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golls17
11-03-2011, 15:09
Hey guys. A while back I posted that I didn't think I was cut out to be a cop. About 2 months ago, I turned in my badge and gun after only 4 months of duty. I have spent a lot of time pondering and praying about my future, and my reflections have led me to one conclusion: I still am meant to be a cop.

After talking to other people in other local departments, I came to realize that the problem may not have been me, but possibly the FTO program at my agency. I was the 7th consecutive recruit to resign/be forced to resign. For the record, I resigned on my own terms. I did a lot of thinking about why I did not succeed with this department, and here is what I realized.

There are many similar examples, but these are the few that stand out in my mind:

I always thought FTOs are there because they want to share their knowledge with new recruits. At my agency, I was not viewed as the new boot who was ready to learn, but the FNG who was a burden to the department. I resembled extra paperwork, longer hours, and more work. The Field Training program is set up so you can make mistakes but still be successful. While I expected to make mistakes, I got the impression that my FTOs expected me to be perfect or they didn't trust me to do anything. Despite many arrests for OWI, I was not allowed to do my own SFSTs until my last week in Field Training. This was after I demonstrated numerous times during my first phase that I know what to say, how to demonstrate, and all the clues to watch for. If they weren't going to trust me when I have a "safety net" of an FTO to correct me, how were they going to trust me on my own? And especially for things I had demonstrated in the past. I have a theory on this: I understand that departments have to justify their work with numbers. While in Field Training, my stats are reflected through my FTO. I think our agency was so numbers driven that my FTO did not want to lose an arrest because they did not trust my abilities. I understand healthy competition for getting drunks, which there was, but it should not come at the cost of my opportunities to learn and demonstrate my knowledge.

When I did finally get an OWI arrest doing my own fields (on my 2nd to last day), it was at the end of my shift. When I told my FTO I couldn't smell alcohol on the guy, she told me to move and took over the stop. She got him out of the car and had me to fields. Guy bombed the fields, I knew I was going to make the arrest, and he ended up blowing zeros. FTO asked me what I'm going to do. I said we need to call a Drug Recognition Expert and get the guy to the hospital to draw blood. My FTO said I was right, but she would be doing it without me because it was the end of my shift and they did not want to pay me the overtime. I had only been to the hospital once before for blood draws (my first night of Field Training), and I was only a few weeks away from having to do it on my own. I felt like they did not want to let me capitalize on a few-and-far-between opportunity to learn something I would need to know how to do. I was given a ride back to the station by my backup officer in the back of the squad because he did not want to move his duty bag out of the front seat.

Another example was when I went to an armed bank robbery. I hop in the car, FTO in the passenger seat, and we start flying to the area. I'm about to broadcast I'm going south when my FTO grabs the radio (as I'm reaching for it), and starts to take over the radio and tells me where to drive. Almost immediately, other officers and supervisors start calling out her badge number instead of mine. It was like I didn't exist, even though I've demonstrated in the past I can multitask in stressful situations. We found the car in an apartment parking lot, and she took over. When our Sgt. showed up on the other side, I told my FTO to be careful of crossfire (the suspect vehicle was right between our squad and our Sgt.). She apparently took offense to that because she told me to watch behind us on and worry about what she was doing.

On my first injury accident, I didn't realize I was going to be taking the report since I had taken 2 other reports earlier that day and no other officers did. I understand I'm the new guy and I get work dropped on me, so I was happy to take the report. I saw it as they trusted me to do it right. I started talking to the driver of the striking vehicle, getting her info, etc. I got the info I needed and started trying to coordinate other officers for traffic and gathering information. Another officer started giving me the info he obtained from the victim vehicle. My FTO told me that this is my report and I need to gather the info, cutting off the other officer who was only trying to help me. I go to the other vehicle and try to get his info while the EMTs work on him. I finally get my info, and the other officer asks if there's anything I need. I looked at my FTO wondering if I should cut him loose since it's my report or ask for his help. Without hesitation or provocation, the other officer said, "OK, I'll take pictures." in a way that made me feel really dumb for not saying anything. I then got a lecture from my FTO about how I have a team around me willing to help. I was so confused because I was told 5 minutes earlier to do it all myself.

One of my last days, we took a retail theft. Sure enough, 2 more retail thefts happened in the next 15 minutes. While my FTO and I stayed and booked our arrests, another officer went on the call. In all, we had about 7 people in our booking room. I was booking as efficiently as I could, and had 2 bookings done but when the other officer got back, he commented to my FTO, "Hasn't he booked anybody yet?" in a very annoyed tone in front of our prisoners. This made me pretty mad because I was booking his prisoners in addition to mine. That's something I'm happy to do unless they put me down in front of prisoners. I finished booking another and asked my FTO which she wanted me to book next. She sighed and rolled her eyes and said, "Just do something!". This made me really upset because I was working really hard to get these bookings done quickly to get back on the road. I have no problem being criticized in front of prisoners if it's constructive. This crossed the line in my mind though.

The final straw for me was when I received an NRT for Officer Safety and a 1 for attitude because I was given remedial training for handcuffing. I had begun handcuffing people how my FTOs did it (put your hands behind your back, click click) and they wanted me to do the classroom model (widen your stance, put your arms out like an airplane, thumbs down, bring your arms back to the sound of my voice, lean forward at the waist look to your left, don't move). I understand they want me to know the basics and also it gauges their level of cooperation, but they still gave me remedial training. I got the NRT and the 1 for those respective categories because one day my FTO asked, "Why don't you ask them if the handcuffs are too tight?" My response was that I can tell if they are on properly buy checking for tightness and usually they tell me if it's too tight, even if it's not. She said I would be getting an NRT for that and a 1 for attitude because she considered it lazyness on my part. I had never been corrected for that in the past, and did not understand how I could get a "Not Responding to Training" when I was never given an opportunity to respond in the first place. I brought this up with my FTO and my Sgt. My FTO's explanation was even though it was not covered in remedial training, it is still part of the process and I had remedial training in handcuffing already.

So I ended up calling in sick on Sept. 1 (It's my daughter's birthday, and I couldn't bring myself to quit then) and turned my gear in on the 2nd.

I have finally started applying and testing for other departments again. At the tests, I have talked to other officers that know my old agency's reputation. I just mention I used to work for them, and I usually get an unprovoked response of, "Yeah, I've heard some nasty things about them."

Anyways, I'm applying again and it feels weird but good. I just need to figure out how to answer the inevitable "why did you leave your old agency" question in interviews in a way that I can convey I know what I'm doing without sounding like I'm blaming my other agency.

Thanks for reading, and the continued support! I'll keep everybody posted. The important thing for me is whether it was truly me or my agency, I would never forgive myself if I at least didn't give myself another chance with a different agency.

Cochese
11-03-2011, 15:22
Keep on keepin' on.

While it does sound odd to hear some of the comments made by the training staff at that PD, we are only getting one side of the story.

Regardless, I think you are on the right track and will probably find happiness at your next agency. Especially, if they have competent FTOs and a coordinator who watches and listens.

Good luck.

PinkoCommie
11-03-2011, 15:31
PM sent. Trust me, you'll be fine. It may take a while, but you'll do OK.

Cochese
11-03-2011, 15:37
PM sent. Trust me, you'll be fine. It may take a while, but you'll do OK.

I was going to mention other members and their successful returns as well, but I figured I'd let them do the talking. :)

RocPO
11-03-2011, 17:06
Best of luck to you bro.

golls17
11-03-2011, 17:20
While it does sound odd to hear some of the comments made by the training staff at that PD, we are only getting one side of the story.


I'm sure for every story I have about them, they have one to match for me. On the day I resigned, my Chief said if/when I apply for agencies, they will open my field training reports and records to any agency that asks. I said, "I have nothing in there to hide from them." I can think of plenty of times I made mistakes, and they had every opportunity to tell me their honest opinions of me.

packsaddle
11-03-2011, 17:46
there are good agencies and there are bad agencies.

find a good agency.

if you don't make it there then it wasn't meant to be.

hang in there and best wishes.

Bruce M
11-03-2011, 18:10
... I was the 7th consecutive recruit to resign/be forced to resign.

....


Back in the early eighties at my FTO interview I said that when a PPO fails, I believe it is as much a reflection of either the academy and/or the FTO program as it is of the PPO. A couple decades later I still essentially believe that. I understand that not everyone is cut out for the job and that some can get through an academy with no real likelihood of success on the street. Still though, seven in a row with no one passing may be a clue.

How big is the department. Is the position that you would have filled actually vacant or is it being filled by OT/reserves/part time guys/Victoria Secret models?

golls17
11-03-2011, 18:26
Back in the early eighties at my FTO interview I said that when a PPO fails, I believe it is as much a reflection of either the academy and/or the FTO program as it is of the PPO. A couple decades later I still essentially believe that. I understand that not everyone is cut out for the job and that some can get through an academy with no real likelihood of success on the street. Still though, seven in a row with no one passing may be a clue.

How big is the department. Is the position that you would have filled actually vacant or is it being filled by OT/reserves/part time guys/Victoria Secret models?

30 or so officers. Only 2 or 3 patrol at a time. I was going to be full time patrol. We didn't have reserves/part time guys.

Bruce M
11-03-2011, 19:21
If you stayed would the spot you took reduced overtime for others?

PinkoCommie
11-03-2011, 19:29
Something sounds weird... any agency will on occasion hire people that just don't work out. If seven in a row wash from training, there is something very wrong with either hiring, training, or both.

nitesite10mm
11-03-2011, 19:32
If you stayed would the spot you took reduced overtime for others?

Now there is a question based on a very interesting perspective...

I like it.

DaBigBR
11-03-2011, 19:32
Some departments shred trainees, some FTOs don't get along with some trainees. Obviously hearing just your side of the story makes it sound like they've got issues. I'm not saying you're FOS, either, just pointing out that we've only heard one side.

FWIW there are a number of agencies hiring in Iowa right now and I believe that we would accept your Wisconsin certificate. I've got a couch you can sleep on.

golls17
11-03-2011, 19:35
If you stayed would the spot you took reduced overtime for others?

I never thought about that. You may be on to something there. Obviously, not something I would mention in an interview! But to answer your question, yes and no. Depends on the shift.

golls17
11-03-2011, 19:38
Some departments shred trainees, some FTOs don't get along with some trainees. Obviously hearing just your side of the story makes it sound like they've got issues. I'm not saying you're FOS, either, just pointing out that we've only heard one side.

FWIW there are a number of agencies hiring in Iowa right now and I believe that we would accept your Wisconsin certificate. I've got a couch you can sleep on.

Is there a website that lists them? Here in WI we have wilenet.org which posts actively hiring departments without the spam and ads of usajobs our whatever

Bruce M
11-03-2011, 19:48
I never thought about that. You may be on to something there. Obviously, not something I would mention in an interview! But to answer your question, yes and no. Depends on the shift.


However if there is a way to work it into an interview, that they had a 100% failure rate over seven different PPOs over whatever the time frame, that may well be worth mentioning. It might be nothing. Maybe it is completely coincidental. On the other hand following the money is an age old investigative technique.

DaBigBR
11-03-2011, 19:51
Is there a website that lists them? Here in WI we have wilenet.org which posts actively hiring departments without the spam and ads of usajobs our whatever

Not that I know of. I'm not looking really actively, so I don't claim to be 100% up on it. Places that I know are testing now or will be testing soon and drive time from my place.

Places to start would be Iowa Workforce Development

http://www.iowajobs.org

and the state DAS Human Resources

http://das.iowa.gov/hre/state_jobs.html

Places that either are taking applications now or will be soon:

Des Moines PD (must do their academy)
Dubuque County SO
Iowa State Patrol - Capitol Complex (must do their academy)
Iowa DOT (truck enforcement, but full LE powers)
University of Iowa PD
Iowa State University PD
Newton PD
Cedar Rapids Airport (police/fire/ems, works 24 on / 72 off)
Cedar Rapids PD (likely after the first of the year, they test every year)
Ankeny PD

Also, several departments on the Iowa/Nebraska border that test together are testing:

http://www.morrowhr.com/publicsafetyhiring.php

Supposed to be pretty easy to get on with Council Bluffs (Iowa) PD because most people that test want to work in Nebraska (all of the other agencies are NE agencies in the Omaha metro area, and Iowa requires in-state residency).

Nick.45
11-03-2011, 20:13
Not that I know of. I'm not looking really actively, so I don't claim to be 100% up on it. Places that I know are testing now or will be testing soon and drive time from my place.

Places to start would be Iowa Workforce Development

http://www.iowajobs.org

and the state DAS Human Resources

http://das.iowa.gov/hre/state_jobs.html

Places that either are taking applications now or will be soon:

Des Moines PD (must do their academy)
Dubuque County SO
Iowa State Patrol - Capitol Complex (must do their academy)
Iowa DOT (truck enforcement, but full LE powers)
University of Iowa PD
Iowa State University PD
Newton PD
Cedar Rapids Airport (police/fire/ems, works 24 on / 72 off)
Cedar Rapids PD (likely after the first of the year, they test every year)
Ankeny PD

Also, several departments on the Iowa/Nebraska border that test together are testing:

http://www.morrowhr.com/publicsafetyhiring.php

Supposed to be pretty easy to get on with Council Bluffs (Iowa) PD because most people that test want to work in Nebraska (all of the other agencies are NE agencies in the Omaha metro area, and Iowa requires in-state residency).

DabigBR is correct, here are links to their applications or information of getting one:

Des Moines PD
http://agency.governmentjobs.com/desmoines/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=378904&hit_count=yes&headerFooter=1&promo=0&transfer=0&WDDXJobSearchParams=%3CwddxPacket%20version%3D%271%2E0%27%3E%3Cheader%2F%3E%3Cdata%3E%3Cstruct%3E%3C var%20name%3D%27FIND_KEYWORD%27%3E%3Cstring%3E%3C%2Fstring%3E%3C%2Fvar%3E%3Cvar%20name%3D%27CATEGORY ID%27%3E%3Cstring%3E-1%3C%2Fstring%3E%3C%2Fvar%3E%3Cvar%20name%3D%27TRANSFER%27%3E%3Cstring%3E0%3C%2Fstring%3E%3C%2Fvar%3 E%3Cvar%20name%3D%27PROMOTIONALJOBS%27%3E%3Cstring%3E0%3C%2Fstring%3E%3C%2Fvar%3E%3C%2Fstruct%3E%3C% 2Fdata%3E%3C%2FwddxPacket%3E

Ankeny PD
http://www.ankenyiowa.gov/index.aspx?recordid=143&page=20

Newton PD
http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Jobs/JobDetails.aspx?IPath=QHKCV0A&ff=21&APath=2.21.0.0.0&job_did=J3G3P16J6WSZFL8XJ4H

Decatur County Sheriff (app is due in 2 days, Nov 5th, fyi)
http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Jobs/JobDetails.aspx?IPath=QHKCV0J&ff=21&APath=2.21.0.0.0&job_did=J3G48G6Q8254N3K9K5P

ISP, Capital Complex
http://www.dps.state.ia.us/jobs/
http://careercenter.discoverpolicing.org/c/job.cfm?site_id=6207&jb=8931278

Those are the only ones that I can think of and find right now. You just missed a couple of testing of some Des Moines metro agencies. Alot of them are looking for and will take officers that are already certified in a heartbeat.

rhikdavis
11-03-2011, 20:25
Shoulda asked your FTO if she was getting laid on a semi regular basis...?

Good luck in the search.

beatcop
11-03-2011, 21:08
Hang in there...that 7 in a row doesn't sound right at all. Next time keep at it until they extend you or pass you!

Hack
11-03-2011, 21:49
Good luck in your future endeavours with future departments. The seven in a row thing does sound odd. You'll make it.

DaBigBR
11-03-2011, 22:37
Shoulda asked your FTO if she was getting laid on a semi regular basis...?

Knowing the way things turned out, I bet he regrets not doing it. What would have been the harm?

Kadetklapp
11-04-2011, 07:49
Knowing the way things turned out, I bet he regrets not doing it. What would have been the harm?

This. It sounds to me like she was threatened by any newbie showing "her" up.

golls17
11-04-2011, 12:07
It should be clarified that I had 3 FTOs. Phase 1 was a man and didn't let me do fields. Phase 2 (female) had a reputation of a ball-buster and missed a Sgt. promotion recently. One of my academy buddies hired with my agency quit after 4 weeks, he says because of her. The other female was going through a breakup with her boyfriend while I had her as my FTO. I'm not blaming any of them, just trying to paint the picture a little more detailed...

Sharky7
11-04-2011, 12:08
Some departments and cities are better fits for different people. Good luck on your applications and next job.

Whatever happens at your next agency, I would just hunker down and do your best. Get through the FTO process and concentrate on YOU every day. Concentrate on being the best officer you can be.

You would hope the departments pick their FTO's based on their leadership, personalities, work habit, and ability to train and transfer knowledge. But, other officers will tell you the same thing - some jobs or special assignments are given because you are part of the "club." 7 lost trainees is a lot for such a small agency.

Sometimes it is better to suck it up and let it go though. It sounds like this department wasn't the right fit for you, but I think it's important that wherever you get hired next you have to see the FTO process through until the end. Once you get out on your own, you will have less overall stress. If you are still not happy, look at transferring to another agency - but at least you will have a job and your training is complete.

You are going to have some tough or difficult FTO or bosses if you stay with law enforcement. Sometimes things just aren't going to be fair...it's more than a job though, it is a calling.

drider
11-05-2011, 22:38
The only thing I'm thinking will these past events follow you in your future new PD prospects? Meaning wouldn't the background people investigate the PD where'd you just resign and hold it against you?

JBaird22
11-06-2011, 08:06
A good BI would show the problems from both sides. Also, PD's have reputations just like people have reputations. Some PD's are stand up places where if you flunk out there, its a barometer of whether or not you'll make it at the prospective agency. Some PD's are known for being a hell hole that no one wants to work at.

All hope is not lost. Keep trying. I know, from my own experience, that you can bounce back. It takes a metric butt ton of work on your part but if you believe this is what you are supposed to be doing, then it is absolutely worth the work.

I think the majority of us are giving you the benefit of the doubt but don't assume every seasoned (hardened) cop is going to give you that benefit. There are certainly two sides to every story but I know how some departments are as far as making life hard on a rookie. Just know, that if you get a second chance at this, you're going to have to put in double duty and keep that attitude in check. I'm not saying you're wrong and they were right, but your attitude, body language, reaction to criticism can color how you are taken by your FTO's. And if from day 1 they have a problem with you, it is YOUR responsibility to change that perception.

Good luck.

Metro566
11-06-2011, 09:04
Sounds like they steamrolled you. Happened to a couple of my buddies...it's s****y but it happens.

Basically, you don't "mesh" with their "clique" of a department - sometimes because you don't go to their parties, or watch football at so-and-so's house, or go to choir practice, etc - and they find a way to steamroll you out of the department.

Good friend of mine was doing fan-eff'n-tastic on his FTO, skipped the offer a few times to go to a co-workers Halloween party and then Xmas party that almost all the coppers went to. He got back into work after the xmas party and he said everything changed. They would tell him to do something one way, then the next day when he did it that way, they would NRT him. He brought it up to the boss who told him "Sometimes we just don't fit."

He's now a cop in the next town over, did great on FTO and is a patrol Sergeant.





Keep your head up...the interviews aren't going to be easy when the question comes up, but he would tell them that "I just wasn't the proper fit for that department, and instead of trying to force myself to make it work I wanted to find a department that worked for the both of us."

k9medic
11-06-2011, 13:26
deleted.

4949shooter
11-06-2011, 14:18
Whatever happens at your next agency, I would just hunker down and do your best. Get through the FTO process and concentrate on YOU every day. Concentrate on being the best officer you can be.

You would hope the departments pick their FTO's based on their leadership, personalities, work habit, and ability to train and transfer knowledge. But, other officers will tell you the same thing - some jobs or special assignments are given because you are part of the "club." 7 lost trainees is a lot for such a small agency.

Sometimes it is better to suck it up and let it go though. It sounds like this department wasn't the right fit for you, but I think it's important that wherever you get hired next you have to see the FTO process through until the end. Once you get out on your own, you will have less overall stress. If you are still not happy, look at transferring to another agency - but at least you will have a job and your training is complete.

You are going to have some tough or difficult FTO or bosses if you stay with law enforcement. Sometimes things just aren't going to be fair...it's more than a job though, it is a calling.

Very good words here. Sometimes you just have to suck it up. So...your agency is hard on rookies. We get that, and so was mine. My agency was so bad when I was on FTO I felt the senior officers treated the criminals better than they treated us guys on FTO. Seriously. Does it make it right? Absolutely not. But I stuck it out and showed them I had what it took. It wasn't easy...believe me.



A good BI would show the problems from both sides. Also, PD's have reputations just like people have reputations. Some PD's are stand up places where if you flunk out there, its a barometer of whether or not you'll make it at the prospective agency. Some PD's are known for being a hell hole that no one wants to work at.

All hope is not lost. Keep trying. I know, from my own experience, that you can bounce back. It takes a metric butt ton of work on your part but if you believe this is what you are supposed to be doing, then it is absolutely worth the work.

Good luck.

See in red. You can bounce back.

Sounds like they steamrolled you. Happened to a couple of my buddies...it's s****y but it happens.

Basically, you don't "mesh" with their "clique" of a department - sometimes because you don't go to their parties, or watch football at so-and-so's house, or go to choir practice, etc - and they find a way to steamroll you out of the department.

Good friend of mine was doing fan-eff'n-tastic on his FTO, skipped the offer a few times to go to a co-workers Halloween party and then Xmas party that almost all the coppers went to. He got back into work after the xmas party and he said everything changed. They would tell him to do something one way, then the next day when he did it that way, they would NRT him. He brought it up to the boss who told him "Sometimes we just don't fit."

He's now a cop in the next town over, did great on FTO and is a patrol Sergeant.



This is exactly why recruits (what we call officers on FTO) should not be invited to these types of functions. I never permitted it on my squad, and it was rare in my agency.

At any rate, rookies all over the world are being treated poorly by the senior cops. Sometimes you just have to stick it out. Then when you become a senior officer you can work to change what you don't like. Ask me how I know. :whistling:

OLY-M4gery
11-06-2011, 15:17
Back in the early eighties at my FTO interview I said that when a PPO fails, I believe it is as much a reflection of either the academy and/or the FTO program as it is of the PPO. A couple decades later I still essentially believe that. I understand that not everyone is cut out for the job and that some can get through an academy with no real likelihood of success on the street. Still though, seven in a row with no one passing may be a clue.

How big is the department. Is the position that you would have filled actually vacant or is it being filled by OT/reserves/part time guys/Victoria Secret models?

It's also a reflection of the hiring process.

7 in a row does sound like an issue.

k9medic
11-06-2011, 17:04
I initially wrote a rather long response to this thread, but in the end deleted it. After giving it some thought, I will post the following:

Based upon what you have posted regarding your event, I am very concerned that you bailed so quickly. It makes me question your tenacity when things get tough. You can't bail out when you are toe to toe and things get tough.

I have been an officer for almost 15 years and there has never been a day where I have questioned my ability to be an officer. I got my ass handed to me several times while on FTO (by both bad guys and my FTO) and it humbled me quite a bit. Sure I could have given up, but the task of the FTO is not to be your friend but to push you to a breaking point. You break - they win. You don't - we all win, as a team.

I have been an FTO and I can assure you that there are just some people that don't need to be officers. Most of those officers weed themselves out, but those that make it through either wind up quitting shortly after than or get themselves into a position where they, or someone else gets hurt and they are shown the door. A very small percentage move through this process and learn to become good officers.

I certainly hope that you're able to become one of these. This is not a job for everyone. There has to be an internal line within you that you will not allow others to cross. That is the line that means business. Take command, make the right decisions and handle the problem.

Best of luck to you and the officers that may stand by your side.

MeefZah
11-10-2011, 01:58
In answer to your specific question of "what do I tell agencies I'm applying at" about why you left, the truth is the only way to go. They may not like it and may pass you up, but you can't start a new position based on lies.

And not to sound like a total d-bag, but you should have just STFU and dealt with it. Get through FTO or make them fire you if you can't. You don't ever give up. It speaks ill of you as a cop.

Agent6-3/8
11-10-2011, 08:06
Good luck, bud! Keep pluggin away and you'll find somewhere to land! :wavey:

volsbear
11-12-2011, 08:32
Probationer period of employment aren't just a process of the employer evaluating the employee. It *should* also be a process of the employee deciding whether he/she wants to work for the employer.

You decided. Good for you.

kayl
11-12-2011, 10:01
I shot you a pm- your experience sounds a lot like mine and I wouldn't be surprised if we worked at the same agency.

Keep the faith- I got out of LE for a year before I picked up a part time job. Now I'm getting hired full time in May at a great dept.

Shoot me a pm and I'll let you know when it's hiring time with my part time dept.

PinkoCommie
11-12-2011, 15:47
Probationer period of employment aren't just a process of the employer evaluating the employee. It *should* also be a process of the employee deciding whether he/she wants to work for the employer.

You decided. Good for you.

Well put. In this age of a mobile work force and employers who feel no allegiance whatsoever to their employees, this is a two way street. Yes, we need jobs, but they need good employees. Sometimes it really is just a fit issue. Don't let the "you can't be trusted and you failed as a cop" crowd get you down. You may yet fail as a cop, or succeed as one. This was a false start.

golls17
11-14-2011, 18:08
I shot you a pm- your experience sounds a lot like mine and I wouldn't be surprised if we worked at the same agency.

Keep the faith- I got out of LE for a year before I picked up a part time job. Now I'm getting hired full time in May at a great dept.

Shoot me a pm and I'll let you know when it's hiring time with my part time dept.

PM replied. Small world...

kayl
11-14-2011, 18:25
PM replied. Small world...

It really is!

PM back at you, let's get together sometime.

CJStudent
11-14-2011, 18:37
It really is!

PM back at you, let's get together sometime.

Awww, so cute! :tongueout:

kayl
11-14-2011, 21:09
Awww, so cute! :tongueout:

Lol-
I know I wish I'd known someone who'd worked there and been through the same things I went through back when I resigned! :)

PinkoCommie
11-15-2011, 10:45
Lol-
I know I wish I'd known someone who'd worked there and been through the same things I went through back when I resigned! :)

Talking to people who know what it's like helps. See this thread: http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1381209

:cool:

jolly roger
11-15-2011, 11:31
7 in a row for a 30 man PD sounds very strange.

In our outfit back in the day you had to go thorough MASSIVE paperwork and remedial before they would can ANYBODY. 3 I asked to be tossed made it through...for various reasons. In a years time they were ALL gone for either major "head" issues or IA troubles. The brass then listened to me and some of the more senior FTOs. It's pretty good to go now with good coordinators too. We use FTO as a stepping stone for possible supervision too. If you are a meglamanic in that position or an absolute prick...you'll probably do exactly the same as a Sergeant. We have canned our good share of FTOs as well.