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Pro 2A
11-15-2011, 17:56
I'm reading "The ABC's of Reloading" and finding it hard to separate what applies to handguns and what applies to rifles. Is there a reloading (for beginners) book that only talks about reloading for handguns?
:dunno:
I don't plan to reload anything but 9mm.
.

AA#5
11-15-2011, 18:18
I thought the same thing when I started loading 28 years ago. I've never seen a handgun-only loading manual.

What doesn't usually apply to straight-walled handgun cases is trimming & case lubing (provided you use a carbide sizer die).

Colorado4Wheel
11-15-2011, 18:23
Handgun you simply don't trim, don't primer pocket uniform (etc). Thats about it.

ron59
11-15-2011, 18:51
To make it even simpler... tumble the brass, and even THAT isn't necessary but easier on the dies and keep from scratching the brass.... and start loading it.

In the press, you will
resize - deprime
reprime
flare and drop powder
seat bullet
remove flare (or crimp)

Done.

Everything you need to know is included in these five 10-minute videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRZrbv_8kx4&feature=related

That is specific to a Dillon 550B, but would be almost identical to a Hornady LNL. Even a single stage, except you would do things one at a time. I watched those videos and placed my order for a 550B that same day, literally.

Loading for pistol is cake. Make sure you understand the basics, such as using calipers do measure flare or OAL, watch your powder drop, and go. VERY SLOW at first, speed can come after you've loaded a bunch.

F106 Fan
11-15-2011, 19:09
I don't know if this booklet will help. It may spend a lot of time on details without discussing the overall process. I haven't read it.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/139775/gun-guides-reloading-guide-for-pistols-9mm-luger-357-sig-40-s-and-w-and-45-acp-book

There's a reason that a Dillon 550B has 4 stations. There are only 4 things to do (after the brass has been cleaned):

1) Deprime, resize and seat new primer
2) Expand case mouth and drop powder
3) Seat bullet
4) Crimp case mouth closed.

From 10,000 feet up, that's all there is to know. The rest is details.

Richard

Pro 2A
11-15-2011, 20:32
I just found some videos on Youtube. Is there anything that is NOT on youtube? :-) I plan on getting a Dillon Square Deal B because I only have 9mm guns. The press operation looks pretty simple once it's adjusted. I'm hoping the DVD that comes with it explains how to do the load and seating adjustments. I'll also be getting a tumbler, a caliper and scale. I'm hoping that will be enough to get me started.

The ABC's of Reloading is going into a lot of detail that I'm not sure I need because I don't plan to create my own loads. I plan to find a standard load I like and stick with it. :-) I'm not a competition shooter, but do enjoy going to the range for IDPA and GSSF matches. I'm not shooting at super long distances, I just need a load for range use. I'll use purchased rounds with hollow points for self defense.

I appreciate the info that the book has on what defects to look for and the safety info. And I like to know the details of whatever I get into, but it often fails to say if the details it's giving are for handguns or rifles. Like in the discussion of different types of powder, different primers, excessive head space, etc. and that's where I was having trouble knowing what I had to remember and what I could discard as irrelevent to me.

I think I'll be fine, I was just hoping there would be a source for just the relevant details I'd like to know without all the stuff I don't :-)

.

Colorado4Wheel
11-15-2011, 21:02
It's almost sounds like your trying really hard to not learn any more then absolutely necessary. Problem is sometimes it's the things that you don't know that bite you in the ass. You don't jump into reloading 1/2 way. You learn everything you need to know.
Dillon has EXCELLENT instructions. Tells you all you need to know about setting up the dies. I like reading instructions. I prefer them to videos. Zombie Steve wrote a nice thing on how to reload. You may want to read that. But I would get a manual and read it.

sig357fan
11-15-2011, 21:09
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/277752/lyman-pistol-and-revolver-reloading-handbook-third-edition-reloading-manual

I have a copy of the first addition from 1978 printed in 1989......once again I've dated my self.....is Jack the only guy older than me in this forum?

WiskyT
11-15-2011, 21:19
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/277752/lyman-pistol-and-revolver-reloading-handbook-third-edition-reloading-manual

I have a copy of the first addition from 1978 printed in 1989......once again I've dated my self.....is Jack the only guy older than me in this forum?

Bob's older than the two of you...combined.

ImpeachObama
11-15-2011, 21:31
There's a good Lyman book out there that discusses some basics and the difference between powders among other things, suggested loads, sizing parameters. If you happen to be near a Cabela's, they have a bunch of books. Keep it simple thou.

GioaJack
11-15-2011, 21:33
Bob's older than the two of you...combined.


Unclebob is older than printing presses so I don't think he's qualified to comment on loading books... unless they're chiseled into stone tablets.


Jack

Pro 2A
11-15-2011, 21:35
It's almost sounds like your trying really hard to not learn any more then absolutely necessary.


No, really I'm not. I just find it confusing to read stuff that only applies to rifle bullet reloading because if I try to apply it to pistol round loading it could cause issues (like the types of powders). I think there are some assumptions made in the book about the reader already understanding what the writer is talking about. And in most cases, after some reading, I do figure out that what I just read is irrelevant and only applies to rifle rounds. Frustrating. I just think it would be easier if there was a book for each since there is a fair amount that doesn't apply to both.

Pro 2A
11-15-2011, 21:44
Zombie Steve wrote a nice thing on how to reload. You may want to read that. But I would get a manual and read it.

If that's the sticky at the top of the reloading info, I have read it. It was fantastic info and helped me select the equipment I want. The ABC's book was the only one the library had. But I have also been reading things on the net, watching videos and plan to get the Instructional DVD from Dillon. I learn better by watching a video, than reading. But I do a lot of reading too. I'm not the kind that jumps into doing potentially dangerous things without a lot of planning/learning.

I'm saving up for the purchase of the equipment which I hope to get around the holidays or in January. I'm also trying to learn all I can before I get it so I can be ready.

My dad and my brother are both engineers and I tend to be quite mechanically inclined. And reloading doesn't seem like it would be as difficult as flying a chopper and I have done that without a "hard landing", so I think I'll be ok :-)
.
.

fredj338
11-16-2011, 11:53
The ABC's of Reloading is going into a lot of detail that I'm not sure I need because I don't plan to create my own loads. I plan to find a standard load I like and stick with it. :-) I'm not a competition shooter, but do enjoy going to the range for IDPA and GSSF matches. I'm not shooting at super long distances, I just need a load for range use. I'll use purchased rounds with hollow points for self defense.

Nice thought, but IMO, there is no "standard" load. You are being a lazy reloader trying to rely on some other shooters load. Do your own load workups, that's how you learn the process of reloading, not just cobbling some components together. At best it's lazy @ worst it's dangerous. Many guns have been KB using someone elses untested data or fav load.
Reloading isn't diff or requiring a degree in chemistry, but it should be approached methodically & w/ an eye to detail. Working your own loads up is just that. The only diff between rifle & handgun is really one step, belling the case on handgun. Otherwise, your steps are almsot identrical:
size case
prime case
powder charge
seat bullet (crimp or not)
Pretty basic & that is very well explained in ABCs. If you can read you can teach yourself safe reloading. For som, taking a class is a good way to go. My only issue w/ Utube stuff, how do you knwo the guy presenting it knows what he is doing?

TN.Frank
11-16-2011, 12:03
For me, weather it's rifle or pistol it's all about steps. First step is to resize and de-prime the case. After that's done I pull the sizing die and put the case flaring die in and flare all the cases.
Next I come inside and grab a seat at the dinning room table and take my RCBS Handi-Primer and put my primers into the cases. Then it's back out to my loading bench in the garage where I'll adjust my powder measure to the load I want, drop powder into case, put the bullet on top of the case and adjust the seating die to seat the bullet to proper length. Then I can back off the bullet seater and crank in the die to crimp the cases(don't like to seat and crimp at the same time) and that's about it. Really pretty basic stuff but then I've done this since I was 19 so after 31 years you kind of get a knack for it.:cool:

F106 Fan
11-16-2011, 14:56
Assuming you are past the machine setup stage and looking around for that first load, here are some suggestions:

First, select a common bullet like the 115 gr FMJ RN. You can get these in bags of 100 (or lots of 1000):
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shooting/Reloading/Reloading-Components%7C/pc/104792580/c/104761080/sc/104275080/Winchester-Pistol-Bullets-Per-100/731774.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Fshooting-reloading-reloading-components%2Fwinchester%2F_%2FN-1100194%2B1000005171%2B4294771353%2FNe-1000005171%2FNs-CATEGORY_SEQ_104275080%3FWTz_l%3DSBC%253Bcat104792580%253Bcat104761080%26WTz_st%3DGuidedNav%26WTz_st ype%3DGNU&WTz_l=SBC%3Bcat104792580%3Bcat104761080%3Bcat104275080

Why that bullet? Well, there is a lot of published load data for jacketed bullets. Not much is published for cast bullets and nothing specific to plated bullets. Plated bullet manufacturers just say to use the data for cast bullets. Fair enough, they haven't tested their bullets and have no idea what pressures are being developed. Worth knowing...

Next we need a reloading manual that has that bullet. The Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading (8th Ed) has the info on page 898:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/783420/hornady-handbook-of-cartridge-reloading-8th-edition-reloading-manual

There are a dozen powders listed, which one to choose?

For IDPA, you need to make 125 power factor (PF) but let's try for 130 just to avoid disqualification. Power factor is bullet weight times velocity divided by 1000. So, for the 115 gr bullet:
130 = velocity * 115 / 1000
velocity = 130 * 1000 / 115 = 1130 fps

The most common powder capable of reaching this velocity is Bullseye.

So, now you need a source of Bullseye and Federal No. 100 Small Pistol Primers. Try your LGS because you really don't want to pay the Hazmat fee associated with ordering the stuff from Cabela's. Still, it's only a $20 fee and sometimes shipping is only $5.

The Handbook tells you that the OAL should be 1.100" so set your seating die accordingly. Further, it tells you that 4.4gr of Bullseye should result in 1100 fps and 4.6 gr is the maximum and should result in 1150.

Load some cartridges with 4.2gr, 4.4 gr and 4.5 gr. I like to stay away from the maximum load and I have already proven that I get to 132 PF with just 4.5 gr. My powder measure might drop an extra 0.1 gr from time to time and I am counting on the barrel to handle even +P loads to provide additional comfort. I do not want a KABOOM!

Grab a chronograph and some targets and head out to the range.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/773378/ced-millennium-2-chronograph-system

Shoot a dozen or so of each load over the chronograph, starting with the 4.2 gr loads. Look at the spent primers and see that they aren't showing signs of excessive pressure (cratering around the firing pin indentation). Shoot the rest at targets and see if you like the load. I reached 132 PF with a 4" SA XD9 and 4.5 gr Bullseye.

In IDPA, the chronograph checks must be performed with the maximum barrel length for the division - in other words, a 5" barrel. The velocity will be even higher in a 5" barrel and if I had such a gun, I would do more testing and probably reduce the powder to 4.4 gr, maybe even 4.3 gr.

That's about it. A nice, workable 9mm load.

DO NOT RELY ON ANY NUMBERS I PROVIDED ABOVE!

I am getting old and my typing sucks. Do your own research from printed loading manuals. Absolutely never use any load you find on the Internet without backing it up with a printed manual.

Buy lots of printed manuals. I have Sierra, Hornady, Lyman, Speer and a copy of Ken Waters' Pet Loads Complete Volume. There are others available at Midway.

Richard

WiskyT
11-16-2011, 15:26
Nice thought, but IMO, there is no "standard" load. You are being a lazy reloader trying to rely on some other shooters load. Do your own load workups, that's how you learn the process of reloading, not just cobbling some components together. At best it's lazy @ worst it's dangerous. Many guns have been KB using someone elses untested data or fav load.
Reloading isn't diff or requiring a degree in chemistry, but it should be approached methodically & w/ an eye to detail. Working your own loads up is just that. The only diff between rifle & handgun is really one step, belling the case on handgun. Otherwise, your steps are almsot identrical:
size case
prime case
powder charge
seat bullet (crimp or not)
Pretty basic & that is very well explained in ABCs. If you can read you can teach yourself safe reloading. For som, taking a class is a good way to go. My only issue w/ Utube stuff, how do you knwo the guy presenting it knows what he is doing?

Working up loads is over rated for many situations. There is no need to "work up" a load if all you want is a good ball round. Since some of the best shooters win some of the biggest prizes with ball loads, it is good enough for the vast majority of handgun shooting.

fredj338
11-16-2011, 15:39
Working up loads is over rated for many situations. There is no need to "work up" a load if all you want is a good ball round. Since some of the best shooters win some of the biggest prizes with ball loads, it is good enough for the vast majority of handgun shooting.

Not my point WT. My point is learnign to reload is more than just cobbling together a load from some one elses data. Learn to do it right, you'll understand the process better & avoid problems down the road. You are correct in the fact if you chose average middle data for any powder/bullet combo, it will go bang & most likely be reliable. You have learned very little about the reloading process though. I suspect many are fine with that, it's just not the best way to learn or get good at the craft. Much like I can give you a handgun & show you how it works, that won't make you a good shooter.

TN.Frank
11-16-2011, 15:45
Sometimes you have no choice but to "cobble" a load up. A few years ago I had a nice Nagant revolver that I modified to use 32-20 brass and the Lee die set up. There wasn't much data for it so I took what data there was and just worked with it until I got a pretty decent load using a wad cutter bullet and 5.0grs of Unique. Most of the time thought I like to use published data since they're time tested loads.

Gary Davidson
11-16-2011, 22:34
Lyman published a reloading how-to and data book that is strictly for handgun reloading. It is called the "Lyman Pistol & Revolver Handbook", "The World's Leading Handgun Reloading Manual". Here it is listed on Midway USA's Web site:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/277752/lyman-pistol-and-revolver-reloading-handbook-third-edition-reloading-manual

fredj338
11-17-2011, 00:02
Sometimes you have no choice but to "cobble" a load up. A few years ago I had a nice Nagant revolver that I modified to use 32-20 brass and the Lee die set up. There wasn't much data for it so I took what data there was and just worked with it until I got a pretty decent load using a wad cutter bullet and 5.0grs of Unique. Most of the time thought I like to use published data since they're time tested loads.
That is actually doing load workups. You didn't just come on the net & ask for a load.:dunno:

Pro 2A
11-17-2011, 14:00
Lyman published a reloading how-to and data book that is strictly for handgun reloading. It is called the "Lyman Pistol & Revolver Handbook", "The World's Leading Handgun Reloading Manual". Here it is listed on Midway USA's Web site:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/277752/lyman-pistol-and-revolver-reloading-handbook-third-edition-reloading-manual


Thank-you! I understand about the fine tuning, but once I find something I like, I'm going to stick with it. I use unmodified factory Glocks (26 and 19) and don't plan to modify them in a way that would affect the load. It sounds like the book above will get me exactly what I want. The info I need to get started and a general load to start with.

My interest is not in developing specialty loads or pushing the envelope on power or velocity. My interest is in participating in shooting sports without breaking the bank on factory ammo. But unless I get lucky and the first load I try gives me what I like/need, I will make minor adjustments and will try a couple different powders. Maybe I will find I'm wrong once I get into this (wouldn't be the first time), but at this point I don't see myself "experimenting" with variables once I find the load I like.

I plan to use FMJ 115 gr bullets with either Bullseye or Unique powder (I'll try each to see which I like better) and the name brand primers I can find at the local gun show (Winchester, Federal, Remmington). Once I get the powder/primer combo and # of grains I like, I'll stick with it. I already have my data recording sheet ready for the testing phase. The range where I shoot IDPA has a chronograph that I can shoot through to check different loads (if someone takes the time to set it up).

I really do appreciate all the info! And I'm glad to see that there IS a book just for handguns.

malleable
11-17-2011, 14:23
tagged

Pro 2A
11-17-2011, 14:42
tagged

What does this mean?

malleable
11-17-2011, 15:16
What does this mean?

It means that it's a topic that I find interesting and while I didn't contribute, I did post so I can just click on "replies" and see all future posts without remembering the title etc.

ImpeachObama
11-17-2011, 19:33
It'll show up under his subscribed threads so it's easy to follow along to the comments made. Hit Quick Links, then drag down to Subscribed Threads.

g29guy
11-18-2011, 15:47
Thank-you! I understand about the fine tuning, but once I find something I like, I'm going to stick with it. I use unmodified factory Glocks (26 and 19) and don't plan to modify them in a way that would affect the load. It sounds like the book above will get me exactly what I want. The info I need to get started and a general load to start with.

My interest is not in developing specialty loads or pushing the envelope on power or velocity. My interest is in participating in shooting sports without breaking the bank on factory ammo. But unless I get lucky and the first load I try gives me what I like/need, I will make minor adjustments and will try a couple different powders. Maybe I will find I'm wrong once I get into this (wouldn't be the first time), but at this point I don't see myself "experimenting" with variables once I find the load I like.

I plan to use FMJ 115 gr bullets with either Bullseye or Unique powder (I'll try each to see which I like better) and the name brand primers I can find at the local gun show (Winchester, Federal, Remmington). Once I get the powder/primer combo and # of grains I like, I'll stick with it. I already have my data recording sheet ready for the testing phase. The range where I shoot IDPA has a chronograph that I can shoot through to check different loads (if someone takes the time to set it up).

I really do appreciate all the info! And I'm glad to see that there IS a book just for handguns.

What the reading and learning provides is the ability to troubleshoot when something doesn't seem right.

You are correct that loading a middle charged load is easy and all you need for it to go bang is the basics. example: What do you do if primers aren't going off? The basics help to understand how the entire package works(The theory behind reloading).

For most of us, the reloading started out to save money or shoot more, and evolves into a hobby of some sort. The hobby gets better the more you learn from books and forums like this.

The ABC's of Reloading is probably the first book id recommend for a reloading novice. After reading it twice from front to back, I actually understood the handloading magazines and forum talk.

Good luck and be safe!:supergrin:

Pro 2A
11-22-2011, 13:19
It means that it's a topic that I find interesting and while I didn't contribute, I did post so I can just click on "replies" and see all future posts without remembering the title etc.


Thanks for explaining. I'm still relatively new to message boards, but I think you can click on "thread tools" at the top of the post and choose to subscribe (or unsubscribe) if you want to follow a thread.

Pro 2A
11-22-2011, 13:20
I ordered the handgun reloading book that was recommended and it shipped on it's way on Friday. I'm looking forward to getting it.