to 90C core temperature under full load.

I've been building computers off and on for years and I hate installing cpus onto motherboards. Everytime I just worry about smashing it lol

LukeDuke
10-15-2011, 09:20
I just finished my first build and had a lot of fun in the process. I would recommend selecting a case that has a good cable management compartment so that you can neatly organize the zillions of cables you will be running. Beyond that, take your time and enjoy it!

tous
10-15-2011, 09:22
I've been building computers off and on for years and I hate installing cpus onto motherboards. Everytime I just worry about smashing it lol

After the first bazillion or so you relax a bit. :supergrin:

If you have a case where the power supply mounts on the bottom, the mainboard power cables (a 24-pin and an 8-pin or 4-pin) may not reach. You can buy extenders, but all in all, it's annoying when a cable is juuuuuuuuuuuuust that much too short. :crying:

pal2511
10-15-2011, 10:52
Make sure you have the proper size screwdriver on hand, anti static wrist band strap (never used one though always keep one hand in the case). Ive heard keeping the power supply plugged in helps with grounding and other people say leave it unplugged. Don't know which is better.

CitizenOfDreams
10-15-2011, 11:43
Make sure you have the proper size screwdriver on hand, anti static wrist band strap (never used one though always keep one hand in the case). Ive heard keeping the power supply plugged in helps with grounding and other people say leave it unplugged. Don't know which is better.

I would say, keep the power supply plugged in (which grounds the case) with the AC switch off (which turns off the standby +5V supply). My house has 2-pin receptacles without ground, so it's does not matter either way. :wavey:

MySiK26
10-15-2011, 15:46
Go to Newegg and sign up for their e-mail alerts, E-BLAST, Guerilla deals, etc ... you can catch some great deals on parts.


Another site to watch ... http://www.techbargains.com/


.

Thanks, never heard of Techbargains.com I will have to check them out.

I ordered this case from Newegg yesterday afternoon: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147107

This MOBO/CPU combo is next on my list: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.739472

Modular Rosewill 800w PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182238

(I think the Internal lights look cheesy, but I'm going more for functionality here. I might even try to cover the internal lights so they don't shine.)

Corsair RAM 2X4 8GB DDR3 at 1600 : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233196

I am undecided on the video card still so any recommendations would be appreciated.

Also, thanks for the heads up on the electrostatic wristband thing. I will definately look into it. :wavey:

pal2511
10-15-2011, 22:21
Cod that's what I dtry to do. Sometimes it won't reach though so I try to keep one hand on case at all times. Never owned a strap before

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pal2511
10-15-2011, 22:23
I have a fractal designs arc MIDI. Love it and its close in prise to the rosewill. Look at the PC power and cooling power supplies or seasonic

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pal2511
10-15-2011, 22:25
I like Intel more for raw processing. Have not used amd for quite some time...

Is that the new bulldozer chip?

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Linux3
10-16-2011, 07:26
I've been building computers off and on for years and I hate installing cpus onto motherboards. Everytime I just worry about smashing it lol
I buy a case, motherboard, power supply, cpu and RAM from a local White Box store and then add the extras either from Newegg or stuff I have around.
If the motherboard or RAM or cpu is bad it can be a nightmare trying to find which is which. You almost have to do a parts swap. I have had this experience so now I am willing to pay a very small premium to make life easier.

Most White Box stores, in my experience, offer 'bare bones' systems at great deals for just this kind of build.

JimmyN
10-16-2011, 07:33
I'm getting ready to build another AMD system for myself, either 6 or 8 core, and have been doing a bit of research so I'll offer up my suggestions and thoughts for what it's worth.

That motherboard/CPU is a good combo, but do note that the CPU is currently out of stock, so it might be a while before you get it, since the 8 core is new and shipments may be spread out for a while yet as AMD tries to meet demand. It looks like both the 8150 and 8120 are out of stock, so Newegg doesn't have any 8 core CPU's available at the moment.

Nice case and it has a removable drive section in the center so long video cards will fit. It also has a bottom mounted PSU. But for that reason I would go with this power supply instead, since it will have longer cables for the motherboard power connections. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139010 The Rosewill supply would work well as a top mounted PSU, but for your case you will likely need a 6pin and possibly a 24pin power cable extension to reach all the way from the bottom to the top if you expect to do any cable management and tuck things out of sight. The Corsair is a little cheaper too, but it's not modular and doesn't have any lights, so I don't know if that's a deal breaker.

For the motherboard I've narrowed my short list down to:
ASUS - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131736 (the one in your combo)
ASRock - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157267
Gigabyte - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128509

All are the same price, have AMD3+ sockets and AMD 990FX chipsets. So they can use either the 6 core or 8 core AMD CPU's.

After looking at all the reviews and benchmarks for the new 8 core I'm really not that impressed so far. The 6 core 1100T can pretty much hold it's own against the 8 core, depending on what you'll use it for, and it's quite a bit cheaper. If you have a motherboard with AMD3+ socket and 990FX chipset you can always upgrade to 8 core later.

Generally for gaming you want to go with fewer cores and faster clock speeds, as games don't utilize 8 or even 6 cores at this point, or a least I'm not aware of any that do. If you are doing a lot of video encoding, demuxing, remuxing, or photo rendering of Sketchup drawings and other CPU intensive tasks then more cores will give you better performance even if they run at a slightly slower clock rate. For the ultimate gaming system with frame rates you can really brag about you'll want to go with Intel, but you'll pay a premium, ~$600 for the CPU + ~$200 for the motherboard. But then Ferrari engines cost more than Ford engines, quite a bit more. If you don't need the highest frame rates possible while gaming, and the system is also used for other CPU intensive tasks then you'll get a lot more bang for the buck with a 6 core AMD. And it will still post respectable frame rates when gaming.

Right now this is my choice for CPU. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103913&Tpk=amd%201100t

Since I'll be overclocking this quite a bit I'll also have to decide on a CPU cooler that can handle at least 150watts, 350W capability would be better to keep the temps down, like one of the Zalman extreme coolers. But large aftermarket coolers take a lot of space and tend to infringe on the RAM slots. ASUS seems to be the most crowded, Gigabyte is a little better, and ASRock boards usually provide the best clearance as they seem to have the widest spacing between the CPU socket and the RAM slots.

Of course all this is just my opinion...

MrSmoofy
10-16-2011, 08:00
The few things I can think of are:

1. Make sure the powersupply you pick is big enough and don't get one that is just big enough always over do it here you don't want your power supply running at 100% all the time.

2. If your using Sata drives (probably are) make sure you get the cables that have latches. I did a build and every time I would reach into the case to move/change soemthing I would end up unplugging a drive and not notice until I turned the PC on. Was very frustrating.

MySiK26
10-16-2011, 10:54
Lots of good suggestions. I may have to rethink the components. I know they have an HH Gregg store close by. I may go check them out later after I do some housework. Thanks again for all the info!

MySiK26
10-16-2011, 10:55
I like Intel more for raw processing. Have not used amd for quite some time...

Is that the new bulldozer chip?

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Yes it is. :wavey:

MySiK26
10-16-2011, 11:50
Jimmy, I like that PSU alot. I actually like it more than the one I was considering. I'd like to over-do it on the PSU in case I want to add more things in the future. Like Mr Smoofy suggested, how many watts would leave me a good deal of room to add more things later on? Do you think 750 watts is more than enough for the CPU, MB, a few HDD's, etc? If I remember correctly, the case I ordered comes with five fans as well. Maybe I should sit down and crunch some numbers to make sure I don't get just enough for what I need/want.

ETA, I found this site, but not sure of all the components still:

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

sbhaven
10-16-2011, 12:11
Do you think 750 watts is more than enough for the CPU, MB, a few HDD's, etc? If I remember correctly, the case I ordered comes with five fans as well.
700 watts should be plenty. For more than a few years I've been running a 600 watt power supply (FSP Group FX600-GLN) to drive an Q6600 processor on an ASUS P5W DH board, with a 1 GB ATI video card, 4 internal SATA hard drives, a DVD+-R drive, a CD-RW drive, and 5 80mm internal case fans.

Dandapani
10-16-2011, 12:17
I quit building my own computers. I just go to BB and buy a cheap business machine, reformat the HD and install Linux. Last one was a Gateway with an Intel i5, 6gb memory and 1.5tb harddrive for $700.

MySiK26
10-16-2011, 12:30
700 watts should be plenty. For more than a few years I've been running a 600 watt power supply (FSP Group FX600-GLN) to drive an Q6600 processor on an ASUS P5W DH board, with a 1 GB ATI video card, 4 internal SATA hard drives, a DVD+-R drive, a CD-RW drive, and 5 80mm internal case fans.

Cool. I'm gonna check out HH Gregg in a few.

I quit building my own computers. I just go to BB and buy a cheap business machine, reformat the HD and install Linux. Last one was a Gateway with an Intel i5, 6gb memory and 1.5tb harddrive for $700.

lol that takes the fun out of it! I will most def be messing around with Linux, That will probaly be the first OS to go in. Dual Boot WIN7 afterwards.

mhunter
10-16-2011, 13:05
I just built an Intel i7 rig this past June. Best thing I've ever done regarding computers. It was so easy. I'm sure luck played in somewhat, but it booted on the very first power up and tried loading an old jacked up Win XP hard drive from my old system, which I hadn't reformatted with a new OS (Win 7) yet. My BS degree is Comp Sci ('93) and I figured it was finally time to roll my own system. I still can't believe everything worked perfectly on the first try. I WILL build my own systems from now on and I'll hook everything up outside the case next time and make sure it all works first. I would have been pissed if I had to pull everything back out of the case to troubleshoot bad hardware. :supergrin:

H3br3wHamm3r
10-16-2011, 13:57
I used to be an AMD guy...have an Eyefinity 6 5870 by Sapphire, and a 970 Black Edition 4-core processor. Both are pretty good.

I think I will remain loyal to AMD graphics cards, but my next CPU will likely be Intel's 2600k. It's insane.

Of course, that means I have to change the mobo too.

I usually get my parts from Newegg. If you want a damn good box, check out the Corsair 600T.

As far as dual booting, I think I'll just go with installing OS's (Ubuntu, BackTrack) in VMWare from now on. Got a great price using the student discount. I'll just keep Windows 7 as my main OS on my hard drive. Reduces the complexity and hassle.

GAFinch
10-16-2011, 14:48
Whatever video card you get, make sure it's supported well by the Linux build you're using.

MySiK26
10-16-2011, 14:57
Whatever video card you get, make sure it's supported well by the Linux build you're using.

Thanks, I will keep that in mind.

JimmyN
10-17-2011, 04:29
Jimmy, I like that PSU alot. I actually like it more than the one I was considering. I'd like to over-do it on the PSU in case I want to add more things in the future. Like Mr Smoofy suggested, how many watts would leave me a good deal of room to add more things later on? Do you think 750 watts is more than enough for the CPU, MB, a few HDD's, etc? If I remember correctly, the case I ordered comes with five fans as well. Maybe I should sit down and crunch some numbers to make sure I don't get just enough for what I need/want.

ETA, I found this site, but not sure of all the components still:

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp


If you are going to run a single video card then 750 watts will be plenty. If you are going with two or more in a SLI/Crossfire configuration then you may need something bigger depending on the cards you choose.

An EVGA GTX 580 (~$590.00) will need about 40 amps, or almost 500 watts. So a 750 watt would be enough even with that video card. But if you want two of those in parallel then you'd need 1,000 watts just to power the graphics. I'd want at least a 1200 watt PSU.

Drop down to an EVGA GTX 550 (~$190.00) and you'll be around 25~30 amps or a little over 300 watts. You could almost power two of those with a 750 watt supply, but that would be really maxing the PSU a good part of the time so it wouldn't be the best choice, I'd go with a 1000 watt PSU.

MySiK26
10-17-2011, 12:30
If you are going to run a single video card then 750 watts will be plenty. If you are going with two or more in a SLI/Crossfire configuration then you may need something bigger depending on the cards you choose.

An EVGA GTX 580 (~$590.00) will need about 40 amps, or almost 500 watts. So a 750 watt would be enough even with that video card. But if you want two of those in parallel then you'd need 1,000 watts just to power the graphics. I'd want at least a 1200 watt PSU.

Drop down to an EVGA GTX 550 (~$190.00) and you'll be around 25~30 amps or a little over 300 watts. You could almost power two of those with a 750 watt supply, but that would be really maxing the PSU a good part of the time so it wouldn't be the best choice, I'd go with a 1000 watt PSU.

Thanks. I will probably run one card at first, but will def run two eventually, so I'll definately go for more wattage and get it right the first time around.

MySiK26
10-19-2011, 17:25
Delete

Wake_jumper
10-19-2011, 17:57
I built an i5 2500K last month using a Gigabyte z68x mobo. It is smokin fast! I am still on the fence about a video card though. In the meantime, I'm just using the on-chip video built into the i5 (Intel HD Graphics 3000). Unless you are running the latest super duper video games, you should try the built in video. I think it works at least as well as the entry level dedicated cards. The mobo has DVI, VGA, and HDMI ports.

Drjones
10-20-2011, 08:58
I'll tell ya one thing is do NOT buy an OCZ SSD!!!

Otherwise, I'd really strongly recommend you get an SSD for your boot drive, and have a 1 or 2TB additionally for storage.

I wouldn't recommend any smaller than 120GB though, and you'd need more space depending on the programs/games you'd want to install.

The speed an SSD offers is ridiculous...

podwich
10-20-2011, 13:26
I'll tell ya one thing is do NOT buy an OCZ SSD!!!

Otherwise, I'd really strongly recommend you get an SSD for your boot drive, and have a 1 or 2TB additionally for storage.

I wouldn't recommend any smaller than 120GB though, and you'd need more space depending on the programs/games you'd want to install.

The speed an SSD offers is ridiculous...

What's up with the OCZ SSDs now? They used to be rather desired.

I have 2 of them- a Vertex I use as a boot/system drive in my desktop and a larger Vertex 2 I have in my laptop. Both have worked flawlessly.

MySiK26
10-21-2011, 15:02
What's up with the OCZ SSDs now? They used to be rather desired.

I have 2 of them- a Vertex I use as a boot/system drive in my desktop and a larger Vertex 2 I have in my laptop. Both have worked flawlessly.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4973/sandforce-identifies-firmware-bug-causing-bsod-issue-fix-available-today

MySiK26
10-21-2011, 15:04
I'll tell ya one thing is do NOT buy an OCZ SSD!!!

Otherwise, I'd really strongly recommend you get an SSD for your boot drive, and have a 1 or 2TB additionally for storage.

I wouldn't recommend any smaller than 120GB though, and you'd need more space depending on the programs/games you'd want to install.

The speed an SSD offers is ridiculous...

There were issues that required a firmware update. If you purchased a defective unit or experienced bad customer service, those are different matters. I have read a lot of complaints about their customer service though.

wct097
10-21-2011, 18:40
I'm still loving my 2600k/16gb/Vertex3/Asus 6850... fastest PC I've ever touched.

I considered building an AMD based machine, but I've been so happy with my Sandy Bridge quad-i7 laptop, that I just couldn't do it with all of the benchmarks showing the i7 destroying the AMD.

m2hmghb
10-22-2011, 19:48
A higher end power supply is the best bet. The more room on the PS the more efficient it will be, an 800 watt PS working with 600 watts will be a lot less efficient then a 1000 watt PS. In addition it gives room for expansion.

I personally will not buy an ATI graphics card anymore since they discontinued the 5870 without giving notice to anyone. I'm stuck with a single 5870 when I planned on putting in a second one, 400 dollars down the drain because of their BS move.

mhunter
10-23-2011, 09:37
I personally will not buy an ATI graphics card anymore since they discontinued the 5870 without giving notice to anyone. I'm stuck with a single 5870 when I planned on putting in a second one, 400 dollars down the drain because of their BS move.

You can't find another one from a vendor who still has old stock...or a used one?

pal2511
10-23-2011, 09:58
Surely you could find a used 5870 somewhere. Maybe find someone else that was going to SLI them :)

Drjones
10-23-2011, 12:07
What's up with the OCZ SSDs now? They used to be rather desired.

I have 2 of them- a Vertex I use as a boot/system drive in my desktop and a larger Vertex 2 I have in my laptop. Both have worked flawlessly.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4973/sandforce-identifies-firmware-bug-causing-bsod-issue-fix-available-today


Yep, this. If you look back over the last few pages of this forum, you'll see a thread or two about my woes with the drive, an Agility 3.

The first one I received was DOA, and then I started having all sorts of lovely BSOD issues with the second one.

I also have a dead Vertex 2 on my desk that I need to RMA, but I have one installed in my old desktop PC that was working perfectly. I still need to find another purpose for it since I "upgraded" to the SATA 3 Agility.

Anyway, here's a breakdown of my experience with OCZ drives:

1) Vertex 2, used as my primary drive in my old desktop PC, has worked perfectly for around a year or so, no issues at all.

2) Agility 3, purchased in Aug. 2011 for the new PC I built myself. DOA.

3) Agility 3, replacement unit for #2 above. Been having infrequent BSOD - about once a week or so. Haven't had any in about 2 weeks now, keeping fingers crossed....

4) Vertex 2, purchased around May 2011 to install into a clients' desktop. It's DOA, sitting on my desk waiting to be RMA'd.

5) Agility 3 installed in another clients' laptop. Haven't heard anything, hoping it will stay alive.


Anyway, after experiences like this, I'm done with OCZ and will look elsewhere for my next drive. I did a ton of research before purchasing that first Vertex 2.

Otherwise, I can't recommend an SSD highly enough - the speed is just stupid. My new PC I built myself - Core i7-2600k - boots in about 30 seconds or so.

Big Al 24
10-23-2011, 18:42
Crucial m4 are the way to go currently- unless you want to shell out for the intel ones.

MySiK26
10-24-2011, 16:02
]
Thanks for all your help and suggestions. I'll keep you all updated (for those of you that are interested) on the build and hopefully get a few pics up!

:wavey:

MySiK26
10-29-2011, 19:30
Got all my parts today. I'm about to throw in the towel and finish tomorrow. I've plugged everything in and....no power on. I've checked all the connections four times and still no power on. I'm hoping the PSU isn't DOA. It's an OCZ MODX streampro 700w. Really frustrated right now. :crying:

Drjones
10-29-2011, 20:19
Got all my parts today. I'm about to throw in the towel and finish tomorrow. I've plugged everything in and....no power on. I've checked all the connections four times and still no power on. I'm hoping the PSU isn't DOA. It's an OCZ MODX streampro 700w. Really frustrated right now. :crying:


I have that exact same power supply....seems fine for me, but after all the crap I've gone through with OCZ's SSDs, I'm not so confident in their stuff.

What's happening, nothing at all, any beeps or errors on screen or what? If there's nothing at all, check the switch on the back of the power supply - make sure it's in the "on" position. :supergrin:

MySiK26
10-29-2011, 21:11
Doc, I must have some of the plugs in the wrong place, if that's even possible. When I plug in the AC cord to the PSU, and throw the switch to the "on" position, the L.E.D. on the mobo turns on, so I know there's juice (at least I assume so). When I press the Power button on the case I hear a faint noise from the PSU like it's about to turn on, then nothing happens. No beeps, no fans turning on, just nothing. From that I assume the PSU is fine and I'm just missing something somewhere.

Javelin
10-29-2011, 22:05
Wouldn't this be a good option vs. building one? Just thinking about what the OP is doing & thought this might be a good option.

iBUYPOWER Gamer Extreme 920SLC Gaming PC - Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz, 8GB DDR3, 1.5TB HDD, DVDRW, NVIDIA GT 520, Liquid Cooling, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=567261&CatId=4928

pal2511
10-29-2011, 22:05
Make sure your not grounding the mobo on a exta standoff

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MySiK26
10-29-2011, 22:17
Wouldn't this be a good option vs. building one? Just thinking about what the OP is doing & thought this might be a good option.

How is that fun?? :rofl:

iBUYPOWER Gamer Extreme 920SLC Gaming PC - Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz, 8GB DDR3, 1.5TB HDD, DVDRW, NVIDIA GT 520, Liquid Cooling, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=567261&CatId=4928

Make sure your not grounding the mobo on a exta standoff


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what do you mean??

Javelin
10-29-2011, 22:27
what do you mean??

I was talking about just buying one from iBuyPower vs. building it. Just seems a lot easier to flip the switch and it comes on..... :dunno:

StarvinMarvin
10-29-2011, 22:38
Doc, I must have some of the plugs in the wrong place, if that's even possible. When I plug in the AC cord to the PSU, and throw the switch to the "on" position, the L.E.D. on the mobo turns on, so I know there's juice (at least I assume so). When I press the Power button on the case I hear a faint noise from the PSU like it's about to turn on, then nothing happens. No beeps, no fans turning on, just nothing. From that I assume the PSU is fine and I'm just missing something somewhere.

Do you have the 4pin cpu power aux hooked up to the mobo? It will not boot without that hooked up. I've forgotten that little sucker before lol .

MySiK26
10-29-2011, 23:42
Do you have the 4pin cpu power aux hooked up to the mobo? It will not boot without that hooked up. I've forgotten that little sucker before lol .


are you talking about this one?

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-2545-1319951956390.jpg

does it go in that top right corner where I put a pcie cable my mistake? :supergrin:

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-5700-1319952251909.jpg

I'm still having the same problem though.

MySiK26
10-29-2011, 23:54
I was talking about just buying one from iBuyPower vs. building it. Just seems a lot easier to flip the switch and it comes on..... :dunno:

i was referring to the other poster's question about the 4-pin aux
edit: that is a nice setup. I wanted to learn how to put it together, so I went this route.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 00:02
oh, I also have this left over :

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-760-1319954489361.jpg

can't seem to find it in the manual.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 00:12
Make sure your not grounding the mobo on a exta standoff

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

It must be this... which means I'll need to take the mobo out and redo it

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 00:20
oh, I also have this left over :

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-760-1319954489361.jpg

can't seem to find it in the manual.

and I'm guessing that's the bridge cable for SLI

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 00:53
got all the stand offs mounted correctly, board isn't making contact anywhere I can see. Still have the same problem.

m2hmghb
10-30-2011, 02:10
Surely you could find a used 5870 somewhere. Maybe find someone else that was going to SLI them :)


Last one I found was more the 1.5x what they originally sold for. The profiteers are out in force on them. I won't buy a used card because of people abusing them then reselling.






As for your mobo, I'd suggest you contact the tech support for the company, sounds like you might have a bad one. Good luck.

JimmyN
10-30-2011, 04:56
If you have the motherboard I think you do then you should have an 8 pin connector (4+4) for ATX/EPS 12V rather than a 4 pin (ATX).

Start with the bare minimum to test it, divide and conquer is the key to diagnostics. Unplug all the cables to the motherboard, including the ones from the front of the case that are plugged into the pin header. Unplug all the connectors from the PSU to the drives, fans, PCI-e, etc. so there is nothing connected to the PSU. We only want to power the motherboard for the test and nothing else. When everything is disconnected then:

Plug in the 24 pin mainboard connector.

Plug in the 8 pin (4+4) CPU power. The connector socket will be at the top edge of the board, left side. And you will have a matching cable with the 8 pin connector coming from the PSU, there will only be one. All the wires will be yellow or black, no red.

Note that the PCI-e connectors from the PSU are also 8pin but they are 6+2 plugs rather than 4+4. According to the Rosewill specs for that PSU you will have six of those PCI-e plugs, but there will only be one 4+4 plug for CPU power.

With just the 24pin and 8pin connected to the motherboard you've got everything needed to power it up. Turn on the power supply and you should have a power led on the board light up, that means you have 3.3V output from the PSU and it's ready for a power_up signal from the motherboard.

Look down on the pin header, bottom edge of the board. It's probably silk screened onto the board, or look in your motherboard manual for pin connections. You'll have a pin marked "Power" or "PWR" or "Power on" and an adjacent "Gnd" pin. Touch a screwdriver tip, paper clip, or something similar across the two pins, so that you short the "Power" pin to the "Gnd" pin momentarily. The power supply should start up and the CPU fan should start spinning.

I always test the motherboard and PSU before I put anything in the case, to make sure it works. I lay the motherboard on the desk, set the PSU next to it and plug in the 24 and 8 pin connectors. Turn on the PSU then short the power up pins and see if the PSU starts up and the CPU fan turns. If that checks out OK then I install them in the case.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 08:12
If you have the motherboard I think you do then you should have an 8 pin connector (4+4) for ATX/EPS 12V rather than a 4 pin (ATX).

Start with the bare minimum to test it, divide and conquer is the key to diagnostics. Unplug all the cables to the motherboard, including the ones from the front of the case that are plugged into the pin header. Unplug all the connectors from the PSU to the drives, fans, PCI-e, etc. so there is nothing connected to the PSU. We only want to power the motherboard for the test and nothing else. When everything is disconnected then:

Plug in the 24 pin mainboard connector.

Plug in the 8 pin (4+4) CPU power. The connector socket will be at the top edge of the board, left side. And you will have a matching cable with the 8 pin connector coming from the PSU, there will only be one. All the wires will be yellow or black, no red.

Note that the PCI-e connectors from the PSU are also 8pin but they are 6+2 plugs rather than 4+4. According to the Rosewill specs for that PSU you will have six of those PCI-e plugs, but there will only be one 4+4 plug for CPU power.

With just the 24pin and 8pin connected to the motherboard you've got everything needed to power it up. Turn on the power supply and you should have a power led on the board light up, that means you have 3.3V output from the PSU and it's ready for a power_up signal from the motherboard.

Look down on the pin header, bottom edge of the board. It's probably silk screened onto the board, or look in your motherboard manual for pin connections. You'll have a pin marked "Power" or "PWR" or "Power on" and an adjacent "Gnd" pin. Touch a screwdriver tip, paper clip, or something similar across the two pins, so that you short the "Power" pin to the "Gnd" pin momentarily. The power supply should start up and the CPU fan should start spinning.

I always test the motherboard and PSU before I put anything in the case, to make sure it works. I lay the motherboard on the desk, set the PSU next to it and plug in the 24 and 8 pin connectors. Turn on the PSU then short the power up pins and see if the PSU starts up and the CPU fan turns. If that checks out OK then I install them in the case.

JImmy, I just did what you said and it powers on right away. Somewhere after that I must be messing up. Thanks.

ETA:

Just plugged everything back in one by one, checking each time that it still boots up and everything seems fine. Will update. Thanks again Jimmy.

JimmyN
10-30-2011, 08:53
Excellent. Since it powers up I'm going to say that most likely your only problem was the 2pin connector coming from the case "Power" button was on the wrong two pins.

Look for the 2 pin connector coming from the case front, it should be labeled "Power SW", "Power on" or something similar. Plug that onto the two pins you shorted and then you should be able to power it on from the front pushbutton. Then find the 2 pin connector labeled "Reset" and plug it onto the reset pin and gnd. Orientation of the plug will be the same as the "Power on" connection. You should then be able to start it up with the power button, and pressing the reset button should give you a re-start.

If that works then start plugging in drives and fans and try it again. There is a possibility that one of them could be shorted which will shut down the PSU on overcurrent. But in that case you'll usually see the fans bump a little as the PSU comes up but shuts right back down.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 10:00
Excellent. Since it powers up I'm going to say that most likely your only problem was the 2pin connector coming from the case "Power" button was on the wrong two pins.

Look for the 2 pin connector coming from the case front, it should be labeled "Power SW", "Power on" or something similar. Plug that onto the two pins you shorted and then you should be able to power it on from the front pushbutton. Then find the 2 pin connector labeled "Reset" and plug it onto the reset pin and gnd. Orientation of the plug will be the same as the "Power on" connection. You should then be able to start it up with the power button, and pressing the reset button should give you a re-start.

If that works then start plugging in drives and fans and try it again. There is a possibility that one of them could be shorted which will shut down the PSU on overcurrent. But in that case you'll usually see the fans bump a little as the PSU comes up but shuts right back down.

Yup, all the fans and lights are on and running. I'm just not getting video. I have the HDMI plugged in right now but still no signal. Grrrr... gotta go back and check my connections and that none of them came loose. I have a PNY Geforce GTX 460 card.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 11:35
I don't know what I'm missing. Everything seems plugged in, I do not get any beeps.

wct097
10-30-2011, 12:07
I've had issues with video cards not booting with HDMI working. Actually had to get it booted and change a setting first. Any chance you can use a DVI or VGA connector to get up and going with?

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 12:25
I've had issues with video cards not booting with HDMI working. Actually had to get it booted and change a setting first. Any chance you can use a DVI or VGA connector to get up and going with?

The video card has two VGA connectors, there are two slots I can put the video card in as well. I have tried both connectors on both slots and nothing. The RAM LED is lit when the computer is on, so I'm not sure if there is a ram issue. There are four slots for RAM, and I'm using 2x4gb ddr3. I have tried installing the ram in the other two slots as well.. not sure whats going on at this point. :dunno:

JimmyN
10-30-2011, 12:31
That card will require a PCI-e power connector, maybe two of them I'm not sure. Make certain the power connector is all the way in and seated on the GTX 460.

Try connecting the monitor to a DVI port rather than the HDMI port on the GTX 460. HDMI includes sound, so you may not get HDMI output on that port until you load all the drivers for the adapter, which you can't do until you have installed the OS.

There is no video difference in DVI and HDMI, they are identical signals, same spec. HDMI is just DVI plus sound and two way communication between the devices on the single cable. Unless you want to use speakers in the monitor, assuming it has speakers, there is no advantage to using HDMI for a computer monitor.

No beeps on POST? It could be the system speaker is on the wrong pins, so you don't get any sound, or it could be failing on POST. Just use one stick of RAM to start, and make sure you have both a mouse and keyboard plugged in. The BIOS could be set by default to stop on keyboard/mouse error, and you can't change anything in the BIOS until you have a working display.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 13:08
That card will require a PCI-e power connector, maybe two of them I'm not sure. Make certain the power connector is all the way in and seated on the GTX 460.

Try connecting the monitor to a DVI port rather than the HDMI port on the GTX 460. HDMI includes sound, so you may not get HDMI output on that port until you load all the drivers for the adapter, which you can't do until you have installed the OS.

There is no video difference in DVI and HDMI, they are identical signals, same spec. HDMI is just DVI plus sound and two way communication between the devices on the single cable. Unless you want to use speakers in the monitor, assuming it has speakers, there is no advantage to using HDMI for a computer monitor.

No beeps on POST? It could be the system speaker is on the wrong pins, so
you don't get any sound, or it could be failing on POST. Just use one stick of RAM to start, and make sure you have both a mouse and keyboard plugged in. The BIOS could be set by default to stop
on keyboard/mouse error, and you can't change anything in the BIOS until you have a working display.

Just got to BIOS, changed boot order and installed ubuntu from usb thumb drive. So far so good guys, thanks.

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 15:07
I keep getting a cpu fan error then a prompt to hit F1 for setup. It looks like the cpu fan is connected, and all the fans are running fine, even the Cooler Master CPU fans I have on there (both fans are running).

MySiK26
10-30-2011, 16:07
Also im getting one continuous beep, followed by four short beeps. Morse code for Hardware Component Failure according to the manual. :dunno:

JimmyN
10-31-2011, 07:34
So it's indicating a hardware failure during POST, but then it boots up and appears to be functioning OK? Does the amount of installed RAM match what the system is reporting?

That could also be related to the fan error, which is telling you the BIOS doesn't think the CPU fan is turning. Look at the fan and make sure it is still running, they do fail sometimes. Then look at the plug for the CPU cooler fan. If it is 3 pin, and the CPU fan header on the motherboard is 4 pin that can cause a problem because the fan is not reporting RPM's back to the BIOS. That's why the BIOS can't tell if it's functioning.

You'll want to check CPU temp anyway so let the system run for about 5 minutes to warm up and then reboot and go into the BIOS.

You should have a section titled "PC Health", "Hardware Monitor" or something similar. Look at the CPU temp to see what it's running while idling. It should be pretty cool.

Disable any automatic fan speed control, it will shown as "Q-Fan", "Cool & Quiet" or something. It usually won't work correctly unless you install the motherboard drivers for it and I don't think you can do that running Ubuntu. You may be able to change the CPU fan type, so if the CPU cooler fan is a three pin then set the fan type to "DC" so the BIOS doesn't expect RPM feedback.

If you still get the fan error you may also have the option in the BIOS to turn off the low speed fan alarm

That may take care of your errors.

wct097
10-31-2011, 07:57
Wait... is it booting or not? I'm confused, you keep saying that it's working, then reporting back with errors stating that it isn't booting.

With the ASUS board, if it's like mine, the LEDs indicate the part of the system that's hanging when it won't post. If the LED by the memory is lit and it won't POST or beep, then you have a memory issue.

The newer boards take the memory differently than the other boards. Does your memory slot have a locking mechanism at both ends or just one end? If it's the latter, then you need to put the opposite end in first, then push the end with the lock in second. The first time I dealt with one of this type of board, I installed the memory like I was used to installing it and mine wouldn't POST.

MySiK26
10-31-2011, 13:53
Guys, the memory should be fine, I just didn't have one of them seated all the way. Also I was trying to use 32 bit. I'm DLing 64 bit right now.

As far as the fan goes, the aftermarket PC Power and Cooling fan I bought is three pin, and the header is three pin as well. Both fans on that cooler run despite the error msg on POST. I tried booting with the Stock INTEL CPU fan which has a four pin connector, though it runs, I get the same message on POST. I was able to boot once from my Vertex SSD, but no dice after that. I'm going to try to install the 64 bit version of Ubuntu, after I download it and start from scratch. At this point I don't think it's a hardware issue, rather the settings need to be tweaked correctly. I will report back after I try the 64 bit install.

MySiK26
10-31-2011, 13:54
Jimmy, to answer one of your other questions, I think the CPU was at about 120 degrees F

MySiK26
10-31-2011, 13:58
Wait... is it booting or not? I'm confused, you keep saying that it's working, then reporting back with errors stating that it isn't booting.

With the ASUS board, if it's like mine, the LEDs indicate the part of the system that's hanging when it won't post. If the LED by the memory is lit and it won't POST or beep, then you have a memory issue.

The newer boards take the memory differently than the other boards. Does your memory slot have a locking mechanism at both ends or just one end? If it's the latter, then you need to put the opposite end in first, then push the end with the lock in second. The first time I dealt with one of this type of board, I installed the memory like I was used to installing it and mine wouldn't POST.

As of right now, it's not booting. Yes, my board is the type that only one side locks, but the memory is seated fine and I'm ok with that now.

MySiK26
10-31-2011, 14:44
Just went through the 64 bit installation. Everything seemed fine. It finished installing, asked to reboot. After reboot I get the same msg at POST (the fans are all working) then it tries to boot and gives me this:

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/knuckleball6268/photobucket-3144-1320093512844.jpg :dunno:

MySiK26
10-31-2011, 17:51
WOW. ok, I had the CPU fan plugged into the wrong header. :whistling:

All is working great now. I learned alot in the whole process, thank you all for your help.:wavey:

JimmyN
11-01-2011, 06:24
Glad to hear you got it working. You learn a lot more by fixing problems than you do if everything goes perfectly. And as you've seen it's usually nothing major, it's the little things that you didn't pay much attention to as you put it together that cause problems.

MySiK26
11-01-2011, 15:19
Glad to hear you got it working. You learn a lot more by fixing problems than you do if everything goes perfectly. And as you've seen it's usually nothing major, it's the little things that you didn't pay much attention to as you put it together that cause problems.

Thanks Jimmy, I'm actually glad I ran into some minor problems, as I learned a few things. It would've been alot easier to buy a computer like some others suggested... but what would I have learned? :wavey:

mhunter
11-01-2011, 15:33
WOW. ok, I had the CPU fan plugged into the wrong header. :whistling:

Good God...are you serious? All this because of that?

My mother board has the plug labeled CPU FAN. In fact, EVERY fan plug was clearly labeled. Did you even LOOK at the motherboard picture/schematic that came with it? :upeyes:

MySiK26
11-01-2011, 18:46
Good God...are you serious? All this because of that?

My mother board has the plug labeled CPU FAN. In fact, EVERY fan plug was clearly labeled. Did you even LOOK at the motherboard picture/schematic that came with it? :upeyes:

This is my first build friend. I'm sorry for the inconvenience.

mhunter
11-01-2011, 23:37
This is my first build friend. I'm sorry for the inconvenience.

I'd console with you, but I did my "first build ever" myself this past summer.

Intel mobo, core i7 processor, 16GB RAM...the works... I used my old 500GB hard drive from my previous computer and it booted on the very first power-on attempt. The boot didn't go well as it was an XP install previously...but it WORKED. Formatting/installing Win 7 after that was a snap. :cool:

MySiK26
11-02-2011, 19:04
I'd console with you, but I did my "first build ever" myself this past summer.

Intel mobo, core i7 processor, 16GB RAM...the works... I used my old 500GB hard drive from my previous computer and it booted on the very first power-on attempt. The boot didn't go well as it was an XP install previously...but it WORKED. Formatting/installing Win 7 after that was a snap. :cool:

pm me your mailing address, I'll send you a cookie.

mhunter
11-02-2011, 19:14
pm me your mailing address, I'll send you a cookie.

Nah...I wouldn't want to soak up any of your time since you have your hands full with just the very minor stuff. :tongueout:

MySiK26
11-02-2011, 19:58
Nah...I wouldn't want to soak up any of your time since you have your hands full with just the very minor stuff. :tongueout:

At least I don't spend my time being an *******.

Sgt. Schultz
11-02-2011, 20:15
:popcorn:


.

mhunter
11-02-2011, 21:45
At least I don't spend my time being an *******.

Good for you. I don't spend my time getting my knickers up in a wad over something so minor that I feel the need to post a bunch of asterisks. :rofl:

MySiK26
11-03-2011, 15:22
You can pee further than I can. I get it... you win, tough guy.

mhunter
11-03-2011, 16:17
You can pee further than I can. I get it... you win, tough guy.

Well, if you know that little detail about ANY other man...you just might be a meat gazer... :aodnsb:

MySiK26
11-03-2011, 17:39
Well, if you know that little detail about ANY other man...you just might be a meat gazer... :aodnsb:

hahaha...WHATEVER man. Carry on.

mhunter
11-03-2011, 18:10
Toodles!

DWavs
11-04-2011, 19:23
Well, if you know that little detail about ANY other man...you just might be a meat gazer... :aodnsb:

Grow up. This one is closed.