Small Rifle Primer vs Small Rifle Magnum [Archive] - Glock Talk

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gforester
10-19-2011, 16:27
Went by my LGS to get a pack of large rifle primers but they were out. Got some magnum primers instead. I was going to use them to reload some 30.06 on my new press. Can I use the magnums in place of the standard ones and if so should I make any adjustments to the powder charge.

Kentucky Shooter
10-19-2011, 16:37
Went by my LGA to get a pack of small rifle primers but they were out. Got some small rifle magnum primers instead. I was going to use them to reload some 30.06 on my new press. Can I use the magnums in place of the standard ones and if so should I make any adjustments to the powder charge.


First of all, the 30-06 uses large rifle primers. Small rifle primers are not going to work.

Second, unless your recipe calls for magnum primers, you should not be using them. Cartridges designated as "magnum" like the 7mm mag, 300 mag, etc... generally call for them where a standard cartridge like the 30-06 or 270 will not.

You need a good manual and do your homework before proceeding. I would suggest the Speer, Hodgon, or Lyman manuals. Follow the advice in these books religiously and precisely----anything less can not only possibly damage/ruin an expensive firearm, but it can get you hurt.

Reloading is a great hobby and very safe, when carried out as prescribed by expert advice. Speaking from my own expereince, all of us started out as beginners who did not know much about it. I learned over time, from reading manuals and my own experience. So my advice is read all you can, and proceed slowly, building on your own experience.

Good luck.

ColoCG
10-19-2011, 16:37
Went by my LGA to get a pack of small rifle primers but they were out. Got some small rifle magnum primers instead. I was going to use them to reload some 30.06 on my new press. Can I use the magnums in place of the standard ones and if so should I make any adjustments to the powder charge.


No! 30-06 case takes Large Rifle primers.

shotgunred
10-19-2011, 16:58
Second, unless your recipe calls for magnum primers, you should not be using them. Cartridges designated as "magnum" like the 7mm mag, 300 mag, etc... generally call for them where a standard cartridge like the 30-06 or 270 will not.
Good luck.

I use magnum primers interchangeably with regular primers. As long as your not going for super top end loads they are fine.




Reloading is a great hobby and very safe, when carried out as prescribed by Experts.
:rofl: Experts probably should know what they are talking about.

ColoCG
10-19-2011, 17:09
I use magnum primers interchangeably with regular primers. As long as your not going for super top end loads they are fine.



:rofl: Experts probably should know what they are talking about.


I agree with you. I don't interchange them much, but I agree it can be done without problems especially in 30-06.
Small for Large is asking too much.

Kentucky Shooter
10-19-2011, 17:37
:rofl: Experts probably should know what they are talking about.

not sure your point........my only point is do your homework. The original post suggested to me a lack of even the most basic and fundamental knowledge of reloading. I was offering a sincere opinion to a sincere question.

gforester
10-19-2011, 18:20
not sure your point........my only point is do your homework. The original post suggested to me a lack of even the most basic and fundamental knowledge of reloading. I was offering a sincere opinion to a sincere question.

I have been reloading for more than two years, albeit handgun ammo only. I know that you CAN use magnum primers in place of standard primers in handguns but it is NOT the recommended thing thing to do. However, I wasn't so sure about rifles. My bad on calling them small instead of large primers. I'm so used to loading small and small magnum primers for my pistol loads that I inadvertently typed small.

So my question should be, in a pinch, is it permissible to use the magnum instead of the standard primers in my 30.06 and should there be a corresponding adjustment to the powder charge? Neither my Lyman or Speer reloading guides specify a charge using magnum primers.

If it really is an issue I can always return them and drive another 20 miles to another shop that should have the standard ones in stock.

Thank you ColoCG, I promise to not peen over the brass on my .06 cartridges in an attempt to make small primers fit. :supergrin:

Kentucky Shooter
10-19-2011, 20:09
I understand gforester..... I sometimes think one thing and type another. I hope I did not offend in making the assumption from your typo that you did not know what you are doing---that was certainly not my intent. :wavey:

I am sure magnum primers can be and are often used in standard cartridges. Me personally, if I were going to do so, I would go to the starting load and test from there.

If you don't have a chronograph, a $100 chrony is a great investment and a good way to test loads for consistency. If your starting loads with magnum primers are in line with your expected velocities, you could leave your charge alone or adjust up a little.

Good luck.

ColoCG
10-19-2011, 21:30
gforester, it is not nearly as big a deal substituting magnum primers for standard primers in large rifle calibers.

Start your loads at a safe pressure and work up. As shotgunred said you can probably use them interchangebly in a safe load, but they may shoot to a different point of aim than standard primers. In which case any load worked up with them would have to be changed if you returned to standard primers.

Why waste your time unless it is all you can get. If it was me, I would return them and get standard primers and stay with the same components.
Just my opinion.

fredj338
10-19-2011, 21:38
Second, unless your recipe calls for magnum primers, you should not be using them. Cartridges designated as "magnum" like the 7mm mag, 300 mag, etc... generally call for them where a standard cartridge like the 30-06 or 270 will not.

You need a good manual and do your homework before proceeding. I would suggest the Speer, Hodgon, or Lyman manuals. Follow the advice in these books religiously and precisely----anything less can not only possibly damage/ruin an expensive firearm, but it can get you hurt.
.
I agree, especially for noobs, follow the data as closely as possible. You can certainly use a magnum primer in place of a std, but it depends on your load & how close you are to the top end. BTW, the name magnum has nothing to do with the primer used. You match the primer to the type & volumn of powder, has nothing to do with the cartridge. There are powders that can be used quite nicely in the 7RM & 300WM w/o a mag primer. I look at about 70gr of slow powders as my point to look @ mag primer or most ball powders ignite better w/ mag rpimers @ any volumn.

Zombie Steve
10-19-2011, 23:33
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x214/sbecht/SPPvsLPP.jpg

gforester
10-20-2011, 07:36
Thanks for the suggestions guys, it is appreciated. I do plan to start at the lower end to work up my loads and will be using a chrono to check my results. I just wanted to be extra careful as this will be my first foray into the world of rifle reloading.

PCJim
10-20-2011, 09:12
GF, make a mental note that when you revert to a standard LRP, the accuracy of your newly developed load "may" change. That's why I don't like interchanging primers for rifle. Once I develop a load, I like to keep the components consistent to that I don't feel the need to rework the load again for accuracy.

fredj338
10-20-2011, 09:16
GF, make a mental note that when you revert to a standard LRP, the accuracy of your newly developed load "may" change. That's why I don't like interchanging primers for rifle. Once I develop a load, I like to keep the components consistent to that I don't feel the need to rework the load again for accuracy.
Very true JIm. When I work up an accuracy load for a rifle, the last thin I do is swap 3-4 dif brands & even throw a mag primer at it. Raraly does the mag rpimer increase accuracy & some loads in some rifles show a distinct pref for one primer type. I rarely change my rifle loads components once the load has been established.

gforester
10-20-2011, 12:43
Well, since this will be my first attempt at rifle loading I just want to have some primers to work with. These magnums fill that bill for me. I have some H335 powder to try out as well so even that may change down the road. Besides I only picked up 100 primers as that is typically enough for 4 range trips with the Springfield. For some reason I seldom put more than 20-25 rounds down range in any trip. So, maybe I am just a sissy when it comes to shooting the 03A3. :)

Once I am comfortable with the process I will probably pick up 1K of primers in the correct size. I would think that should be enough to last me quite a long time, maybe even the rest of my life.

fredj338
10-20-2011, 13:48
I think you'll find H335 a bit lacking in the larger 06 case, too fast. Something along the lines of one of the 4350 would be better. The fastest I would go would be IMR4895, even then only for 150gr bullets. The medium to medium slow powders will give highert vel w/ exc accuracy & lower pressures. So powders from IMR4064 to IMR4831 for bullets of 150-180gr. For heavies, IMR4831 & slower.