"Carry Rotation" I that wise? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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runcible68
11-12-2011, 23:49
I've noticed a lot of posts where forum members write about their "carry rotation." Some posters have written that they have 4 or more guns in their line up. Is that wise? What does that old maxim say? "You can own a lot of guns, but the man who only owns one will shoot it very, very well." In the stress of an armed confrontation, would it not be better to be totally versed in the use of only one gun? Maybe two?

All my big handguns are for plinking or taking gun haters to the range and luring them to dark side. I own two carry pieces, a G36 and a S&W 442. The Smith is my summer/spring gun and my G36 is my cold weather carry. My G36 is actually my house gun!

80 percent of the time I go to the range I practice with these two pistols. Since it's fall, my practice is mostly with my 36. And when I switch from carrying the Smith to the 36 or vice versa, it takes some getting used to. My muscle memory concerning the draw and the firing of these weapons is different. I'm wondering how a person who cycles though multiple weapons handles this.

Just my two cents. Love to hear what others think.

HarleyGuy
11-13-2011, 00:16
I have quite a few handguns (and holsters) but my main carry guns are a Kel-Tec .32ACP, a Glock 27, and a Kimber UltraCDPII .45ACP.
I must admit that I have been carrying the Kel-Tec for months simply because it's so light, small and easy to conceal in my front pants pocket in a soft pocket holster.
With cooler weather coming I'll probably start carry a larger gun but I'm also thinking about carrying my S/W 642 instead of the heavier semi-autos.
THe issue that I have with the small pistol is the accuracy.
The Glock and the Kimber are pretty accurate but the S/W is definitely for close encounters. THen again, perhaps I just need to practice more with it.

Lior
11-13-2011, 03:05
As long as all of the guns involved share a common manual of arms, rotating between multiple guns for SD should not be a problem. KISS saves lives here.

A problem would be if say a user kept a PPK and a 1911 with the safety on - confusion might result as to which way to thumb the safety in dire straits. I would advise not going there. But a user alternating between (for example) an XD and a Glock should not enounter major hardware related difficulties in saving their hides, despite the differences in operating mechanisms between the guns.

kgjl
11-13-2011, 04:38
I have quite a few handguns (and holsters) but my main carry guns are a Kel-Tec .32ACP, a Glock 27, and a Kimber UltraCDPII .45ACP.
I must admit that I have been carrying the Kel-Tec for months simply because it's so light, small and easy to conceal in my front pants pocket in a soft pocket holster.
With cooler weather coming I'll probably start carry a larger gun but I'm also thinking about carrying my S/W 642 instead of the heavier semi-autos.
THe issue that I have with the small pistol is the accuracy.
The Glock and the Kimber are pretty accurate but the S/W is definitely for close encounters. THen again, perhaps I just need to practice more with it.


I am curious, with the KT32 and the KT380 being the same size, why have you stuck with the 32?

Bogey
11-13-2011, 04:56
My daily carry is a 30. I carry a 21 in the winter sometimes, and on occasion I will wear a 17.

I have no problem with switching up as I shoot all 3 in competition. Shoot a 686 and GP 100 in comps too, but don't carry them.

I have a Ruger LCR for a BUG, and am fairly proficient with it too.


I don't think the old adage is necessarily 100% true anymore.

collim1
11-13-2011, 06:47
I dont "rotate" guns, but I have a gun for each CCW situation. I carry a P239 OWB most of the time, but I have a 442 for pocket and ankle carry for those situations that require 100% concealment.

t-shooter
11-13-2011, 09:47
I think having a common manual of arms is critical. I attempted briefly to alternate between a 1911 and a Glock 19. I could not make the transition under stress. I would fish for the non-existent safety on the Glock or squeeze the trigger until I turn blue on the 1911 because I did not take off the safety. My carry rotation now consists of a couple of various caliber Glocks, Kahr PM9 and a S&W 642. They are all three double action only with no manual safety. I believe that as long as you stay with one manual of arms and practice with all of the weapons in the rotation you are OK.

GlockPride
11-13-2011, 09:58
I too agree with the same manual of arms. I transition from a m&p 9c and a PF-9. Both da and 9mm. Yes, they are different grip sizes, mag capacities and trigger weights, but they are close enough to count for me.

PAGunner
11-13-2011, 10:22
A lot of people already beat me too it, but it's the reason I'm going to eventually get rid of my USPc .45, it's all about manual of arms. If you carry all Glocks chances are you'll shoot any of them very well, same grip, same trigger.

Yes, you could have a Kahr, Glock and J-frame in the same line up, all have different grips and triggers... I'd consider this same manual of arms, but the closer you can get to the same the better off you are. It's when you pick up a gun like an XD, 1911, Berretta, Sig or SA/DA HK that will mess you up.

michael e
11-13-2011, 10:27
I carry several diff from time to time. My main is always a Glock, sometimes its full size compact or sub compact. BUG is a SW 642 and LCP. If going OWB that holster is for the 9mm 40sw 357sig frames, my IWB is for 45 10mm frames. So what I carry really goes by what I wear and the weather.

Goat 36
11-13-2011, 10:28
Same Manual of Arms is very wise.

G36/G19 here. Only difference to compensate for is recoil management to get back on target for follow-up shots. Both fit in same holsters and feel pretty similar in the hand.

If I grab one in the dark, they both have same operator night sights, one with green/green and one with green/yellow.

So, if I have a chance to actually 'SEE' the sights before I have to engage, I can tell which caliber to prepare my timing between shots, etc.

If not, it won't matter much.

Berto
11-13-2011, 10:28
My carry guns are usually just two, a 442 or 1911.

I have several others and practice every week, so making a switch doesn't concern me much.

Warp
11-13-2011, 10:51
I don't think it matters much which of my three Glocks I have in my holster.

Even if it's one of my revolvers it still works pretty much the same. Draw, aim, and if necessary pull the trigger.

happyguy
11-13-2011, 10:54
I've noticed a lot of posts where forum members write about their "carry rotation." Some posters have written that they have 4 or more guns in their line up. Is that wise? What does that old maxim say? "You can own a lot of guns, but the man who only owns one will shoot it very, very well." In the stress of an armed confrontation, would it not be better to be totally versed in the use of only one gun? Maybe two?

All my big handguns are for plinking or taking gun haters to the range and luring them to dark side. I own two carry pieces, a G36 and a S&W 442. The Smith is my summer/spring gun and my G36 is my cold weather carry. My G36 is actually my house gun!

80 percent of the time I go to the range I practice with these two pistols. Since it's fall, my practice is mostly with my 36. And when I switch from carrying the Smith to the 36 or vice versa, it takes some getting used to. My muscle memory concerning the draw and the firing of these weapons is different. I'm wondering how a person who cycles though multiple weapons handles this.

Just my two cents. Love to hear what others think.

With the exception of my P7 all my guns are point and click.

Regards,
Happyguy :)

Stevekozak
11-13-2011, 12:59
I carry different guns at different times, depending on situation. I practice with all the guns that I carry and trust muscle memory to do what needs doing when it comes time to do it.

unit1069
11-13-2011, 14:30
I like striker-fired DAO pistols. I was carrying a micro 9mm pistol most of the time but never was satisfied with its almost reliability and loooong trigger pull.

Now I have one sub-compact 9mm DAO Austrian pistol that gets most CCW time and a second Austrian pistol in .357sig with the same DAO trigger that gets most of the remaining CCW time.

Just my personal opinion but I feel better having one system of trigger/striker mechanism. Eliminating any difference in systems will automatically eliminate another variable of successful self-defense.

MLittle
11-13-2011, 18:02
I've been battling with this issue now for a couple of months and have finally made the decision to not carry either of my Glocks (26 and 30). I shoot them ok, but for me the pistol I love and shoot so well is a Sig Sauer in da/sa. I have the P220 Carry and P226 (and may get more). The transition from da to sa is no longer an issue for me. Shooting revolvers in da helped me a lot in learning the transition. I like the Glocks, but LOVE my Sigs. I guess I could extend my collection to a da/sa Beretta or HK and not leave my manual of arms. I also pocket carry a Ruger LCR 38+p on occasion.

JK-linux
11-13-2011, 18:16
Never had a big problem transitioning between different pistols. That said, I generally carry a Colt Cobra, so it doesn't get much more simple than "Pull trigger, go bang." I also carry a 1911, but it's been carried so long that my hand just naturally does what it does when it holds one.

1canvas
11-13-2011, 20:35
for me it makes no difference what i carry with the few i do. i have shot and carried both the 1911 and S&W J frame for over 30yrs and now i carry a 23 and 27 mostly. although i have only carried Glocks for a little over 4yrs i never look for a thumb saftey on the Glocks. my point is that the four guns i carry feel so different that when i grab them my manual of arms is automatic according to feel.

Caver 60
11-13-2011, 21:36
Got four in my carry rotation.

All are DAO with no external safeties and no magazine disconnects (I hate those things). All are carried plus one.

Two are identical. Calibers 380, 9mm, 45 ACP. Only significant difference is 10 plus one on the 45. Rest are 6 or 7 plus one.

ETA I do have 40 that I use for car carry. It meets the same criteria except 5 or 6 plus one.

RussP
11-14-2011, 05:35
Early on I went through a multi-platform phase. It took a lot of hours practice to recognize by feel which pistol was in my hand when drawing and respond with the proper muscle actions. Sure, I thought I had it all worked out, but reading about and talking with "one gun" guys, well, I decided to pick a comfortable and reliable platform.

For me, that was the Glock. But, as I say, what's good and right for me may not be best for you. The idea, for the majority of those who carry who do not have, or choose not to spend the hours to practice, is "KISS", "Keep It Simple Shooter".

Like someone said earlier, owning multiple, different firearms is really great. Getting to shoot the different pistols and revolvers, that's the fun of owning guns.

If you want to carry different pistols, please practice.

SouthernBoyVA
11-14-2011, 06:09
For the past 4 1/2 years, my primary carry gun has been one of my 3G Glock 23's. While I have other guns in my carry stable, they reside there because they are viable candidates for carry and were purchased for that purpose. Recently, I have been re-evaluating my primary carry gun because let's face it. We change. As we get older a number of factors come into play and should be considered in the whole scheme of things related to a daily carry gun.

My two main carry classes of guns are the Glock series in the G19/23 models and the Smith and Wesson M&P series in their standard 4.25" barrel sizes. I have been spending some time at ranges with a neighbor friend who is trying to hone his skills (he is relatively new to all of this but doing excellently). I have been finding lately that I tend to shoot the M&P a little better than the Glock platform, but to me for a carry gun, there are a whole lot of factors to weigh in the end. I'm anxious to see how this all comes out.

As for trading between carry guns on a more than occasional basis, I would avoid this unless you are well trained with each of them and that they have very similar systems. For example, I don't have any problems going between my G23 and my M&P9 Pro Series, but I would definitely have problems between the G23 and one of my 1911's. Totally different designs. All of my carry guns are either DAO or SAO designs (examples: Glock and M&P), with no external safeties, are all around the same weight, fit the same style of holster, and all are striker fired. Their triggers all tend to come in around 4 1/4 to 5 pounds and all have pre-travel with short resets. This helps me a great deal.

So yes, in the perfect world you would be best served by the finest carry gun you can lay your hands on and to train with and carry that one platform all the time. But the world is not perfect so the next best thing is to build your stable on guns which offer very similar criteria for your personal carry needs.

HarleyGuy
11-14-2011, 08:00
I am curious, with the KT32 and the KT380 being the same size, why have you stuck with the 32?

Quite frankly, impulse buying!
I was at the gun store, they had the gun, and I had the money:supergrin:

ronin.45
11-14-2011, 09:12
There isn't anything wrong with carrying different guns. A competent shooter should be well versed with everything they own.

ithaca_deerslayer
11-14-2011, 11:37
I've noticed a lot of posts where forum members write about their "carry rotation." Some posters have written that they have 4 or more guns in their line up. Is that wise? What does that old maxim say? "You can own a lot of guns, but the man who only owns one will shoot it very, very well." In the stress of an armed confrontation, would it not be better to be totally versed in the use of only one gun? Maybe two?
.

In my opinion, guns are a fun hobby. That view does not conflict with the serious side of self-defense and safety. Instead, I think training/practise with many types of guns is useful.

There's nothing wrong with just sticking with 1 gun; but I don't see much wrong with trying a bunch of different guns, either. The important thing is to be proficient with what you carry.

I've got 4 guns in my concealed carry line up. Am I proficient with all 4 of them? I think so. I can change between them, on any given day, and still feel quite prepared.

Could I be wrong? Sure.

One thing I do like is that all 4 (G26,PM9,642,LCP) are DAO no external safety. All just draw and pull the trigger. After that, reloading is different.

Toorop
11-14-2011, 14:20
I like to keep the same platform myself. I carry a Glock most of the time but if I can carry my 17 I will. Sometimes I carry my 26 if I need a smaller gun due to wardrobe.

bustedknee
11-14-2011, 15:40
It seems a lot of people have a .380 they carry on days they will not be called upon to use it.

However, on days in which they feel they may have to actually use it, they carry a real gun. :animlol:


My grandad said, "A handgun is just to get you to your shotgun."
I carry a level of defense depending on the situation(s).

TreeTrooper
11-15-2011, 14:25
I carry a Glock 31 and 33 at work, and own a couple 19s, a 21SF, a 34, and a 20. I have carried all of them (not at the same time) at one point or another. Occasionally carry my 4 inch Smith M29 when hiking, or fishing with my cousins in Alaska.

OctoberRust
11-17-2011, 15:34
I've noticed a lot of posts where forum members write about their "carry rotation." Some posters have written that they have 4 or more guns in their line up. Is that wise? What does that old maxim say? "You can own a lot of guns, but the man who only owns one will shoot it very, very well." In the stress of an armed confrontation, would it not be better to be totally versed in the use of only one gun? Maybe two?

All my big handguns are for plinking or taking gun haters to the range and luring them to dark side. I own two carry pieces, a G36 and a S&W 442. The Smith is my summer/spring gun and my G36 is my cold weather carry. My G36 is actually my house gun!

80 percent of the time I go to the range I practice with these two pistols. Since it's fall, my practice is mostly with my 36. And when I switch from carrying the Smith to the 36 or vice versa, it takes some getting used to. My muscle memory concerning the draw and the firing of these weapons is different. I'm wondering how a person who cycles though multiple weapons handles this.

Just my two cents. Love to hear what others think.

I own multiple handguns, but it's like only owning one since they're all the same sized frame and make, just in diff calibers. :supergrin:

FireForged
11-20-2011, 08:50
Stress can effect your performance, sure. I will also agree that you may shoot one firearm better than another but I am not inclined to believe that there would be "in most SD instances" a remarkable difference in your performance from one gun to another. Assuming that you are "familiar" with the firearm in your rotation. When I reference most SD instances, I am talking about few shots at close range against a single attacker.

Sippo
11-22-2011, 12:33
I carry Glock 19 and 26 over and over again. It's boring but rapid, unconsciously competent performance demands it. If you want to perform under stress practice the same manual of arms repeatedly.
Yes, it's boring, but I don't carry for entertainment.

fastbolt
11-22-2011, 13:16
At one time I had a car with an automatic transmission, a truck with a manual transmission and 3 motorcycles that obviously had transmissions that were operated differently than either the car or the truck.

The 2 computers in the house (tower & laptop) have some user operating differences.

Sometimes I use an electric razor, and sometimes a blade.

I can't even begin to list the differences when it comes to my tools.

My involvement in the martial arts (spanning 4 decades so far, this year) hasn't been limited to a single 'style', either.

Yes, I use some different designs and platforms for my dedicated defensive handguns.

Many years ago, before I became interested in becoming a firearms instructor, I primarily carried either a Colt Model O Pistol (1911) or a traditional double action revolver. (My interest in single action revolvers was mostly for 'backwoods' and leisure/target/plinking use.) As disparate as these 2 designs may be, I spent enough years learning to properly, safely & effectively use them so that I could use both as off-duty weapons (with the revolver being an on-duty weapon).

Some years later I decided to add the traditional double action pistol (think DA/SA) to my skillset. This more or less became a necessity when we transitioned to TDA pistols as issued weapons. :supergrin:

Some years after that I finally decided to treat the growing number of plastic pistols as something more than interesting range exercises, and I slowly began adding them to my collection (and attending armorer classes for some different designs). Naturally, this involved becoming conversant and skilled with some variations inherent in the different designs.

Nowadays? Well, having to be able to train shooters to use all of the above handguns, as well as becoming interested in owning and using many of them myself, I had to develop my knowledge, familiarization & skillsets with enough of them to be able to fulfill both my responsibilities as an instructor, as well as an owner/user. This has required a lot of range time, and some amount of class time(armorer classes) learning to become familiar with many of them, but then I don't mind shooting while working on the range or recerting on the various classes now and again. ;) (If I had to pay for all of my own ammunition, I'd be using fewer of them, though. :whistling: )

Yes, I have a lot of different handguns which have been listed in official records as having been used for periodic quals.

I could make do with limiting myself to any one of them, but so far that hasn't been required.

Once I decide to withdraw from remaining a firearms instructor, or perhaps move away and no longer have access to an agency range (or some other range facility that permits me to run a lot of different drills, movement, carry methods, threat/no-threat identification practice, barrier/cover situations, etc), then I'll probably reduce the number of guns I commonly use for both training/practice and dedicated carry purpose.

I've worked with a number of guys & gals over the years who were not what you might consider firearms enthusiasts or 'frequent shooters', and it generally worked out best for them to choose a single platform or design and work on skillset development & maintenance. Not everyone found the same design to work as well for them as it might for someone else.

This is something that has to be decided, hopefully after carefully consideration, by each person. (This is presuming that the person has a choice under whatever local laws or licensing regulations may exist in this regard, as well.)

After all, some folks never learned how to use a manual transmission, or even if they did learn to use a 'stick shift' in a car or truck, they may never have felt the desire to learn to ride a motorcycle. ;)

Darkangel1846
11-23-2011, 08:51
I've noticed a lot of posts where forum members write about their "carry rotation." Some posters have written that they have 4 or more guns in their line up. Is that wise? What does that old maxim say? "You can own a lot of guns, but the man who only owns one will shoot it very, very well." In the stress of an armed confrontation, would it not be better to be totally versed in the use of only one gun? Maybe two?

All my big handguns are for plinking or taking gun haters to the range and luring them to dark side. I own two carry pieces, a G36 and a S&W 442. The Smith is my summer/spring gun and my G36 is my cold weather carry. My G36 is actually my house gun!

80 percent of the time I go to the range I practice with these two pistols. Since it's fall, my practice is mostly with my 36. And when I switch from carrying the Smith to the 36 or vice versa, it takes some getting used to. My muscle memory concerning the draw and the firing of these weapons is different. I'm wondering how a person who cycles though multiple weapons handles this.

Just my two cents. Love to hear what others think.

I carry for specific situation....my CCW for work is quite different from what I pack in the woods or in my summer shorts, or at a wedding.:wavey:

Captain Bligh
11-25-2011, 10:53
I am of the "rotation" persuasion. Yes, I have heard all the arguments about muscle memory. I believe it oversimplifies the complexity of the human nervous system. I believe we can have muscle memory for more than one platform. What is important is that you have range time with each platform you choose to carry. If I am changing carry platforms, I believe it is good practice to have range time with the new carry before you switch.

Depending upon different circumstances or time of the year, I may switch between point-and-shoot platforms (i.e., Glock, Sig DA/SA, S & W revolver) and my preferred 1911. I've never been at the range and tried to sweep a non-existent safety on a Glock. I doubt I would do so in a real life situation. Similarly, when I feel that beavertail grip safety against my palm, I know it isn't any Glock.

What scares me more are persons who don't practice with their carry gun at all. I invited an acquaintance who carries to go to the range with me. He said, "Oh, I don't go to the range." I asked him how he maintained proficiency? He said, "I went to the range once after I bought the gun. I know I can shoot it." He'd owned the gun for ten or fifteen years. Later I found out that he had occasion to draw his gun in a defensive situation and managed to shoot himself in the process. :shocked:

Practice. Practice. Practice.

eaglefrq
11-25-2011, 13:01
I am of the "rotation" persuasion. Yes, I have heard all the arguments about muscle memory. I believe it oversimplifies the complexity of the human nervous system. I believe we can have muscle memory for more than one platform. What is important is that you have range time with each platform you choose to carry. If I am changing carry platforms, I believe it is good practice to have range time with the new carry before you switch.

Practice. Practice. Practice.

This is the best advice yet.

I didn't read every post, just skimmed them, so I may have missed something.

I have been carrying my G26 exclusively, for several months. I recently picked up a Sig P250SC and intend to start carrying that one. While I was at the range practicing with the Sig, I found I kept dropping the mag with 2 rounds still in it. I did this the first few times I fired it. The more I practiced, I became accustomed to the 12 vs 10 rounds, and I've always counted my rounds when shooting (a throwback from my IPSC days).

I didn't even realize I was counting until, I dropped the mag with the 2 rounds still loaded. I believe it was more muscle memory.

I can't stress enough if you alternate or change your EDC, to practice extensively prior to carrying the new one.

Landric
11-26-2011, 07:02
All the guns I carry work the same way: align sights, pull trigger.

I think dry fire practice is the key here. Different triggers (DAO vs. Safe-Action for instance) are not a problem with practice. I carry Glocks and DAO revolvers, and yes, I have about 5 guns in my carry rotation, including my duty gun.

NEOH212
11-26-2011, 19:18
It's good to practice with a gun, regardless of what it is. It's better to practice with what you carry and devote yourself to one gun when you do. This way, that particular gun becomes a extension of your body and just as familiar to your as your hand. This way, if you ever must call upon it to save your life, you can be confident and know what your abilities are with that firearm and know that your at your best with it.

Switching between several guns means that you would have to practice enough each one to be proficient with each of them. Unless you practice regularly with each gun that you carry, you can't possibility be as good with any one of those guns as you could be if you stayed with just one.

Maybe practicing with a primary and backup as alot of LEO's do isn't a bad idea. But to change between several different guns, different calibers, and different platforms, just doesn't seem like a good idea for those that don't train and practice regularly with all of them.

Carrying a handgun for self defense is a serious responsibility and isn't a novelty or something that should be taken lightly. As armed citizens, we are obligated to be responsible, safe and law abiding with our firearms. As such, part of being a responsible armed citizen means that we must consider that at some time, we may have to deploy our firearm to defend ourselves or someone else.

With all that in mind, we must be ready to face the threat and know that we can neutralize the situation and if need be, use a firearm to do so. That will require a skill that is of the utmost importance under those circumstances and one that would be much better developed if practiced with the weapon that you will have in your hand when that time comes.

IMHO, staying with one gun is the way to go. It doesn't matter which brand, which caliber (for the most part), which type of trigger, or which platform. As long as it's a quality firearm that you shoot well and is reliable and accurate to the point that you can hit what your aiming at and shoot well under stress, your good to go.