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sglock45
01-04-2012, 17:51
I've been looking at some different presses and I think I like the lee pro1000 is this good press ill be reloading 9mm and .45 acp mostly for target practice. Is this a good press for these cal and what powder should I use both guns are glocks a 17 and a 30 thanks for any info

GioaJack
01-04-2012, 17:58
Many factors are involved; budget, number of rounds expected to be shot, space to set up, amount of spare time, mechanical aptitude, etc., etc., etc.

Read the stickies at the top of the forum, buy a couple books on loading, read them several times and you'll be able to answer most of the questions that fit your circumstances.

Do a search on this forum and you'll come up with a plethora of threads on the subject.

Good luck.


Jack

TX expat
01-04-2012, 17:59
^^^what he said^^^

unclebob
01-04-2012, 18:07
For the pro 1000 and Load Master the emphasis is on your mechanical aptitude.

sglock45
01-04-2012, 18:10
Thanks for the reply I've read reloading manuals till my eyes bleed was just wondering if this press will work for what I want to do I've seen my step dad use a single stage press and it looks like a pain in the butox I have lots of room and already have a good solid bench setup already to go

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F106 Fan
01-04-2012, 18:21
Thanks for the reply I've read reloading manuals till my eyes bleed was just wondering if this press will work for what I want to do I've seen my step dad use a single stage press and it looks like a pain in the butox I have lots of room and already have a good solid bench setup already to go

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Before anyone can give you reasonable advice, you need to define how much ammo you plan to shoot per week/month/year.

Another interesting data point is your budget. Yes, I know that's kind of personal and I know everyone wants to start reloading on a shoestring. The problem is that such a view is shortsighted. But how shortsighted depends entirely on the quantity of ammo to be reloaded. You have seen how slow a single stage press can be. It turns out that most precision rifle ammo is probably loaded on a single stage press. But 50 rounds of precision rifle ammo is a big deal. For pistol, quantities tend to be much larger.

Figure that you can reload ammo for 1/2 the price of Wally World Federal Champion. With the savings, over some period of time, you pay for the equipment. Whether that payback is 6 months, a year or two years depends, again, on quantity and the equipment cost. What's an acceptable payback period? In other words, how much can you put in up front to get the savings after some payback period?

Richard

sglock45
01-04-2012, 18:32
I'm willing to spend whatever it takes to get quality equipment I don't want to find out that after 50 rounds my press is shot or something else is junk I would like to shoot 10000 rounds a day but it will be more like 300 to 400 every 2 weeks that's a good practice session for me

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F106 Fan
01-04-2012, 18:45
I'm willing to spend whatever it takes to get quality equipment I don't want to find out that after 50 rounds my press is shot or something else is junk I would like to shoot 10000 rounds a day but it will be more like 300 to 400 every 2 weeks that's a good practice session for me

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So, about 5000 rounds per year, give or take. I don't know the price for the various Wally World rounds but let's just say $15/50 or $300/1000. For 5000 rounds, that would be $1500/year and you could save about $750/year.

So, why wouldn't you be looking at something like a Dillon RL550B? Caliber changes are fairly simple and it loads at a reasonable rate. Sure, it's going to eat up most of the first year's savings but it will always have a resale value > 80% of first cost and will last for generations. That, and it's guaranteed FOREVER.

There is the complication in that you want to load 9mm which uses a small pistol primer and .45 ACP that USUALLY uses a large pistol primer. That is why some of us have two RL550Bs - one for small primer and one for large primer. But you can change the primer mechanism with just a little effort. Or. you can hunt around for that Blazer .45 ACP brass that uses a small primer. That stuff is a real PITA when I get it mixed in with my normal brass!

If you wind up having to change the primer mechanism, you will want to load in LARGE batches.

There's some good reading here:
http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html

Richard

sglock45
01-04-2012, 18:53
Thanks for all the info I won't be doing as much 45 as 9 I like shooting the 9 more thanks once again

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TX expat
01-04-2012, 19:11
Some will depend on how much time you want to devote to reloading. If your time is limited then you might want to consider a Dillon; you'll crank out volume quite a bit faster than with a single stage press.

If you have more time than budget, then just about any Lee, RCBS or other major player will do the job fine.

If you are doing it correctly, your gun won't know the difference between a round made on a single stage press and one made on the best Dillon. Your end result should be the same either way. The difference is going to be the time it takes to make the rounds and the equipment cost to get you started.

If you have any desire to do any rifle rounds, you might want to consider starting with a single stage press first, since you'll always be able to use it for quick test batches along with rifle rounds too.

unclebob
01-04-2012, 19:23
So, about 5000 rounds per year, give or take.

So if he shoots 400 rds. every two weeks? So using normal math I think. At my age I could be wrong. There are 52 weeks a year divided by 2 = 26. So 26 X 400= 10,400.

dkf
01-04-2012, 19:44
So if he shoots 400 rds. every two weeks? So using normal math I think. At my age I could be wrong. There are 52 weeks a year divided by 2 = 26. So 26 X 400= 10,400.

Your old math is inline with my new math.

AZson
01-04-2012, 19:51
You can not go wrong with Tightgroup powder, usually you use less of it then other powders. There by saving money. Which is the biggest reason I reload.

F106 Fan
01-04-2012, 19:53
so if he shoots 400 rds. Every two weeks? So using normal math i think. At my age i could be wrong. There are 52 weeks a year divided by 2 = 26. So 26 x 400= 10,400.

oops!

That increases the savings enough to easily cover the RL550B.

Richard

AZson
01-04-2012, 19:56
Also find a good lead bullet maker, I like Bear Creek Bullets or Billy Bullets, they leave no lead in my Glock stock barrels.

Black&TAN
01-04-2012, 20:00
So, why wouldn't you be looking at something like a Dillon RL550B? Caliber changes are fairly simple and it loads at a reasonable rate. Sure, it's going to eat up most of the first year's savings but it will always have a resale value > 80% of first cost and will last for generations. That, and it's guaranteed FOREVER.
Just bought an RL550B, and absolutely love it! Good advice for the beginner, or vetran reloader in the market for a new press.

sent via Tapatalk

TN.Frank
01-04-2012, 20:13
Dillon makes excellent equipment. If you can afford one(and I've looked lately and the Square Deal B isn't really all that expensive, really.) then I'd say go with a SDB or 550B and call it a day. You'll have plenty of press to load up handgun rounds quickly for the rest of your days here on Earth. They really do make that good of a press and IIRC they've got a lifetime warranty too but don't quote me on that.
If I get lucky enough to shoot my PX4 more I just might break down and buy a Dillon my dang self since it gets kind of old pulling the handle on a RCBS Partner press when you've got 400 or 500 rounds to load. :supergrin:

sglock45
01-04-2012, 20:46
getting some good info here i and my friend have been talking about reloading for a long time now this just makes it easy to decide on which equipment to get thanks alot guys :wavey:

PCJim
01-04-2012, 20:50
It's not always about whether one shoots a high quantity of rounds or not. Sometimes, its a simple matter of how much or little time one wants to spend in front of a press to produce their own quality product, regardless of the number rounds made.

WiskyT
01-04-2012, 21:22
The Pro1000 will do fine in terms of production speed for what you want. It is cheap to buy. In many ways it is a very simple press. BUT, and it's a big but, it can be a frustrating press to use. The instructions aren't much help when it gives you trouble.

If you are an un-indicted CEO of an investment banking firm, get a Dillon. If money is tight, the Lee will work, just be prepared to deal with some of it's issues.

labdwakin
01-04-2012, 21:44
Dillon!!! Dillon!!!! Dillon!!! Dillon!!! Dillon!!!

fredj338
01-05-2012, 00:52
The Pro1000 will do fine in terms of production speed for what you want. It is cheap to buy. In many ways it is a very simple press. BUT, and it's a big but, it can be a frustrating press to use. The instructions aren't much help when it gives you trouble.

If you are an un-indicted CEO of an investment banking firm, get a Dillon. If money is tight, the Lee will work, just be prepared to deal with some of it's issues.

FUnny WT, the diff between a Lee & 550B is about a case of 9mm ammo. Hardly breaking anyones bank & the almost instant successon a a550B would be well worth the cost diff. The gear is out living most shooters, so the cost shouldn't even come into play considering how much is saved in ammo over the years of it's use. What do I know though, I hate TG.:yawn:
You can not go wrong with Tightgroup powder, usually you use less of it then other powders. There by saving money.
You save so little on powder per round it's just not a reason to use a powder that has so many negatives. the cost diff is at most, 2/5 of one penny per round. If you want to save money, shoot lead bullets, 1.5-3c per round bought commercially.

fredj338
01-05-2012, 00:54
I'm willing to spend whatever it takes to get quality equipment I don't want to find out that after 50 rounds my press is shot or something else is junk I would like to shoot 10000 rounds a day but it will be more like 300 to 400 every 2 weeks that's a good practice session for me

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Well, quality & Lee are NOT synonymous. If you can even remotely scrape together the add'l. $250 for a 550B, you will be far happier in 6m. As above, think of it as a case of 9mm ammo in diff, not that much really. If not, you can sell it for 80% of what you paid.:supergrin:

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 12:30
Well, quality & Lee are NOT synonymous. If you can even remotely scrape together the add'l. $250 for a 550B, you will be far happier in 6m. As above, think of it as a case of 9mm ammo in diff, not that much really. If not, you can sell it for 80% of what you paid.:supergrin:

While I have to agree the Dillon would be a better press I think it would be more then a case of ammo difference. You can get set up with the P1,000 with extras for around $250 ( I wouldn't go this way ), the classic turret with extras $350 and the Dillon 550 with extras around $850.

fredj338
01-05-2012, 12:56
While I have to agree the Dillon would be a better press I think it would be more then a case of ammo difference. You can get set up with the P1,000 with extras for around $250 ( I wouldn't go this way ), the classic turret with extras $350 and the Dillon 550 with extras around $850.

You don't need all the extras on the 550B. It is quite capable right out of the box. From Graf's: 550B $386, LNL $400, Lee $200 (no dies for any). So for about $200 more, you get a far better press in either the 550B or LNL & w/ better CS, JMO. Upside, either will resale for 80-85% of new 5yrs down the road. I am not sure the Lee will even be functional 5yrs down the road.:supergrin:
Sure, if I was really poor, then I might look at a Lee progressive. Honestly, I think the LCT is a better bet though. It will produce ammo at a reasonable rate, is simpler to use & less palstic parts to break. So if I was reloading on a budget & time was not all that important to me, the LCT would be my choice. If time is critical, as many say it is the single reason they don't reload, then spend more money & get a 650. At 700-800rds/hr, trouble free, it's like paying yourself to reload. If I was buying cleap Wollf 45acp @ $36/100, I can reload FMJ for $16/100 saving $20/100 x 7=$140/hr NET. I would have to make more than $225/hr gross to buy the equiv factory ammo & mine is better than Wolf or WWB or UMC by a good margin. At 200rds/hr, it's getting close to not worth my time for blasting ammo. I would be better off working more hours & buying cheap factory.

unclebob
01-05-2012, 13:18
The Grafís 550 does not come with any conversion. So I would say getting a press from Brian would be cheaper. I think if you buy 500.00 or more its free shipping.

ron59
01-05-2012, 14:20
While I have to agree the Dillon would be a better press I think it would be more then a case of ammo difference. You can get set up with the P1,000 with extras for around $250 ( I wouldn't go this way ), the classic turret with extras $350 and the Dillon 550 with extras around $850.

Are you including the casefeeder in that? Because of all the issues I've heard about with the 550 casefeeders, I wouldn't get one for that press. I wouldn't get one for the LNL AP either. Neither of those presses were originally designed *AROUND* a casefeeder, they are afterthoughts that are not as reliable as they need to be.

The 650 was truly designed to have a casefeeder, and it is a thing of beauty.

fredj338
01-05-2012, 14:23
Are you including the casefeeder in that? Because of all the issues I've heard about with the 550 casefeeders, I wouldn't get one for that press. I wouldn't get one for the LNL AP either. Neither of those presses were originally designed *AROUND* a casefeeder, they are afterthoughts that are not as reliable as they need to be.

The 650 was truly designed to have a casefeeder, and it is a thing of beauty.

I would bet a 550B w/o case feeder is faster than any of the Lee progressives with. Without hurrying, I can load 450rds/hr of 9mm or 45 on my 550B.:dunno: The LNL will run fine w/ a case feeder, but you may have to make some adjustments to get it trouble free.

F106 Fan
01-05-2012, 14:38
RL550B

I linked to Brian Enos' site earlier in this thread. Yes, shipping is FREE on orders over $400.

The base price of the machine is $430 plus $70 for the dies and with Brian's recommended upgrades, it is $643 including the dies. It's all described on the site.

The machine comes with the parts necessary to change the primer system between LP and SP.

The second caliber costs about $108 without a new powder measure. The NCC (Nice Caliber Conversion) costs about $207 and includes everything including a new powder measure.

Bottom line, a new user can get started for $500 and add the upgrades and second caliber over time.

Richard

redbrd
01-05-2012, 15:17
I had a lee 1000 for 9mm. It works but did all my case prep on a single stage. I found I prefer the single stage better to have better control of the various stages. I had one sqib which was enough. I never could get the priming tool to work well which is why I was using the single stage and a hand primer for case prep. Single stage is slower but you get better quality and more dependable ammo (at least I can). I am considering a turret press seems like a good compromise. I don't seem to have trouble keeping up with my own demand for ammo on the single stage (rock chucker). I relaod 9mm, .40, .45, and .223/5.56.

fredj338
01-05-2012, 15:34
I had a lee 1000 for 9mm. It works but did all my case prep on a single stage. I found I prefer the single stage better to have better control of the various stages. I had one sqib which was enough. I never could get the priming tool to work well which is why I was using the single stage and a hand primer for case prep. Single stage is slower but you get better quality and more dependable ammo (at least I can). I am considering a turret press seems like a good compromise. I don't seem to have trouble keeping up with my own demand for ammo on the single stage (rock chucker). I relaod 9mm, .40, .45, and .223/5.56.
Just not true at all. Buy better equip, your ammo coming off a Dillon or LNL is going to be every bit as reliable & accurate as a ss press or turret press. It's always the nut pulling the handle that is the issue.:wavey:
Again, with the 550B, all you need is the press & a caliber setup/dies & you are reloading. All the other stuff is fluff, nice it have but not needed to make a lot of quality ammo in a hurry. I reload for 12 diff calibers on my 550B, I only use two powder measures; pistol & rifle. That is only for convenience sake.

unclebob
01-05-2012, 15:38
I had a lee 1000 for 9mm. It works but did all my case prep on a single stage. I found I prefer the single stage better to have better control of the various stages. I had one sqib which was enough. I never could get the priming tool to work well which is why I was using the single stage and a hand primer for case prep. Single stage is slower but you get better quality and more dependable ammo (at least I can). I am considering a turret press seems like a good compromise. I don't seem to have trouble keeping up with my own demand for ammo on the single stage (rock chucker). I relaod 9mm, .40, .45, and .223/5.56.

Yes priming and a few other things are some of the major complaints of the pro 1000 press. Sorry but having a squib load or double charge is the fault of the operator and not by any type of press. You can also load just as good as quality of ammo using a progressive as you can on a single stage press out to 600 yards.

scccdoc
01-05-2012, 15:40
Hey guys........What is the best powdwer in your opinion and why? I'm new to this also with a "Square Deal"............ DOC

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 15:43
Are you including the casefeeder in that? Because of all the issues I've heard about with the 550 casefeeders, I wouldn't get one for that press. I wouldn't get one for the LNL AP either. Neither of those presses were originally designed *AROUND* a casefeeder, they are afterthoughts that are not as reliable as they need to be.

The 650 was truly designed to have a casefeeder, and it is a thing of beauty.

No I am going off the last eight threads I read from new people starting with a Dillon 550. They normally go to BE and get talked onto the strong mount, roller handle, spare parts kit ect. In every thread I read by the time they bought the tumber calipers and everything for one caliber they were all around $850.

I agree if I was going to go with a case feeder I would get the 650.

redbrd
01-05-2012, 15:50
Yes priming and a few other things are some of the major complaints of the pro 1000 press. Sorry but having a squib load or double charge is the fault of the operator and not by any type of press. You can also load just as good as quality of ammo using a progressive as you can on a single stage press out to 600 yards.

I totally agree regarding the sqib, my fault. That said I get a warm and fuzzy being able to stop check the case, re wiegh... if I have any doubts.

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 15:53
RL550B

I linked to Brian Enos' site earlier in this thread. Yes, shipping is FREE on orders over $400.

The base price of the machine is $430 plus $70 for the dies and with Brian's recommended upgrades, it is $643 including the dies. It's all described on the site.

The machine comes with the parts necessary to change the primer system between LP and SP.

The second caliber costs about $108 without a new powder measure. The NCC (Nice Caliber Conversion) costs about $207 and includes everything including a new powder measure.

Bottom line, a new user can get started for $500 and add the upgrades and second caliber over time.

Richard

True you can start quite a bit less than $850 if you don't let them talk you into the extras. In my opinion you should add a scale and calipers to that to get started. Still not a lot of money, around another $70.

unclebob
01-05-2012, 16:01
No I am going off the last eight threads I read from new people starting with a Dillon 550. They normally go to BE and get talked onto the strong mount, roller handle, spare parts kit ect. In every thread I read by the time they bought the tumber calipers and everything for one caliber they were all around $850.

I agree if I was going to go with a case feeder I would get the 650.

Granted it all depends on how tall your reloading bench is if you need a strong mount or not. If you donít need the strong mount you donít need the bullet tray. You can get by without the roller handle. Some like the ball better anyway. You donít need the low powder sensor. Or the cartridge case bin/bracket. Just like buying a car the salesman is going to try and get you to buy stuff you really donít need. Just like do you need cruise control and all you do is drive around town. Sun roof, heated seat. Nice to have but do you really need them? He is in the business to make money just like everyone else. And no I do not know Brian or even talked to the gentlemen.

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 16:03
I just wanted to add I'm not picking on Dillon or saying they are not worth the money, I also own a 550.

unclebob
01-05-2012, 16:20
I totally agree regarding the sqib, my fault. That said I get a warm and fuzzy being able to stop check the case, re wiegh... if I have any doubts.

And I can and do on a progressive press also. Other than bullet swaging and crimp removal. And there are better tools in doing so. I can do on a 650 or even a 550 press easier, faster and IMHO believe safer. And yes I have loaded about 200,000 rds. on a single stage press.

Colorado4Wheel
01-05-2012, 17:10
True you can start quite a bit less than $850 if you don't let them talk you into the extras. In my opinion you should add a scale and calipers to that to get started. Still not a lot of money, around another $70.

That has always boggled my mind. People buy a LnL and don't think twice about NOT having all those things. But they start looking at a Dillon and all of a sudden they just have to have it all. Very weird in my book. I got my 550 with no options other then the Roller Handle. I didn't have it on the 550 at the start. BUT, I really like the roller handle. Even more so on the 650, but even on the 550 it's very nice.

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 17:29
That has always boggled my mind. People buy a LnL and don't think twice about NOT having all those things. But they start looking at a Dillon and all of a sudden they just have to have it all. Very weird in my book. I got my 550 with no options other then the Roller Handle. I didn't have it on the 550 at the start. BUT, I really like the roller handle. Even more so on the 650, but even on the 550 it's very nice.

I got my 550 bare bones because I already have dies and everything else for reloading. I can see where somebody new can get talked into a lot of extras.

WiskyT
01-05-2012, 19:44
I would bet a 550B w/o case feeder is faster than any of the Lee progressives with. Without hurrying, I can load 450rds/hr of 9mm or 45 on my 550B.:dunno: The LNL will run fine w/ a case feeder, but you may have to make some adjustments to get it trouble free.

I loaded 100 9mm in 12 minutes on my Pro1000. I'm certain I could not have kept that up for an hour. 300 is a nice pace and plenty fast enough for most shooters. I think I could do 400, but it would be "work" as opposed to fun. I haven't used a 550, but I'd say that the 550 is faster.

GioaJack
01-05-2012, 19:49
Little Stevie once loaded a hundred rounds, ate a sammich then squeezed a dozen oranges to wash it down with all in under three and a half minutes on his 550B.

He would have done it faster but he had to pick out the orange seeds.


Jack

WiskyT
01-05-2012, 19:54
FUnny WT, the diff between a Lee & 550B is about a case of 9mm ammo. Hardly breaking anyones bank & the almost instant successon a a550B would be well worth the cost diff. The gear is out living most shooters, so the cost shouldn't even come into play considering how much is saved in ammo over the years of it's use. What do I know though, I hate TG.:yawn:

You save so little on powder per round it's just not a reason to use a powder that has so many negatives. the cost diff is at most, 2/5 of one penny per round. If you want to save money, shoot lead bullets, 1.5-3c per round bought commercially.

A pro1000 is $175.00 complete with dies at Midway plus $10.00 for the case colator. Often they are on sale for much less. Some people just don't have the $400.00 or so more for the 550.

I don't understand the train of thought that says if you buy a less expensive press now, and start saving money with it now, you are somehow doomed and unable to step up to a better press later. How many people don't reload at all because the Dillon stuff is expensive and they don't have the money to buy $500-$600.00 worth of gear to reload? They conitnue to pee away money on factory ball, never getting the same ammo twice due to walmart having different color boxes of promo ammo every time they go shopping. Those people could have been stuffing free range brass with a pinch of Unique and a lead bullet for several years already on a Lee.

WiskyT
01-05-2012, 19:55
Little Stevie once loaded a hundred rounds, ate a sammich then squeezed a dozen oranges to wash it down with all in under three and a half minutes on his 550B.

He would have done it faster but he had to pick out the orange seeds.


Jack

:supergrin:

Phunahm
01-05-2012, 20:57
Ive used the Lee Loadmaster with case and bullet feeder and was very happy I did however get a 550b and is a better press but the Lee would do the job IF you were on a budget

fredj338
01-05-2012, 20:59
True you can start quite a bit less than $850 if you don't let them talk you into the extras. In my opinion you should add a scale and calipers to that to get started. Still not a lot of money, around another $70.

You have to buy that stuff for a Lee press too. Just looking at the presses, not a huge amount of money diff. I knwo that is relative, but if you look at it in the ttrems of factory ammo cost, it's peanuts even @ $500 over the life of the press, which in case of Dillon is forever.

fredj338
01-05-2012, 21:04
A pro1000 is $175.00 complete with dies at Midway plus $10.00 for the case colator. Often they are on sale for much less. Some people just don't have the $400.00 or so more for the 550.

I don't understand the train of thought that says if you buy a less expensive press now, and start saving money with it now, you are somehow doomed and unable to step up to a better press later. How many people don't reload at all because the Dillon stuff is expensive and they don't have the money to buy $500-$600.00 worth of gear to reload? They conitnue to pee away money on factory ball, never getting the same ammo twice due to walmart having different color boxes of promo ammo every time they go shopping. Those people could have been stuffing free range brass with a pinch of Unique and a lead bullet for several years already on a Lee.
Not at all, but why spend good money now & spend more & buy better later? That is what I never understand. If you buy good equip now, you have it forever. With Dillon, if they upgrade a press, you can get your upgraded most of the time for free. For $250, one case of 9mm ammo, geeze, pony up do without the latte for 2m & buy the better equip. You will be ahead in the long run. I am sure most don't buy a Hi-point now so they can shoot & save to buy a real gun later. No, smart consumers buy well once & live happily ever after.
Far too many people are short sighted when it comes to spending money on this or that. Yes, if it cost more doesn't mean it's better, but when you know better, why buy cheap now so you can save money & buy better later? If you hate reloading, the Dillon can be resold for 80-85% of a new one in a day.:okie:

AZson
01-05-2012, 21:15
Hey guys........What is the best powdwer in your opinion and why? I'm new to this also with a "Square Deal"............ DOC

Like I said before Tightgroup is a pretty universal pistol powder and you tend to have to use less then other powders, which saves money.
Those are the reasons I picked it for my .40s and .45gap, when I started.
Now I use it also on my 9mm and .45 colt.

RustyFN
01-05-2012, 21:46
You have to buy that stuff for a Lee press too. Just looking at the presses, not a huge amount of money diff. I knwo that is relative, but if you look at it in the ttrems of factory ammo cost, it's peanuts even @ $500 over the life of the press, which in case of Dillon is forever.

I included the extras in the prices I showed for the P1000 and classic thrret. I agree Fred but some people just don't have the money. I will use myself as the example. When I started reloading I started with the Lee classic turret. When I bought mine nobody offered it in a kit. It was a stretch for me to buy that press but I went with it anyway. There was no way I could go Dillon. Now if you are going to say it would have been better for me to wait five years until I could buy the dillon I would have to disagree. I would have missed a lot over the last six years if I had not started.

Colorado4Wheel
01-05-2012, 21:56
I agree 100%. People act like they have to buy only one press or it was a waste. I think it's better to get started with a simple and affordable pass then to wait forever to buy a Dillon. It's not like the lee classic turret will be a waste of money later. It's
a useful press.

akroguy
01-05-2012, 22:17
I have a Pro 1000 for both 9mm and .45 ACP. I've cranked out thousands of rounds through them. They do get pissy if you let them get dirty or don't lube them. I use the red can Hornady spray lube and it works great on cases and the moving parts of the presses. The priming station will cause problems if the shell plate gets out of time, so that needs to be fine tuned every couple hundred rounds. It's not that hard though.

I was really tight on funds when I bought the first one, then for the second, I figured I'd already figured out the design so, why not? I fully agree that the Dillon presses are far superior and the better choice over the long haul. But if the cash ain't there, it ain't there. The Lee presses get the job done.

fredj338
01-06-2012, 10:53
I included the extras in the prices I showed for the P1000 and classic thrret. I agree Fred but some people just don't have the money. I will use myself as the example. When I started reloading I started with the Lee classic turret. When I bought mine nobody offered it in a kit. It was a stretch for me to buy that press but I went with it anyway. There was no way I could go Dillon. Now if you are going to say it would have been better for me to wait five years until I could buy the dillon I would have to disagree. I would have missed a lot over the last six years if I had not started.

I think I recommended the LCT over buying a Lee Poorgressive, I think it's a better piece of gear. Move up to something better later & you can still use the LCT. Buying two Lee poorgressives, now where is the economy in that?:whistling: If one can't afford gear to reload, how does one afford the components or guns or???? Again, think of the case of 9mm or 45acp ammo you buy instead? Just seems buying right the first time saves money in the long run. If it's about saving money, then a smarter purchase eventually saves you money. Again, not everyone needs a progressive at all, a LCT is plenty of press for the 100rd a week shooter, but if you are making the jump to a progressive, getting substandard equip is NOT economical in the long run, especially when you start factorying in time wasted or lost dealing w/ breakage or something not working.

F106 Fan
01-06-2012, 12:55
Fred makes a good point. My wife's P229 belongs to the county and we don't shoot reloads through guns we don't own. It's kind of a rule...

I just got back from Wally World where I dropped $200 on ammo that will last two or three outings (at most) and at least $100 of it was pure waste over what it would have cost to reload the .40 S&W. Worse yet, I have at least 5000 rounds of empty brass (bags and bags of it) that indicates how much more money we have blown on factory ammo.

I'm beginning to suspect that I should just buy another matching P229 for practice. It would be far better than continuing to pour money into Wally World.

When it comes time to load .40 S&W, I doubt that I will be interested in anything other than a Dillon 650 or perhaps another 1050. I'm certainly not going to be looking at entry level presses. The savings will easily support any press I want to buy and the faster the press, the more time we can spend shooting.

As an aside, our workaround is for her to shoot my P220 with my .45 ACP reloads. So that's 4 of us shooting out of my ammo can: Me, my wife, my son-in-law and my grandson. No wonder it goes empty so quick. And that's why I bought a 1050 to refill it.

Richard

trashcat
01-06-2012, 13:06
I don't have a lee progressive but I'll admit many people seam to have issues with them and it's not as fast as the high priced other brands.
However there is nothing wrong with the lee turret or classic turret, cheap price, reliable, reasonably fast, and makes great ammo. Get the lee and start reloading, if you like reloading and you find it economical and it turns out you want more production, then buy an expensive fast press. Keep the lee around for those random or small batch calibers you'll want to reload. Load 9mm and 45cal with your production press and .357, .44, .380, etc. on the lee. Buy a turret plate for each caliber, about $10, and keep your other dies set up in their own turret plates. Buy 4 boxes of .44mag at retail and you'll quickly buy the dies, shell holder, turret plate for the lee.

fredj338
01-06-2012, 13:26
I'm beginning to suspect that I should just buy another matching P229 for practice. It would be far better than continuing to pour money into Wally World.

When it comes time to load .40 S&W, I doubt that I will be interested in anything other than a Dillon 650 or perhaps another 1050. I'm certainly not going to be looking at entry level presses. The savings will easily support any press I want to buy and the faster the press, the more time we can spend shooting.

As an aside, our workaround is for her to shoot my P220 with my .45 ACP reloads. So that's 4 of us shooting out of my ammo can: Me, my wife, my son-in-law and my grandson. No wonder it goes empty so quick. And that's why I bought a 1050 to refill it.

Richard
HA! For sure. As my boss learned buying his first handgun, the gun is cheap compared to the ammo. $700 invested in another Sig would eventually put you money ahead not having to buy factory ammo for her to practice with. Just add a conversion to the 650 & move on.
Buy 4 boxes of .44mag at retail and you'll quickly buy the dies, shell holder, turret plate for the lee.
This is where reloading really saves you money. My 44mags have never seen factory ammo & I have shot literally 1000s of rounds of 44mag.

WiskyT
01-06-2012, 16:53
Not at all, but why spend good money now & spend more & buy better later? That is what I never understand. If you buy good equip now, you have it forever. With Dillon, if they upgrade a press, you can get your upgraded most of the time for free. For $250, one case of 9mm ammo, geeze, pony up do without the latte for 2m & buy the better equip. You will be ahead in the long run. I am sure most don't buy a Hi-point now so they can shoot & save to buy a real gun later. No, smart consumers buy well once & live happily ever after.
Far too many people are short sighted when it comes to spending money on this or that. Yes, if it cost more doesn't mean it's better, but when you know better, why buy cheap now so you can save money & buy better later? If you hate reloading, the Dillon can be resold for 80-85% of a new one in a day.:okie:

I've been using my Pro1000 since 1986. I'll use it later tonight. I haven't spent more than $30.00 in parts for it in all of that time. Is that "forever" enough?

I'm so glad I was shortsighted as a kid and bought it. That same shortsightedness allowed me to buy my first house. When I was buying my Pro1000, I saved every nickel I could. No weekends in the Bahamas (like my friends), no IROC Z28, no ****ing latte's.

I still wouldn't have the 650 if I hadn't inherited it. I used it before I inherited it and STILL did not buy one even after I had the money. If I bought another press, it would still be a Pro1000.

Sorry, I can understand why someone would want a high end Rem 700 to hunt with, but it's not a better "value" than my Stevens 200 that will put 5 shots into 0.75" at 100 yards. I wouldn't call the guy with the nicer gun a snob, as long as he had the sense to not try and tell me I need a better rifle so I can only "cry once".

WiskyT
01-06-2012, 16:55
You have to buy that stuff for a Lee press too. Just looking at the presses, not a huge amount of money diff. I knwo that is relative, but if you look at it in the ttrems of factory ammo cost, it's peanuts even @ $500 over the life of the press, which in case of Dillon is forever.

The Lee Pro 1000 is complete. It needs nothing but to be bolted to the bench. There are things that are worth buying to go with it, but not needed.

fredj338
01-06-2012, 17:02
The Lee Pro 1000 is complete. It needs nothing but to be bolted to the bench. There are things that are worth buying to go with it, but not needed.

Neither do any of the others. Still need dies & shell plates for each caliber, still need calipers to measure, but I suppose the thrifty types can use a stick marked off w/ the correct OAL.:wavey: Many people get by w/ cheap equip in every endeavor in life. Like sex; if you have never had great sex, then you have no idea you are missing anything, so carry on. Just ask Jack.:supergrin:
Really T, to ignore there is "better" in the world is just hiding your head in the sand.

WiskyT
01-06-2012, 17:11
Neither do any of the others. Still need dies & shell plates for each caliber, still need calipers to measure, but I suppose the thrifty types can use a stick marked off w/ the correct OAL.:wavey: Many people get by w/ cheap equip in every endeavor in life. Like sex; if you have never had great sex, then you have no idea you are missing anything, so carry on. Just ask Jack.:supergrin:
Really T, to ignore there is "better" in the world is just hiding your head in the sand.

The best things in life are free, it's not just a cliche'.

Regarding the Pro 1000, it includes dies, shell plate, and powder measure. If you want to talk caliber conversions, the cost of a Dillon conversion approcahes the cost of a complete Pro1000 in some cases. For the Lee, it's about $40.00.

Colorado4Wheel
01-06-2012, 18:30
Yes, but if you had bought a Dillon all those years ago you could have sold it today for a HUGE profit and bought 3 Pro 1000 with the money.

;)

WiskyT
01-06-2012, 18:33
Yes, but if you had bought a Dillon all those years ago you could have sold it today for a HUGE profit and bought 3 Pro 1000 with the money.

;)

There is some kind of warping in the time/space continuum. I agreed with you earlier in the week, you agreed with me, and now I find myself actually enjoying your posts. There is definately a wormhole or something getting ready to swallow us up.

Colorado4Wheel
01-06-2012, 20:14
My wife leaves me and you start liking me. Not sure if that is a fair trade.

ron59
01-07-2012, 10:00
My wife leaves me and you start liking me. Not sure if that is a fair trade.

I hope that's a joke that I'm not getting ?

Colorado4Wheel
01-07-2012, 13:19
I hope that's a joke that I'm not getting ?

It's a joke that is not a joke. Life is funny sometimes. I can joke about it so it can't be that bad now can it. We really just decided to call it quits. Maybe all these people who like Unique will start treating me better.

GioaJack
01-07-2012, 15:40
Fat chance. :supergrin:


Jack

HexHead
01-07-2012, 17:02
I've suggested this before, and I'll suggest it again. If you're on a budget, consider a 550 Basic Loader for $259. Use Lee dies, Lee Auto Disk powder measure and hand primer. But you've got a Dillon you can add the powder measure and priming system to later on and have the same 550b others paid $429 for from the get go. Your not going to lose money selling/replacing that "starter" press and will be enjoying the Dillon all along.

WiskyT
01-07-2012, 17:14
It's a joke that is not a joke. Life is funny sometimes. I can joke about it so it can't be that bad now can it. We really just decided to call it quits. Maybe all these people who like Unique will start treating me better.

If you start using Unique, and take a bath, we will like you.:wavey:

scccdoc
01-24-2012, 08:59
Like I said before Tightgroup is a pretty universal pistol powder and you tend to have to use less then other powders, which saves money.
Those are the reasons I picked it for my .40s and .45gap, when I started.
Now I use it also on my 9mm and .45 colt.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Sorry to respond so late,How about smoke and amount of residue? I use Hodgdon HP-38,but with your input I may change once I finish my powder,thanks for the reply.......DOC