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.50 cal
01-24-2012, 20:06
Hello, I looking to upgrade from my standard tarp to something better, I will keep this shelter in my bags and would like it to be small and lightweight, I'd like several tie down points and a durable material, the item I'm currently considering is the proforce all weather shelter, it is 10x10 and comes with stakes, any suggestions? advice? thank you

jellis11
01-24-2012, 20:42
I have a reusable emergency tarp that Dave Canterbury uses. Actually two of them. I like it a lot. Planning a few trips in the WV forests that will use it as a main shelter. Just my .02!

Lionhill
01-24-2012, 23:14
Tent tarp: Tarp Tent Set Up - YouTube

Canvas, you can have a fire quiet close to the opening, or a micro wood inside.

LH

Bilbo Bagins
01-25-2012, 08:37
Tent tarp: Tarp Tent Set Up - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzJHuWlEAtk)

Canvas, you can have a fire quiet close to the opening, or a micro wood inside.

LH

Nahh that thing is huge and heavy, expecially when it gets wet, which will take forever to dry. Also Poly and Nylon will melt, but Cotton Canvas will burn.

The OP wants small, lightweight. He needs to look at hiking tarps or something made by Tarptent or Go lite.

http://www.tarptent.com/

http://www.golite.com/tents

All I got to say is it ain't cheap, but an 2.7lb OD green Go-Lite Shangri La 3 fly retrofitted with a chimmney setup and you are in business

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3450/3964109896_6d2f89a042.jpg


http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small50215174.JPG

http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small12906285.JPG

Babynine
01-25-2012, 10:51
/\ That Tipi stove setup seems great. I have been looking ino the Kifaru Tipi and stove setups for awhile now. Its amazing how light some of that stuff is.

I have a Euraka TCOP one man combat tent that weighs 7lbs with steaks and lines. And thats a one man tent with no heat! I love the thing, but it is heavy.

The tarp in the op seems great as well. I may have to get one as the $1100+ for a Kifaru Tipi and stove is far above my budget. Its far lighter than my TCOP.

Aceman
01-25-2012, 14:04
Catoma bednet + Tarp

But I live in florida...

Nine Shooter
01-25-2012, 14:13
http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small50215174.JPG

What kind of stove is that? That looks nifty!

dherloc
01-25-2012, 14:29
http://www.combatreform.org/ECOTATSYSTEMS/index.htm

What about this?

Bilbo Bagins
01-25-2012, 15:47
http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small50215174.JPG

What kind of stove is that? That looks nifty!

http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

You know between tipi tents, hammock camping, ultralight hikers with ther cuben tarps, there is so many subcultures and small business support it. Its almost as bad as gun owners. :rofl:

wjv
01-25-2012, 16:53
I have a couple light weight tarps; some paracord and some 8" galvanized nail/spikes.

M1A Shooter
01-28-2012, 00:36
i run a tarp and a usgi bivy bag with my MSS.

humanguerrilla
01-28-2012, 04:10
http://www.golite.com/tents


+1. Longterm I'd want more tent, but my tried, true, and simple old Golite Cave2 is in the BOB. Great ultralite 2-3 person tarp tent packs into 4x8" package and weighs 1.2 lbs with the fixin's.

UneasyRider
01-28-2012, 07:49
Hello, I looking to upgrade from my standard tarp to something better, I will keep this shelter in my bags and would like it to be small and lightweight, I'd like several tie down points and a durable material, the item I'm currently considering is the proforce all weather shelter, it is 10x10 and comes with stakes, any suggestions? advice? thank you

That's pretty large, you might do better where it's cold with something smaller to conserve your body temperature.

walkin man
01-31-2012, 15:09
I continue to read these threads where the posters seem to think a shtf situation is going to be like an extended camping/hiking trip.
Build a fire in your stove for cooking and warmth and all sorts of bad things can happen. 1-Bad guys will smell the smoke or food odors and hunt you down causing a confrontation that you may not survive.
2-Its extra weight you have to carry causing you to lose mobility and burn more energy.

Learn to think like a fugitive and not be seen. If you have to cook food, then eat and move to a better location to sleep. Better yet, eat it cold if you can. Find a natural windbreak or rain shelter to sleep in. Try to always remain unseen till you can get to your BOL. Travel at night and lay up during the day. Predators will seek the easy prey first, don't be it.
walkin man

Unistat
01-31-2012, 15:57
I have a Coghlan's tube tent in my GHB. Not much better than a tarp, lol, but enough to keep the rain off my face.

Bolster
01-31-2012, 16:24
ENO Pro Fly Tarp looks interesting...

Amazon.com: ENO Pro Fly Rain Tarp: Sports & Outdoors@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31Z7Oqx21wL.@@AMEPARAM@@31Z7Oqx21wL

Lone Kimono
01-31-2012, 22:52
Nahh that thing is huge and heavy, expecially when it gets wet, which will take forever to dry. Also Poly and Nylon will melt, but Cotton Canvas will burn.

The OP wants small, lightweight. He needs to look at hiking tarps or something made by Tarptent or Go lite.

http://www.tarptent.com/

http://www.golite.com/tents

All I got to say is it ain't cheap, but an 2.7lb OD green Go-Lite Shangri La 3 fly retrofitted with a chimmney setup and you are in business

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3450/3964109896_6d2f89a042.jpg


http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small50215174.JPG

http://forums.bowsite.com/tf/pics/00small12906285.JPG
Do those come with the hole in the top for the stove? The Kifaru is out of my price range as well.

Babynine
02-01-2012, 09:23
I continue to read these threads where the posters seem to think a shtf situation is going to be like an extended camping/hiking trip.
Build a fire in your stove for cooking and warmth and all sorts of bad things can happen. 1-Bad guys will smell the smoke or food odors and hunt you down causing a confrontation that you may not survive.
2-Its extra weight you have to carry causing you to lose mobility and burn more energy.

Learn to think like a fugitive and not be seen. If you have to cook food, then eat and move to a better location to sleep. Better yet, eat it cold if you can. Find a natural windbreak or rain shelter to sleep in. Try to always remain unseen till you can get to your BOL. Travel at night and lay up during the day. Predators will seek the easy prey first, don't be it.
walkin man

Up here in Wisconsin fire is the only way to dry clothing in the cold winter months. And wet clothing can kill you dead when the weather gets nasty.

Some dont realize that there is basicly no way to prevent geting wet in the winter months, at least in cold climates. And when its cold, even wool socks might take days to dry without fire, if you can dry tham at all. Sweating, and even water vapor in our breath can condense and make clothing wet while in a tent.

Also many of the Tipi and stove setups are meant to be pulled in a "pulk" or snowshoe sled. The Kafarus and that Go Lite are the only ones I have seen that are almost backpackable.

UneasyRider
02-01-2012, 10:30
Up here in Wisconsin fire is the only way to dry clothing in the cold winter months. And wet clothing can kill you dead when the weather gets nasty.

Some dont realize that there is basicly no way to prevent geting wet in the winter months, at least in cold climates. And when its cold, even wool socks might take days to dry without fire, if you can dry tham at all. Sweating, and even water vapor in our breath can condense and make clothing wet while in a tent.

Also many of the Tipi and stove setups are meant to be pulled in a "pulk" or snowshoe sled. The Kafarus and that Go Lite are the only ones I have seen that are almost backpackable.

My Stepfather was in the battle of the bulge and he changed his socks twice in 6 weeks living in the snow! He said that anyone who took off their boots let alone their socks got frost bite, period. He only got to change his because he took shrapnel a couple of times and spent a day in the MASH while they removed half a pound of metal, then back to the line. What a generation.

walkin man
02-01-2012, 12:58
Up here in Wisconsin fire is the only way to dry clothing in the cold winter months. And wet clothing can kill you dead when the weather gets nasty.

Some dont realize that there is basicly no way to prevent geting wet in the winter months, at least in cold climates. And when its cold, even wool socks might take days to dry without fire, if you can dry tham at all. Sweating, and even water vapor in our breath can condense and make clothing wet while in a tent.

Also many of the Tipi and stove setups are meant to be pulled in a "pulk" or snowshoe sled. The Kafarus and that Go Lite are the only ones I have seen that are almost backpackable.
__________________
I understand what you are saying about the cold and snow.
What I a saying though is, if you must build a fire, get it done, dry your clothes, cook, whatever you have to do, then move to a safer location some distance away. Just cause the fire is nice and warm doesn't mean you have to lay up and enjoy it all night.
You would be surprised how far wood smoke smell will carry, especially when its humid.
walkin man

Babynine
02-01-2012, 18:02
My Stepfather was in the battle of the bulge and he changed his socks twice in 6 weeks living in the snow! He said that anyone who took off their boots let alone their socks got frost bite, period. He only got to change his because he took shrapnel a couple of times and spent a day in the MASH while they removed half a pound of metal, then back to the line. What a generation.

Yeah I dont know how those guys did it. My grandfather was one of 3000 taken prisoner of war on December 21 '44 at the Battle Of the Buldge. He was in the 106th Infantry, 81st combat engineer.

He and the others were marched at gunpoint 600 miles into the Nazi Stalag 4B camp. He said they were given no food during this entire forced march, but he said he was able to steal a few handfulls of frozen horse food that nearly broke his teeth, and that was all he ate during the march.

The fact is though, when your cold and wet, your body burn carories fast, even without phyisical activity, just to keep from freezing. Energy will be lost very fast without a lot of calories.

I dont know offhand exactly how long my Late Grandfather was held in that Nazi camp, but I know he weighed only 79 or 89 pounds when the War in Europe was over. It took six months in hospitals in Germany, London, New York, and Chicago before he had gained enough weight to be allowed home.

I wouldnt survive half of what that man went through. That generation was tough as nails.

UneasyRider
02-01-2012, 19:36
Yeah I dont know how those guys did it. My grandfather was one of 3000 taken prisoner of war on December 21 '44 at the Battle Of the Buldge. He was in the 106th Infantry, 81st combat engineer.

He and the others were marched at gunpoint 600 miles into the Nazi Stalag 4B camp. He said they were given no food during this entire forced march, but he said he was able to steal a few handfulls of frozen horse food that nearly broke his teeth, and that was all he ate during the march.

The fact is though, when your cold and wet, your body burn carories fast, even without phyisical activity, just to keep from freezing. Energy will be lost very fast without a lot of calories.

I dont know offhand exactly how long my Late Grandfather was held in that Nazi camp, but I know he weighed only 79 or 89 pounds when the War in Europe was over. It took six months in hospitals in Germany, London, New York, and Chicago before he had gained enough weight to be allowed home.

I wouldnt survive half of what that man went through. That generation was tough as nails.

They were tough, and different than us. They grew up with very little and invented very much to change their world and I don't think that there will ever be another generation to do that.

Maybe it was the depression that made them so strong mentally, or the culture that they had and we abandoned but I have never heard my stepfather complain once since I was 10 years old. He is the best man that I have ever met.

Babynine
02-02-2012, 11:09
My Stepfather was in the battle of the bulge and he changed his socks twice in 6 weeks living in the snow! He said that anyone who took off their boots let alone their socks got frost bite, period. He only got to change his because he took shrapnel a couple of times and spent a day in the MASH while they removed half a pound of metal, then back to the line. What a generation.

I'm not sure exactly how cold it was during the Battle of the Bulge, as the only info about temps I could find in a quick Google search was a tempature of 14 degrees Fahrenheit at 5:30 AM the day the Battle began.

I would think that half this nation sees temps colder than that every winter. I know the big problem was that the Americans did not have true winter gear, and the Germans did. But I would think that the Americans were still wearing wool uniforms. And wool is a lifesaver in cold wet conditions, as it maintains 80% of its insulation value when wet.

A couple weeks back (Jan 10) I did my first night of winter camping with most of my bug out gear. I had never camped during the winter months before, but we were in the middle of a winter heatwave with overnight lows at a scorching 28 degrees.

Now I have a harder time in the cold than most around here, but with overnight temps of 28, I never even put a coat or gloves on the entire 20+ hours I was out, and I never got cold. In the early morning I was walking around the campsite on ice and snow wearing only wool slippers with wool socks (and wool baselayers, wool pants, and wool sweater)

Now of course I'm not trying to compare one dry night to what that generation went through, but I always try to convince everyone I know to buy as much wool clothing as you can, while you still can. Wool is likely what kept those soldiers alive. I dont know of another material that insulates as well when wet, is fire naturally retardant, and it breaths allowing persperation to evaporate.

Buying wool clothing also shows you what has really happened to the buying power of our Dollar. Wool base layers start at $160-$200 a set! Most wool shirts are over $100ea, and the Filson wool pants I have my eye on are $200 for one pair!

UneasyRider
02-02-2012, 12:07
I'm not sure exactly how cold it was during the Battle of the Bulge, as the only info about temps I could find in a quick Google search was a tempature of 14 degrees Fahrenheit at 5:30 AM the day the Battle began.

I would think that half this nation sees temps colder than that every winter. I know the big problem was that the Americans did not have true winter gear, and the Germans did. But I would think that the Americans were still wearing wool uniforms. And wool is a lifesaver in cold wet conditions, as it maintains 80% of its insulation value when wet.

A couple weeks back (Jan 10) I did my first night of winter camping with most of my bug out gear. I had never camped during the winter months before, but we were in the middle of a winter heatwave with overnight lows at a scorching 28 degrees.

Now I have a harder time in the cold than most around here, but with overnight temps of 28, I never even put a coat or gloves on the entire 20+ hours I was out, and I never got cold. In the early morning I was walking around the campsite on ice and snow wearing only wool slippers with wool socks (and wool baselayers, wool pants, and wool sweater)

Now of course I'm not trying to compare one dry night to what that generation went through, but I always try to convince everyone I know to buy as much wool clothing as you can, while you still can. Wool is likely what kept those soldiers alive. I dont know of another material that insulates as well when wet, is fire naturally retardant, and it breaths allowing persperation to evaporate.

Buying wool clothing also shows you what has really happened to the buying power of our Dollar. Wool base layers start at $160-$200 a set! Most wool shirts are over $100ea, and the Filson wool pants I have my eye on are $200 for one pair!

You hit the nail on the head. No winter weather gear and living in the snow, you take off your boot and wet sock and expose your foot and it never gets warm again. They were sleeping in the snow for weeks, not tents.

Bilbo Bagins
02-02-2012, 13:17
ENO Pro Fly Tarp looks interesting...

Amazon.com: ENO Pro Fly Rain Tarp: Sports & Outdoors (http://www.amazon.com/ENO-Pro-Fly-Rain-Tarp/dp/B005JX2542/ref=pd_sim_sg_6)


That is a tarp for hammock camping, but nothing saying you can't just use it alone as a tarp shelter. They do make them in OD green. I seen the gray ones in version and they stand out like a sore thumb in the woods, but they may blend in better the western enviroments.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41sB81J0LqL.jpg

.50 cal
02-02-2012, 16:31
Hello, I looking to upgrade from my standard tarp to something better, I will keep this shelter in my bags and would like it to be small and lightweight, I'd like several tie down points and a durable material, the item I'm currently considering is the proforce all weather shelter, it is 10x10 and comes with stakes, any suggestions? advice? thank you

I've read everyones reply's and done some research, the material that I'm looking for is silnylon, I really like the tarptent contrail for its complete bug protection and the included floor liner, it's currently not available which is perfect since it is more than I planned on spending right now

Bilbo Bagins
02-03-2012, 08:43
I've read everyones reply's and done some research, the material that I'm looking for is silnylon, I really like the tarptent contrail for its complete bug protection and the included floor liner, it's currently not available which is perfect since it is more than I planned on spending right now


Good Choice. Don't worry, the Tarptent Contrail is really big with Appalachian Trail Thru hikers, and since the 2012 season is about to start they are probably busy as heck and sold out. With the warm winter some North bound hikers are probably going to start their 2,100 hike from Spinger Mountain GA next week (which I think is foolish). The season start is February and runs to about June when the last of the south bound hikers leave Maine to hike to Georgia. They will probably be back in stock by May or June. 24oz is pretty light.

http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html#specs

http://www.tarptent.com/photos/ct-7.jpg