wear to start [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : wear to start


Rinconjoe
12-08-2011, 13:01
OK I am thinking of reloading. I am confused about the presses, there are so many brands.
I want to keep it fairly simple I understand progressive presses are faster and less steps,
I am looking for quality not quantity , the three that I am looking at reloading are 9Mm maybe , definitely 40 S&W and possibly 7 rem mag ,
I have over 1000 rounds brass for the 40 and about 300 for rem mag,
Havenít bought anything except ABC of reloading itís on it way,
So going to ask for suggestionís yes I understand itís a personal choice was wondering if some of the start up kits worth it,
My problems is guess is bulletís and powder ECT I mainly target shoot my 40 .

jr05
12-08-2011, 13:09
I would recommend:
underwear
socks
pants - khaki
polo shirt


sorry, had to say it.

As far as the press goes, I went with a Lee Classic Turret kit. I have not gotten it yet, but they get very good reviews and should serve you quite well. It can also be set up as as single stage press which gives you some good options for loading, especially the rifle rounds. ABC of reloading is definitely a good start, I knew most of the stuff in there from researching online, but it was a good read.

Personally I would stick with a turret or single stage to start as it just seems safer when you are starting out and learning stuff. Some people may say to go with a progressive right off the bat, but I could see a use for a single stage or turret even if I get a progressive down the road, so it seems like a perfect place to start. Just don't cheap out, get a cast iron one, not the budget versions...The kits do save some money if you intend to buy all the pieces anyway.

EL_NinO619
12-08-2011, 13:13
I say LnL or Dillon 650. LnL is Cheaper and 500 free bullets, 650 is more rugged I guess but is a lot more money, and caliber change over is $$$$. Hornady I feel is more suited for Rifle. Whats your price range and how much will you really be loading.. All these factors play apart.

pauldunlop13
12-08-2011, 13:15
I am at the same stage of investigation

I am pretty much set on the Dillon 500b

Ranger325
12-08-2011, 13:15
I'd say you're starting off well by odering the ABCs book. Read it, it will generate more questions and make the rounds on the online forums.
I have a Dillon Square Deal that primarily loads .45 ACP and some 9mm - I like it alot and Dillon is a great company to work with. I also have a RCBS progressive that I'll use for rifle ammo this winter.

Regards,

fredj338
12-08-2011, 13:26
I'll disagree w/ my friend Elnino. You do not need a 650 or even a LNL Sounds like a minimal amount of reloading, a Lee turret would work fine, but if you want a progressive, the Dillon 550B can be used like a turret & load one round at a time or as fast as you want. Very well suited to rifle rounds where the LNL can be problematic w/ the shell holder/wire & longer cases. Even a good single stage press kit like the RCBS RCII will work fine for the casula shooter/reloader. I still use my ss press a lot even though I have a 550B & 650.

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 13:43
We can't possibly answer the "Which press should I buy?" without knowning how many rounds are going to be loaded over some period of time. And how many caliber changes are going to be required.

It is certainly possible to load pistol ammo on a single stage or turret press. I have never used the turret but I can tell you that loading a bunch of pistol ammo on a single stage press is GRIM. It's doable but if you're shooting a couple of hundred rounds per week, you probably won't enjoy reloading.

The other question we should ask is "How much do you have to spend?". My personal favorite press for loading a single caliber of pistol ammo is the Dillon 1050 - think in terms of $1800 ready to load. That just isn't feasible for a lot of shooters. They aren't going to shoot 1000 rounds every time out and they have no need for the speed of a press like that. Besides, caliber changes are expensive and time consuming.

The Dillon XL650 will handle a lot of calibers and caliber changes are fairly easy. It costs a little less than 1/2 that of the 1050 including the case feeder. It is a fully progressive press and capable of cranking out a lot of ammo.

The Dillon 550B is the workhorse of the industry. It loads everything but it does it a little slower. It can be operated as a manually progressive press or in a way that simulates a turret press. Caliber changes are dead simple - unless the primer size is being changed and that's not a big deal either. It is a very capable machine and a great place to start.

Then there are all the other presses.

So, before you can get any realistic answers, you need to provide more information.

Richard

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 13:49
Read Colorado4Wheel's "How to get started in Reloading" 'sticky' at the top of this forum.

In fact, read ALL of the 'stickies'. That's why they are 'sticky'.

Richard

GioaJack
12-08-2011, 13:52
Get a Lee... it's the easiest one to spell. :whistling:


Jack

rpgman
12-08-2011, 13:56
We can't possibly answer the "Which press should I buy?" without knowning how many rounds are going to be loaded over some period of time. And how many caliber changes are going to be required.

It is certainly possible to load pistol ammo on a single stage or turret press. I have never used the turret but I can tell you that loading a bunch of pistol ammo on a single stage press is GRIM. It's doable but if you're shooting a couple of hundred rounds per week, you probably won't enjoy reloading.

The other question we should ask is "How much do you have to spend?". My personal favorite press for loading a single caliber of pistol ammo is the Dillon 1050 - think in terms of $1800 ready to load. That just isn't feasible for a lot of shooters. They aren't going to shoot 1000 rounds every time out and they have no need for the speed of a press like that. Besides, caliber changes are expensive and time consuming.

The Dillon XL650 will handle a lot of calibers and caliber changes are fairly easy. It costs a little less than 1/2 that of the 1050 including the case feeder. It is a fully progressive press and capable of cranking out a lot of ammo.

The Dillon 550B is the workhorse of the industry. It loads everything but it does it a little slower. It can be operated as a manually progressive press or in a way that simulates a turret press. Caliber changes are dead simple - unless the primer size is being changed and that's not a big deal either. It is a very capable machine and a great place to start.

Then there are all the other presses.

So, before you can get any realistic answers, you need to provide more information.

Richard

I loaded on a Lyman Turret II Press (just got a Dillon xl650 this pass weekend and still use the Lyman)....did 400 rounds in a day or so over a weekend. Both .40 and 9mm.

It has 5 die stations and you index it manually, but it works great.

I would first de-prime all my cases, tumble them, then start loading them.
Greg

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 14:01
I would first de-prime all my cases, tumble them, then start loading them.
Greg

I kind of rely on the decapping pin to get the media out of the flash hole. I would have to think about depriming followed by tumbling.

My process is to take the cases out of the media separator and dump them in the case feeder (on the 1050) or shell bin (on the 550B).

Richard

rpgman
12-08-2011, 14:08
I kind of rely on the decapping pin to get the media out of the flash hole. I would have to think about depriming followed by tumbling.

My process is to take the cases out of the media separator and dump them in the case feeder (on the 1050) or shell bin (on the 550B).

Richard

I did it both ways...I'm talking about BEFORE I got the xl650. Using the Lyman Turret II Press.

I have tumbled them and then de-primed them all first, then loaded them.
On the xl650, I tumble them first, then load them into the case feeder like you do.

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 14:14
Get a Lee... it's the easiest one to spell. :whistling:


Jack


Jack has a more comprehensive response here:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=gioajack&source=video&cd=1&ved=0CDMQtwIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DYcT6Tyv4Unw&ei=yifhTpbGIMKYiQLC6cCgAw&usg=AFQjCNG10PwGxXLGx0A1lVfLSZ_XaDjaQw

and here:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=gioajack&source=video&cd=3&ved=0CEcQtwIwAg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D0Esf-fUo9Qk&ei=iCjhTqCDNsbniAKU94WUDw&usg=AFQjCNESVpujXGtaS88aBNUTyC5ZZtWkuA

Richard

EL_NinO619
12-08-2011, 15:11
I'll disagree w/ my friend Elnino. You do not need a 650 or even a LNL Sounds like a minimal amount of reloading, a Lee turret would work fine, but if you want a progressive, the Dillon 550B can be used like a turret & load one round at a time or as fast as you want. Very well suited to rifle rounds where the LNL can be problematic w/ the shell holder/wire & longer cases. Even a good single stage press kit like the RCBS RCII will work fine for the casula shooter/reloader. I still use my ss press a lot even though I have a 550B & 650.

I have never had a Single problem with my shell plates, But on Chris 550b its a nightmare to load the tiny little .223. They act very top heavy and wobbly on a Dillon.. I would hate to try .308 or 7mm.

I just put out the Progressive, I will use this example that I was told at a fish store. Its a lot Cheaper to buy a 100 gallon now, Than a 10g, 20, 50g, than a 100 gallon as the hobby grows..

Buy a LEE Classic SS kit, I have one and they are money, puts that damn Lyman Orange Crusher I bought from Chris to shame, But that Cheap bastard wont give me a refund....:steamed:

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 15:24
I have never had a Single problem with my shell plates, But on Chris 550b its a nightmare to load the tiny little .223. They act very top heavy and wobbly on a Dillon.. I would hate to try .308 or 7mm.



I have loaded quite a bit of .223 on my 550B without problems. I can't recall if I have loaded .308 with that machine; probably not. That is because I feed my M1A with NATO surplus 7.62 mm and I make .308 for my Steyr SSG on my single stage press. Measured loads and all that...

It seems to me the problem might be that the shell plate is too loose.

Richard

dkf
12-08-2011, 16:06
The Lee Classic Turret would be a good press to do the rounds you want to get started. You could always upgrade to a larger faster press later for pistol rounds and just keep the LCT around for lower quantity rifle cartridges. For the larger rifle cartridges like the 7mm you will have to use the LCT as a single stage though but thats not really a big deal unless your loading a lot at one time. Just my $.02.

thorn137
12-08-2011, 16:14
One of the first questions you should answer for yourself is, "How many times do you want to pull a handle to get a completed round?"

If you get a single-stage or turret, it's a lot more arm work... 3-4 times more than with a progressive. That's 400 pulls for 100rds, instead of ~100. And it's 3-4 times slower.

I'm not one of those guys that factors TIME into my reloading savings... i do it for enjoyment. But like anything, i like having time for other things too.

thorn

PCJim
12-08-2011, 16:22
I have never had a Single problem with my shell plates, But on Chris 550b its a nightmare to load the tiny little .223. They act very top heavy and wobbly on a Dillon..

I have loaded quite a bit of .223 on my 550B without problems.....

It seems to me the problem might be that the shell plate is too loose.

Richard

I'd say either the wrong shellplate and/or buttons/pins, or a loose shellplate. Next time you are over at Chris', check the shellplate and pin numbers - both should should be a #3.

I reload a lot of .223 on a 550b, Lee dies, and don't have any problems (except for that darn primer bar sticking).

F106 Fan
12-08-2011, 16:54
I'd say either the wrong shellplate and/or buttons/pins, or a loose shellplate. Next time you are over at Chris', check the shellplate and pin numbers - both should should be a #3.

I reload a lot of .223 on a 550b, Lee dies, and don't have any problems (except for that darn primer bar sticking).

A real possibility.

And what is it with that primer bar? Mine sticks from time to time. Then I disassemble it, clean all the pieces, reassemble it and it will work some more.

Richard

TX Archer
12-08-2011, 17:20
I'm not even remotely qualified to tell you what to get. But having gone through the same education and decision process recently, I can advise you on how to make the decision - read all the stickies at the top of this forum. Then read every thread that sounds like it's related to your reloading goals. When you're reading and come across a concept you don't feel you understand, use the search function and search the reloading forum for it. If you don't get enough info here or just want some variety, do the same thing at the Brian Enos forum, The High Road, and The Firing Line. I did this for months before I bought my equipment and I think it helped a lot. It gave me a good idea of what people use, the various pros and cons of different equipment, and helped me learn a lot about the process.

FWIW, I ended up buying a Dillon 550B with toolheads and dies for 9mm and .40 S&W along with a Dillon Eliminator scale from Brian Enos. Tumbler was a Cabela's brand made by Berry's. Your needs may be different.

RustyFN
12-08-2011, 17:35
I have never had a Single problem with my shell plates, But on Chris 550b its a nightmare to load the tiny little .223. They act very top heavy and wobbly on a Dillon.. I would hate to try .308 or 7mm.

Sounds like his shell plate isn't adjusted right. I load 223 on my 550 and it's nothing like you describe.

unclebob
12-08-2011, 17:51
Itís nice to know what everyone loads on. You have said what you want to load. But how much do you shoot a week, month etc.? How much time do you have to reload and how long do you want to spend doing it? How deep are your pockets? Read the Sticky by Colorado 4 wheeler.

Rinconjoe
12-09-2011, 06:03
ok I go with what I shot last month 300 rounds 40 and 75 rounds 7 rem Mag , I guess it looks like my shooting the 40 going to increase due to my availability of a range know , so that’s the main one I am focusing on , the local gun shops was no help , they seem to be all against the kits , they said I can get better by customizing my kit , he recommended the XL 650 , which I guess is true over long term for now I want to get started and progress . I also picked up the Speer manual since he had it there, but the 550 looks like it do the job too .

XDRoX
12-09-2011, 06:13
Sounds like his shell plate isn't adjusted right. I load 223 on my 550 and it's nothing like you describe.

Yep, it was a shell plate issue. I didn't have it down far enough. I fixed the problem Justin, I thought I told you.

I wasn't pushing te shell plate down flat before tightening it down and then slowly backing the bolt out.

rpgman
12-09-2011, 06:48
ok I go with what I shot last month 300 rounds 40 and 75 rounds 7 rem Mag , I guess it looks like my shooting the 40 going to increase due to my availability of a range know , so thatís the main one I am focusing on , the local gun shops was no help , they seem to be all against the kits , they said I can get better by customizing my kit , he recommended the XL 650 , which I guess is true over long term for now I want to get started and progress . I also picked up the Speer manual since he had it there, but the 550 looks like it do the job too .

I was just like you on my decision.

I asked here also on the board (3 months ago, I believe) and someone suggested the Lyman Turret II even though I was thinking 550 or xl650.

Ron, here on this board has a 550, and made his case for me getting the xl650.

I, at the time (3 months ago) went and got the Lyman Turret II at Brass Pro, since I was a a new loader, I wanted to wait to get a progressive xl650.

I have loved the Lyman Turret II....yea, you have to manually index it, but it produced nice rounds. The most I ever done on a weekend was 300 9mm and 100 .40 and that was a majority of my weekend. Keep in mine, I hand did the powder. When I got the Lyman, I also purchased a RCBS 1500 ChargeMaster, and that scale is dead on all the time.

I would de-prime all my cases, tumble them, and then start loading them, and the RCBS ChargeMaster 1500 did all the charges automatically, by just replacing the powder tray after I would load a case with powder. I would be seating a bullet and crimping it while it was calculating the next charge.

It's a nice press.

Now, I moved up to the Dillon xl650.

Greg

unclebob
12-09-2011, 06:52
ok I go with what I shot last month 300 rounds 40 and 75 rounds 7 rem Mag , I guess it looks like my shooting the 40 going to increase due to my availability of a range know , so thatís the main one I am focusing on , the local gun shops was no help , they seem to be all against the kits , they said I can get better by customizing my kit , he recommended the XL 650 , which I guess is true over long term for now I want to get started and progress . I also picked up the Speer manual since he had it there, but the 550 looks like it do the job too .

So if you start reloading you will probably double of what you shoot now. You did not mention money or time. So from the bottom end I would recommend the Lee LCT. My next choice if you want to spend more money and less time the Dillon 550. And then if really need be the 650. You need to figure out what your needs are now and even what you might want or need in the future. Like what other guns you might add and do you plan on getting or getting into any type of competition.

ColoCG
12-09-2011, 10:34
So if you start reloading you will probably double of what you shoot now. You did not mention money or time. So from the bottom end I would recommend the Lee LCT. My next choice if you want to spend more money and less time the Dillon 550. And then if really need be the 650. You need to figure out what your needs are now and even what you might want or need in the future. Like what other guns you might add and do you plan on getting or getting into any type of competition.

I agree with this choice for what you descibe your needs are. The Lee Classic Turret is an autoindexing press that can easily be converted to single stage for large rifle, relativly inexpensive, can easily produce 150 to 200+ rds. of pistol ammo an hour, caliber conversions are cheap. A good solid press for someone whose ammo demands are in your range.

EL_NinO619
12-09-2011, 11:47
Yep, it was a shell plate issue. I didn't have it down far enough. I fixed the problem Justin, I thought I told you.

I wasn't pushing te shell plate down flat before tightening it down and then slowly backing the bolt out.

I don't recall, But I recall when the going got tough the tough got going, We haven't loaded .223 at your house in months.. ONLY Pistol...:supergrin::rofl:

fredj338
12-09-2011, 12:17
Sounds like his shell plate isn't adjusted right. I load 223 on my 550 and it's nothing like you describe.

I agree, I load 308 on mine & recently 223, runs like a champ. Xdie, powder thru die, COP die & seat/crimp.:dunno:

Just1More
12-09-2011, 12:26
Did you try oiling where metal parts rub together?

fredj338
12-09-2011, 12:30
Did you try oiling where metal parts rub together?

If yo uare talking about the 550B primer slide, you do NOT want any oil on that at all. It just gums up faster & stops working sooner. No, keep it clean w/ a brush or air, dry lube w/ some graphite or moly, that works pretty well.

Rinconjoe
12-09-2011, 16:35
well I thinking I will be shooting more , I have already over 1000 rounds 40 S&W brass , I didn’t set price because I am in fact doing my research first , no one suggested RCBS , my local have some rcbs but mainly Dillon , I am assuming you have to buy whole new press for shot gun , but seems the Dillon 550B is good way to go too ,

unclebob
12-09-2011, 16:40
well I thinking I will be shooting more , I have already over 1000 rounds 40 S&W brass , I didn’t set price because I am in fact doing my research first , no one suggested RCBS , my local have some rcbs but mainly Dillon , I am assuming you have to buy whole new press for shot gun , but seems the Dillon 550B is good way to go too ,

Yes shotgun is a different press. Depending on how much you shoot and the price of the components will depend if it would be worth it or not.

HAMMERHEAD
12-09-2011, 20:38
Get a Lee... it's the easiest one to spell. :whistling:


Jack
That's cold blooded. Funny, but cold blooded.

Rinconjoe
12-10-2011, 10:03
Quote:
Originally Posted by GioaJack View Post
Get a Lee... it's the easiest one to spell.


Jack
That's cold blooded. Funny, but cold blooded.

well I am sure one day way back in his old fart days he was asking just like many others did , we rely on some of the old farts to help us make right choice and guide us . like me still trying to figure out what the main difference between the Dillon 550 b and the XL 650

Disregarded9-side
12-10-2011, 10:11
I'm sure it's not the most popular option, but I bought a Lee single stage as my first, as I was on a budget, just wanted to start loading and find what I liked/wanted before I dropped the money on an expense set-up. It was well under $100. I was also not in an extremely 'permanent' living situation at the time. I've reloaded thousands of 5.56, 9, 40 and 45 with it; mainly 9. It's much slower than a progressive, but that's not always a bad thing when you're starting out. This is a viable cheap option--it doesn't mean your reloads will lack quality. It seems like you have similar goals as I did when starting out; you said you preferred quality over quantity, so I would recommend a single stage anyway.
I may buy a 550 within the next year or so, but I am glad I went the inexpensive route to begin with. Lee products in general are inexpensive, simple and very effective, leaving me to recommend them to any new 'loader.


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

norton
12-10-2011, 10:20
IMHO
Buy a quality single stage to start. You will always find a use for your single stage, even if you "graduate" to progressive later.
My preference is the RCBS Rock Chucker, but Lee, Hornady, Lyman all make a quality unit.
You need at least two up to date loading manuals. Read them before you load even one round.
Handloading is a great hobby. Welcome to the club.

unclebob
12-10-2011, 11:15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GioaJack View Post
Get a Lee... it's the easiest one to spell.


Jack
That's cold blooded. Funny, but cold blooded.

well I am sure one day way back in his old fart days he was asking just like many others did , we rely on some of the old farts to help us make right choice and guide us . like me still trying to figure out what the main difference between the Dillon 550 b and the XL 650

To put it in a nut shell. The 550 is a 4 station press. And you manually have to index the shell plate. Yes you can put a case feeder but it is pistol cartridge only. And it may or may not work.
The 650 is a 5 station press. It has one extra hole that you if you want can put a powder check. It only checks that you have a double change or no powder. It does not check to see if you have like .2 grains over or under. Or you can leave it open. The press is auto indexing. The press turns the shell plate for you. Or you can it very easy that you have to rotate the shell plate manually. It does not come with a case feeder, but it highly recommended. And it works. The 650 caliber conversions cost 32.00 more and the tool heads cost 5.00 more.
For me I loaded about 18 years on a 550 and 19 years on a 650. If there was a 650 when I bought the 550 I would have had 37 years loading on a 650. I would never go back to a 550 even though it is a very good press.
Both pressís you can use as a single stage press until you learn the ropes.

GioaJack
12-10-2011, 12:20
With the Hornady Powder Cop you can easily tell if you're a couple tenths over or under on a charge, that's one of the reasons I prefer it over the RCBS Lock-Out die.

Then again I just stuff my cases as full as I can with what ever powder I have laying around so it doesn't really matter. (I go through a lot of guns but it makes for exciting shooting sessions.)


Jack

rpgman
12-10-2011, 13:07
I still recommend the Lyman Turret II press if money is an issue.
You have to manually index it like the 550 but it has 5 stations compared to the 550's 4.

A good press under $300 and that's the price of the kit. The press alone is cheaper.

RustyFN
12-10-2011, 15:14
I still recommend the Lyman Turret II press if money is an issue.
You have to manually index it like the 550 but it has 5 stations compared to the 550's 4.

A good press under $300 and that's the price of the kit. The press alone is cheaper.

Yes but the 550 is a progressive and the Lyman isn't.

rpgman
12-10-2011, 15:30
Yes but the 550 is a progressive and the Lyman isn't.

Correct. The 550 is doing 4 things on 1 pull but its way more expense than the Lyman.
The reason I recommended it because the Lyman has 5 stations. Yea ur doing one thing on every pull but all u have to do is manual index it to the next station.

Plus you can use the same dies in the 550 when u move up.

unclebob
12-10-2011, 19:54
Correct. The 550 is doing 4 things on 1 pull but its way more expense than the Lyman.
The reason I recommended it because the Lyman has 5 stations. Yea ur doing one thing on every pull but all u have to do is manual index it to the next station.

Plus you can use the same dies in the 550 when u move up.

Or you can use the 550 or 650 as a single stage press or turret press. In the end if you buy a single stage or a turret press you still only have a single stage or turret press.
You can build just as quality ammo on either press as you can on a single or turret. David Tubbs uses a 550. A friend of mine that is a national high powder shooter that was on the Air Force high power shooting team uses a 650.
I have never fell in the trap that if you have a progress press you need a single stage press. You can do the same thing on a progress as you can on a single stage. Most people donít swage bullet or need a single stage to decrimp brass. There are a lot better tools out there for that.
You donít need a single stage for load development. So if you do either you have to buy another set of dies or you have to take the dies out of the tool head. Sizing and depriming is the same, seating the bullet is the same. Crimping is the same. The only difference is how you add the powder. You can do the same thing on a progress as you would if you were using a single stage. Pull the case out of the shell plate, add the powder and put it back into the shell plate. Simple.

Rinconjoe
12-11-2011, 08:35
ok what is the main diffrenace in the 550 B and the 650 ?

does this sound like good deal and set up:

Xl650 in sw 40 ? 546.95

40 dies ? 62.95

Electric case feeder ? 214.95

Powder check system ? 65.95

Low powder senser ? 39.95

Aluminum roller handle ? 40.95

Strong mount ? 45.95

Bullet tray ? 39.95

Wrench set and holder ? 28.00

Dillon determinator scales ? 135.95

unclebob
12-11-2011, 09:02
You donít need the low powder sensor.

glockaviator
12-11-2011, 10:41
Go to youtube.com and put in reloading and watch the videos.

Reloading is not difficult. But figuring out what to buy can be.

My advice is to start simple.

Also, get a hammer style bullet puller right away. At first is where you will make some mistakes and you need to SAFELY be able to take apart your mistakes. Trying to pull mistakes apart with a pair of pliers and a vice is dangerous. Get a bullet puller!

Other than that, all the presses work. So pick one and have at it. (I bought a Lee Classic Loader and am happy).

thorn137
12-11-2011, 19:41
You don't need a powder hopper alarm, and don't spend $140 on a scale... a nice 505 will run half that much.

thorn

Colorado4Wheel
12-11-2011, 19:47
ok what is the main diffrenace in the 550 B and the 650 ?

Not to be a jerk.....but you clearly didn't read the sticky. Might want to go over to Brian Enos Forums and read some of the great info on his Dillon Store area.

Rinconjoe
12-13-2011, 13:04
so would this be everything to get me going with a good set up
RL550B In SW 40
40 dies dillon
Aluminum roller handle
Strong mount
Bullet tray
Empty Case Bin and Bracket-Attaches
Low powder alarm
Extra primer pick-up tubes
Wrench set and holder
Primer flip tray
Headspace case gauge
RCBS Pow'r Pull Impact Bullet Puller Kit
CV500 vibratory case cleaner #21027
CM-500 case/media separator #21045
Corncob cleaning media #13496
Rapid Polish 290 #13804

Colorado4Wheel
12-13-2011, 14:34
Your missing a scale. You got a nice setup besides that. More then you need.

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1027887

Read that thread.

Disregarded9-side
12-13-2011, 15:10
Seriously don't spend that much money to begin with. Buy the bare minimum and build up after you know how much you're actually going to reload (and shoot). You won't have any regrets.
You can easily get everything you need for less than the $540 that upmarket press is going to cost.

unclebob
12-13-2011, 18:54
Seriously don't spend that much money to begin with. Buy the bare minimum and build up after you know how much you're actually going to reload (and shoot). You won't have any regrets.
You can easily get everything you need for less than the $540 that upmarket press is going to cost.

After 1 January the price is going up. And why wait and pay extra for shipping. If you can afford it go for it.

glockaviator
12-13-2011, 19:13
(deleted)

Colorado4Wheel
12-13-2011, 19:34
If your ready to buy a 550 I would just get the 550, some dies, Dillon Eliminator Scale and perhaps the Dillon Tumbler. It's very nice but kinda pricey.

Besides that I would make a bench at 40 inch's, and then make another section at 47" (you could use some 2X6's and another section of double 3/4. Press goes on the 47 inch high section. Saved the cost of a strong mount and all the assorted parts. If you like loading seated on a stool the 40" section is close to right for a lot of people. You can always make it a little taller with some ingenuity.

GioaJack
12-13-2011, 19:49
I'm having trouble breathing, my left arm is numb and there's a sharp pain in the center of my chest... this happens frequently when I hear, (or read), something that shocks my senses.

Did Little Stevie just suggest that someone actually use lumber to raise a bench top rather that buy a strong mount?

I am perplexed as to why someone hasn't come up with this idea years ago... just shows you that the Christmas season brings out the creativity in Little Stevie... or improves his memory. :whistling:

The pain isn't getting any better and Dawg won't get off my oxygen hose... this could be the big one. Such a shame, there were still so many women yet to entertain.


Jack

Rinconjoe
12-21-2011, 07:53
just thought I update some my brother out west sent me a early Xmas present he upgraded his system to a 1050 , sent me his striped down back to basic RL550B with set 40 S&W dies conversion set , plate what ever it called his beam scale that he never used he has RCBS Chargemaster Combo Scale/Dispenser which he loves , anyway he said few items i need to get to clean brass , a good caliber and bullet puller sure there more but that what he recommended to start with have the Lyman and Speer reloading manuals any other you all recommend

Colorado4Wheel
12-21-2011, 19:59
just thought I update some my brother out west sent me a early Xmas present he upgraded his system to a 1050 , sent me his striped down back to basic RL550B with set 40 S&W dies conversion set , plate what ever it called his beam scale that he never used he has RCBS Chargemaster Combo Scale/Dispenser which he loves , anyway he said few items i need to get to clean brass , a good caliber and bullet puller sure there more but that what he recommended to start with have the Lyman and Speer reloading manuals any other you all recommend


Sounds like you have a really smart brother. I would listen to him a lot.