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nathanours
10-31-2011, 10:48
Hey guys, I'm new to reloading (well haven't even started yet) and I have a few questions.

I just ordered the ABCs of reloading I've seen you guys mention, and I'll give that a thorough reading when it arrives in a week or so.

My question is, which press should I buy? I've got a budget of around $200 max for the press itself. I know I'll still need dies a scale, a powder measure, and a tumbler at some point too.

I've currently got around: 500 5.56x45 brass, 2000 45 auto, 4000 9mm, and 500 38 special brass to reload that I've saved over the last 2 years.

ETA: that is about how much I shoot in a year or two, so that is the volume I'll probably be reloading, maybe more if that matters.

I want a good quality press that will hold up well, and people have recommended to me the RCBS rock chucker, and the lee classic turret. What are you guys opinions of those two?

I tried the search function, but for some reason it isn't working.

Thanks,

Nathan

freakshow10mm
10-31-2011, 11:03
Classic Turret press will load faster than the single stage, since each case is ran through the series of 4 dies without changing to complete a single loaded round. The single stage is best loaded in batches, so you put the sizing die in then run all the cases to size, deprime, and reprime them. Then take out that die and put in the next and run the cases through that step, etc.

Both are great presses for what they are. With shooting that volume, you'd be fine with a single stage press. With a turret press you can cut your loading time in half and have that much more time for other matters (be they gun/shooting related or family/life related).

nathanours
10-31-2011, 11:06
Which brand is better quality, Lee or RCBS?

creophus
10-31-2011, 11:06
At that budget...Lee Classic Cast Turret.

Hogpauls
10-31-2011, 11:07
I use the Rock Chucker Supreme, it's built very well and will be around for the grandchildren to use. I shoot and load 6000-7000 rounds a year of various calibers and have no problems keeping up using the single stage. The press alone will run around $130 and the kit for $300 depending where you shop.

nathanours
10-31-2011, 11:09
The $200 is only for the press, not everything. So you guys think I'd be okay reloading that volume with a single stage?

freakshow10mm
10-31-2011, 11:39
Which brand is better quality, Lee or RCBS?
The RCBS is over-engineered more than the Lee. The RCBS is stronger by design than the Lee and has a longer warranty. I've had a Lee Classic Turret for several years and it's still running strong. A friend is using it to load .44 Mag.

unclebob
10-31-2011, 11:41
Like what was said before, how much time do you have to reload? If you are like most people you will double the amount you shoot now.

F106 Fan
10-31-2011, 11:53
Well, I'm going to suggest a different approach. Consider the Dillon BL550. It is a stripped down RL550B that is still a progressive press. Sure, it's $60 more than the budget but at least it has a future with an eventual upgrade to a full-blown RL550B.

You will need a powder scale immediately. There is simply no other way to meter the powder charges unless you add some kind of powder dispenser. But you would need a scale anyway.

Just something to think about...

Richard

PEC-Memphis
10-31-2011, 12:13
Well, I'm going to suggest a different approach. Consider the Dillon BL550. It is a stripped down RL550B that is still a progressive press. Sure, it's $60 more than the budget but at least it has a future with an eventual upgrade to a full-blown RL550B.

You will need a powder scale immediately. There is simply no other way to meter the powder charges unless you add some kind of powder dispenser. But you would need a scale anyway.

Just something to think about...

Richard

Pretty good advice. But to add....

I have a single stage RCBS that is 39 years old. I still use it for bullet pulling and for short runs (typically rifle). If you get a single stage RCBS, you will always find a use for it, even if you get a progressive later.

PCJim
10-31-2011, 12:38
Like some others, I still have and use the press that got me into reloading, a RCBS RS2 back in '83. I now load almost exclusively on a 550b (can't get myself to fall in love with the SDB). I still work up loads as well as perform some rifle prep work on the ss.

nathanours
10-31-2011, 12:41
I honestly have plenty of time, so that really isn't a concern. I'd rather get something good to learn on.

What do you guys recommend for a powder scale, and a powder dispenser if I get the RCBS?

freakshow10mm
10-31-2011, 12:45
Powder scale I use a cheap digital jeweler's scale that converts to grains. I like the RCBS Uniflow powder measure as it comes with a bar so you can mount it around the sizing die and secure with its lockring so it hangs off to the side. Size the case, reprime it, then take it out of the shellholder, slide it under the powder measure to drop the powder charge, then place in your loading block. After that is done, put in your seating die and just seat the bullets.

fredj338
10-31-2011, 12:51
I started w/ *& still use a RCBS ss press, but you would never get me to go back to it for volumn handgun reloading. The LCT makes mroe sense & should last you along time, maybe all the press you'll ever need but for heavy duty case forming or bullet sizing. A good scale, powder measure & die setups & you are on your way.

unclebob
10-31-2011, 13:01
For the life of me I cannot understand why people that have a progressive press think they need to work up loads on a single stage press. I just does not make any since too me.

creophus
10-31-2011, 13:08
Scale: RCBS 505
Powder measure: RCBS Uniflow

freakshow10mm
10-31-2011, 13:16
If I have one caliber setup on the progressive and want to make a quick run of another caliber for load workup, I don't want to tear down the progressive to make the caliber change only to change it back shortly thereafter.

When I do load workups I usually bring the components and the Lee hand press to the range and do it there.

When I use the progressive to load workups, I drop 10 cases into the casefeed tube and load those, then increase the PM a bit, drop another 10 cases into the tube and continue.

If I'm doing workups for more than one caliber, I use the single stage as it's faster to setup than the progressive, especially if I'm only loading 50 rounds to test.

I don't think you need a single stage for workups, but certain instances it's nice not to have to touch the progressive.

dkf
10-31-2011, 13:45
I have an LCT but if I was buying a single stage press I would lean towards the Lee Classic Cast Breech Lock press. Lees breech lock system is pretty slick and quick. You can put Lees safety prime setup on the classic cast press also. I was thinking about picking one up to go with my LCT but I may just buy another LCT in the future.

F106 Fan
10-31-2011, 14:02
Pretty good advice. But to add....

I have a single stage RCBS that is 39 years old. I still use it for bullet pulling and for short runs (typically rifle). If you get a single stage RCBS, you will always find a use for it, even if you get a progressive later.

Oh, absolutely! I have both an RCBS RockChucker and a Big Max. I use the RockChucker for rifle reloading - in particular, .308 and 6.5x284 NORMA. But for these, 100 rounds is a big session. Fifty rounds is more typical.

For these, I trickle the powder and try to make every cartridge identical. I spend a lot of time on case prep and such. The results are worth it.

However, when it comes to .223 and 9mm, I use the 550B and for .45 ACP I use the 1050. I'm in a hurry...

I could use the 550B as a rotary single stage press, it would certainly do the job. In fact, it would be easier to prime cases on the 550B than it is to use a hand priming tool. To trickle the charges would just involve changing the powder dispenser with some kind of funnel. If I didn't already have the RockChucker, this is exactly how I would do it.

In fact, now that I think about it, maybe I should move my precision rifle loading the the 550B. All I need is a new die head and maybe a new shell plate. Then I could recover some bench space currently used by the RockChucker. This is a really good idea!

I guess I have to agree with some of the others, there is simply no point in buying a single stage press. Everything you can do on a single stage can be done better on a progressive regardless of how you operate the progressive.

And there is probably no reason to buy a turret press either. It has no upgrade possibility and it is unlikely to be the last press. A 550B could very well be the last press unless pistol loading gets out of hand. Then a 650 or 1050 would be a better choice. But the price goes up considerably.

No, I think I'll stick with the recommendation for the Dillon BL550 with the idea that the press will be upgraded to a 550B over time. It will do everything the turret and single stage presses will do and it has a future.

Richard

unclebob
10-31-2011, 14:02
If I have one caliber setup on the progressive and want to make a quick run of another caliber for load workup, I don't want to tear down the progressive to make the caliber change only to change it back shortly thereafter.

When I do load workups I usually bring the components and the Lee hand press to the range and do it there.

When I use the progressive to load workups, I drop 10 cases into the casefeed tube and load those, then increase the PM a bit, drop another 10 cases into the tube and continue.

If I'm doing workups for more than one caliber, I use the single stage as it's faster to setup than the progressive, especially if I'm only loading 50 rounds to test.

I don't think you need a single stage for workups, but certain instances it's nice not to have to touch the progressive.

I guess it all depends on how you do it. I donít change the powder measure for adding powder. Only to bell the case. For powder I pull the case out of the press and either use the RCBS charge master or use the Dillon powder measure with powder and dump the charge on the other scale then trickle in the rest of the powder. Yesterday I load 100rds of 45 ACP ammo for an upcoming GSSF match on a LCT press. Everything was already set. But I could have changed the 650 from 9mm to 45acp loaded the rounds and put it back to 9mm in the time it took me to load them of the LCT.Once I have a load I donít change the powder bar setting. It only changes if I change the type of powder or the amount of powder. So unless I come up with a better load for that round the powder measure stays the same.

unclebob
10-31-2011, 14:08
I have an LCT but if I was buying a single stage press I would lean towards the Lee Classic Cast Breech Lock press. Lees breech lock system is pretty slick and quick. You can put Lees safety prime setup on the classic cast press also. I was thinking about picking one up to go with my LCT but I may just buy another LCT in the future.

You can put the Hornady LNL system on a Rock Chucker Press.

PCJim
10-31-2011, 14:14
Bob, I perform .223 resizing on the RS2 simply because the 550 pretty much stays set for my fav 9mm load. I could take a spare toolhead and load it with only the resizing, and resize them all before retumbling to remove the lube. I just don't think there's all that much time savings when the RS2 is already sitting there with the .223 resizing die loaded (it seems to stay set up that way).

While I do have several spare toolheads, I haven't loaded them up for any of the less reloaded rounds - 44mag, 30-06, 243 and now 308. I may get around to doing it, but don't feel the need as of yet. I'm sure the 550 can make ammo just as consistent as the RS2 does. I just haven't gotten around to doing it. That being said, if I didn't have the RS2, I would be reloading these other calibers on the 550.

nathanours
10-31-2011, 14:38
Well guys, I ended up ordering some stuff, let me know what you think.

So far I've got: RCBS rock chucker press, RCBS uniflow powder measure, and an RCBS 5-0 scale. Also 45 RCBS dies to start with.

DoctaGlockta
10-31-2011, 14:41
I was about to say that if I had to do it over again I'd start with a LCT instead of a hand press but upon thinking about it I would keep things the same.

Using the hand press forced me to really think about what I was doing and why. I think if I just had a LCT or progressive I would have not had the appreciation for 'learning' the how, why, where, what's of reloading. It made me handle the brass. Double check my primer seating. Double check my powder charges. It forced me to slow down.

Once I had the 'basics' down then I progressed to a progressive.

Looking back I would not have changed a thing. YMMV.

Lockback
10-31-2011, 14:42
FWIW, I highly suggest the Lee Turret Press (or Classic edition).
A great press for the money. It does everything and anything you ask it to.

unclebob
10-31-2011, 14:51
Well guys, I ended up ordering some stuff, let me know what you think.

So far I've got: RCBS rock chucker press, RCBS uniflow powder measure, and an RCBS 5-0 scale. Also 45 RCBS dies to start with.

I have put I personally don't care for the RCBS dies. I would also get the Hornady LNL bushings. Once you get the dies setup it is then just a matter of turning the die about a quarter of a turn and pull out install the next die and turn a quarter of a turn.
http://www.midwayusa.com/Product/858110/hornady-lock-n-load-press-and-die-conversion-bushing-kit

atakawow
10-31-2011, 14:55
Well guys, I ended up ordering some stuff, let me know what you think.

So far I've got: RCBS rock chucker press, RCBS uniflow powder measure, and an RCBS 5-0 scale. Also 45 RCBS dies to start with.

IMO, skip the Rock Chucker and go with the Lee Classic Turret. It just makes a whole lot more sense to have an LCT as your first and only press. Quality, inexpensive, anything the Rock Chucker can do the LCT does it better, much higher rate of production, outstanding customer service, made in the US vs made in China (not that it matters).

F106 Fan
10-31-2011, 15:02
I have put I personally don't care for the RCBS dies. I would also get the Hornady LNL bushings. Once you get the dies setup it is then just a matter of turning the die about a quarter of a turn and pull out install the next die and turn a quarter of a turn.
http://www.midwayusa.com/Product/858110/hornady-lock-n-load-press-and-die-conversion-bushing-kit

I'm not certain this will work. The conversion bushing requires a 1-1/4"x 12 thread in the press and I would think that most presses are 7/8"x14.

I really like the L-N-L concept but I just don't think they will work on RCBS or Dillon presses. If it does work, I would certainly like to know about it!

I like the Redding Competition dies for rifle reloading and the Dillon dies work fine for pistol reloading. I have some RCBS dies (actually, I have somewhat more than 'some') and they work ok but I like the precision features of the Redding dies and the productivity features of the Dillon dies.

Richard

mnhogrider
10-31-2011, 15:03
How about this?

http://www.midwayusa.com/Product/646599/rcbs-rock-chucker-supreme-single-stage-press-master-kit

Good press, powder measure and scale. The hand priming tool works great.

The Spear reloading manual has some good reading in it.

You'll need to buy your die set and shell holder.

Get some primers, powder and bullets. Read the ABC's and reloading manual. You're ready to go. You'll probably be under $500.00 for all of it.

unclebob
10-31-2011, 15:23
I'm not certain this will work. The conversion bushing requires a 1-1/4"x 12 thread in the press and I would think that most presses are 7/8"x14.

I really like the L-N-L concept but I just don't think they will work on RCBS or Dillon presses. If it does work, I would certainly like to know about it!

I like the Redding Competition dies for rifle reloading and the Dillon dies work fine for pistol reloading. I have some RCBS dies (actually, I have somewhat more than 'some') and they work ok but I like the precision features of the Redding dies and the productivity features of the Dillon dies.

Richard

Yes they will work on a Rock Chucker press. I have them on mine. Look on top of the press and where the die goes you notice that it is shaped so you can put a wrench on it. Take that out and replace it with the Hornady adaptor. It well not work on any of the Dillon pressís. There is not enough room to drill and tap the tool head of a Dillon. Already looked in on doing just that.

dkf
10-31-2011, 15:40
You can put the Hornady LNL system on a Rock Chucker Press.

I saw LNL conversion kits but didn't know what presses they had them for.

IMO the Lee breech lock system is a better design because it locks in place to prevent die rotation. Plus the Lee Classic Cast with the Breech Lock already on it is cheaper than the Rockchucker press alone, then you have to add the LNL setup. Six of one and a half dozen of the other I guess.

F106 Fan
10-31-2011, 15:50
Yes they will work on a Rock Chucker press. I have them on mine. Look on top of the press and where the die goes you notice that it is shaped so you can put a wrench on it. Take that out and replace it with the Hornady adaptor. It well not work on any of the Dillon pressís. There is not enough room to drill and tap the tool head of a Dillon. Already looked in on doing just that.

My bad! My RCBS press is an RS, not a RockChucker. In any event, it doesn't have a removable bushing. Bummer... I think my RCBS Max may have that bushing but that thing is huge!

I really like the L-N-L concept. I have even been thinking about getting one of the matching Hornady presses. Probably the L-N-L AP in 9mm.

Richard

unclebob
10-31-2011, 16:06
I saw LNL conversion kits but didn't know what presses they had them for.

IMO the Lee breech lock system is a better design because it locks in place to prevent die rotation. Plus the Lee Classic Cast with the Breech Lock already on it is cheaper than the Rockchucker press alone, then you have to add the LNL setup. Six of one and a half dozen of the other I guess.

If you already own a Rock Chucker you can add the Hornady LNL system. Never had a problem of it unlocking. But then about all I use it for is depriming primers that got screwed up.
I like the Lee cast press. For one the spent primers. Hated the spent primer tray on the RCBS. Looks like RCBS used part of my idea. But they still used the tray. Mine the primer stays in the ram until I lower the ram. It then goes out the back of the ram into a garbage can. So if a live primer should ever go off. It will just bounce around inside the ram.

freakshow10mm
10-31-2011, 22:48
I guess it all depends on how you do it. I donít change the powder measure for adding powder. Only to bell the case. For powder I pull the case out of the press and either use the RCBS charge master or use the Dillon powder measure with powder and dump the charge on the other scale then trickle in the rest of the powder. Yesterday I load 100rds of 45 ACP ammo for an upcoming GSSF match on a LCT press. Everything was already set. But I could have changed the 650 from 9mm to 45acp loaded the rounds and put it back to 9mm in the time it took me to load them of the LCT.Once I have a load I donít change the powder bar setting. It only changes if I change the type of powder or the amount of powder. So unless I come up with a better load for that round the powder measure stays the same.
I hear what you're saying. My progressive is a 1050 so caliber changes take longer on it than a 650. When I still had my 550 I used that for workups and did long production runs of ammo on the 1050. Sometimes I get seller's remorse for getting rid of the 550, but I just load a few on the 1050 and it goes away quickly. :)

I'd love to get a micrometer powder bar, but I'm too cheap.

unclebob
11-01-2011, 07:04
I hear what you're saying. My progressive is a 1050 so caliber changes take longer on it than a 650. When I still had my 550 I used that for workups and did long production runs of ammo on the 1050. Sometimes I get seller's remorse for getting rid of the 550, but I just load a few on the 1050 and it goes away quickly. :)

I'd love to get a micrometer powder bar, but I'm too cheap.

I agree doing conversions on a 1050 is out of the question. Probably the biggest reason why I do not own one. Instead of the micro bar I went with extra powder bars. Once set for the charge I want. Takes about two minutes to swap out. Plus you can get about 2 bars for the price of the micro bar.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 07:29
I agree doing conversions on a 1050 is out of the question. Probably the biggest reason why I do not own one. Instead of the micro bar I went with extra powder bars. Once set for the charge I want. Takes about two minutes to swap out. Plus you can get about 2 bars for the price of the micro bar.

I wonder if it is worth drilling and tapping a hole for a setscrew to hold the adjusting bar in position. I'm less than thrilled with the security of that 1/4"-20 machine screw.

Richard

creophus
11-01-2011, 07:38
IMO, skip the Rock Chucker and go with the Lee Classic Turret. It just makes a whole lot more sense to have an LCT as your first and only press. Quality, inexpensive, anything the Rock Chucker can do the LCT does it better, much higher rate of production, outstanding customer service, made in the US vs made in China (not that it matters).

Agreed.

To the OP: It's your money so it's your choice but the LCT is a better option, no question, in my opinion.

unclebob
11-01-2011, 07:50
I wonder if it is worth drilling and tapping a hole for a setscrew to hold the adjusting bar in position. I'm less than thrilled with the security of that 1/4"-20 machine screw.

Richard

I have thought of that also. But in over 30 years of loading on a 550 and 650 with over half a million rounds loaded between the two. I have not had one that ever moved. Itís one of the reasons why I do not like changing the settings on the bar two much. Large threads and soft metal moving around all the time I think over time will cause slop. I also always start below the charge I want and workup. If I go past I go back down and go back up again. Just to take some of the slop out.

freakshow10mm
11-01-2011, 08:28
I wonder if it is worth drilling and tapping a hole for a setscrew to hold the adjusting bar in position. I'm less than thrilled with the security of that 1/4"-20 machine screw.

Richard
I had to do it on my 550 because the screw walked.

unclebob
11-01-2011, 08:41
I had to do it on my 550 because the screw walked.

But I think you changed the setting on the bar more than the average reloader. It also I think proves my point of not adjusting the bar all the time.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 08:41
I had to do it on my 550 because the screw walked.

I'm starting to use Titegroup (today, as a matter of fact) and it seems like a little goes a long way. A couple of tenths could be a serious problem.

I bought an extra-small charge bar so maybe I'll try the lock screw from the beginning.

Richard

unclebob
11-01-2011, 08:48
I'm starting to use Titegroup (today, as a matter of fact) and it seems like a little goes a long way. A couple of tenths could be a serious problem.

I bought an extra-small charge bar so maybe I'll try the lock screw from the beginning.

Richard

If you do I would put a piece of lead shot between the bolt and the set screw so you don't screw up the threads on the bolt.

Colorado4Wheel
11-01-2011, 09:30
I'm starting to use Titegroup (today, as a matter of fact) and it seems like a little goes a long way. A couple of tenths could be a serious problem.

I bought an extra-small charge bar so maybe I'll try the lock screw from the beginning.

Richard

It ain't broke, don't fix it.

Any screw that walked would result in a call to Dillon for a new setup. It is very rare for that to happen.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 09:39
If you do I would put a piece of lead shot between the bolt and the set screw so you don't screw up the threads on the bolt.

I wasn't going to lock the screw, I was going to lock the internal bar that's connected to the screw. Still, the piece of lead shot would prevent scarfing the bar. As part of the mod, I'm trying to eliminate the backlash in the screw mechanism by basically taking it out of the adjustment. Once the bar drops the proper load, I want to lock the internal bar and then I don't care what the screw does.

On all of my charge bars, I can easily turn the adjustment screw by hand. It certainly doesn't require a wrench. AFAIK, the adjustment has never slipped but there is nothing to prevent it. For some powders, like Unique, a couple of tenths probably doesn't matter. But this Titegroup stuff seems pretty fast and a little goes a long way.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
11-01-2011, 10:26
I would be much more inclined to use some Medium LocTite. it will still be moveable, but it will create friction beyond what you have now.

creophus
11-01-2011, 11:26
Titegroup only takes a little to go a long way that's true. I can turn the screw on mine by hand also but it never moves when I don't want it to move.

I recommend weighing a charge at the begining and then loading 50-100 or there about and then weighing the charge again.

fredj338
11-01-2011, 12:14
It ain't broke, don't fix it.

Any screw that walked would result in a call to Dillon for a new setup. It is very rare for that to happen.


^^THIS^^ I have never had the powder bar screw walk on either the 550B or 650, 10s of 1000s of rounds. If I did, I would get a new one.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 12:50
Titegroup only takes a little to go a long way that's true. I can turn the screw on mine by hand also but it never moves when I don't want it to move.

I recommend weighing a charge at the begining and then loading 50-100 or there about and then weighing the charge again.

I installed the extra-small bar this morning. The adjusting screw is sufficiently tight that is won't move without a small wrench and backlash is minimal. The Titegroup seems to meter pretty well and I have it set up for 3.4 grains. I'll load some at 3.4, 3.3 and 3.2 grains and chronograph them later in the week.

Now if UPS will just deliver the bullets, I could get something done today.

BTW, I ordered the caliber change kit, tool head and powder die to move my single-stage 6.5x284 NORMA to the 550B. Even if I operate the press as a single-stage, one-round-at-a-time machine, I will still have the advantage of not having to interchange and adjust dies between every step.

I ordered the plastic funnel as well so I can still trickle the charges. I just hope it isn't as statically charged as the green plastic RCBS funnel. I have some caliber specific metal funnels I got from Sinclair. It may be possible to adapt them to the power die.

Richard

fredj338
11-01-2011, 13:39
I ordered the plastic funnel as well so I can still trickle the charges. I just hope it isn't as statically charged as the green plastic RCBS funnel. I have some caliber specific metal funnels I got from Sinclair. It may be possible to adapt them to the power die.

Richard

Wipe the plastic funnels repeatedly w/ a dryer sheet to reduce staitic. After the funnel gets a coating of dust from the powder it should run pretty well w/ no static.

GioaJack
11-01-2011, 14:02
I'm a bit confused as to why some people think that you have to readjust your dies every time you remove one from a SS press.

Screw down your die for what ever operation you're doing and adjust it. Run down the lock ring to the press top, tighten the set screw or hex head to lock in the die adjustment and you're done. You can remove the die and reinstall it for decades without ever losing the adjustment.

If for some reason you're worried that the set screw might loosen over time, (I've never had one come loose or do damage to die threads), simply use some Lock-Tite. What's the big deal? :dunno:


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
11-01-2011, 14:15
I'm a bit confused as to why some people think that you have to readjust your dies every time you remove one from a SS press.

Screw down your die for what ever operation you're doing and adjust it. Run down the lock ring to the press top, tighten the set screw or hex head to lock in the die adjustment and you're done. You can remove the die and reinstall it for decades without ever losing the adjustment.

If for some reason you're worried that the set screw might loosen over time, (I've never had one come loose or do damage to die threads), simply use some Lock-Tite. What's the big deal? :dunno:


Jack

Lee Dies don't have a set screw. Besides that, I am with you.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 14:58
I'm a bit confused as to why some people think that you have to readjust your dies every time you remove one from a SS press.

Jack


With the lock ring in the proper position for the press, the removed die will not fit back in the nice wooden box. You simply MUST move the lock ring to get it to align with the slot in the wood.

Same story for the Redding plastic boxes.

Richard

StaTiK
11-01-2011, 16:28
I'm a bit confused as to why some people think that you have to readjust your dies every time you remove one from a SS press.

Screw down your die for what ever operation you're doing and adjust it. Run down the lock ring to the press top, tighten the set screw or hex head to lock in the die adjustment and you're done. You can remove the die and reinstall it for decades without ever losing the adjustment.

What do you do if your brand of choice happens to use a rubber O-ring instead of a set screw? Or do I already know the answer...?

-StaTiK-

GioaJack
11-01-2011, 16:40
With the exception of Square Deal dies and some of the really old Herters dies all the threads are now 7X14, (or what ever they are), if your lock rings don't have set screws why not buy a set that does? How much can they be, a couple bucks each?

Then again it is an insurmountably problem if your dies won't fit back in the plastic or wooden storage box... unless of course you just trim out the offending pieces of plastic or wood. I guess the alternative is just to buy another press but as you all know I am totally opposed to owning more presses than you absolutely need.

Waste not, want not.


Jack

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 17:20
With the exception of Square Deal dies and some of the really old Herters dies all the threads are now 7X14, (or what ever they are), if your lock rings don't have set screws why not buy a set that does? How much can they be, a couple bucks each?

Then again it is an insurmountably problem if your dies won't fit back in the plastic or wooden storage box... unless of course you just trim out the offending pieces of plastic or wood. I guess the alternative is just to buy another press but as you all know I am totally opposed to owning more presses than you absolutely need.

Waste not, want not.


Jack

Adjusting the dies a few times a years seems like a lot less work that hacking up the boxes. But that's just for .308 & 6.5x284 NORMA and I probably only load those a couple of times a year. All my other dies are on toolheads and ready to go.

Now that I'm setting up the 550B to load the 6.5, those dies will stay set as well. If it works out, I'll do the same for .308.

Then I won't need the boxes... Even easier!

But thinking about the L-N-L AP, I could dump the RCBS SS, both 550Bs and the 1050 and have just one press with quick change dies, a case feeder, a bullet feeder and a motor drive. Or not...

One thing I am concerned about is the flex in the 550B platform. There's a reason we have to adjust the bullet seating die with cases at every station. So, I wonder if I will get consistent resizing on the 6.5 cases. I plan to do that as a separate step (and, potentially, using a separate toolhead) but I will have to do some tests to convince myself that the 550B is a good substitute for the RCBS RS.

Richard

GioaJack
11-01-2011, 17:43
Richard, you're not going to see a bit of difference, (at least not any practical difference), between the Chucker and the 550. or 650 or 1050 or any other quality press for that matter.

My Co-Ax has by far tighter tolerances than my 45 + year old Chucker has and it doesn't make any higher quality rounds than the Chucker... or any of my other presses. (It does have the most consistent priming system of anything I've ever used however. Slow but very, very good and the leverage of the Co-Ax makes it far superior to the Chucker for sizing cases... but still not better rounds.)

I've never loaded rifle rounds on my 550, never had the need, but if I did I'd do it in a heartbeat and never give it a second thought. Other than .223 I don't really shoot rifle any more, the recoil breaks my shoulder so as Little .223 that I shoot I just do it on a single stage. The only time I ever had to readjust my RCBS small base dies was when I changed over from the Chucker to the Co-Ax... other than that they had never been readjusted in over 35 years when I switched from loading for an AR to a bolt SAKO. (You have to adjust the seating die when you change bullets of course.)


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
11-01-2011, 17:45
What do you do if your brand of choice happens to use a rubber O-ring instead of a set screw? Or do I already know the answer...?

-StaTiK-

You can buy the lock rings with the set screws. Not expensive at all.

F106 Fan
11-01-2011, 18:03
Richard, you're not going to see a bit of difference, (at least not any practical difference), between the Chucker and the 550. or 650 or 1050 or any other quality press for that matter.

I've never loaded rifle rounds on my 550, never had the need, but if I did I'd do it in a heartbeat and never give it a second thought.

Jack

I have loaded .223 on my 550B and my grandson (new shooter) can shoot about 1-1/2" at 300 yards with a Savage Long Range Precision Varmit. So that ammo that comes off the press is adequate. He just needs to tighten up the outlier and his group would be about 1". I'm pretty proud of his shooting. Mine? Not so much... It's hit or miss :rofl:

What I was concerned about was whether I will get a consistent shoulder height. At the moment, I am full-length sizing the brass. There's no need for that and I could just resize the neck. The 6.5 is a Savage F-Class bolt action rifle so neck sizing will probably work fine.

For that matter, the .308 is also a bolt action (Steyr SSG) so I can get away with neck sizing there as well.

The 550B may work very well.

Richard

GioaJack
11-01-2011, 18:11
Amazing what young eyes will do, isn't it?

Unless you let Zombie Steve touch your press you'll have no problems. :whistling:


Jack

atakawow
11-01-2011, 21:10
This thread is three pages long already, can we go off-topic yet?

I'll start, that Kim Kardashian's bottom is pleasant to look at. I heard she is now in the market. :whistling:

Colorado4Wheel
11-01-2011, 21:12
I need Pics to be sure.

freakshow10mm
11-01-2011, 22:10
This thread is three pages long already, can we go off-topic yet?

I'll start, that Kim Kardashian's bottom is pleasant to look at. I heard she is now in the market. :whistling:
Kourtney is the cutest one, IMO.

ron59
11-02-2011, 08:09
This thread is three pages long already, can we go off-topic yet?

I'll start, that Kim Kardashian's bottom is pleasant to look at. I heard she is now in the market. :whistling:

Ugh.

WAAAAAYYYYYYYY too big for me.

Divorced after 72 days after $10,000,000 wedding. I wouldn't show my face in public for 10 years.

noylj
11-02-2011, 21:11
When you start reloading, you either very quickly love or not. If not, you will be selling the press.
For this reason, I always start off with a "strange" recommendation: buy the little Lee Reloading Press for about $30 and the Lee manual if you buy a Lee press or dies. This press is not a joy to use, but the ammunition loaded is as good as from any other press.
Most presses are very over-built. My Lee Reloading Press has been in use, intermittently, for about 20 years.
If you are convinced that you will enjoy reloading, then the decision is really between a Lee Classic Turrer Press (where you will have loaded ammunition after 4 strokes of the ram) or a real progressive press.
For a real progressive, I decided back in the late '70s that I wanted at least five stations. At the time, as I remember, Dillon had a 4-station. When Hornady came out with an affordable 5 station press, I bought it as was very happy.
I found the Hornady L-N-L to be a joy to use. When I acquired a couple of Dillon 1050s, my wife "suggested" that I gift my Hornady to my son when he announced he wanted to start reloading. I found the Hornady to be very easy for him to learn on.
Given you budget, I really can't see any other press than the Lee Classic Turret. Buy a turret head for each caliber you reload for.
Mount a powder measure to the left. Then you can charge the case, inspect the powder in the case, and seat a bullet.