Can't shoot my 642 [Archive] - Glock Talk

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benji
12-27-2011, 15:50
I'm no pro with any of my guns but my 642 makes me look even worse. It seems like when I take a good grip and point the gun that it is pointing way higher than with any of my Glocks or other pistols I've shot. Is there something that I'm doing wrong or is the grip angle just that much different? I'm considering getting a LCP or something else that points better naturally for me than this 642. The bad angle plus the super heavy trigger makes me terrible with this gun...

Leigh
12-27-2011, 15:58
Welcome to "Snubbies 101" and it's probably not "you."

Short sight radius and near non-existent sights on most, lightweight frame on many, 12+ pound DA on some, and reduced gripping surface on a lot. Need I say more?

The very few folks I know who have truly "mastered" the little 5-shot, 2 inch 38/357 revolver have put many, many hours of practice and training into them. There are no shortcuts.

Funny how many armchair idiots over the years have recommended them to women based solely on their size/weight.

benji
12-27-2011, 16:01
Funny how many armchair idiots over the years have recommended them to women based solely on their size/weight.

"Idiots" might not be a strong enough word. My 642 is a beast to shoot I can't imagine my wife ever enjoying it.

Leigh
12-27-2011, 16:30
I've carried a an Airweight Bodyguard (model 638 in .38 Special) for 10+ years and I am happy with consistent "minute of grapfruit" groups at 21 feet.

While +P rated, I would argue that reliable ans consistent expansion from a 1 7/8 inch barrel to be sometimes debateable 9and possibly overrated).

With practice, I can unload (accurately) a cylinder of five plain old lead 158 grain SWC (non +P) much quicker than many who are using the same lightweight J-frame with +P JHP rounds.

Whatever the platform it ALL comes down to practice, practice, and a lot more practice. Always has and always will.

Stick with it. It's not like a duty-sized 1911 with a crisp trigger and visable sights but it can be done!

Foxtrotx1
12-27-2011, 16:51
It's you. Many people shoot the snubbie fine, takes skill and practice.

John Galt
12-27-2011, 17:00
Instead of ditching the gun, try some different grips and the lightest kicking round you can find. 130 grn. standard pressure WWB seems to kick the least to me. YMMV.

Then, as Leigh said, practice, practice, practice.


ETA: Something I've found that works for me is replacing the factory grips with a pair of Taurus rubber boot grips that cover the backstrap. Really helps tame recoil.

MtnBiker
12-27-2011, 17:40
It's discouraging, isn't it?

Hey it could be worse. My first snubbie was a S&W 940. A J frame that shot 9 mm. OUCH! I HATED shooting that gun. My hand would literally sting after half a box of shells. I traded it for a Colt 1991. Not Colt's best work, but a big leap forward in shootability.

My 642 is tame in comparison, even with +P. I dry fire my 642 fairly often, plus I have about 800 rounds through it by now. It's getting smoother. I'm getting better with it.

The sight picture takes some getting used to, but the gun really is pretty accurate. I've hit a 2 liter coke bottle 4 of 5 shots at 25 yards (standing, 2 hand slow fire).

It gets better, but you have to practice.

Ajon412
12-27-2011, 18:05
Don't give up. As suggested, practice "dry firing" your 642. This is a very good way to get accustom to the different trigger than you're apparently not use to. As mentioned, you may also want to try shooting standard velocity 38 special ammo, either a 148gr wadcutter or a 130gr FMJ and then spend time on the range...Good luck..

Chup
12-28-2011, 12:04
It took me a lot of dry fire practice as well as Range Shooting to get half way decent with my Snubs. I think trigger control and keeping your eye on the sight alignment is key. A 4" gun is always easier.

fowler
12-28-2011, 20:25
I gave up on the airweights and got a Sp101 and put Pachmyr Compac,s on it. Its a dream to shoot with full power 357 mag 125gr. hp,s. IT points and shoots right nice and a true fight stopper with real horsepower to stop a fight DOA. I use a pancake holster and a pocket holster with a few speed strips. I like the heft and control.

pitdog02
12-28-2011, 20:47
I dont know what distance your shooting, but I would move it in as close as you need it to start hitting good. I mean even 3 to 5 yrds to start. Once you figure out how to aim it and get consistent start moving out. You will also have to shoot atleast once a week 50rds until you get it. This is why I like to see new snub owners buy a model with a hammer. Shooting single action at first lets you get the aim down then proceed to all the nasty things double action throws in the game after. Short of a real gunsmiths action job, the wolfe spring kits or the apex spring kit with extended firing pin will lighten and smooth things out a bit for you.

JK-linux
12-28-2011, 21:21
I dont know what distance your shooting, but I would move it in as close as you need it to start hitting good. I mean even 3 to 5 yrds to start. Once you figure out how to aim it and get consistent start moving out. You will also have to shoot atleast once a week 50rds until you get it. This is why I like to see new snub owners buy a model with a hammer. Shooting single action at first lets you get the aim down then proceed to all the nasty things double action throws in the game after.

Quoted for truth. It took me a long time to become "proficient" with an alloy framed snubbie. Starting out single-action and close-up is the way to go.

fmhuff
12-29-2011, 02:16
I have a 642 and I'll agree you need to get used to the grip angle and trigger pull. Either work at it until you're better or move on to something else. No shame in that, shoot what suites you.

I like the J frame because It's a gun I can hand to somebody without the fear of a NG. My son likes only two of my handguns, the G23 and the 642. Go figure.

Gray_Rider
12-31-2011, 18:20
I use my 642 for what it was designed for. ECQB.

Extreme Close Quarters Battle

Gray_Rider
Deo Vindice!

benji
12-31-2011, 18:49
I shot it much better today than I had in the past. I was able to keep everything on a small target at 10-15 yards. I'm not going to win any accuracy contests any time soon, but I was much happier today.

Gray_Rider
12-31-2011, 19:04
+1 Benji. Welcome to the wonderfull world of lightweight snubbies!

Gray_Rider
Deo Vindice!

deadeyeluke
01-04-2012, 23:09
they are true classics, classics stand the test of time. If you you learn to drive on stick shift then you can drive anything that comes your way, if you learn to drive on an automatic then thats all you got.practice and you will be much further ahead

dsa1115
01-05-2012, 00:13
I think the double action only J-frames are difficult to master primarily because the triggers are typically well over 10lbs. The short sight radius doesn't help either. While I like the S&W J-frames, it's my opinion that the Ruger LCR's trigger is easier to shoot well.

MphsTiger1981
01-07-2012, 11:43
Dry firing is a major key to better accuracy with any handgun, but especially true of the snub nose revolver. For one thing, the dry firing helps break in and smooth out the double action trigger, and it teaches you how to smoothly pull the trigger to keep it consistently on target. I bought and installed the Apex Duty Trigger Kit and it made a great deal of difference. Its still probably around 9lbs, but much easier to shoot now. I would encourage you not to give up. I've owned a lot of the pocket semi autos over the years in .32, .380 and 9mm, but the J frame 642 will always be my favorite pocket pistol.

captcurly
01-07-2012, 16:16
Been shooting and carrying (at times) J frames since 1964. The two inch J frame takes a lot of time to master. Some folks get it faster than others. You just keep working at it. Get a grip that is comfortable for you, consent firm trigger pull (always double action) and watch the front sight. Do not give up because we all had to work at it. Again, some get it faster than others. I know you will get it.

ViennaGambit
01-07-2012, 16:24
I gave up on the airweights and got a Sp101 and put Pachmyr Compac,s on it. Its a dream to shoot with full power 357 mag 125gr. hp,s. IT points and shoots right nice and a true fight stopper with real horsepower to stop a fight DOA. I use a pancake holster and a pocket holster with a few speed strips. I like the heft and control.

Agree 100%

Have both a 642 and 2" SP101 also - hate shooting my 642 and LOVE shooting my sp101.

BUT,

The 642 is great for dropping in the pocket of summer shorts - this is really the only reason I haven't sold it.


.

50 Cent
01-08-2012, 12:47
I gave up on the airweights and got a Sp101 and put Pachmyr Compac,s on it. Its a dream to shoot with full power 357 mag 125gr. hp,s. IT points and shoots right nice and a true fight stopper with real horsepower to stop a fight DOA. I use a pancake holster and a pocket holster with a few speed strips. I like the heft and control.

Yeah I have one of those - REAL NICE. I have to admit I shoot it better than my 642, but AM improving with the Smith. As said above - PRACTICE and I try and do it with a 158 gr load.

You just can't beat dropping a 642 into you pocket for going out the door....

TN.Frank
01-10-2012, 11:35
Get a Wolff spring kit and install in the gun, that'll help with the DA trigger pull. Find a set of grips that will let you get a more comfortable grip on the gun, that'll help some more. Get some lower power ammo like wad cutters to practice with, that way you won't be worried about recoil.
I don't know if I'm just an exception to the rule or what but I've never had any problems shooting snubbies. Heck, one place in AZ where we use to shoot had a lot of junk around the area and one day there was an old water heater at I'd guess 100+ yards away. After a few shots I was lobbing in rounds and making hits on it with a M36 S&W that I'd converted to DAO and had installed a Wolff spring kit in.

DFin
01-13-2012, 09:39
How hard is it to install the Wolf spring kit? Are any special tools needed?

TN.Frank
01-20-2012, 15:53
How hard is it to install the Wolf spring kit? Are any special tools needed?

Not hard at all, just hit YouTube to watch a vid that'll show you how to remove the side plate and pull the parts out so you can put the new springs in. Basically you're only replacing two springs, the trigger spring and the hammer spring, piece of cake. Of course the vid shows a flat hammer spring instead of the coil hammer spring like the J-Frames will have but it's still about the same deal.
Gunsmith - How to install a spring kit in a S&W revolver - YouTube

SDGlock23
01-20-2012, 21:08
I have a 442 and it's not the easiest gun I have to shoot accurately. Nothing teaches good trigger control like a J-frame, since you have a heavy trigger pull and have to keep the thing as motionless as possible. Dry fire a lot and work on getting your staging down pat and you'll improve big time.

TN.Frank
01-20-2012, 21:40
Here's the spring kit that I'm going to get and install in my new(to me) 642.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/375177/wolff-shooters-spring-pack-s-and-w-j-frame-reduced-power
I'll probably start with the 13# trigger return spring(stock is 15#) and the reduced power hammer spring is a given. If all works well then great, if the trigger doesn't return as fast as I'd like then I'll bump up to the 14# and give it a try but IIRC the 13# worked out fine in the last J-Frame that I had.

TN.Frank
01-24-2012, 13:41
First 5 shots ever today out of my new(to me) 642, bone stock, 3 yards, off hand using Remington UMC 158gr LRN ammo.
1st shot hit the bull, second and third I pulled low(my fault, I'm sure) and 4th and 5th hit the bull. I've not shot a snub in years, let along a DAO snub.
I'm sure with the Wolff spring kit and the better feeling to me Hip Grips I'll cut even tighter groups.
I've never had a problem shooting any handgun, even snubbies. :supergrin:
http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/1422/6421st.jpg

Dalton Wayne
01-24-2012, 13:57
I have a S&W 442 +P it's painful to shoot but I can keep em in a 4" circle at seven yards, but fifty rounds is all I can take in one session.
Edit to add:
I put an Apex trigger kit in mine and it made a huge improvement in accuracy

http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu192/Daltonlwayne/442100_1894.jpg

TN.Frank
01-24-2012, 14:31
I'll have to try some +P in mine but the standard pressure 158gr LRN stuff is a real kitty cat to shoot, not punishing at all.

faawrenchbndr
01-24-2012, 16:48
.....Funny how many armchair idiots over the years have recommended them to women based solely on their size/weight.


Shooting a Snubby takes practice,....ya didn't learn how to ride a bike in 5 mins!

TN.Frank
01-24-2012, 21:08
Shooting a Snubby takes practice,....ya didn't learn how to ride a bike in 5 mins!

Shooting any gun takes practice. I'd not shot a shub 38spl in years and still cut that decent group at 3 yards(combat distance) and I know I'll do a lot better the more I shoot. Shooting a snub isn't any harder then any other gun, line up the sights, squeeze the trigger and if the sights are on the bullet will go where it's pointed at.

fowler
02-10-2012, 06:39
The 125gr. +P is not so bad to handle and still very powerfull for defence. The 158+P lswchp are no more in stopping power than the 125gr. +P loads on the street.

ChiefWPD
03-04-2012, 10:34
This target is from a night qualification I shot back in 1994. I used another officer's 642. Ranges of the course were at 5/10/15 yards.

I've found the 642 to be an accurate revolver. I prefer standard grips with a Tyler T-grip adapter. I generally carry mine in a pocket holster (Nemises).

You do need to practice with this style handgun in order to get good results. Do focus on your front sight and do learn to control your trigger. For the record, my 642 is stone stock. No light springs for me. This is a combat handgun, not a sporting piece. I want the darn thing to go Bang! every time I pull the trigger.



http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l149/RichCapeCod/Firearms/IMG_3535_QualTarget_07-03-11.jpg

http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l149/RichCapeCod/Firearms/IMG_3542_QualTargetWords_07-03-11.jpg

L Pete
03-04-2012, 15:48
Practice.....Practice.....Practice......

That's what it takes...

J frames are usually very accurate.....the difference is the shooter. Now days, most people are used to the delightfully light trigger pulls on the autos of today, but revolver shooting is another matter. Just keep plugging away, and you'll get better. If you're used to a Glock type trigger or S & W M & P, shooting a revolver is a whole different thing. Most people today start out with a 9mm auto and think that they're good shots. When you can keep all your shots in the 9 ring at 25 yds., with a revolver at 25 yards shooting double action, then you're ready to carry that gun.

Once again, practice.......that is the key

steve581581
03-04-2012, 19:05
I love my 642. I put some oversized wood grips on it and gave it a nice trigger job and its now my favorite shooter. Well, besides for all of the reloading.

Dandapani
03-04-2012, 19:18
I shot it much better today than I had in the past. I was able to keep everything on a small target at 10-15 yards. I'm not going to win any accuracy contests any time soon, but I was much happier today.

If you can punch holes in a 9" paper plate at 21 feet with the snubbie, then you are using it correctly.

It's not meant for 50 feet target practice. :wavey:

NOLA_glock
03-05-2012, 00:00
It takes a lot of practice, but I can shoot my 642 pretty well now. It's awesome trigger control technique practice, and you'll be a better shooter all-around when you get better with the little snub.

ARP
03-05-2012, 10:18
trying crimson trace laser grips. I am currently putting a fund together to buy a 642, plan to do the laser grips hoping that this might shorten my learning curve to proficiency.

Travclem
03-06-2012, 10:11
My 642 is one of the best shooting guns I own. I don't see what the problem is. If you stage the trigger it can be very accurate at long ranges too. We have an 18"X18" gong at 100yds and I can ring it 5 times with my 642. Slowly press the trigger, click, click, bang.

readingbill
03-06-2012, 10:56
Instead of opening up your j-frame to install new springs - which can be an adventure, particularly with the rebound slide spring, S&W offers a j-frame trigger package for around $80. You have to call their customer service about it because I don't believe it was listed on their site when I had it done on my 642-1. They keep the springs stock but clean up the internals, and it's now nice and smooth. Swapping out the mainspring on a carry gun may not be the best idea, as a previous poster noted, in terms of reliability.

nastytrigger
03-12-2012, 17:01
I have a Taurus 851 and my friend has a 642. The Taurus I bought off a friend.

The Taurus was my first leap into revolver world, being a Beretta, Glock, and 1911 owner.

It took me awhile to get accustomed to the long DAO pull, but I never knew you could stage a revolver until my friend with the 642 showed me. Shooting the snub has helped me control my Beretta 92FS' first DA pull.

I like my Taurus, but I've always wanted a S&W of some sort, and I may trade the Taurus for a 642. Plus, I only paid $150 for my Taurus (hoping to get more than that on a trade-in).

benji
04-14-2014, 18:37
Quite a long time since I originally posted this but tonight I got around to putting in an Apex Trigger Kit. Feels great. Can't wait to get to the range to shoot it soon.

billy b
04-14-2014, 19:15
I have a 642 that I put crimson trace laser grips on. the guns are very accurate. problem is they are very hard to shoot accurately. with CT grips & off a rest at 10 yards I have shot golf ball size groups. also some do not shoot to point of aim. mine shot 3" left at 10 yards. so I turned barrel some to correct that.

cowboywannabe
04-14-2014, 19:23
don't kid yourself, a light weight gun and +p ammo is a man sized problem not all can handle.

next, if you put the sights on target and stroke the trigger correctly the bullet will go fairly on target. minor variations based on weight and speed apply.

a light weight J frame is fine for as a "woman's" gun if its loaded properly for her skill level.

JuneyBooney
04-15-2014, 03:47
Quite a long time since I originally posted this but tonight I got around to putting in an Apex Trigger Kit. Feels great. Can't wait to get to the range to shoot it soon.

You sound like me...it takes me a long while to get to stuff that needs doing. I hope it works for you but I have actually found that cheap Davis 380 type guns shoot more accurately than the snubbie guns. Just too much trigger and too short of a barrel but at five feet they work fine. Good luck.

beckmurph1
04-16-2014, 09:50
239229239230
My 340PD bites. What ever I use, .38 or .357 it will take the hide off my index.
My 642 never did this.
I'm not complaining. Its just that way.

itstime
04-16-2014, 10:17
I'm one of those "pretty good shot" guys.

But with that exact gun not so much.

I shoot various models better than others. The snubbies are definitely on the lower end of the list.

Chup
04-18-2014, 20:38
Dry fire practice will save a lot of ammo. Putting your sight on a fixed object and watching it while pulling the trigger. When you can pull the trigger without moving the sight, your good to go.

Maine1
04-20-2014, 00:43
I prefer steel snubs. I have an old model 36 that i picked up used at a show, it was pretty beaten. The trigger was OK. Then i popped off the sdieplate, stripped it to the frame and cleaned 30 years of crud out of it. Trigger improved.
Its a great shooting gun, but its the sights that make it tough for me. With better sights, i'd be more accurate and faster.

My SP101 is a great shooter, its a DAO, and the trigger is great. Sights are a bit larger than the 36, and its easier to hit with.

The snub is a gun for the disciplined person. Some call it an experts gun.
Its challenging and fun to shoot, and for those who take the tiem to master it, it can work magic, as people seem to underestimate them.

fwm
04-20-2014, 14:03
Welcome to "Snubbies 101" and it's probably not "you."

Short sight radius and near non-existent sights on most, lightweight frame on many, 12+ pound DA on some, and reduced gripping surface on a lot. Need I say more?

The very few folks I know who have truly "mastered" the little 5-shot, 2 inch 38/357 revolver have put many, many hours of practice and training into them. There are no shortcuts.

Funny how many armchair idiots over the years have recommended them to women based solely on their size/weight.

I recommend them for women because my wife shoots one very well. Although she grew up shooting rifles, the 642 was her first handgun. She has several pistols and revolvers and the 642 is what she shoots best. Maybe because it was her first, she had no preconceived habits or expectations, and just learned to shoot what she had.

So for newbie women I still say they need one, whatever else they have. Simple to understand, simple to operate, simple to reload.

WT
04-20-2014, 14:14
My wife had a problem with limp wristing a Glock. I had her dry fire a J-frame for a few months. She built up her grip strength and trigger finger strength. She tried the Glock again and the limp wristing problem was gone.


One needs a firm grip and strong fingers to shoot a J-frame fast and accurately. You might have to do some strengthening exercises.

Chup
04-21-2014, 15:34
My Wife shoots a 442 well. When she carries it's her pick.

Bren
04-21-2014, 17:41
I'm no pro with any of my guns but my 642 makes me look even worse. It seems like when I take a good grip and point the gun that it is pointing way higher than with any of my Glocks or other pistols I've shot. Is there something that I'm doing wrong or is the grip angle just that much different? I'm considering getting a LCP or something else that points better naturally for me than this 642. The bad angle plus the super heavy trigger makes me terrible with this gun...

Well, who taught you to shoot a revolver? If the answer is "nobody," that is the start of the problem.

Almost everything about grip and trigger control is different between a DA revolver and a semi-auto. Among other things, your strong hand should be gripping high and tight - by high I mean the hammer should touch or nearly touch the web of your hand every time you fire double action and it should press into it if you cock it to fire single action.

captcurly
04-22-2014, 12:31
I have been carrying and shooting 2" J frames since July,1964. The J frame takes a lot of practice and a build up skill level. Make sure you lock your wrist and keep the grip tight. Stroke the trigger and after a while you will get the knack. I have seen guys guys get tight groups at 40yds with a J frame. Do not get discouraged but just keep shooting and you will get it. Good Luck to you and I am sure if you want it bad enough you will master the J frame. The many that have mastered the J frame are no better than you. YOU CAN DO IT.

deputy tom
05-04-2014, 18:39
I started shooting J-frames in the early '70's and still shoot them better than anything else. I believe it is all about the gun fitting your hands. Ergonomics will play a very big part in which guns you will be successful with and those you won't. To be honest I've been trying many different revolvers/pistols to get a new EDC carry gun these past few years and am about to throw in the towel and just stick to my old stand by J-frames.Good luck. tom. :cool:

notsobigal
05-14-2014, 14:36
The last few years I've been shooting a lot of tiny 380 pocket pistols. After a recent range session with my LCP I put a few rounds through my 642 and was amazed how much more accurate I was with it than I was with the LCP. I guess it's all relative.

Glockanatorrrrr
06-01-2014, 06:36
239229239230
My 340PD bites. What ever I use, .38 or .357 it will take the hide off my index.
My 642 never did this.
I'm not complaining. Its just that way.

My 340pd is snappy too, I've encountered the same issue when shooting .357 rounds. 5 shots my hand was numb but after shooting it and focusing on trigger control it has become manageable. I rotate rounds in mine, .38, .38, .357, .357,.357

I figure if I have to use it in in real life the adrenaline and practice will help me place all the shots on target.

gypsytraveller
06-01-2014, 07:02
I am "very" accurate with a J-Frame and in my opinion it is how you grip the gun and lots of dry fire practice to learn the S&W trigger stage where you can pull the trigger until right before the break consistently..and then drop the hammer like a single action..

I can ring a 50 yard gong all day long like this...and have hit the 100 yard as well..

My aimed rapid fire is pretty darn good too..

With a sharp-recoiling, ultra lightweight J-frame, you DON'T grip it like this, as the small grip simply rotates in your hand under recoil:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/04eb6361e2f31dafcf0d54124da428ac_zpsda669bd6.jpg

You grip it very high up on the grip, with a crush grip, and this puts the sights and bore almost in line with your wrist..

This grip helps with accuracy and with recoil..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/aa589244c9865800c99a1b7e7f4f7739_zps450a569e.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/a786dde0e7a0fb52b606d25769e937ee_zps0b5133e8.jpg

OMEGA5
06-01-2014, 16:25
If you really want to keep the 642, get a set of Crimson
Trace Laser Grips, LG305, not the 105. The 105's are too
short. The 305 allows a full grip and doesn't give up that
much in conceal-ability.
When dry firing you can see your mistakes. Great trigger
control training aid. I like lasers. I practice using the laser
and using iron sights but for night work, a laser is great
and the CT allows simple middle finger pressure to put the
laser on or off as needed.
Dano

janice6
06-01-2014, 16:37
Instead of ditching the gun, try some different grips and the lightest kicking round you can find. 130 grn. standard pressure WWB seems to kick the least to me. YMMV.

Then, as Leigh said, practice, practice, practice.


ETA: Something I've found that works for me is replacing the factory grips with a pair of Taurus rubber boot grips that cover the backstrap. Really helps tame recoil.

I put these on my wife's 642 and they help. With factory grips, rapid firing (as fast as I could) peeled back the skin on the web of my hand. My wife complains after 20 to 24 rounds.

She is 76 and 5'2. I don't enjoy shooting her pistol but it is an excellent defensive weapon and can be fired from within the pocket or purse. She is better with it than I am, I am 6'2" and 220 lbs.

I can't imagine getting rid of it. It has a place in the selection of CCW firearms for her.

My CCW choice is a 4" .357 Magnum CCW with an alternative 2" .357 Magnum.

PhantomF4E
06-01-2014, 16:50
My wife can shoot the 642 quite well . Snubbies are short range guns. It has all been said in the previous posts . They are safe , they are effective , for what they were designed for . Close up messy work, not a 2" group at 25 yards . If you can put 5 rounds on a paper plate at 10 yards that is MOA of snubbie... Yeah , you can tighten up the groups but do you really need to . Go instinctive , drop the bad guy.

Berto
06-01-2014, 17:35
I want to shoot what I carry as good as possible. If that means 2" groups at 25yrds, then I'll strive for that, knowing that my skills will degrade under serious pressure and the higher I maintain them, the better off I am.
I use the 442 and have started playing around with the LCR .357mag. I do like the trigger, but I like the (well broken-in) 442's trigger as well.

My first outing with the LCR @ 25yrds leads me to believe it will get the job done at any reasonable handgun range.
http://i1287.photobucket.com/albums/a623/bertoworld/d7198793ddec099c43b0561be54cf2bf_zps16c24f89.jpg

PhantomF4E
06-01-2014, 17:47
Berto , That will get the job done !!! No questions .

Berto
06-01-2014, 17:58
Berto , That will get the job done !!! No questions .

I'm pretty happy with that, but I've done better with the 442....but it has about 1300 rounds head start.:supergrin:
I actually get a kick out of shooting the lightweight snubbys at the bullseye range, people don't know what to think.

kilibreaux
06-03-2014, 01:48
I'm no pro with any of my guns but my 642 makes me look even worse. It seems like when I take a good grip and point the gun that it is pointing way higher than with any of my Glocks or other pistols I've shot. Is there something that I'm doing wrong or is the grip angle just that much different? I'm considering getting a LCP or something else that points better naturally for me than this 642. The bad angle plus the super heavy trigger makes me terrible with this gun...

You are serious?

The extended backstrap of the 642 tends to make the shooter grasp the gun "high" on the grip when they should in fact grasp LOW.

The Smith & Wesson M642 PRO was NEVER meant to be a "convenience weapon."

deputy tom
06-20-2014, 18:17
I am "very" accurate with a J-Frame and in my opinion it is how you grip the gun and lots of dry fire practice to learn the S&W trigger stage where you can pull the trigger until right before the break consistently..and then drop the hammer like a single action..

I can ring a 50 yard gong all day long like this...and have hit the 100 yard as well..

My aimed rapid fire is pretty darn good too..

With a sharp-recoiling, ultra lightweight J-frame, you DON'T grip it like this, as the small grip simply rotates in your hand under recoil:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/04eb6361e2f31dafcf0d54124da428ac_zpsda669bd6.jpg

You grip it very high up on the grip, with a crush grip, and this puts the sights and bore almost in line with your wrist..

This grip helps with accuracy and with recoil..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/aa589244c9865800c99a1b7e7f4f7739_zps450a569e.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v386/lawdog1971/a786dde0e7a0fb52b606d25769e937ee_zps0b5133e8.jpg

^^ Exactly. tom. :cool:

NMPOPS
06-22-2014, 03:28
Snubbies, especially the airweights, take practice, then more practice. They also need a good set of grips and whats good for me may not be good for someone else. I shoot mostly standard velocity LSWC reloads and then shoot about 10 +P carry loads each session. With grips that fit well the 642/638 are a joy to shoot.