1st day with 20sf, report and questions. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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orangeride
11-11-2011, 18:45
So I consider my self pretty lucky. My brother and I just picked up matching 20sf's and a 1000 rounds of 180gr FMJ from Georgia arms. This mourning we put about 300 rounds each through our guns, and they ran flawless. Empty's went to the right 7-10', never up or over our heads. Just for kicks we threw in stainless guide rods with 22lbs springs and put another 100 rounds. They still ran great, but you could tell the recoil was down and they weren't throwing the shells as far. Here's where things got a little funny. We were messing around doing rapid fire drills from the holster and in the first mag my gun FTF two different times. I thought that's strange. So my brother gets up and his gun does the same thing! So were switched back to the stock rod and spring. Problem gone 99%. We Ran several mags down range, and if we were really consensus about a firm grip, and keeping the gun down they ran great. But if we let them climb they would occasionally FTF (not nearly as bad as with the 22lbs springs) Here's my question. Do we need to work more on technique? Do we need hotter ammo? (box says 180gr at 1100FPS) or do we need to drop down on the springs. This is our first glocks and we love them. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks. Aaron

arushus
11-11-2011, 18:54
I only have one question, what are you doing with your brass? If you arent saving it to reload yourselves, you should still be saving it cuz someone, like me, will buy it from you!

orangeride
11-11-2011, 19:06
Ya I'm saving it! My dies from dillon just came in. We figered if you have to buy the brass your only saving 10-15c to reload. So we split a 1000 from Georgia arms. Plus I think it's best to break um in with factory ammo.

arushus
11-11-2011, 19:18
Thats about the best way to get into it and get some brass...I just couldnt stand the thought of all that brass going to waste!

TreyG-20
11-11-2011, 20:04
My guess would be after they climb it gets to the point where the recoil goes more into your wrist instead of into the gun to properly cycle another round use the stock spring and rod and keep a firm grip and it should go away. By the way congrats on a sweet Gun you will love it forever

arushus
11-11-2011, 20:22
Im able to shoot some weak tulammo .40cal through my conversion barrel with my 22lb spring and ss guide rod installed. It cycles perfectly, the cases just barely dribble out, but they eject every time...

orangeride
11-11-2011, 20:40
Im able to shoot some weak tulammo .40cal through my conversion barrel with my 22lb spring and ss guide rod installed. It cycles perfectly, the cases just barely dribble out, but they eject every time...

Mine also ran fine during normal shooting, but when I'd go to ultra rapid fire it'd hang up. I think was a little hotter ammo and a firm grip I'd have no problems.

arushus
11-11-2011, 21:59
that is an odd issue...

4949shooter
11-12-2011, 04:02
I han't even fired my 20SF yet though I own 4 other glocks, but I will guess that you got used to the less felt recoil from the stiffer spring and relaxed your wrist somewhat.

Definately strange..

orangeride
11-12-2011, 08:44
I'm headed up right now to put a few more through it. I'll try and stiffin up my wrist. I'll report later.

post-apocalyptic
11-12-2011, 12:06
So; putting a 22lb aftermarket spring, (5 lbs heavier than the OEM), in a brand-new G20-SF and shooting mild 10mm will cause the occasional FTF when firing quickly. That's hardly suprising.

I'd try lubing the slide rails with your choice of gun grease; that should help the pistols feed more reliably with the heavier spring until they break-in.

Grimson
11-12-2011, 15:01
1100 fps for 180 gr is too soft for a 22lb recoil spring IMO. It could be a combination of the recoil spring and not a firm enough grip that could be causing the FTF. I use a 22lb spring myself but strictly for hotter loads. (1250+ fps for 180gr)

Ethereal Killer
11-12-2011, 18:46
ALL GUNS need some breaking in. that is usually best done with some shooting. generally I dont consider a gun broken in until I have AT LEAST 500 rounds thru the pipe. I usually notice that teh majority of problems experienced are in the first 100-150 rounds, then they smooth out and get better.

newer glocks seem to need it more than the older ones did IME. just roll with it and chock one up to testing and evaluation.

rcd567
11-13-2011, 09:23
I've run a little over 500 with my 20sf in the original configuration, meaning the stock 17lbs spring. Throws most of the brass about 10 at about the 4 o'clock position. The hottest was the Underwood 165 gr. JHP that runs at or near 1400 fps. About a 100 rounds of this stuff.:supergrin: It's my favorite load.

If you check around, there are some on here that change springs with just about every different load. And there are some around here that shoot everything with the stock spring. I'm not sure either is "right", so just do what you want. I may opt for a steel guide rod and a 20 pound spring sometime in the future, but I figure Glock probably knows a little more than I do about their guns and since they ship them with a 17, that should work. Your Mileage May Vary.

MarineHawk
11-13-2011, 14:52
I get the impression that something like a 22 lb spring may be ideal solely for shooting the high-pressure loads, but won't shoot the lighter stuff as reliably. The 17 lb spring will function more reliably with the lighter loads, but will slam harder against the receiver with the hotter loads. I assume Glock went with the 17 lb spring, since most of the factory 10mm loads are at the low end and to allow better function across the board. I only shoot the hot stuff out of mine, so I just got a 22 lb spring. I have a bunch of .40s out of which I can shoot lighter loads. It's a trade off. It's certainly true that Glock knows its stuff, but there's nothing to say that they would not put a 22 lb spring on the stock gun if the hotter loads were standard.

21Carrier
11-14-2011, 14:56
It's called limp-wristing. It happens when you don't control the gun well. For a short recoil semi-automatic pistol to cycle properly, you have to control the frame. It needs to be held firmly to be able to cycle. As the muzzle rises, and your wrist flexes, your control lessens, and the entire gun starts to move during recoil. Ideally, only the slide would move. When you allow the entire gun to move, part of the recoil impulse is wasted in moving the frame, and less energy is available to drive the slide rearward. That translates to a jam.

The weak ammo makes the problem worse. The heavier recoil springs will also make the problem worse, especially when combined with a weak grip and ammo. If you combine the heavy springs with hot ammo, reliability should increase. However, I've found that heavy springs can also cause feeding issues regardless of ammo power and grip. Even after thousands of flawless rounds through my G29, I started experiencing failures with heavy springs. It speeds up the forward stroke of the slide, and can cause problems. However, from reading your post, I'd suspect the primary issue was a lack of control.

ArmyDoc
11-14-2011, 16:59
1100 fps for 180 gr is too soft for a 22lb recoil spring IMO. It could be a combination of the recoil spring and not a firm enough grip that could be causing the FTF. I use a 22lb spring myself but strictly for hotter loads. (1250+ fps for 180gr)


I agree. I have the G21 (.45 ACP). The remington .45 +P 185 is slightly heavier and rated at about 1140 fps. I use the standard factory spring. Your G20 has a slightly heavier slide than my G21. I don't think you need the heavier springs for that ammo.