Primitive reloading [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Primitive reloading


cosmose
11-29-2011, 11:23
Hi guys, Dave Canterbury did a video on reloading Black Powder shotgun shells in the field, He used very basic tools to do so, he used Pyrodex powder and even used an old rag for the patch/wadding and he used bb gun bbs for the load
http://www.youtube.com/user/wildernessoutfitters#p/u/10/F85LMFWKwTo

This really intrigued me, and might actually be the push for me to get into reloading, he made it sound very simple but i have some questions on reloading black powder shotguns shells.

what is the difference in Pyrodex and black powder (any links would be appreciated) also any links on black powder shotgun shells reloading.
also how dangerous is this using black powder? my understanding is black powder is a lot more forgiving than smokless?
I want to read up on everything i can on reloading black powder shotguns shells so any and all links would be appreciated:)

ron59
11-29-2011, 11:47
Wow, I found that very interesting and educational. You're right, he made that look VERY simple.

I would like to hear what guys a little more knowledgeable about blackpowder and shotguns have to say about this.

Jack ?

m2hmghb
11-29-2011, 11:53
Black powder is highly corrosive, pyrodex was developed as a substitute for black powder, meaning it has similar burn characteristics without the corrosion. Black powder can be dangerous, when you see it in tins it's usually one that will not collect a static charge, the same for powder measures. It can be set off by a spark.

DoctaGlockta
11-29-2011, 11:57
Hey great link. I was always told never to use black powder in rifles or pistols but I guess it flies in a shotgun. Thanks for the info.

paintballwannab
11-29-2011, 11:58
check out the Lee loader, reloading by hand.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/702138/lee-classic-loader-357-magnum?cm_mmc=Froogle-_-Reloading+-+Metallic+Reloading+Equipment+(Not+Presses)-_-PriceCompListing-_-702138


make them in a ton of calibers, including shotguns.

cosmose
11-29-2011, 12:06
Black powder is highly corrosive, pyrodex was developed as a substitute for black powder, meaning it has similar burn characteristics without the corrosion. Black powder can be dangerous, when you see it in tins it's usually one that will not collect a static charge, the same for powder measures. It can be set off by a spark.
so after shooting pyrodex can you clean the gun just like after shooting smokeless? also does the pyrodex equal the same measure as black powder? or do you have to convert it?
check out the Lee loader, reloading by hand.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/702138/lee-classic-loader-357-magnum?cm_mmc=Froogle-_-Reloading+-+Metallic+Reloading+Equipment+(Not+Presses)-_-PriceCompListing-_-702138


make them in a ton of calibers, including shotguns.

Thanks for the link!

cosmose
11-29-2011, 12:07
Wow, I found that very interesting and educational. You're right, he made that look VERY simple.

I would like to hear what guys a little more knowledgeable about blackpowder and shotguns have to say about this.

Jack ?

Hey great link. I was always told never to use black powder in rifles or pistols but I guess it flies in a shotgun. Thanks for the info.

Dave has some awesome vids, he even shows how to load the single shot like a muzzle loader http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ES59LtA7XE8

Adjuster
11-29-2011, 12:17
Cool video.

m2hmghb
11-29-2011, 12:31
so after shooting pyrodex can you clean the gun just like after shooting smokeless? also does the pyrodex equal the same measure as black powder? or do you have to convert it?


Thanks for the link!

That much I couldn't tell you. I know that they also make pyrodex pellets that are at set grain weights but I can't tell you the loads. There is more fouling with pyrodex then smokeless, but less then with black powder. http://www.hodgdon.com/pyrodex.html

dkf
11-29-2011, 12:51
Wheres the Bush Hippie?

ron59
11-29-2011, 13:14
Dave has some awesome vids, he even shows how to load the single shot like a muzzle loader http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ES59LtA7XE8

Oh believe me... I'm very interested in his channel. I definitely plan on reviewing ALL his videos. I'm at work now and just watched that one, but I saw several others I'd like to look at later.

RWBlue
11-29-2011, 14:09
I have not loaded for a shotgun, this is rifles, single shot pistol and revolver knowledge. And I haven't done it in a couple years so check to make sure I haven't had a moment of stupidity.

Blackpowder is an explosive.
Pyro is a propellent.
Both are very corrosive.

Black and pyro come in different sized granules (F, FF, FFF, FFFF). A load is different for different sized grains. Bore size makes a difference in what grain size to use, although I have done some substitution and not had a problem.

For the same sized grain, the powders (black and pyro) are very close to the same load by volume. This is not to say they are the same. I had better results with Black in the caplock and better results with the pyro in the inline. DON'T MEASURE EITHER BY WEIGHT!! because they can be off by weight. I think they absorb water in the air, but I don't think that theory has ever been confirmed.

There were some non-corrosive powders, but I never had any luck with them.

Good luck, don't load blindly. Find a manual.

RWBlue
11-29-2011, 14:14
so after shooting pyrodex can you clean the gun just like after shooting smokeless?

No. Treat it like BP.

DoctaGlockta
11-29-2011, 14:19
Good luck, don't load blindly. Find a manual.

Can't seem to find a charge in my ABC's of reloading for a stack of BB's in a 12 gauge hull with bees wax and a couple of rags loaded on a wood stump :dunno:

ron59
11-29-2011, 14:47
Can't see to find a charge in my ABC's of reloading for a stack of BB's in a 12 gauge hull with bees wax and a couple of rags loaded on a wood stump :dunno:

I was wondering about his statement, but you put it in a much funnier way.

GioaJack
11-29-2011, 15:00
Fun videos to say the least but I don't see any practical application other than a lot of fun factor. Why not just carry a muzzle loading shotgun and cut down on all the work?

While black powder shotguns can be loaded with any granulation from FG to FFFG, (FFFFG should be avoided since it will develop too much pressure), Pyrodex will obviously work but produces erratic ignitions and pressures. While black powder shotguns are very forgiving in how they're loaded the same is not true with black powder rifles... accuracy and consistent pressures will suffer.

It was originally thought that Pyrodex was a safe alternative to real black powder... until the original Pyrodex factory blew up. Even though Pyrodex is slightly harder to ignite, (you can really see the difference in flintlocks) many misinformed cities, (Denver being one of them) prohibit the storage of more than one pound of black powder, making it impossible to walk into a gun shop and buy a can of Goex, Swiss, etc. but yet buy as much Pyrodex as you want. Doesn't make any sense... I have 50 pounds of black powder delivered to the house by UPS.

Cleaning black powder guns is greatly misunderstood and has turned many potential shooters off to the joys of it because they think it's too much trouble. Many still think that you need to boil a cauldron of water and spend two hours cleaning your rifle or shotgun after each shot. Nothing could be further from the truth.

As many of you know I have a rather extensive collection of custom made black powder rifles, (both percussion and flint) and shotguns, (percussion and one in-line for shooting competition trap doubles), and none of them have ever seen a drop of water, other than shooting in the rain or snow. A small, $3.00 bottle of Black Solve makes a full quart of patch lube and cleaning solution. Simply mix it into a small spray bottle and slip it into you possibles bag... in the video he refers to his possibles bag as his 'pack'. It's a lot easier than finding a stream.

Loading and shooting a muzzle loading is a lot easier, and quicker than the system used in the video and at no time would you have to leave your shooting position to load or reload. Your possibles bag will easily carry enough supplies for 50 to a 100 shots and if you want to make loading even quicker carry a separate powder horn and shot horn over your strong side shoulder.

Rather than having to worry about carrying enough cloth for improvised wadding why not just carry over powder and over shot card wads in your possibles bag... more than a 100 of each will easily fit in a film container or you can just let them sit in the bottom of your bag... or in a shirt pocket.

If you don't want to swab your barrel to clear fouling every couple of shots simply use a moist fiber wad over your over powder card wad. (You can moisten it with a spray of Black Solve, spit, plain water, urine, (yeah, I know), or pre-moisten them with a mixture of mineral oil and mineral spirits... they will stay moist for weeks. With each subsequent shot the fiber wad scrubs the barrel of fouling. Using this system I only run a cleaning patch down the barrel after ever 25 round of trap or skeet even when shooting competition at the nationals in Friendship. (I've been known to do fairly well on occasion.)

Being very hydroscopic any gun firing black powder, (this goes for Pyrodex too), should be protected with a light coating of oil after the day's shooting has been completed. If you live in a very low humidity area as I do several days without oil causes no harm... back east it's a different matter but if you're going to start shooting again the next morning it's not imperative.

Technically any round that can be loaded with smokeless powder can be loaded with black powder, especially handgun rounds, (they may not produce enough pressure to operate the slide on all semis but they will shoot without problem). Bottle neck rifle rounds require a bit more experience but straight wall rifle calibers are a joy to shoot with black powder... most of them started out that way.

As I said, the videos were most entertaining and informative, it's just not something I would bother doing... hard to teach an old dog new tricks.


Jack

DoctaGlockta
11-29-2011, 15:28
Fun videos to say the least but I don't see any practical application other than a lot of fun factor. Why not just carry a muzzle loading shotgun and cut down on all the work?

While black powder shotguns can be loaded with any granulation from FG to FFFG, (FFFFG should be avoided since it will develop too much pressure), Pyrodex will obviously work but produces erratic ignitions and pressures. While black powder shotguns are very forgiving in how they're loaded the same is not true with black powder rifles... accuracy and consistent pressures will suffer.

It was originally thought that Pyrodex was a safe alternative to real black powder... until the original Pyrodex factory blew up. Even though Pyrodex is slightly harder to ignite, (you can really see the difference in flintlocks) many misinformed cities, (Denver being one of them) prohibit the storage of more than one pound of black powder, making it impossible to walk into a gun shop and buy a can of Goex, Swiss, etc. but yet buy as much Pyrodex as you want. Doesn't make any sense... I have 50 pounds of black powder delivered to the house by UPS.

Cleaning black powder guns is greatly misunderstood and has turned many potential shooters off to the joys of it because they think it's too much trouble. Many still think that you need to boil a cauldron of water and spend two hours cleaning your rifle or shotgun after each shot. Nothing could be further from the truth.

As many of you know I have a rather extensive collection of custom made black powder rifles, (both percussion and flint) and shotguns, (percussion and one in-line for shooting competition trap doubles), and none of them have ever seen a drop of water, other than shooting in the rain or snow. A small, $3.00 bottle of Black Solve makes a full quart of patch lube and cleaning solution. Simply mix it into a small spray bottle and slip it into you possibles bag... in the video he refers to his possibles bag as his 'pack'. It's a lot easier than finding a stream.

Loading and shooting a muzzle loading is a lot easier, and quicker than the system used in the video and at no time would you have to leave your shooting position to load or reload. Your possibles bag will easily carry enough supplies for 50 to a 100 shots and if you want to make loading even quicker carry a separate powder horn and shot horn over your strong side shoulder.

Rather than having to worry about carrying enough cloth for improvised wadding why not just carry over powder and over shot card wads in your possibles bag... more than a 100 of each will easily fit in a film container or you can just let them sit in the bottom of your bag... or in a shirt pocket.

If you don't want to swab your barrel to clear fouling every couple of shots simply use a moist fiber wad over your over powder card wad. (You can moisten it with a spray of Black Solve, spit, plain water, urine, (yeah, I know), or pre-moisten them with a mixture of mineral oil and mineral spirits... they will stay moist for weeks. With each subsequent shot the fiber wad scrubs the barrel of fouling. Using this system I only run a cleaning patch down the barrel after ever 25 round of trap or skeet even when shooting competition at the nationals in Friendship. (I've been known to do fairly well on occasion.)

Being very hydroscopic any gun firing black powder, (this goes for Pyrodex too), should be protected with a light coating of oil after the day's shooting has been completed. If you live in a very low humidity area as I do several days without oil causes no harm... back east it's a different matter but if you're going to start shooting again the next morning it's not imperative.

Technically any round that can be loaded with smokeless powder can be loaded with black powder, especially handgun rounds, (they may not produce enough pressure to operate the slide on all semis but they will shoot without problem). Bottle neck rifle rounds require a bit more experience but straight wall rifle calibers are a joy to shoot with black powder... most of them started out that way.

As I said, the videos were most entertaining and informative, it's just not something I would bother doing... hard to teach an old dog new tricks.


Jack

Dude you need to put that in Wikipedia.

RWBlue
11-29-2011, 15:35
Can't seem to find a charge in my ABC's of reloading for a stack of BB's in a 12 gauge hull with bees wax and a couple of rags loaded on a wood stump :dunno:

Although I like Dave and have done some things off book. There is probably a good reason for that load data not being available..:whistling:

Some of the cowboy shooters are reloading BP and Pyro. The load data should be available. If you then want to go off book you can slowly work off book.

ron59
11-29-2011, 16:22
Fun videos to say the least but I don't see any practical application other than a lot of fun factor. Why not just carry a muzzle loading shotgun and cut down on all the work?



Jack,

Not certainly trying to debate you, because I don't know **** from shinola when it comes to blackpowder anything or shotgun reloading.

From an outsiders point of view though... Wouldn't sitting down and loading up 10-20 of the hulls and carrying them with you, then being able to eject one and load another *immediately* be of some value?

As well.... wouldn't you be able to use a *normal* shotgun with normal shotgun shells, then use it for this method... clean it properly, then return to normal shells? I'd imagine a muzzle loading shotgun wouldn't allow using shells.

For me... when I'm hunting I want to hunt. I wouldn't want to take a shot, then have to pour/pack/stuff/pack/pour/pack/stuff/pack (whatever the process is) before I can shoot again. What if I came across a bunch of things I could shoot if I could get another shell in there quicker?

Just playing Devil's Advocate here. Edumucate me I'm on my incorrect viewpoints.

cosmose
11-29-2011, 17:13
Fun videos to say the least but I don't see any practical application other than a lot of fun factor. Why not just carry a muzzle loading shotgun and cut down on all the work?

While black powder shotguns can be loaded with any granulation from FG to FFFG, (FFFFG should be avoided since it will develop too much pressure), Pyrodex will obviously work but produces erratic ignitions and pressures. While black powder shotguns are very forgiving in how they're loaded the same is not true with black powder rifles... accuracy and consistent pressures will suffer.

It was originally thought that Pyrodex was a safe alternative to real black powder... until the original Pyrodex factory blew up. Even though Pyrodex is slightly harder to ignite, (you can really see the difference in flintlocks) many misinformed cities, (Denver being one of them) prohibit the storage of more than one pound of black powder, making it impossible to walk into a gun shop and buy a can of Goex, Swiss, etc. but yet buy as much Pyrodex as you want. Doesn't make any sense... I have 50 pounds of black powder delivered to the house by UPS.

Cleaning black powder guns is greatly misunderstood and has turned many potential shooters off to the joys of it because they think it's too much trouble. Many still think that you need to boil a cauldron of water and spend two hours cleaning your rifle or shotgun after each shot. Nothing could be further from the truth.

As many of you know I have a rather extensive collection of custom made black powder rifles, (both percussion and flint) and shotguns, (percussion and one in-line for shooting competition trap doubles), and none of them have ever seen a drop of water, other than shooting in the rain or snow. A small, $3.00 bottle of Black Solve makes a full quart of patch lube and cleaning solution. Simply mix it into a small spray bottle and slip it into you possibles bag... in the video he refers to his possibles bag as his 'pack'. It's a lot easier than finding a stream.

Loading and shooting a muzzle loading is a lot easier, and quicker than the system used in the video and at no time would you have to leave your shooting position to load or reload. Your possibles bag will easily carry enough supplies for 50 to a 100 shots and if you want to make loading even quicker carry a separate powder horn and shot horn over your strong side shoulder.

Rather than having to worry about carrying enough cloth for improvised wadding why not just carry over powder and over shot card wads in your possibles bag... more than a 100 of each will easily fit in a film container or you can just let them sit in the bottom of your bag... or in a shirt pocket.

If you don't want to swab your barrel to clear fouling every couple of shots simply use a moist fiber wad over your over powder card wad. (You can moisten it with a spray of Black Solve, spit, plain water, urine, (yeah, I know), or pre-moisten them with a mixture of mineral oil and mineral spirits... they will stay moist for weeks. With each subsequent shot the fiber wad scrubs the barrel of fouling. Using this system I only run a cleaning patch down the barrel after ever 25 round of trap or skeet even when shooting competition at the nationals in Friendship. (I've been known to do fairly well on occasion.)

Being very hydroscopic any gun firing black powder, (this goes for Pyrodex too), should be protected with a light coating of oil after the day's shooting has been completed. If you live in a very low humidity area as I do several days without oil causes no harm... back east it's a different matter but if you're going to start shooting again the next morning it's not imperative.

Technically any round that can be loaded with smokeless powder can be loaded with black powder, especially handgun rounds, (they may not produce enough pressure to operate the slide on all semis but they will shoot without problem). Bottle neck rifle rounds require a bit more experience but straight wall rifle calibers are a joy to shoot with black powder... most of them started out that way.

As I said, the videos were most entertaining and informative, it's just not something I would bother doing... hard to teach an old dog new tricks.


Jack
Thanks for the info:) I was thinking it would be easier to just carry wadings also but its good to know you could do it with just a rag
Jack,

Not certainly trying to debate you, because I don't know **** from shinola when it comes to blackpowder anything or shotgun reloading.

From an outsiders point of view though... Wouldn't sitting down and loading up 10-20 of the hulls and carrying them with you, then being able to eject one and load another *immediately* be of some value?

As well.... wouldn't you be able to use a *normal* shotgun with normal shotgun shells, then use it for this method... clean it properly, then return to normal shells? I'd imagine a muzzle loading shotgun wouldn't allow using shells.

For me... when I'm hunting I want to hunt. I wouldn't want to take a shot, then have to pour/pack/stuff/pack/pour/pack/stuff/pack (whatever the process is) before I can shoot again. What if I came across a bunch of things I could shoot if I could get another shell in there quicker?

Just playing Devil's Advocate here. Edumucate me I'm on my incorrect viewpoints.

I think that is what Dave meant, load up at least 10 at camp then go hunting.


I'm still having trouble finding any links to loads, I really want to study up on this but do not want to blow up my gun..... as a side not how hard would it be to mess this up to the point of a ka-boom or damage to the gun? (one of my biggest fear when it comes to reloading) I have read that its pretty hard to screw up Black powder?

TN.Frank
11-29-2011, 17:23
Don't know if it's been said(probably has) but Pyrodex is loaded on a volume to volume basis with black powder. A measure that would give you 70grs of black powder would only give you 46.76grs of Pyrodex. Volume measures for black powder are adjusted to give the weight of the powder, i.e. a 70gr measure will give you 70 grains of black powder if you took the time to weigh it on a scale.
We got into a big ol' harry debate over weather there was a such thing as "grains volume" or not and there's NOT. Grains is a measure of weight, 7000 grains to the lb, it's just that a powder measure is calibrated to throw a certain weight of powder by volume.
Anyway, I digress, I was on a Pyrodex kick a few years back. Had a 45/70 Sharps, '51 Navy conversion to 38spl, and an old single shot 12ga all of which I loaded with Pyrodex because it worked great in the 45/70, kept pressure down in the 38spl and was just plain fun to shoot in the 12ga. Wouldn't recommend shooting a black powder/pyrodex shotshell in a semi-auto shotgun but in a single shot there's no problems at all.

Anyway, what was I saying.:dunno:

GioaJack
11-29-2011, 18:40
Jack,

Not certainly trying to debate you, because I don't know **** from shinola when it comes to blackpowder anything or shotgun reloading.

From an outsiders point of view though... Wouldn't sitting down and loading up 10-20 of the hulls and carrying them with you, then being able to eject one and load another *immediately* be of some value?

As well.... wouldn't you be able to use a *normal* shotgun with normal shotgun shells, then use it for this method... clean it properly, then return to normal shells? I'd imagine a muzzle loading shotgun wouldn't allow using shells.

For me... when I'm hunting I want to hunt. I wouldn't want to take a shot, then have to pour/pack/stuff/pack/pour/pack/stuff/pack (whatever the process is) before I can shoot again. What if I came across a bunch of things I could shoot if I could get another shell in there quicker?

Just playing Devil's Advocate here. Edumucate me I'm on my incorrect viewpoints.


Ron, you're absolutely correct on all points. You can use the gun for both types of shooting but as I queried before, other than the novelty of it why would you?

If you're going to hunt and you have a modern shotgun then why wouldn't you sit in a blind with a few boxes of shells or if you prefer stalking why not put a bandolier of shells around your waist and have a ball?

On the other hand if you prefer traditional black powder hunting why wouldn't you utilize the most effective method? Part of black powder hunting is realizing that you will only have one quick shot, (two if you're carrying a double), that's why black powder hunters know the importance of an accurate shot and the ability to get close to their game.

As I mentioned, you're spot on with all your points but there is a world of difference between modern firearms hunting and muzzle loading hunting. Kinda like American football and English football... they both involve a ball, (game animal), but that's where the similarity ends.



Thanks for the info:) I was thinking it would be easier to just carry wadings also but its good to know you could do it with just a rag.

Most non-black powder shooters have only seen it shot during daylight hours and almost always comment on the amount of smoke produced. If they saw it shot at night the subject of smoke would never come up... they'd be commenting on the sparks produced.

It is not uncommon at all during our major shoots to have to close the line so everyone can go out and stomp out the grass fires. It is also not uncommon for the forest service to cancel our scheduled Memorial Day and State Championship shoots due to dry conditions. Even when we are allowed to shoot we are required to have fire extinguishers and buckets filled with water on the line.

Those conditions are with rifles using moistened patches which don't tend to smolder. The fires are started by the powder.

In the videos he uses dry cotton wadding to load the shotgun. Although it certainly wouldn't happen with every shot one of those cotton wads will, (over powder wads), end up smoldering and landing in a area of dried grass or leaves. If unnoticed it will spread to that kindling and while your sitting in your camp cleaning your freshly killed rabbit you may turn to see a wall of fire racing toward you.

Although what he does in the videos is admittedly pretty nifty it is at the same time pretty irresponsible from a safety and conservation standpoint. (From a purely survival standpoint I have no problem with it but I can't envision why you would just happen to have a can of black powder, a modern gun and a box of BB's without a lot of prior planning. But maybe that's just me.)


I think that is what Dave meant, load up at least 10 at camp then go hunting.


I'm still having trouble finding any links to loads, I really want to study up on this but do not want to blow up my gun..... as a side not how hard would it be to mess this up to the point of a ka-boom or damage to the gun? (one of my biggest fear when it comes to reloading) I have read that its pretty hard to screw up Black powder?

You can indeed blow up a gun with black powder but it is much harder than with smokeless powder... the pressures are considerably lower. When we build a new barrel we proof the barrel with three times the expected charge to check for soundness. If we build a .45 caliber barrel with a an expected average charge of 60 grains we'll load 180 grains, (usually FFFG), tie the barrel to an old tire, cap the nipple and with a really long string let 'er rip.

It's fun to take a sot out barrel that's too old to bore oversize and see what it takes to blow the breech plug out of it or split the chamber. Great fun, great fun.



Jack

Well, so much for trying to respond directly under the questions with red answers. Okay, I know it, I'm an idiot.

RWBlue
11-29-2011, 21:27
Jack,

Not certainly trying to debate you, because I don't know **** from shinola when it comes to blackpowder anything or shotgun reloading.

From an outsiders point of view though... Wouldn't sitting down and loading up 10-20 of the hulls and carrying them with you, then being able to eject one and load another *immediately* be of some value?

As well.... wouldn't you be able to use a *normal* shotgun with normal shotgun shells, then use it for this method... clean it properly, then return to normal shells? I'd imagine a muzzle loading shotgun wouldn't allow using shells.

For me... when I'm hunting I want to hunt. I wouldn't want to take a shot, then have to pour/pack/stuff/pack/pour/pack/stuff/pack (whatever the process is) before I can shoot again. What if I came across a bunch of things I could shoot if I could get another shell in there quicker?

Just playing Devil's Advocate here. Edumucate me I'm on my incorrect viewpoints.

If you are going to do that, why not reload smokeless powder?

ron59
11-30-2011, 12:04
Jack and RWBlue...

I think both of you are are looking at this as as ever day loading type situation. That Dave Canterbury guy is a self proclaimed "survivalist expert", even being on TV (Discovery Channel?) on that show "Dual Survival" with Cody Lundine (the Bush Hippie referred to above). His other videos on that youtube channel are along those lines.

Guess I was looking at the practice more in the lines of a SHTF scenario. Disclaimer... I am in no way one of those guys who think about that alot or am super prepared for that sort of thing. However, this looked like a great method of having ammo in that event.

Sure, I could go out and buy 1000 rounds of shotgun shells and store them up somewhere. ** OR ** I could buy some powder, pack of BBs, and a couple of candles. Bam, I'd be in business (I'd need some hulls obviously). Rags for stuffing would be easy. Smaller amount of money spent, and less space taken up. Once the BBs were gone... go to any small creekbed and you could scoop up tons of small pebbles, from BB sized to near buckshot sized. Of course, small pebbles probably wouldn't be the best thing for a barrel, but if it came to true SHTF... you do what you have to.

Guess I was what iffing along the lines of how that video was intended, as opposed to everyday type loading.

DoctaGlockta
11-30-2011, 12:12
Jack and RWBlue...

Guess I was what iffing along the lines of how that video was intended, as opposed to everyday type loading.

For some reason the 'Macguyver' factor appealed to me as well. I've never reloaded shot shells before but will give this a try. Going to get some shotshell primers and pyrodex this weekend and my neighbor is a beekeeper so I'll pick up some wax from her.

And I don't need to buy a Mec reloading press to give it a try.

ron59
11-30-2011, 12:27
For some reason the 'Macguyver' factor appealed to me as well. I've never reloaded shot shells before but will give this a try. Going to get some shotshell primers and pyrodex this weekend and my neighbor is a beekeeper so I'll pick up some wax from her.

And I don't need to buy a Mec reloading press to give it a try.

LOL. Well said.

cosmose
11-30-2011, 12:46
For some reason the 'Macguyver' factor appealed to me as well. I've never reloaded shot shells before but will give this a try. Going to get some shotshell primers and pyrodex this weekend and my neighbor is a beekeeper so I'll pick up some wax from her.

And I don't need to buy a Mec reloading press to give it a try.

Be sure and let us know how it works out!

cosmose
12-02-2011, 11:38
Dave just uploaded a new video on brass shotguns shells, I did not know they used large pistol primer's. He shows how to drill it out to accept 209 primers. thought you guys might find it interesting. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNGruN290t0&feature=g-user

TN.Frank
12-02-2011, 11:50
Once the BBs were gone... go to any small creekbed and you could scoop up tons of small pebbles, from BB sized to near buckshot sized. Of course, small pebbles probably wouldn't be the best thing for a barrel, but if it came to true SHTF... you do what you have to.


You can always make Swan Shot by pouring molten lead thru a metal screen. That's the way the old timers did it on the frontier. :cool:

ron59
12-02-2011, 12:42
You can always make Swan Shot by pouring molten lead thru a metal screen. That's the way the old timers did it on the frontier. :cool:

Interesting. Another factoid I'll file away for the future. Thanks. :wavey:

TN.Frank
12-02-2011, 12:56
Interesting. Another factoid I'll file away for the future. Thanks. :wavey:

You do need to have a pan of water under the screen to cool the shot, just thought I'd mention that. Here's a link to a Cast "Boolit" forum that I'm on. Lots of good info, this link is for shotgun shooters.
http://castboolits.gunloads.com/forumdisplay.php?f=36
You may be able to get more info here.

cosmose
12-02-2011, 12:57
You can always make Swan Shot by pouring molten lead thru a metal screen. That's the way the old timers did it on the frontier. :cool:

Interesting. Another factoid I'll file away for the future. Thanks. :wavey:

+1 awesome info! I really like this 21st century long hunter series Dave is doing, kinda like a modern day mountain man. the Swan shot fits it perfectly:)

norton
12-02-2011, 19:10
Jack was spot on with his comments.
I also am a long time blackpowder shooter. Revolvers, kentucky style pistols. I assembled a couple of Track Of the Wolf component flintlocks, one a smoothbore, one a rifle. I also own and shoot T/C weapons and have a Springfield 1861 replica musket.
I have been shooting and cleaning BP since the 1970's. I used to exclusively use hot water and soap. Yes, bar soap, breaking up a bar into small chips and then swirling it in the water.
Some guys think hot water dries faster,and minimizes any potential for rust.
I have found cold water works just as well, and the soap is probably not necessary either.
I lubricate the cleaned weapon with WD 40. It displaces moisture.
Some BP shooters have fits when I tell them about the WD, but it has worked for me.
The most important thing about cleaning is it needs to the done the same day the weapon was used. Don't put it off. Many is the barrel that has been ruined due to delayed cleaning
And I almost always use real BP. It is superior to any of the synthetics in a flintlock. Except maybe in inlines, which any traditional BP shooter will tell you are the devils work. :supergrin: