Primer tube kaboom... [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Primer tube kaboom...


XDRoX
11-03-2011, 18:01
I'm interested in some opinions from you more experienced guys on this. I know this guy. I've traded him some bullets before. He's a new reloader and very safe.

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=495909

Travclem
11-03-2011, 18:14
Looks to me like a good run of bad luck... I've loaded thousands of rounds on my XL650 and haven't blown up anything yet. (knocks on wooden table)

XDRoX
11-03-2011, 18:31
That's what I think as well.

Any chance you think static electricity could actually set off a primer?

GioaJack
11-03-2011, 18:32
Although primer detonation is a rather common occurrence in the primer assembly itself, (I think most everyone here has seen the picture of my primer magazine that blew up in the early 70's and stuck in the ceiling), I've never heard of a detonation in a pick-up tube.

With all the pick-up tubes that are loaded everyday without incident I'm not sure it's going to rate high on my list of things to worry about.


Jack

XDRoX
11-03-2011, 18:34
Although primer detonation is a rather common occurrence in the primer assembly itself, (I think most everyone here has seen the picture of my primer magazine that blew up in the early 70's and stuck in the ceiling), I've never heard of a detonation in a pick-up tube.

With all the pick-up tubes that are loaded everyday without incident I'm not sure it's going to rate high on my list of things to worry about.


Jack

What do you think caused it Jack? A bad primer? The story just doesn't seem plausible:dunno:

GioaJack
11-03-2011, 18:47
Bearing in my that I need help flipping on the lights I don't really know about the static electricity theory. I guess it's possible but then again it's possible that space aliens who eat terrorists and piddle gasoline might land tomorrow... but how probable is it?

I know that there have been countless tests done trying to ignite black powder with static electricity and the last that I've read they've yet to be successful.

Maybe primers are more susceptible to SE but I've had wall to wall carpeting in almost every one of my loading rooms and have never had that problem nor have any of my loading buddies over the years ever mentioned anything like that.

Then again, I can't figure out why women go out with me so I guess anything is possible. :dunno:


Jack

unclebob
11-03-2011, 18:52
My bet goes with static electricity. Even though the tube is aluminum the pin is steel. My biggest fear has always been when the primers are going down the primer fill tube to the primer magazine tube that they would go off then. Once they are in the primer magazine and my hand is away I donít really worry if they should go off.
Just touching the press to discharge any static electricity is not going to do anything unless the press itself is grounded. Always pointing both ends of the primer magazine tube in a direction that is not going to hurt anything or destroy anything is a good idea. Wearing a Kevlar gloves or even a welderís glove might not be a bad idea. Wearing safety glass whenever working with primers is a must. If you leave in an area that has very low humidity I would think seriously about grounding the press. Grabbing the press before touching any primers. And grabbing the press again before filling the magazine tube with primers would not be a bad idea also.

unclebob
11-03-2011, 19:26
There are millions of people that fill their cars with gas every day and nothing happens. But every once in a while static electric from a spark from their finger sets the car on fire.
As some one that spent about 5 years dealing with bombs, rockets and missiles every day. Static electricity can if you get complaisant in what you are doing can bite you on you know what. That was one thing we never forgot to check for was static electricity before carting or connecting any missiles or rockets. And then 19 years of dealing with electric primed 20mm ammo when I got on the gunships.
So yes static electricity is real.

ChrisJn
11-03-2011, 20:01
I'm with Unclebob on this one. Just switching on a light switch near a safebreaking/bomb scene was always a big no, no.

Colorado4Wheel
11-03-2011, 20:08
The most common way to get a tube to explode is to tap it. He doesn't describe doing that but it's still a possibility that he just doesn't remember doing it.

I have thought about getting a metal shield for primer tubes. Then if they exploded the direction of damage would be upward and downward, not sideways.

fredj338
11-03-2011, 21:24
I have never seen it before or heard of anyone having primers detonate in the pickup tube, wierd & scarey. My bet would be he was tapping the pickup tube on top of the primer mag tube & freak accident, they went off. I didn;t see primer type, I would bet Federal????

XDRoX
11-03-2011, 21:35
I have never seen it before or heard of anyone having primers detonate in the pickup tube, wierd & scarey. My bet would be he was tapping the pickup tube on top of the primer mag tube & freak accident, they went off. I didn;t see primer type, I would bet Federal????

CCI 500.

I feel bad for the guy. He's new at reloading and now is going to worry about this happening again unless he figures out what caused it. And that's probably going to be impossible.

Really nice guy, he's a fireman. Just one of those things I guess :dunno:

njl
11-03-2011, 21:37
Perhaps someone from here registered there could post the question "What were you wearing?"
I know that may sound a little weird, but I used to have a coworker who'd wear corduroy and walk around the office building up static, then touch people to static shock them. He mentioned it's been cold, so I wonder if he was wearing corduroy pants or shirt.

Also, the pick up tube pin looks undamaged and not covered in soot. That makes me wonder if the explosion was after the pin had been pulled out, and maybe he wasn't quite lined up, and the stack of primers fell against the primer magazine, and the force of the entire stack falling on the first one against the edge of the magazine was enough to set it off, starting the chain reaction?

njl
11-03-2011, 21:40
I have never seen it before or heard of anyone having primers detonate in the pickup tube, wierd & scarey. My bet would be he was tapping the pickup tube on top of the primer mag tube & freak accident, they went off. I didn;t see primer type, I would bet Federal????

He mentioned they were CCI small pistol. Aren't CCI's reputed to be on the harder side?

janice6
11-03-2011, 21:44
My father worked at the Twin Cities Arsenal during WW2 and they used to have bunkers outside where the primers were handled (I don't know more then I'm telling). They used to be in "trays" and There were two people to a bunker. He said one day a bunker blew up and they spent the rest of the day watching the crows circle and raced them to body parts.

I don't know specifically why or how these were handled, but it suffices to say that it is a very delicate part.

They made 50 cal because he had a set made into steak knives.

XDRoX
11-03-2011, 21:50
He mentioned they were CCI small pistol. Aren't CCI's reputed to be on the harder side?

They are on the harder side. Interesting theory about the primers weight falling on one to cause the detention.

I'm not sure what he was wearing, but it was extremely dry and although he was not on carpet, SE is still a viable explanation worth exploring.

noylj
11-03-2011, 21:57
Primers need a minimum impact force and static is not going to set them off. Even with out that, any static would pass through the metal cup and anvil and into the primer tube and into the operator. There is no way to have static build-up on the priming compound.
A very minor possibility is that there was primer powder and the shear between the aluminum tube and steel pin set off some powder between the two. However, that should have been too small to chain fire.
I keep reading these very hard-to-understand accidents and shake my head in wonder at what some people can achieve.

GhettoSmack
11-04-2011, 07:22
Sounds like a job for Myth Busters!

Colorado4Wheel
11-04-2011, 07:38
Sounds like a job for Myth Busters!

Seriously.

njl
11-04-2011, 07:41
I think any theories on static electricity would be that it built up on the guy, not the primers, and that when he/the primer tube touched something that gave the charge somewhere else to go, the spark of the static electricity jumping from him to that thing (the press?) was enough to ignite a primer or some priming compound dust, and start the chain reaction that set off the whole tube.

The bottom of the primer tube (on Dillon tubes) when dumping primers into the magazine is plastic. I'd have to look closely at one of my tubes to see if the pin can even contact the metal part of the tube.

I still think the pin must have been out before the boom, or it would have been mangled and covered in soot.

The build-up of primer residue is an interesting issue. How often do you / should we be cleaning out things like the primer pickup tubes, primer magazine tubes, and primer flip trays...and what do you use? 90% isopropyl and paper towels, cotton cleaning patches?

Boxerglocker
11-04-2011, 09:19
The build-up of primer residue is an interesting issue. How often do you / should we be cleaning out things like the primer pickup tubes, primer magazine tubes, and primer flip trays...and what do you use? 90% isopropyl and paper towels, cotton cleaning patches?

I use a small cleaning patch wet with alcohol tied to the end of a length of fishing line. Pull it through a couple times wet, then a dry patch after. I may even blow some compressed air through it if the inclination hits me. The tips I soak in a mild solution of aviation simple green and water while cleaning the tubes then shake out and air dry on a paper towel. I usually clean all 9 of my small primer tubes every few months. You will be surprised how dirty with build up they get.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

unclebob
11-04-2011, 09:36
If you read what the person wrote. He did not hit anything. He was in the process of removing the pin to drop the primers. The static electricity I will say went from his finger tip to the pin that set off the primer touching the pin. You probably could try to duplicate what happened thousands of times and nothing will happening.
Just like who would ever thought that a 40mm round would go off by just being dropped. But one did. Like the saying goes SH$^ happens with no logical reason why it did happen.

fredj338
11-04-2011, 09:36
The bottom of the primer tube (on Dillon tubes) when dumping primers into the magazine is plastic. I'd have to look closely at one of my tubes to see if the pin can even contact the metal part of the tube.

I still think the pin must have been out before the boom, or it would have been mangled and covered in soot.

The build-up of primer residue is an interesting issue. How often do you / should we be cleaning out things like the primer pickup tubes, primer magazine tubes, and primer flip trays...and what do you use? 90% isopropyl and paper towels, cotton cleaning patches?
I have the older tubes, all alum w/a plastic pickup tip. So it is possible to contact the primer w/ the retaining pin. Since I have been using a 550B for 35yrs & never heard fo such a thing happening, it just has to be one of those planetary alignment things; primer dust, static ele, primer impact,e tc all coming together at the right moment.

WiskyT
11-04-2011, 12:47
I still think the pin must have been out before the boom, or it would have been mangled and covered in soot.



Good point, and it adds a little ammo to my skeptical outlook of such things like this.

WiskyT
11-04-2011, 12:50
They are on the harder side. Interesting theory about the primers weight falling on one to cause the detention.

I'm not sure what he was wearing, but it was extremely dry and although he was not on carpet, SE is still a viable explanation worth exploring.

Did he have static electricity shocks prior to this incident? Not that you would know, I'm just saying that he thinks SE caused this yet he makes no mention of any other shocks he got while going about his business prior to this.

PCJim
11-04-2011, 13:14
I'd say freak accident, or there is information withheld that would play a key role in a final determination. I've also heard of incidents of "spontaneous human combustion", but I don't believe science has ever proved it could actually happen. Then again, with the use of an accelerant....

FM12
11-04-2011, 14:53
Stray voltage from the low primer alarm perhaps? All I can think of.

Colorado4Wheel
11-04-2011, 15:09
People don't always remember events clearly. So no offense meant to the poor guy who got hurt. Seriously. Traumatic events are often not clear to people despite how much they say "I remember exactly what happened".

Primers most likely go off due to being hit. From the picture it's clear to me that the pin was 100% out of the tube. Pin is perfect. Barely even burnt. I think the primers fell down the tube and some how some way hit something causing the detonation. It's even possible that a primer was jammed in some way and pulling the pin (moving the tube) cause it and several other primers to move down the tube and detonate. I think they hit the side of the primer alarm. You can see extra damage at that point. I remember a guy over at Brian Enos Forums had a tube explode when he tapped it on the bench while loading a primer. He lost a finger or some such thing. I read that and started thinking about making a blast shield as well. Just so I would know that the explosion (however unlikely) would not be in my hand but would funnel away (up and down). Problem is you would need to make one for every primer tube. I think putting a loaded tube into a blast shield is actually more dangerous.


http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj77/grant22_2000/Forum%20Crap/CIMG1993.jpg

gator378
11-04-2011, 15:26
I'm interested in some opinions from you more experienced guys on this. I know this guy. I've traded him some bullets before. He's a new reloader and very safe.

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=495909

Blew one primer in over 35 years of reloading. Always wear the poly carb precription glasses around primers. Only keep one box of 100 out at a time. Used to wrap a 100 or so in tape and shoot them with a 22 at 100 yards to see what they do. A 100 primers going off will make any impression so keep the safety gear on and only 1 box in area at a time.

Colorado4Wheel
11-04-2011, 16:51
I built a Primer Tube Shield for a tube. I have enough spare material to make two. I will try this one first tomorrow after it's dry. Basically it's just a square tube cut to the right length. You can keep your fingers away from the primer tip and if it exploded it would blow away from you rather then out at you.

njl
11-04-2011, 20:52
I have the older tubes, all alum w/a plastic pickup tip. So it is possible to contact the primer w/ the retaining pin. Since I have been using a 550B for 35yrs & never heard fo such a thing happening, it just has to be one of those planetary alignment things; primer dust, static ele, primer impact,e tc all coming together at the right moment.

His blown tube was the newer style with a plastic tapered end for dumping into the primer magazine. It took me a minute at first, but you can clearly see the fragments of the blown up plastic end in the pictures. I just looked at one, and while the pin wouldn't be in contact with the metal tube while in place, it's awfully close, and could definitely touch (even scrape) during removal.

Colorado4Wheel
11-05-2011, 14:22
I made this shield to keep my hands away from the tube when you are loading the tube and when you pull the pin.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3727.jpghttp://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3729.jpg

I will replace the zip tie with a string, attach the string to the upper part of the tube. Then you can use a screw in the hole of the pin, the pin slides out easy but the pin would stay attached to the tube and not fall on the ground.

EL_NinO619
11-05-2011, 14:33
Now everyone is scaring me... I think I may be took shook to reload again...

EL_NinO619
11-05-2011, 14:35
Really though, I had to stop my self from asking the guy who had this KB, when he said he was not going to load anymore. How much for the 550, but I thought that would be way out of line on the first day..

Colorado4Wheel
11-05-2011, 15:57
Now everyone is scaring me... I think I may be took shook to reload again...

When I read the story from the Grand Master shooter over at brian enos loosing a finger I started taking primer tubes very seriously. After seeing this event, and the total unexplained/unpredictable nature of the event. I decided to up my precautions a little. I want to keep my fingers away from the aluminum tube. So this steel shield will let me load the tube with out my fingers being near any of the primers. That is good enough for me.

unclebob
11-05-2011, 19:58
When I read the story from the Grand Master shooter over at brian enos loosing a finger I started taking primer tubes very seriously. After seeing this event, and the total unexplained/unpredictable nature of the event. I decided to up my precautions a little. I want to keep my fingers away from the aluminum tube. So this steel shield will let me load the tube with out my fingers being near any of the primers. That is good enough for me.

I think on the blue end side of the shield I would have cut out the two sides just enough that the pin can be inserted and pulled out. And have the shield go all the way down on top of the primer warning buzzer. So if it did blow the plastic pieces would blow out to the left and right. Just a thought.
What did you use to hold the pickup tube in place?

VN350X10
11-05-2011, 20:33
A former member in this forum (now banned by Eric) has conducted experiments regarding static & primers. His experiments failed in every attempt to cause a primer to detonate with static, even when using 125K volts from a lab grade Van de Graf generator.
I have seen primerrs detonate in the tube of a Dillon 1050, but haven't figured out how except operator carelessness. A primer won't "pop" from slow, steady pressure.
Put a primer in a bench vise & slowly squeze it untill totally flattened. Like less than 1/16" thick flattened. It still won't have gone off.
NOW, (wearing safety glasses & hearing protection) lightly tap the vise jaw with a very small hammer. BANG!!! The impact sets it off.
A fast, jerky movement during the priming motion can have the effect of hitting a primer. Slow & steady pressure, feel the primer seating.
THERE'S NO POINTS GIVEN FOR SPEED WHILE RELOADING ! A bit of care goes a long way.
Primers need help to detonate.

unce albert

Colorado4Wheel
11-05-2011, 20:42
Tube is not big enough for the blue part to go inside. It would be nice to have a shield of some sort. I am thinking about that one. This was made out of scrap metal so I used what I had. BTW, While fiddling with this thing I noticed the blue tip is a exact fit to the inside hole on the primer alarm. Lines up the tube and the blast shield perfectly. Never noticed that before. I still think it's possible the tube shifted and the primers hit the edge of the alarm. Using the tube as I describe would prevent that from ever happening.

I used RTV in just a couple spots to hold the tube in place. I also just added a string through the tube. It's attached to the clip on one side and has a knot on the other. I just stick a phillips screwdriver in the clip from above and the pin slides out. The string keeps it from falling away. And the string pulls through to the other side when you don't want it on the yellow end when your picking up primers.

leeward419
11-06-2011, 04:04
I have the older tubes, all alum w/a plastic pickup tip. So it is possible to contact the primer w/ the retaining pin

The hole in the tube and fingers looks like that was where he was holding it, This is confusing, why would primer dust ignite where he was holding it, why would pin not set off the one by the pin? Perhaps a faulty primer with way too much charge making it more likely ?, isnt this stuff fulminated mercury or some other similar pressure sensitive compound?
I know in laboratories when they take down old fume hood duct where the FM is used it is very dangerous due to the explosion hazard of particulate left in the ductwork. Could one have hung up a little in the tube setting off residual primer dust ?. Maybe had one hang a little and it needed to be jiggled, maybe the primer rod down the tube to clear? Maybe , maybe maybe......Im on board with the planetary alignment thing mentioned above, and will be cleaning my primer tubes out today.... I would love to know the answer to this, wonder if the primer companies know of similar situations...or the static hazard probability?

mnhogrider
11-06-2011, 05:18
In his description of the event, he said he put "about 50" primers in the pick up tube. My guess is that being the primer tube wasn't completely full and when it was turned over to duimp into the magazine, there was enough space for the primers to slide together and make it detonate. Maybe a defective primer, maybe a build up of primer dust. Either way, a very freak accident. I do this quite often (pick up just 50 primers in the tube).

If my guess was right, then why don't primers go off when transfering them into the magazine? There are 100 sliding down once the pin is pulled into the empty magazine. There would be write-ups all over the place if this was happening. I don't think it was static electricty. I think it was a one-in-a-zillion event. It does prove though what we all know: primers can be unpredictable and need to be handled with safety gear worn. I always wear safety glasses and will be wearing gloves when filling up primer tubes/magazines.
I also clean out the primer pick-up tubes/magazine tubes with pipe cleaners every so often.

I've never had a primer go off while reloading and I've smashed some pretty good. I've also loaded a primer tube without the J-clip completely in the end, turned it over and spilled 100 primers down onto the concrete floor without incident.

giant_pita
11-06-2011, 05:30
Stray voltage from the low primer alarm perhaps? All I can think of.

I think that might be the source; that aaa battery might just be enough.



Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Myke_Hart
11-06-2011, 06:12
I made this shield to keep my hands away from the tube when you are loading the tube and when you pull the pin.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3729.jpg

I will replace the zip tie with a string, attach the string to the upper part of the tube. Then you can use a screw in the hole of the pin, the pin slides out easy but the pin would stay attached to the tube and not fall on the ground.

What is the size of that stock (square dimensions and metal thickness). I have not seen square stock that small before. Might just be a optical illusion.

I have a ton of primer tubes :wow:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/reloading/IMG_1023.jpg
...if I was to duplicate this... I might use round stock and make a holder/adaptor on the very end to duplicate how the blast shield on the press is made. Held and sealed at the bottom and open on top... but that is a problem because primer tubes are flipped when filled and flipped when dumped. Your square tube idea does make channels of air to allow the gasses to escape if it detonates... if you did not block the air passage with the RTV.

I might have to fire up the lathe and mill to try some stuff... only problem is that the designs would have to be tested. That would be scary.

Here is something I would like to try making. Shouldn't take but a few minutes.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/MISC/BLASTSHIEDFORPRIMERTUBElabeled.jpg

WiskyT
11-06-2011, 06:24
If primer dust or SE were such a problem, don't you think that someone at all the companies that make primers, sell reloading instruction, or sell reloading equipment might have mentioned it by now?

Are any of y'all losing sleep over possible yeti attacks?

Colorado4Wheel
11-06-2011, 07:47
What is the size of that stock (square dimensions and metal thickness). I have not seen square stock that small before. Might just be a optical illusion.

I have a ton of primer tubes :wow:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/reloading/IMG_1023.jpg
...if I was to duplicate this... I might use round stock and make a holder/adaptor on the very end to duplicate how the blast shield on the press is made. Held and sealed at the bottom and open on top... but that is a problem because primer tubes are flipped when filled and flipped when dumped. Your square tube idea does make channels of air to allow the gasses to escape if it detonates... if you did not block the air passage with the RTV.

I might have to fire up the lathe and mill to try some stuff... only problem is that the designs would have to be tested. That would be scary.

Here is something I would like to try making. Shouldn't take but a few minutes.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/MISC/BLASTSHIEDFORPRIMERTUBElabeled.jpg


.504" with a .068 thickness. I did not block the corners with RTV. Just a dab in one corner on each end. I don't want to test this thing but it's gotta be better then not having any protection. The explosion is not contained, it's vented out the top and bottom. Venting is the key I think. Main thing for me is your hands are not near the primers any longer. Even when pulling the pin. It looks awkward but pulling the pin with the screwdriver isn't bad at all if you don't have to worry about loosing the pin.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3730.jpg

I fished the string through it so the pin doesn't go flying when I pull the pin with the screwdriver.

GioaJack
11-06-2011, 10:50
The hole in the tube and fingers looks like that was where he was holding it, This is confusing, why would primer dust ignite where he was holding it, why would pin not set off the one by the pin? Perhaps a faulty primer with way too much charge making it more likely ?, isnt this stuff fulminated mercury or some other similar pressure sensitive compound?
I know in laboratories when they take down old fume hood duct where the FM is used it is very dangerous due to the explosion hazard of particulate left in the ductwork. Could one have hung up a little in the tube setting off residual primer dust ?. Maybe had one hang a little and it needed to be jiggled, maybe the primer rod down the tube to clear? Maybe , maybe maybe......Im on board with the planetary alignment thing mentioned above, and will be cleaning my primer tubes out today.... I would love to know the answer to this, wonder if the primer companies know of similar situations...or the static hazard probability?


Actually 'fulminate of mercury' hasn't been widely used in U.S. primer production since around the turn of the century. In addition to being very sensitive to impact the mercury in the compound attacked the brass case and made it very brittle. F of M was replaced by Potassium Chlorate which solved the problem of brittle cases by lead to severe rusting of barrels since it left a large amount of salt as a residue inside the bore.

Around the 1920's or so potassium chlorate was replaced with a Lead Styphnate compound which was non-corrosive and more stable than F of M. A total transition to the PC compound was completed by U.S. manufactures during the 1950's. (Old WWII surplus ammunition is loaded with the old corrosive primers so if you shoot it clean the hell out of your bore. Since the corrosiveness is not negated by modern solvents use old black powder shooters method of cleaning your gun... lots of soap and water or you WILL end up with a pitted bore.)

Modern primers are now loaded with improved forms of LS compound resulting in non-corrosiveness and less compound sensitivity with the primer detonation point being more controlled by the thickness and hardness of the actual cup.

All in all I'm with Wisky, I'm more concerned by a Yeti attack than I am with primers detonating in a pick-up tube. Can it happen... if the above account of the loader's detonation is accurate then obviously it can but it certainly doesn't appear to be a widespread problem... or even a problem at all, more a case of an anomaly that happens so infrequently that it is up to the individual loader to decide if they want to take safeguards against it happening to them.

I would think that if it was a likely problem, given the litigious society we live in, press manufactures would have long ago published warnings and designed their pick-up tubes to alleviate any possible injury to the loader.

As always... I could be wrong. :supergrin:


Jack

leeward419
11-06-2011, 11:02
Around the 1020's or so potassium chlorate was replaced with a Lead Styphnate compound which was non-corrosive and more stable than F of M. A total transition to the PC compound was completed by U.S. manufactures during the 1950's. (Old WWII surplus ammunition is loaded with the old corrosive primers so if you shoot it clean the hell out of your bore. Since the corrosiveness is not negated by modern solvents use old black powder shooters method of cleaning your gun... lots of soap and water or you WILL end up with a pitted bore.)

Modern primers are now loaded with improved forms of LS compound resulting in non-corrosiveness and less compound sensitivity with the primer detonation point being more controlled by the thickness and hardness of the actual cup.

I guess I should have looked it up first, I was being lazy I guess, nice writeup, as always, I learn stuff here.
Thank you Jack.

I do believe the hole in the tube was where the initial explosion took place, maybe IT WAS initiated by a Yeti Bite?
Ok, Im stumped I give up. I did swab out my tubes but......curiosisty being what it is ....I would love to see the photos of HIS (Yetti) ER visit

PCJim
11-06-2011, 11:33
I didn't pick up on there being appx 50 primers in the tube. Very easily, with an anvil incorrectly seated / partially angled in the cup, the impact of sliding a partially filled tube of primers against an offset anvil could easily cause a detonation. You would think, though, that if the anvil was that much misaligned out of the cup, that the primer would have been blatently obvious in the primer tray when he went to pick it up.

mnhogrider
11-06-2011, 12:04
I would also be taking a close look at the rest of the trays of primers coming out of the same box as the tray that went off looking for anything abnormal.

WiskyT
11-06-2011, 15:12
All in all I'm with Wisky...

Jack

The odds of Jack agreeing with me, and then to admit it in a public forum, are so astronomically bad, that I'm starting to rethink this whole random spontaneous primer detonation thing.

Myke_Hart
11-06-2011, 15:39
.504" with a .068 thickness. I did not block the corners with RTV. Just a dab in one corner on each end. I don't want to test this thing but it's gotta be better then not having any protection. The explosion is not contained, it's vented out the top and bottom. Venting is the key I think. Main thing for me is your hands are not near the primers any longer. Even when pulling the pin. It looks awkward but pulling the pin with the screwdriver isn't bad at all if you don't have to worry about loosing the pin.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3730.jpg

I fished the string through it so the pin doesn't go flying when I pull the pin with the screwdriver.

Looks good. The blueing is perfect.
How heavy is it? Can Jack lift it? :supergrin:

Messing around with what I have at the house I had to instantly make a design change. The clearence between the tube and the shield was massive in the first design sooo... I am changing it to a little smaller clearance, but not as tight as yours. This should allow me to use a thicker tube.

Trying this...
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/MISC/BLASTSHIEDFORPRIMERTUBElabeleddesignchange.jpg

I think you are right... venting is the key. Venting without creating projectiles is my goal. :embarassed:

Edit: Yeah, I know... worthless without pics.
First design attempt (parts fitting)
Shield was too fat for my taste. Going with a smaller tube.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/MISC/BLASTSHIEDFORPRIMERTUBEfirstattempt.jpg

Colorado4Wheel
11-06-2011, 16:36
I used mine a lot today. I also made another shield for the primer alarm. So it would not "blast back" at the user if something blew while primers are going into the tube. Again. So far this has been a fun project and free. I actually feel good about doing it. Plus, it drives Jack and Wisky nuts so that is good as well.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3731.jpg

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/DSC_3732.jpg

GioaJack
11-06-2011, 16:58
Why take chances... if you're going to load safely really load safely.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1luLRXKoJM8/TPoeq48qH-I/AAAAAAAAnLw/zEYsLaWNpbQ/s1600/701_EOD.jpg


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
11-06-2011, 17:08
I need it in BLUE.

Thanks.

WiskyT
11-06-2011, 17:10
Plus, it drives Jack and Wisky nuts so that is good as well.



I think it's great. All I have to do now is find a few more vaguely described events to send you off on a snipe hunt to fabricate protection against them

VN350X10
11-06-2011, 17:20
Jack & Wisky in agreement ?...:dunno:

:wow:Quick, re-think the entire posting, as ONE OF THEM HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN ABDUCTED & REPLACED BY A SINISTER ALIEN LIFEFORM !!!!!:wow:



uncle albert

WiskyT
11-06-2011, 17:25
Even more rarely, meteorites can also hit people. The most famous recent event was in Sylacuaga, Alabama in 1954, when a 4 kg stone hit Mrs. Hulitt Hodges who was asleep on a couch. Mrs. Hodges suffered a bruised hip and lived to tell the tale!

http://epswww.unm.edu/meteoritemuseum/virtualtour/world.htm

Colorado4Wheel
11-06-2011, 17:29
I think it's great. All I have to do now is find a few more vaguely described events to send you off on a snipe hunt to fabricate protection against them

Lauge all you want but I have thought about this for about a year. It's not a bad thing to keep your hand away from the tube a little. When I saw that post it kinda pushed me along a little more. But reading the story from the guy who lost his fingers and was not able to shoot properly with his strong hand really makes you think. This guy got away Lucky if you ask me. It could have been much worse.

Myke_Hart
11-06-2011, 17:42
I just like stealing other peoples dreams...Crushing them... Then improving them for my personal use. :supergrin:

Wow, C4W you really are taking this seriously. Some people are afraid of spiders... Others... Primer pickup tubes!

I am working on a spring loaded nail device to go the end of the primer tube to kick off detonation of 100 primers. Wanna hold the tube for the blast shield test? Gotta see if all this hard work is paying off!:supergrin:

I added a edit on my earlier post that included a picture of my improved design that I stole from you.:embarassed:

WiskyT
11-06-2011, 17:42
For Jack:

Since it was launched in 1998, more than 5,600 men have died after taking the antiimpotence pill Viagra. In 1998, Nigerian dictator Sani Abacha died of a heart attack caused by taking large quantities of the drug before taking part in an orgy.


And for Steve:

Dr Oscar Dominguez, a 45- year-old psychiatrist in Sao Paulo, Brazil, admitted he'd shot and killed his patient while she told him about her sex life. He told the court: 'I couldn't take those nutcases any more.'


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1043775/Champagne-corks-Inflatable-elephants-Too-Viagra--new-book-revealing-unlikely-ways-people-meet-maker.html

GioaJack
11-06-2011, 17:51
I take great pride in living dangerously. (Exactly what is considered a large quantity of Viagra?)


Jack

Lou Garou
11-06-2011, 18:48
I wonder how many guys will get killed running to Radio Shack to buy resistors, grounding wire, and ohmmeters. If static electricity setting off primers were a real problem we would have heard about it by now. A lot.

It was a freak one-in-a-million shot, like landing on a fusili Jerry just right. My money's on 40 of those 50 primers in that tube getting hung up and dropping at the same time the guy pulled the pin. The impact then set off a primer, initiating a chain fire. No static, no priming compound dust, and no auras. One-in-a-million shot is all.

njl
11-06-2011, 18:49
I take great pride in living dangerously. (Exactly what is considered a large quantity of Viagra?)


Jack


I think this would qualify:

GM Spends $17 Million Per Year on Viagra (http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/04/gm_viagra.html)

Colorado4Wheel
11-06-2011, 18:54
Wow, C4W you really are taking this seriously. Some people are afraid of spiders... Others... Primer pickup tubes!

I am working on a spring loaded nail device to go the end of the primer tube to kick off detonation of 100 primers. Wanna hold the tube for the blast shield test? Gotta see if all this hard work is paying off!:supergrin:

I added a edit on my earlier post that included a picture of my improved design that I stole from you.:embarassed:

I would keep loading with out the shield. It's not like it's likely at all anything would happen. But it's not like the time I spent doing this was a waste either. Didn't cost me a dime. It was kinda fun. I talked to the guy who got hurt about it and it helped him come up with a plan to make himself feel better. Nothing wrong with that at all. He posted over at Brian Enos forums as well.

unclebob
11-06-2011, 19:04
I wonder how many guys will get killed running to Radio Shack to buy resistors, grounding wire, and ohmmeters. If static electricity setting off primers were a real problem we would have heard about it by now. A lot.

It was a freak one-in-a-million shot, like landing on a fusili Jerry just right. My money's on 40 of those 50 primers in that tube getting hung up and dropping at the same time the guy pulled the pin. The impact then set off a primer, initiating a chain fire. No static, no priming compound dust, and no auras. One-in-a-million shot is all.

So in most cases you have 100 primers traveling a distance of a little over 15Ē from the pickup tube to the bottom of the primer magazine without any primers going off when they have an abrupt stop when they hit bottom?

Lou Garou
11-06-2011, 19:12
So in most cases you have 100 primers traveling a distance of a little over 15Ē from the pickup tube to the bottom of the primer magazine without any primers going off when they have an abrupt stop when they hit bottom?Yep, but there's static electricity there in every operation, too. We'll have to let Jamie and Adam compare the two theories, I guess. :supergrin:

unclebob
11-06-2011, 20:08
Yep, but there's static electricity there in every operation, too. We'll have to let Jamie and Adam compare the two theories, I guess. :supergrin:

And that would prove nothing. They could go through a million primers and nothing happens. On the million and one it goes off. When they make primers they do testing to make sure everything is within their specifications. There is no way in telling if somewhere in that batch that could have one or more primes that if you look at it wrong could go off. When I was loading bombs we were loading 750lbs. bombs that the Navy had a 98% detonation rate with no fuses. So why 2% would not go off. And if we would have dropped one when loading would it go off. Luckily never found out on that one. Why do some people have trouble with priming with the LNL and others donít. We like to think that every one of those primers is the same but they are not. Why at times people get a batch of primers that some do not go off first, second or third try. So you can also go the other way and have a very sensitive primer. With it being in the right spot with the right weather conditions and everything else being the same as when it happened and even then it may or may not go off.

Lou Garou
11-07-2011, 05:00
And that would prove nothing. They could go through a million primers and nothing happens. On the million and one it goes off. That would prove that it is possible for a primer to go off under certain conditions. This "proof" would include the remote possibility that an out-of-spec primer made that happen.

When they make primers they do testing to make sure everything is within their specifications. There is no way in telling if somewhere in that batch that could have one or more primes that if you look at it wrong could go off.Those statements are contradictory. Going off "if you look at it wrong" is not in spec. "They" do not make sure every primer is in spec, only that the probability of an out-of-spec primer getting through is within an acceptable range.

My "Adam & Jaime" comment was meant to imply that at this point the scenarios of primers being set off in the tube either by static electricity or by impact are both myths which should be tested scientifically to determine if either is possible. Such testing will never prove that either occurrence is impossible, only that it is possible.

unclebob
11-07-2011, 12:12
:headscratch::rollingeyes::brickwall:

Lou Garou
11-07-2011, 12:44
:headscratch::rollingeyes::brickwall:Sorry to confuse and frustrate you, Bob. My posts were in fact pretty clear.

F106 Fan
11-07-2011, 12:54
Why take chances... if you're going to load safely really load safely.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1luLRXKoJM8/TPoeq48qH-I/AAAAAAAAnLw/zEYsLaWNpbQ/s1600/701_EOD.jpg


Jack


Notice the exposed finger tips. Nice effort though!

Richard

unclebob
11-07-2011, 13:45
Sorry to confuse and frustrate you, Bob. My posts were in fact pretty clear.

Sorry you did not confuse and or frustrate me.
After spending about 25 years in the Air Force. Attending many schools, and working with explosives for those 25 years. I think I have a little bit of understanding of explosives and how they work. I also have been reloading for 50 years. But then what do I know Iím just a senile old man.

Lou Garou
11-07-2011, 14:38
Sorry you did not confuse and or frustrate me.
After spending about 25 years in the Air Force. Attending many schools, and working with explosives for those 25 years. I think I have a little bit of understanding of explosives and how they work. I also have been reloading for 50 years. But then what do I know Iím just a senile old man.So what are you saying, Bob? That the million and one-th primer going off doesn't prove that it's possible for primers to go off?

That "When they make primers they do testing to make sure everything is within their specifications. There is no way in telling if somewhere in that batch that could have one or more primes that if you look at it wrong could go off" are not contradictory statements?

Or are you saying that my statement that methodical testing cannot prove the primers can never go off is incorrect? I was taught (granted not for 25 years in the Air Force, but there are other places to learn things) that it is not easy to prove a negative.

So what makes you think you're senile? :cool:

GioaJack
11-07-2011, 15:32
So what are you saying, Bob? That the million and one-th primer going off doesn't prove that it's possible for primers to go off?

That "When they make primers they do testing to make sure everything is within their specifications. There is no way in telling if somewhere in that batch that could have one or more primes that if you look at it wrong could go off" are not contradictory statements?

Or are you saying that my statement that methodical testing cannot prove the primers can never go off is incorrect? I was taught (granted not for 25 years in the Air Force, but there are other places to learn things) that it is not easy to prove a negative.

So what makes you think you're senile? :cool:


No, he's senile, trust me... as a matter of fact we can all attest to it. :whistling:


Jack

unclebob
11-07-2011, 16:08
So what are you saying, Bob? That the million and one-th primer going off doesn't prove that it's possible for primers to go off? No trying to find that one in a million primer is the problem.

That "When they make primers they do testing to make sure everything is within their specifications. There is no way in telling if somewhere in that batch that could have one or more primes that if you look at it wrong could go off" are not contradictory statements?Is every car coming of the production line the same? one can have no problems and the next is a piece of junk.

Or are you saying that my statement that methodical testing cannot prove the primers can never go off is incorrect? I was taught (granted not for 25 years in the Air Force, but there are other places to learn things) that it is not easy to prove a negative. Yes but trying to duplicate that primer going off with the same conditions that when it happened and trying to find a primer that will go off with those conditions. You would have a better chance of winning the lottery. Is it possible yes but very unlikely. Iím sure that there have been other primer tubes going off. But how many ever get reported. GT and other the sights like GT and the number of people on them is a very small number of the people out there that reload. Or even if they report what happened to the manufacture of the reloader they are using.

So what makes you think you're senile? :cool:See just ask Jack.

noylj
11-07-2011, 16:22
To me, this is another urban legend like the round being set off by an empty case hitting it.
I do not know why so many think that primers are so sensitive that they'll go off if you sneeze near them.
They are not set off by a primer hitting them. They are not set off by falling to the ground. They need a certain minimum impact force that is not found by 100 primers falling on a primer.
I have had two primers go off on me in over 35 years. Both were due to the primer slider impacting the primer against the primer seating cup (due to the primer falling out of the slider due to being the last primer and not seating in the slider's primer cup). When I jiggles the slider to loosen it, the primer fell in front of the slider and the spring slammed the slider into the primer seating cup. That was enough force to set off a primer.

unclebob
11-07-2011, 17:11
To me, this is another urban legend like the round being set off by an empty case hitting it.
I do not know why so many think that primers are so sensitive that they'll go off if you sneeze near them.
They are not set off by a primer hitting them. They are not set off by falling to the ground. They need a certain minimum impact force that is not found by 100 primers falling on a primer.
I have had two primers go off on me in over 35 years. Both were due to the primer slider impacting the primer against the primer seating cup (due to the primer falling out of the slider due to being the last primer and not seating in the slider's primer cup). When I jiggles the slider to loosen it, the primer fell in front of the slider and the spring slammed the slider into the primer seating cup. That was enough force to set off a primer.

Sorry in 1972 Ubon Thailand. When we reloaded the AC-130 gunship we would pull the trailer up close by the right paratroop door one guy would be on the trailer opening the 40mm cans pull out a clip of 4 rounds of 40mm and through the clip to the guy in the doorway. May of rounds have fallen out of the clip and hit the ground. One night one came out hit the ground and went off.

Colorado4Wheel
11-07-2011, 17:19
Don't you know.....

What Happens in Thailand, Stays in Thailand.

fredj338
11-07-2011, 17:20
Idon't think this will get resolved. Sometimes crap happens, like getting hit by lightening, it just happens. All we can do is be diligent, reasonably cautious & wear protective eye gear & move forward. You could probably never reproduce this event in a controlled enviroment.

unclebob
11-07-2011, 17:21
Don't you know.....

What Happens in Thailand, Stays in Thailand.

Not always.

fredj338
11-07-2011, 17:24
If primer dust or SE were such a problem, don't you think that someone at all the companies that make primers, sell reloading instruction, or sell reloading equipment might have mentioned it by now?

Are any of y'all losing sleep over possible yeti attacks?

The primer dust thing actually has been mentioned, it's in the NRA reloading class amterial. Could it happen, yeah, why not, just about anything can happen.:dunno:

Lou Garou
11-07-2011, 18:04
You know, it's highly unlikely that one would fall on a miniature statue of a stand-up comic in such a manner that it would wind up in a place best left unmentioned. Maybe a probability of 0.000001. But, it could happen nonetheless. Even in Thailand.

Colorado4Wheel
11-07-2011, 18:21
Not always.

Your right, I wouldn't know.

GioaJack
11-07-2011, 18:45
Your right, I wouldn't know.


I KNOW, I KNOW!!!


Jack

njl
11-07-2011, 18:57
To me, this is another urban legend like the round being set off by an empty case hitting it.
I do not know why so many think that primers are so sensitive that they'll go off if you sneeze near them.
They are not set off by a primer hitting them. They are not set off by falling to the ground. They need a certain minimum impact force that is not found by 100 primers falling on a primer.


So are you calling BS on this guy's story? What's your explanation for the pictures, what happened, and how it happened?

kcbrown
11-07-2011, 19:09
Not always.

The 40mm round landed outside of Thailand after it went off?

:supergrin:

robinsok
11-07-2011, 21:06
So can the "armored" tubes from the RF100 be used to pick up primers without the machine? Seems if they are so much safer, they should be made available without buying the 300 dollar machine. I am not in that big of a hurry, but the added safety would be good.

noylj
11-08-2011, 00:26
I think we are talking about significantly different weights and forces. Look at a 9x19 and your 40mm rounds.
Somehow, I think your rounds could hit with the force of a hammer.
By the way, was this reported and can we read the findings of the investigation?
Have no idea why anyone thought throwing that ammunition around was a good idea.

n2extrm
11-08-2011, 17:04
Idon't think this will get resolved. Sometimes crap happens, like getting hit by lightening, it just happens. All we can do is be diligent, reasonably cautious & wear protective eye gear & move forward. You could probably never reproduce this event in a controlled enviroment.

That's it Fred you got it! It was lightning! :faint:

Seriously stuff happens. If you worry all the time then it seems more likely to happen then it really is. Reload have some fun and use common sense.

All these shields may do more harm then good. What is going to absorb the blast?

unclebob
11-08-2011, 20:14
I think we are talking about significantly different weights and forces. Look at a 9x19 and your 40mm rounds.
Somehow, I think your rounds could hit with the force of a hammer.
By the way, was this reported and can we read the findings of the investigation?
Have no idea why anyone thought throwing that ammunition around was a good idea.

I donít think there would be too much difference of trying to pull rounds apart with a kinetic bullet puller.
Iím sure that there is a report somewhere. But it happened on a military base and also during a war. After that we had to put a mattress between the trailer and the airplane and one inside of the door of the airplane. We only had one crew working at night and one day time. When the plane landed we had to get the spent brass off the airplane and then load it back up for the next mission. It was the easiest and fastest way of doing it. After the war and state side we have a total different way of doing it. Even then you still have rounds that would fall out of the clips and northing ever happened.

Colorado4Wheel
12-02-2011, 16:16
You guys might be interested in knowing that Grant asked Dillon to provide a RF100 primer filler at cost to make him feel safe with handling primer tubes again. Dillon politely declined. Grant asked Brian Enos (he bought the equipment from Brian) if he would help him out. Brian was happy to help .

Personally, I would not have asked for this, but that is besides the point. Main thing is that this shows Brian Enos is a great guy to do business with.


http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=140988&st=0&gopid=1584639&#entry1584639

TX Archer
12-02-2011, 17:33
Personally, I would not have asked for this, but that is besides the point. Main thing is that this shows Brian Enos is a great guy to do business with.
I'll second that. He was more than helpful during the purchase of my first reloading equipment and when I asked for help with a couple of technical problems. I'm not surprised he stood up in a situation where he had no obligation to. He has made me a loyal customer.

rpgman
12-02-2011, 17:45
I'll second that. He was more than helpful during the purchase of my first reloading equipment and when I asked for help with a couple of technical problems. I'm not surprised he stood up in a situation where he had no obligation to. He has made me a loyal customer.

Brian is a great guy.

n2extrm
12-02-2011, 18:18
You guys might be interested in knowing that Grant asked Dillon to provide a RF100 primer filler at cost to make him feel safe with handling primer tubes again. Dillon politely declined. Grant asked Brian Enos (he bought the equipment from Brian) if he would help him out. Brian was happy to help .

Personally, I would not have asked for this, but that is besides the point. Main thing is that this shows Brian Enos is a great guy to do business with.


http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=140988&st=0&gopid=1584639&#entry1584639

Thanks for sharing that Steve. I like to see that kind of stuff and it leads me to feel better about doing business with people like that.

cysoto
12-02-2011, 20:36
...Grant asked Dillon to provide a RF100 primer filler at cost to make him feel safe with handling primer tubes again.
WOW; what a freaking sense of entitlement this Grant guy has!!!! :wow:

There is no doubt that Brian is a great person to do business with but what this fellow did is deplorable.

WiskyT
12-03-2011, 06:21
You guys might be interested in knowing that Grant asked Dillon to provide a RF100 primer filler at cost to make him feel safe with handling primer tubes again. Dillon politely declined. Grant asked Brian Enos (he bought the equipment from Brian) if he would help him out. Brian was happy to help .

Personally, I would not have asked for this, but that is besides the point. Main thing is that this shows Brian Enos is a great guy to do business with.


http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=140988&st=0&gopid=1584639&#entry1584639

That says a lot about Grant too. Funny how when something unusual happens, one of the parties involved is a twit.

Who is Grant going to ask to load the primer mag on his machine, especially since this is when the event supposedly happened, his wife?

rpgman
12-03-2011, 06:25
OThat says a lot about Grant too. Funny how when something unusual happens, one of the parties involved is a twit.

Who is Grant going to ask to load the primer mag on his machine, especially since this is when the event supposedly happened, his wife?

ouch but soooo correct.

rpgman
12-03-2011, 06:30
Why would asking to purchase at cost make a difference?
I mean it's not like he wasn't going to get another one.
It wasn't the issue with the RF100.

88_gurgel
12-03-2011, 06:33
This happened to a friend of mine but the primer tube was already in the machine and he was pulling the handle when the primer feed malfunctioned and pinched the primer some how. It blew the whole stack into the ceiling. He sent the parts in and it was determined that the parts were worn out and caused the primer to blow.

njl
12-03-2011, 06:39
It's not like Grant asked Dillon for a free RF100. If I read correctly, he just asked Dillon for a deal on one so he could feel safer loading primers into the press.

It may be that Dillon has to say no there for liability reasons...i.e. giving him a deal on the RF100 might be construed as an admission of fault, and then the next time someone has an accident around a Dillon machine, their lawyer does some digging, see's Grant's thread, and uses it to suggest Dillon "knew they had safety problems with their equipment" and sues for a few million $.

I have no idea what Brian's "cost" is on an RF100, but I'm going to guess his markup is pretty small, so giving this guy a break on one isn't going to hurt him very much...and I'm not at all surprised Brian was willing to do it.

I ordered my RL550 setup from Brian with a bunch of stuff for multiple pistol/rifle calibers. After each of us went over my shopping list several times, somehow we both missed a critical item. Brian noticed this after he'd run the charge, included the missed item with my order, and wouldn't charge me for it.

WiskyT
12-03-2011, 06:53
Mouse in beer FTW!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3DYbE44OIE

Colorado4Wheel
12-03-2011, 07:43
It's not like Grant asked Dillon for a free RF100. If I read correctly, he just asked Dillon for a deal on one so he could feel safer loading primers into the press.

It may be that Dillon has to say no there for liability reasons...i.e. giving him a deal on the RF100 might be construed as an admission of fault, and then the next time someone has an accident around a Dillon machine, their lawyer does some digging, see's Grant's thread, and uses it to suggest Dillon "knew they had safety problems with their equipment" and sues for a few million $.

I have no idea what Brian's "cost" is on an RF100, but I'm going to guess his markup is pretty small, so giving this guy a break on one isn't going to hurt him very much...and I'm not at all surprised Brian was willing to do it.

I ordered my RL550 setup from Brian with a bunch of stuff for multiple pistol/rifle calibers. After each of us went over my shopping list several times, somehow we both missed a critical item. Brian noticed this after he'd run the charge, included the missed item with my order, and wouldn't charge me for it.

Thats the way I see it as well. Also he can pull the pin and keep his hand away from the bottom of the tube using a stick. Tube would be protected where his hand is.

Funny thing is you can make a tube protector better then the Dillons RF setup for $15 on about 5 tubes. He just wanted a RF.

unclebob
12-03-2011, 08:15
This happened to a friend of mine but the primer tube was already in the machine and he was pulling the handle when the primer feed malfunctioned and pinched the primer some how. It blew the whole stack into the ceiling. He sent the parts in and it was determined that the parts were worn out and caused the primer to blow.

What press was he loading on?

GioaJack
12-03-2011, 09:32
Little Stevie slid his truck on the ice and caved in the front end last week and had the nerve to call and ask me to buy him a new one.

I sent him a worn out Dillon primer tube... postage due. :whistling:


Jack

unclebob
12-03-2011, 12:25
Little Stevie slid his truck on the ice and caved in the front end last week and had the nerve to call and ask me to buy him a new one.

I sent him a worn out Dillon primer tube... postage due. :whistling:


Jack

Come on Jack where is your Christmas spirit?

GioaJack
12-03-2011, 12:32
There's a foot of snow on the ground, it's still snowing, probably will for the rest of eternity, it's 22 degrees, (the high for today) and I have to load the truck so I can leave for Ft. Worth at 4:30 in the morning.

Christmas spirit my ass... I wanna kill somethin'. :fist:


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
12-03-2011, 12:36
Thats funny, a mountain man complaining about the snow and cold. It's only 24F down here and I just got in from working outside. You can "try" and hit me with your cane tommorow at Cracker Barrel. If you actully hit me your buying.

unclebob
12-03-2011, 12:46
Thats funny, a mountain man complaining about the snow and cold. It's only 24F down here and I just got in from working outside. You can "try" and hit me with your cane tommorow at Cracker Barrel. If you actully hit me your buying.

Steve remember, Jack is a transplant from Florida. I beginning to wonder who complains more, Jack or my wife? I think they might be a good match.

GioaJack
12-03-2011, 14:52
While you flatlanders are sunning yourselves under your sissy palm trees or wiggling your toes in the Atlantic or Pacific ponds us real men, (and there ain't many of us), are out battling Mother Nature.

As soon as I get the truck loaded I'll be ready to leave in the morning. (If it wasn't for the skid steer and ATV with plow I'd say screw it and stay home to watch football.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_0132.jpg

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_0131.jpg

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_0130.jpg

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_0129.jpg

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_0128.jpg

(First pictures I've taken with my iPhone 4s... pretty spiffy little phone.)


Jack

WiskyT
12-03-2011, 15:25
Took the kids to the park today and let them run around. It was 60-something and sunny.

88_gurgel
12-11-2011, 17:55
What press was he loading on?

550 i think

BK63
12-11-2011, 17:59
Holy cow 5 pages of this and probably nobody will ever read this post, but after 40 years of reloading I've never had a primer kaboom.

BK63
12-11-2011, 18:00
Took the kids to the park today and let them run around. It was 60-something and sunny.

I seem to think this post has gone way off topic :supergrin::supergrin::supergrin:

IndyGunFreak
12-11-2011, 18:18
WOW; what a freaking sense of entitlement this Grant guy has!!!! :wow:

There is no doubt that Brian is a great person to do business with but what this fellow did is deplorable.

Hate being negative, but I agree.

Colorado4Wheel
12-11-2011, 18:23
Holy cow 5 pages of this and probably nobody will ever read this post, but after 40 years of reloading I've never had a primer kaboom.

I read it.

federali
12-14-2011, 18:05
Walking on carpet, especially with leather-soled shoes, allows you to build up a static charge. I don't know if static electricity can set off a primer. Also, years ago there was a nasty explosion at M&D Reloading, New York, a licensed, commercial reloader. Blast killed two workers and was apparently caused by a build-up of primer residue. Presses should be vacuumed periodically, especially after a powder spill.

It appears that the tube held many primers but the detonation was at the mid-point. Why one primer and not more of them?

unclebob
12-14-2011, 19:16
It appears that the tube held many primers but the detonation was at the mid-point. Why one primer and not more of them?

All 50 of the primers went off. One primer is not going to split the primer pickup tool. When a friend of mine set of all 100 primers it also split the inside magazine tube in the middle.